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Harrison County Courier

July 21, 1888 - September 31, 1889

Master Negative # S/99-151
Harrison Courier - published weekly each Saturday
Subscription $1.00 per annum
Office on Main Street

Contents: 1888
July, 21, 28
August, 4, 11, 18, 25
September, 1, 8, 15, 22, 29
October, 4, 13, 20, 27 (starting with the 13th, date and issue numbers out of sequence. No issue numbers 4 & 5)
November, 3, 17  (issue missing on November 10, not published on November 24)
December, 22 (issues missing on December 1, 8 & 15)


Harrison County Courier
Saturday 21 July 1888
Volume 1, Number 45
Page 3, Column 1

The National Bank has declared a semi-annual dividend of five per cent.  The Farmer's Bank a dividend of 3 per cent.
The following marriage licenses were issued last week:
J. T. Williams and Miss Flora Dotson
David Hampton and Miss Lucy Smalley
Robert Penn and Miss Cornelia Toadvine Harrison County Courier

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 21 July 1888
Volume 1, Number 45
Page 3, Column 3

Leesburg:
Jas. Smith, who lives in the Oxford precinct, was adjudged of unsound mind and was taken to the Asylum at Lexington on Friday last
About twenty wagons from Augusta camped near here one night last week.  Among them a number of convict going to Franklin County to work on the new railroad.

Connersville:
Blackberries and hen's teeth are on a par.
Died, on the 4 inst. infant son of Thomas Romans, aged three weeks
Died, last Thursday night, Mrs. John Stanfield, after a lingering illness with dropsy of heart

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 21 July 1888
Volume 1, Number 45
Page 3, Column 4

The funeral of Mrs. Sallie F. Nichols, will take place at the Christian Church tomorrow (Sunday) morning, at 9 o'clock.  A previous announcement had been made to hold the services on Saturday afternoon, but a telegram from her son in Missouri requested the services to be withheld until he could arrive, which request was granted

Died
On Thursday night, Mrs. Sally Nichols, aged 78 years, at the residence of her son-in-law, Jas. W. Cromwell. "Aunt Sally" as she was called, was one of the best and most lovable of Christian women and her death is universally regretted. On Wednesday evening last at the Robert’s house, of consumption, Noah Dills, aged about 45 years. Mr. Dills lately came from Hopkinsville, where he has resided for several years engaged in horse raising and knowing that death was a matter of but short time he wanted to return to this city, his old home, to die. His funeral services were held at the Methodist Church Friday morning at ten o'clock, by Rev. H. P. Walker. Burial at Battle Grove. Mr. Dills leaves a most estimable wife to mourn his loss.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 21 July 1888
Volume 1, Number 45
Page 3, Column 5

The following are the dates of Kentucky Fairs
Kirksville - July 27 - 2 days
Sharpsburg - August 7 - 4 days
Danville - August 7 - 5 days
Richmond - August 14 - 4 days
Harrodsburg - August 14 - 4 days

Columbia - August 21 - 4 days
Lawrenceburg - August 21 - 5 days
Maysville - August 22 - 4 days
Lexington - August 18 - 5 days
Paris (Fair and Trotting) - September 4 - 5 days
Bardstown - September 5 - 4 days

Ashland - September 4 - 5 days
Falmouth - September 11 - 5 days
Somerset - September 11 - 4 days
Hopkinsville - October 3 - 4 days
Germantown - October 10 - 4 days

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 28 July, 1888
Volume 1, Number 46
Page 1, Column 8
E. D. Veach, Editor & Prop's

Reunion of the Sixth Kentucky Volunteers
Those interested both Federal and Confederate will keep in mind the fact that the Sixth Kentucky Volunteer Infantry will hold a reunion at the Eminence Fair Grounds, Saturday, July 28.  The managers have kindly invirted boys in gray to join them and not doubt many ex-Confederates will be present to participate in this memorial of hardships and privations long since gone by.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 28 July, 1888
Volume 1, Number 46
Page 3, Column 1
E. D. Veach, Editor & Prop's

Died

On Saturday afternoon last, Wm. Fisher, Proprietor of the Fisher House, aged about 40 years.  He leaves a wife and two children Mrs. Mary Fisher and family return their sincere and grateful thanks to the many kind friends who assisted at the funeral services of her husband, Wm. Fisher.

Lighting struck a pine tree in front of the residence of W. A. Cook, yesterday and slightly demolished it.  The current shook the gound for two square around.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 28 July, 1888
Volume 1, Number 46
Page 3, Column 2
E. D. Veach, Editor & Prop's

Born to the wife of John B. Casey, on the 26th, a daughter.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 28 July, 1888
Volume 1, Number 46
Page 3, Column 1
E. D. Veach, Editor & Prop's

Died
On Tuesday last, Willis Ziller, aged 71 years of paralysis.  He leaves a wife and three children.

The annual reunion of the First Kentucky "Orphan Brigade" C.S.A. will  be held in Frankfort, September 20, the twenty fifth anniversity of the battle of Chickamauga.  Soldiers of other Confederate commands and Federal's are invited by the committee to attend.

The Falmouth Fair Association offers a purse trot for each of three minute, 2:40, 2:30, 2:25 classes to close August 30th. They have a first class half-mile track and we hope our horseman will patronize them liberally.  Writhe to the Secretary for conditions and caralogue of Fair.

The Falmouth Association will hold their fair this year September 11 to 15 and from the number of the special premiums given them we do not see how they can help to be successful this year.  The people of the country have responded to their call for help quite liberally and from appearances they do intend to have a failure this year.  Their Floral Hall list of permiums are liberal and numerous, while thos given to horseman are more liberal that usual besides having added a second premium in good many rings.  A. F. Aulick is president this year and will make a good one.  We hope to see our county help them liberally.  The price of admission has been reduced to 35 and 20 cents.  Write to the Secretary for catalogue.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 4 August 1888
Volume 1, Number 47
Page 3, Column 4
E. D. Veach, Editor & Prop'r

Died
Infant child of P. Karrick on Monday last
A. Casey, of Berry, Tuesday last

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 4 August 1888
Volume 1, Number 47
Page 3, Column 5
E. D. Veach, Editor & Prop'r

Sulphur Springs

Born to the wife of J. H. Anderson, a son
To wife of Rolla VanHook, a son

Leesburg

Born to wife of Wm. Collins, a son
To the wife of John H. Anderson, a son

Henry M. Vimont of Millersburg was tried before a jury her and found to be unsound mind and sent to Lexington Insane Asylum. Those who were acquainted with his habits
say that his los of reason was caused by his invertebrate cigarette smoking, he have been addicted to the habit for twelve years or more and has been known to smoke
over one hundred per day. At the time his mind commenced to give away he was holding a lucrative position in Leadville, Col. a couple of years ago and was a model young
man.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 11 August 1888
Volume 1, Number 48
Page 3, Column 2
E. D. Veach, Editor & Prop'r

Judge Boyd Dead

The demise of an Eminent Jurist, a Distinguished Citizen, A poplar man

Judge John Strother Boyd, died at his home on Pike Street, last Saturday morning, aged 64 and one month.  He had been a sufferer for a long time, and his death was a blissful sleep to his soul.  His funeral services were held Monday afternoon by Dr. Forman, of Richmond and Dr. Keady, of this city.  Judge Boyd was never a member of any church, though always admitting of Presbyterian tendencies.

The name Strother, as Judge always called by his boyhood friends, was a surname in the family.  His great-great aunt Elizabeth Strother gave her name as Elizabeth Church, in Bourbon County. "Porte Crayon" the Virginia Strother, was of the same family.  Lieut. Withers, of British Army at Braddock's defeat was of same family as Judge Boyd's mother, Alice Withers.

The Judge's brother, Dr. Montgomery Boyd was named after his kinsman, General Montgomery, who fell at Quebec in 1775 Their great kinswoman, Elizabeth Marcum, was mother of Chief Justice Marshall

Judge Boyd inherited love of fine horses and had some thoroughbreds on his farm. He leaves a wife, daughter of Rev. Sam'l Rogers, and six children, four sons and two daughters, in comfortable circumstances.  He left no will.  His first wife was a Miss January, left no children.

At a meeting of the bar on Monday resolutions of respect to Judge Boyd's memory were adopted, as published below.  Speeches made by Judges: W. W. Cleary and James O'Hara, of Covington, Hon. Leslie Applegate, of Falmouth; G. C. Lockhard, of Paris; Judge W. P. Ross, of Carlisle; Judge Kimbrough; Mr. Forman, Senator Martin and Hon. A. H. Ward, all of this city.

Judge Cleary had settled in Cynthiana in 1852 and could testify by long observation to Judge Boyd’s integrity and kindly feeling. Mr. Lockhart spoke of when a young lawyer entering Judge Boyd’s court and the kindly courtesy shown him, wining his warm regards. Judge O’Hara and Judge Boyd, as young lawyers roomed together in Williamstown and the friendship has kept up as practicing lawyers, legislators and judges. When Judge O’Hara conclude to resign as Circuit Judge he sent for Judge Boyd and asked him to agree to leave the Criminal Judgeship and fill his vacancy so the people would be satisfied. The Governor promptly agreed to appoint Judge Boyd. Judge O’Hara was much affected in telling of the honest, upright life of his departed friend.

Judge Ross said, although ill, he had driven from Carlisle to be present to pay his respects to one whom he so greatly esteemed. His tribute to Judge Boyd was such as few men can tell truth have said of them. The other younger lawyers all had much to say of Judge Boyd’s kindly treatment of them.

Harry Ward had known and studied law with Judge Boyd 46 years ago, and in trying to tell of his esteem and  affection for him his voice showed such feeling he closed his remarks. It was the Judge’s devotion to duty that shortened his life ten years perhaps. He knew the duties of Circuit Judge were too much for his delicate organization but felt when tendered promotion from the easy position of Criminal Judge that he could not refuse.

(Resolution, part of it omitted. DH)

The Hon. John Strother Boyd late judge of the Circuit Court for the 12th Judicial District, died at his residence in Cynthiana Sunday August 5, 1888. He was born in Harrison County on the 5th day of July 1824. His father was Joseph Boyd, a gallant soldier of the war of 1812. His mother’s maiden name was Alice Withers.

John Strother Boyd attended the county school near his home in Leesburg neighborhood. After the death of his father when the son was about sixteen years of age he attended Center College at Danville and afterwards graduated in the Law School of Transylvania University at Lexington. He was admitted to the bar in 1844, and located at Williamstown and practiced law there about two years. He then went to Memphis in the State of Tennessee and remained but a short time, returned to his native county, and entered upon the practice of his profession continuing same until the year 1856, when he was elected clerk of the Harrison Circuit Court and held that place until 1862. He was elected county attorney of this county without opposition in 1866. Before the expiration of his term he was elected Judge of Criminal Court for the 12th Judicial District and continued in the discharge of the duties of that office until the year 1874,w hen he was elected Judge of the Circuit Court for the district and held that office for two full terms, a period of twelve years.

During the whole of his long professional career as a lawyer and Judge he enjoyed the respect and confidence of his fellow citizens.

(More of Resolution omitted. DH)

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 11 August 1888
Volume 1, Number 48
Page 3, Column 3
E. D. Veach, Editor & Prop'r

Died Died at her home in this city, last night, Mrs. Margaret J. Sparke. She leaves five children. Funeral services will be held at the Presbyterian Church this afternoon at 1 o'clock. Burial in the Georgetown cemetery. At his home near Cynthiana on July 31st, 1888, of general prostration, Willis P. Ziler. He was born December 22, 1816 and was in his 72and year. He moved with his parents from Nicholas county to Harrison county at an early age and had been resident of this county until his death. He was well known by all of the older citizens of this community and was looked upon as an honest, hard working, upright citizen: He leaves a wife and two children, Wm. H. Ziler and Mrs. Ella Ziler Davis (wife of Garrett Davis). Peace to his ashes.

A. Friend

B. F. Miller on the 4th, at his home near Sunrise. On Tuesday evening last, Mrs. Harriet A. Stevens, aged 59, of consumption of the bowels. She was the mother of John B. and Joe R. Stevens, Mrs. T. M. Fowler and Mrs. Chas. Fowler. She was a woman of exceptional Christian like character and was loved by everyone. Her funeral was held at the Christian Church Thursday morning. Burial at Battle Grove.

On Tuesday, T. Jeff Maffett aged about 45 years. Burial took place at Battle Grove Wednesday afternoon, conducted by the Knights of Pythias. He was a genial, whole-souled man and very popular. He leaves a wife and seven children to mourn his loss.

On Monday last, at his home in Indianapolis, IN, Wallace Gruelle of kidney and bladder trouble. Mr. Gruelle was a native of Harrison county and son of John Gruelle, who was postmaster of Cynthiana in 1859-63, having his office on Jones’ Row, in the room now occupied by R. J. Cummins.

Wallace Gruelle had grown up in a newspaper office, was a fine composer and an easy and graceful writer.In the late war he was a staunch soldier. He finally located in Louisville and worked in the daily press of that city. Leaving Louisville after a time he was engaged in several papers throughout the state, finally becoming editor of the Breckenridge News, with which paper he reaminged for many years, doing his work faithfully and well. Quitting the news he went to Louisville and for a time was on the editorial staff of the Evening Times. When Capt. Jack Gross was appointed United States Marshall he gave his friends, Capt. Gruelle a position in his office. Not fancying the character of his work he went into the field as a deputy marshal. But this did not suit him any better. He had printer's ink on his fingers and could not stay away from a newspaper office. For a brief time he was again with the Times. Then he went to Indianapolis to edit the Labor Signal. The new work, Differing from that he had hitherto done on strictly political papers, seemed to suit him well. He made the Labor Signal bright, aggressive, clean and interesting – the best paper of its class in the United States. He was about to succeed at last; the circulation was growing rapidly; he had won a place in the affections of his readers, when death came and cut him down. Rest his soul in peace.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 11 August 1888
Volume 1, Number 48
Page 3, Column 4
E. D. Veach, Editor & Prop'r

A post office has been established at Leeslick, this county, and Cynthia McDaniel commissioned postmaster. Kentucky lost a true man in the death of Judge J. S. Boyd, of Cynthiana. He was for fifteen years Judge of the Circuit Court of the Twelfth District, which included Covington and Newport, and would have been Judge there now save for his failing health. And, for all his active and earnest work upon the bench, he managed to raise upon his farm some of the best running stock that Kentucky knows of. He was an able jurist, a thorough gentleman and good horseman. Cincinnati Enquirer

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 11 August 1888
Volume 1, Number 48
Page 3, Column 5
E. D. Veach, Editor & Prop'r

Connersville

The funeral sermon of Mrs. Corinthia Romans, Deceased will be preached at the White Oak church the first Sunday of September, at 11 o’clock a.m. by Rev. W. W. Chamberlain.

The Courier office enjoyed a splendid serenade from the Antioch band Saturday morning. The band under the supervision of Prof. Woolery, is one of the best in Central Kentucky. We enjoyed the treat much, and the boys can accept our hearty thanks for same.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 11 August 1888
Volume 1, Number 48
Page 3, Column 6
E. D. Veach, Editor & Prop'r

Personals

A. J. Winters, of Paris, was one of the visiting Knights at T. J. Mafett’s funeral Tuesday.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 18 August 1888
Volume 1, Number 49
Page 1, Column 1
E. D. Veach, Editor & Prop'r

Died

At her residence near Claysville, Aug 10th, Mrs. Cynthia McLean, mother of Mrs. Asa Whitaker, R. W., Wm., John and Those. McLean. Had she lived until October she would have been 92 years old. Her husband, Robert McLean died 41 years ago, leaving her, his widow with nine small children. Five of which are still living. Besides may grand and great grandchildren, nearly all which attended the funeral, which took place at Oddville on the 11th.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 18 August 1888
Volume 1, Number 49
Page 1, Column 2
E. D. Veach, Editor & Prop'r

Born

To the wife of John Dickey, on the 13th inst., a daughter
To the wife of Frank Loyd, on the 11th, a daughter

Remember the Sunday ordinance goes into effect tomorrow. Nothing is allowed to be sold but actual necessaries of life.  So if you want to wear a Sunday shave or drink a milk shake, get on Saturday

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 18 August 1888
Volume 1, Number 49
Page 1, Column 3
E. D. Veach, Editor & Prop'r

Personals

B. T. Riggs and Wm. Adams went to Lexington to attend the meeting of the State Miller's Convention

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 18 August 1888
Volume 1, Number 49
Page 1, Column 4
E. D. Veach, Editor & Prop'r

Matrominal

Miss Ida Victor, of Millersburg, sister of J. W. Victor, of this city and a gentlemen from Omaha, Neb. will be married on the 20th of October.

The date of the reunion of the "Orphan Brigade" at Frankfort had been changed from September 20th to September 26th, agreeable to the wishes of Governor Buckner, who has an engagement to meet with the 22d Kentucky Regiment on the first date named.

Lead Mine at Centerville

A Georgetown special dispatch says:  A lead mine was discovered of the farm of Patrick Ryan, near Centerville, on the line of Scott and Bourbon counties. Experts who have examined the ore say it is one of the finest qualities ever seen before.  The vain is very large and inexhaustible.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 18 August 1888
Volume 1, Number 49
Page 2, Column 4
E. D. Veach, Editor & Prop'r

The Word’s Marvelous Events Lightning rods are going out of fashion. Welding by electricity seems to have come to stay. Photographs have been taken by the light of a fire place. Calming the sea with oil is now regularly and systematically done. Executions by electricity will be compulsory in New York after January 1st next. Galvanized lemon squeezers poison the juice by zinc which it dissolves from them. The French propose to send pigeon messages from ship to ship upon the broad seas. A French laundryman cleans linen without soap by rubbing with boiled potatoes. Chaussier dried a man in a kiln and there resulted only twelve pounds of solid matter. Paper pipes have been used for a church organ at Milan and give great sweetness of tone. Modern fortifications seem likely to be great mushrooms of concrete or of steel casting. Natural gas has caused in Pennsylvania in three years seventy-three fires, costing $900,000. Transplanting teeth has been revived. It was done twenty-five or thirty years ago in very rare cases. It is proposed to build a three foot wide cinder path between New York and New Haven for bicycles. The wire gun recently designed weighs only twenty-two tons and drives 380 pound projectile twelve miles. Photographing in colors seems to be the object of considerable experimenting, but so far with little or no success. Florida is to grow opium. It is expected that sixteen plants will grow an ounce of the drug and that an acre will give $1,000 profit. The “one thousand foot tower” at the Paris Exposition will be only 984 feet high. It will take two and a half million rivets to put it up. “Emmensite” is the name of a non explosive by which it is claimed that with a gun forty feet long a projectile can be thrown 27 miles. Paris has thirty miles of pipe for carrying compressed air for power. The engines are three thousand horse power and the consumption fifty tons daily.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 18 August 1888
Volume 1, Number 49
Page 4, Column 3
E. D. Veach, Editor & Prop'r

Neighborhood News

Connersville

Andy Scott, a well-known colored man of this vicinity died Tuesday morning.

Major J. W. Robbins and others of the 18th Kentucky Infantry, request all the members that can, to come to Falmouth the first Monday in September to consider the advisability of having a reunion of all those who served in that regiment either as officers or privates. A great many of this county and counties adjoining Pendleton were members of the 18th and good many are asking for something of the sort and as a preliminary step you are asked to meet here on that day. Let all who can, come.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 25 August 1888
Volume 1, Number 50
Page 1, Column 2
E. D. Veach, Editor & Prop'r

Died

Mrs. Bettie S. Musser, wife of R. W. Musser, died at Somerset on Tuesday last. Mrs. Musser was a daughter of C. A. Webster, of this city. Her remains were interred in Battle Grove Cemetery yesterday afternoon.

Matrimonial

Married, on Monday, at the residence of the bride; John Douglas and Mrs. B. E. Strowbridge.
Married in Louisville, on Tuesday, Louis Frank, of Paris and Miss Lizzie Harvey, of the former place. Mr. Frank is well known here.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 25 August 1888
Volume 1, Number 50
Page 1, Column 3
E. D. Veach, Editor & Prop'r

P. Tillman, of this city, has been awarded the dining privileges of the Falmouth Fair. Pete has been the caterer of public hunger at this fair for several years, and has acquired a reputation for serving the best dinner in the State for the money – 35 cents. Our citizens should remember him when they visit this fair and give him a call.

(Could this have been who Joseph Tillman Harper was named. DH)

A strange dream

George Downing, living near Havilandsville, a few week ago had a strange dream, in which he imagined that he would die sometime in August. A few days ago he was taken sick with typhoid fever, and is now at the point of death, though his physician states that his imagination is doing the greater harm. Downing is afraid he may live through the month to die next and constantly pleads for his existence to end now.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 25 August 1888
Volume 1, Number 50
Page 1, Column 4
E. D. Veach, Editor & Prop'r

Born

To wife of Clarence T. Garnett, a son, on the 18th.
To wife of Editor John Wesley Powling, of Carlisle, a daughter.
To wife of Henry Metcalfe, postmaster at Carlisle, a daughter, her 5th born. Mr. Metcalfe is a son of the noted Federal officer, Col. Leonidas Metcalfe, through himself an ex-Confederate.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 25 August 1888
Volume 1, Number 50
Page 4, Column 3
E. D. Veach, Editor & Prop'r

Neighborhood News

Leesburg

Died at Leeslick, Mrs. Eliza Vanhook, wife of Rolla Vanhook.  She left a babe of six weeks old who is too young to know it's mother's love.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 1 September 1888
Volume 1, Number 51
Page 1, Column 1
E. D. Veach, Editor & Prop'r

Died on Monday, Mrs. Sallie Farris, wife of R. F. Farris, of Ruddles Mill

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 1 September 1888
Volume 1, Number 51
Page 1, Column 3
E. D. Veach, Editor & Prop'r

Died

On Sunday, August 26th at 8:30 p.m. Leslie Thompson, Cashier of Winchester National Bank, aged nearly 38 years.  He was born in Estill County and migrated to Texas with his parents before the war.  He was in a latter part of the war although, but a boy.  He was for years Cashier of the Exchange Bank of Mt. Sterling, which position he resigned to accept Cashier ship of the Winchester Bank.  He leaves a wife and two little daughters and aged mother dependent upon him.

On Wednesday last, of heart disease, T. Wigglesworth, aged 60 years.  Mr. Wigglesworth was on of the best known citizens of Harrison, and was universally killed. He leaves a wife and five children to mourn him.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 1 September 1888
Volume 1, Number 51
Page 4, Column 3
E. D. Veach, Editor & Prop'r

Neighborhood News

Connersville

Died on the 2nd, at the residence of her son, Dr. A. Conner, of flux, Mrs. Rebecca Conner, wife of Lewis Conner, aged 72 years.  She was a noble Christian lady, loved and respected by old and young.  She was a sister of Esq. Thomas Furnish, of this vicinity, and also of Wm. Furnish of Missouri.  A very touching tribute of respect was paid her by her grand-son-in-law, Rev. C. T. Thompson, in the presence of a large concourse of relatives and friends, after which she was quietly laid to rest in the cold narrow grave, there to await the great resurrection mourn.

Leesburg

Mrs. John P. Shropshire, who moved from this place to Illinois, died and was buried in Jacksonville on Sunday eve last.  Her husband and son-in-law accompanied her remains.

We unintentionally failed to note the death of Robbuem, the little son of Everett Allen, some two weeks ago, being from home at the time.  His death was from measles and had he been a great sufferer for several months.

Ruddles Mill

Uncle Willis Collins has been guardian for twenty-three children; has settled with seventeen, and is now guardian of six.

Died, Aug 27th, at the residence of her father, Garrett Whitson, Mrs. Sallie Farris, aged 34 years. Thought she had been a constant sufferer for over two years, she never grew tired but waited patiently for the final summons to come. Her husband, R. K. Farris, was at his home in Harrison, confined to his room with fever, and could not be with her in her last hours. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. C. T. Thompson, at the Christian church, it being a request of hers for Rev. Thompson to preach her funeral, although she was a member of the Christian Church. The bereaved family have the sympathy of the community.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 8 September 1888
Volume 1, Number 52
Page 1, Column 2
E. D. Veach, Editor & Prop'r

Married

On Wednesday evening at Lancaster, Miss Watson, of that place and Lev. Benton, of this city.  The bride is on of the most popular and attractive ladies of Garrard county, and the groom is the son of Rev. W. T. Benton, Methodist divine, and one of the brightest barristers of Harrison.  The happy couple returned home yesterday and will reside with grooms parents on Clifton. God Bless'em and my happiness and prosperity ever be thine, is the wish of the Courier

The following printed on a handsome embossed and satin decorated invitation, was issued from this office this week.

Mrs. F. G. Craig invite you to be present at the marriage of their daughter Nannie to Julian Vest Wednesday, September nineteenth 4 o’clock. p.m. Baptist Church Berry, KY 1888
The marriage of Wm. Hill, Jr. of Paris and Miss Ida Campbell, of Carlisle, is announced to take place at the Christian Church of Carlisle, on the 19th

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 8 September 1888
Volume 1, Number 52
Page 1, Column 3
E. D. Veach, Editor

Died

On Saturday morning last, of inflammation of the bowels, Louis M. Martin, aged 38 years. Mr. Martin was one of the brightest, most talented and intelligent men in Harrison county. He enjoyed a high distinction as a statesman, and a grand reputation as a lawyer and gentleman. His character was exemplary and his life a benefit to his whole associations. He was the son of Squire M. D. Martin. About two years ago he married a daughter of Judge W. P. C. Bush, of Frankfort. Mr. Martin was elected Senator of Harrison, Nicholas and Robertson in 1885 and lie in all other public acts he won admiration for his integrity and ability. In fact Lewis M. Martin was a man among men and a noble and grand one at that. His loss is universally deplored, and many were the affectionate tokens of esteem from friends displayed at the funeral services held Sunday morning. His remains were interred in Battle Grove to rest in the sweet, peaceful sleep that knows no awakening. Peace to his ashes. Heart will hold in sacred memory his name.

Solutions, adopted by the Harrison Co. bar, and the Cynthiana Graded School Alumni, of which he was a member are published herewith. Alumni Resolution

Mr. L. M. Martin died at his last residence on Pleasant street Friday evening August 31, 1888.  He was one of the class of 1873, the first class to graduate from the Graded City School of Cynthiana.

Upon the organization of the Alumni Association he was chosen its president and discharged the duties of that trust in a most efficient manner. He was always an active worker, responding willingly whenever called upon by the Association and was held in great esteem by all its members. Now therefore be it resolved

1. That in his death the Alumni Association has lost an active and efficient member, his wife a devoted husband and the State an able, honored and worthy citizen.
2. That the Alumni of the Graded City School deeply sympathize with the widow and family of the deceased in their loss.
3. That a copy of these resolutions be sent to the widow and that the papers of the county be requested to publish the same.
4. That the Alumni attend the funeral in a body.
Miss Bettie Cromwell
Miss Sally McMurtry Committe
Manville G. Land Bar Resolution

At a meeting of the Harrison County Bar and officers of the Court held at the office of the Circuit Clerk in Cynthiana, KY Sept. 1, 1888, Judge W. T. Lafferty was elected Chairman and W. W. Longmoor Secretary. The chair stated the object of the meeting to be to take some action expressing the feelings of the bar and officers of the court relative to the death of Hon. L.M. Martin, who died at his residence in Cynthiana, August 31, 1888. A. H. Ward, J. I. Blanton, J. T. Simon, T. T. Forman, A. J. Beale and R. M. Collier were appointed a committee on resolutions.And after retiring for consultations, reported the following:

Resolved, that the members of the Harrison County Bar learned with profound regret of the sudden death of the Hon. Lewis M. Martin who has been a prominent and honored member of said Bar since his admission thereto.

Resolved, That in the death of our Brother Martin, the Bar has sustained a great loss, a vacancy that will not soon be filled, his wife of loving and affectionate husband and his parents a dutiful son.

Resolved, The citizens of this Commonwealth, county and city, have lost an honorable and prominent citizen as well as a high toned Christian and scholarly gentleman.

Resolved, That the Secretary of this meeting is directed to present the family of the deceased a copy of these resolutions and that a committee be appointed to present copies to the several courts of this county, that the papers published in this county and the Senatorial district be requested to publish them and that the members of the Bar attend the funeral in a body.

Whereupon, Judge Lucius Desha, W. W. Kimbrough, T. T. Forman, Hon. A. H. Ward, Hon. J. T. Simon and M. C. Swinford addressed the meeting in expression of their warm attachment and devotion to the deceased, and in support of the resolutions. The report of the committee was unanimously adopted, and on motion the meeting adjourned.

W. T. Lafferty, Chairman
W. W. Longmoor, Secretary

On Saturday, of tumor, Chas. Bucher, aged 71, a well known German citizen.

The infant child of A. P. Gooding died yesterday afternoon.

Mr. Martin represented this Senatorial district in the legislature from 1853 to 1887, and gained for himself an enviable reputation as a Senator. His position in the Senate was that of a leader and he was looked upon as one of the bright young men who would be called to stations of trust and honor in the near future. As a lawyer he was attentive, studious and able. As a citizen he ranked second to none and as a gentleman he was recognized everywhere as a peer of any; as that his untimely taking away causes deep regret in the hearts of all who appreciated high mental and moral worth. – Carlisle Mercury

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 8 September 1888
Volume 1, Number 52
Page 4, Column 2
E. D. Veach, Editor

Neighborhood News

RUDDELL'S MILL

Mrs. Belle Harper and children of Covington, are visiting at Harper Bros.

There is a sunflower in Mrs. Lee Ballinger's yard that has two hundred blossoms on it.

God in his infinite mercy has again cause to remove from our midst by death one of our highly esteemed women.  Mrs. Polly Bowen, widow of the last Benj. Bowen. Had she lived until November she would have been 79 years old.  She has two sons and three daughters who survive her.  Mrs. Bowen had long been a servant but bore it all with Christian fortitude and said she was ready and willing to go when the final summons came.  She was a member of the Methodist Church and her funeral was preached by Rev. Vaught, Sunday morning at the residence of her son-in-law, Mr. James Tate.  The remains followed to the grave by a large concourse of relatives and friends.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 15 September 1888
Volume 2, Number 1
Page 1, Column 1

Public Schools opened Monday with 300 pupils.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 15 September 1888
Volume 2, Number 1
Page 1, Column

The county poor house property at Berry will be sold on November 3rd. B. T. Riggs has begun the erection of a two story brick residence on Clifton. Assignment J. A. McKee made an assignment Tuesday to his brothers, J. W. and M. S. McKee assets, 185 acres of land in Harrison county, and 300 acres at King’s Mountain. Liabilities over $11,000. Died

Hon. C. M. Dunham, clerk of United States Courts at St. Joseph, MO died suddenly of heart disease. He was nephew of Judge Jas.. H. Burch, of Harrison county descent. Mr. Dunham was inventor of “Dunham’s Instantaneous Interest Calculator.” For the exclusive manufacture and sale of this machine was offered $76,000 a week before his death. It will keep his family independent. Married At Aberdeen, OH, Saturday evening, W. P. Fisher, son of W. H. Fisher, to Miss Nannie, daughter of Henry A. Butler, both of this county.

Walker Hill and Miss Carrie Jolly were married in the County Clerk's Office by Judge Lafferty yesterday morning.  The judge officated in fine style but is is always noticeable that a look of sadness overcomes his face at such occasions.  His bachelor heart is fast becoming softened, and we expect ere long to hear of his becoming a benedict.

Harrison County license:

John Larue, aged 53 to Deliah Asbury, aged 41
James F. Davis, 21, to Emma Asbury, 23

John Z. Rose, 22 to Eliza E Wright, 31

The following has been received:
Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Campbell request your presence at the
marriage of their daughter, Ida, Wednesday, September 19, 2 p.m.
Christian Church, Carlisle, Kentucky

1888
Ida Campbell
W. A. Hill, Jr.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 15 September 1888
Volume 2, Number 1
Page 1, Column 3

Resolution of Respect

Death of our sister, Mrs. Harriett Stevens
Committee of C. W. B. M

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 15 September 1888
Volume 2, Number 1
Page 1, Column 5

Jas.. Ewing, aged 85, of Berry was adjudged of unsound mind by the County Court Monday and sent to Lexington.  Messers. Renaker and Robertson went with him to Lexington.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 15 September 1888
Volume 2, Number 1
Page 4, Column 2

Neighborhood News

RUDDEL'S MILLS

Messers. Orah and Will Ballinger, of Lair, spent Sunday at home
Miss Annie Ballinger opened school here Monday, and Miss Lida Bowen at the Ead's house

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 15 September 1888
Volume 2, Number 1
Page 4, Column 3

Neighborhood News

Connersville

Died. On the 4th inst. at her home near Boyer's Chapel, Miss Mary Courtney, aged 96 years.  She was born in Virginia in 1782 and came to this sate with her parents when she was only six years old, consequently she was one among the firs emigrants to this part of the state. Peace to her ashes.

Tricum

Died. Miss Mollis, wife of T. F. Terry, with consumption, aged 24 years.  She was a member of the Unity Church and Rev. Frank Tinder preached the funeral at her home after which she was laid to rest at what is known as the Lemons Cemetery.  She leaves a husband and three children

Mrs. Elizabeth Bennett, of Grant County, attended the funeral of her niece, Mrs. Terry.

Broadwell

Frank Ammerman and Miss Wregg eloped Tuesday and were married

Died. On Monday, at the residence of her father, Mrs. Alice Haley.  She leaves two children. Funeral services were conducted at the house of Rev. C. T. Thomson

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 22 September 1888
Volume 2, Number 2
Page 1, Column 1

Marriage Licenses:
Julian Vest and Nannie Craig
Jas.. Jones, 76 and Arminda Hardin, 47:

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 22 September 1888
Volume 2, Number 2
Page 1, Column 1

Married

Wave Foster, of Douglas, Wyoming Territory and Miss Ida Victor, of Millersburg are to be married October 3
Rev. Harry Henderson of Versailles, will wed young lady a Eminence in a few days.

Mr. Henry Power, a commercial man from Cincinnati, well wed Miss Jeanie Basford, October 11, at the Methodist Church.  Another lady of this city will wed a gentleman from Interior Ohio and another will wed a Lexington Gentlemen early in November.  Also a young lady living on Main Street will wed a gentleman living in this city, at an early date, Bourbon News.

The reunion of the Orphan Brigade will take place in Frankfort on the 26th inst.  The program for the day is as follows:  At 11:o'clock the meeting of the survivors will take place at the opera house, Hon, Ira Julian, will deliver the address of welcome, which will be responded to by Gen. Joseph H. Lewis, the old commander of the brigade.  This will be followed by an oration on General William Preston, deceased by Hon. W. C. P. Breckenridge, member of Congress from this district.  The business of the meeting will then be taken up and disposed of, when the brigade will form in columns preceded by a band of music, and march to the cemetery where the remains of Col. James W. Moss, Maj. Rice Graves and about thirty other bodies of dead members of the brigade, disinterred from the field of battle near Chickamauga will be re-interred.  The brigade will return to the opera house, where Col. John W. Caldwe,, of Russellville, will deliver the oration on the dead.  The day will close with a reception and dinner at the executive mansion by Gov. and Mrs. Buckner.

Every arrangement had been made to insure a most happy and successful meeting of the brigade, and it is expected there will be a full attendance.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 22 September 1888
Volume 2, Number 2
Page 1, Column 2

Died

Miss Kity McCarthy aged about to, died at her home on Millersburg Avenue Sunday.

The death of Judge Matt Turney, County Judge of Bourbon, on Saturday morning, 15 inst. Was startling from its suddenness. He retired the night before in his usual good health.On awakening at his regular hour for rising in the morning, complained of an acute pain in the stomach and deadness of his arm. Dr. Bowen was sent for and arrived very soon but Judge Turney had become speechless, and died almost immediately on the physicians entrance.The supposed cause was apoplexy.

Funeral service at the residence, were conducted by Rev. Dr. Rutherford, of the Presbyterian Church, on Monday afternoon, which drew a very large assemblage of sympathizing friends, who followed the remains to burial in the Paris Cemetery.

Judge Turney was a man of cheerful temper, bland manners, and a genial disposition; was widely known and very popular.No county in Kentucky could boast of a more competent or faithful man in this important office.

Resolutions were adopted by the Bourbon County Bar.

County Court will meet Wednesday to elect a Judge to hold the office till August next, when one will be elected by the people to serve out Judge Turney’s unexpired term.Among those spoken of as candidates are Russell Mann, Mayor Holladay, J. H. Brent and J. W. Lucas.

Among those from a distance in attendance of the funeral were Judge B. F. Buckner, of Louisville, Judge Morton and Mr. Thornton, of Lexington, Harry Ward, of Cynthiana, Judge Quincy Ward, of Frankfort, Capt R.A. Buckner, of Winchester, Senator Simon, Judge Lafferty and M. C. Swinford, of Cynthiana.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 22 September 1888
Volume 2, Number 2
Page 1, Column 3

Personals

Miss Fannie Whaley is visiting in Millersburg.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 22 September 1888
Volume 2, Number 2
Page 1, Column 3

At the Orphan Brigade reunion, to be held at Frankfort Wednesday, the following soldiers from this county, killed in the battle of Chickamauga , will be brought to Frankfort and interred in the Capital cemetery.

Sergeant Fritz
Ensign Robt. Anderson
Jno.. Steele
Lieut. David H. Thompson
The above were members of McDowel’s Company F.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 25 September 1888
Volume 2, Number 2
Page 4, Column 2

Neighborhood News

Connersville

Motie, son of L. D. Levi, is quite ill with no hopes of his recovery
Born to the wifes of J. R. Laughlin and James Morris, a son each
B. M. Tucker and wife attended the Vest-Craig nuptials at Berry Wednesday afternoon

Ruddel's Mills

Died: Infant child of Geo. Maybrier, buried in Harrison

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 25 September 1888
Volume 2, Number 2
Page 4, Column 3

Neighborhood News

Leesburg

Born: to the wife of Bee Anderson, a son, John Corren
Died:  Little daughter of C. T. Masterson.  This markes the third death in his family, a wife and child dying a few months ago.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 29 September 1888
Volume 2, Number 3
Page 1, Column 2

(believed to be this page, but it is cut off and not sure.  It is in the right sequence to be this pate DH)

The following is a special from Falmouth:

Arthur Bradford, son of the late Wm. Bradford, of Pendleton County, has just returned from California.  He left Pendleton county in 1852 and has only been heard from but once, about 20 years ago.  His father, Mr. Wm. Bradford, resided near Falmouth and died some ten years ago.  His estate was settled up and the money divided a month the heirs, Arthur supposed to be dead.  His arrival and mysterious movements, and the subsequent disclosure of his identify caused considerable excitement, especially a mont the heirs.  After leaving Falmouth he went to Butler, and there fell in with his brother, Thomas K. Bradford, and rode with him to his house, where told Thom and his family who he was.  It is a pleasure to know that Arthur, during his residence on the Pacific slope, made money and it is not likely that he will give any trouble to his father's heirs.  He is a single man.

Born to the wife of G. C. Lockhart of Paris, a daughter,

Died:

Beela Swinford, died Sunday, of heart disease, aged 70 years.  He was a nephew of Dr. G. H. Penn.
Miss Harriett Ware, aged 53, died at the residence of Prof. Brown, Saturday.  Her home was in Covington, but she had come her to recuperate

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 29 September 1888
Volume 2, Number 3
Page 1, Column 3

The seventh reunion of the Orphan Brigade occurred at Frankfort Monday.  There was a larger attendance of the boys who wore the gray that at any meeting since 1867, and the old veterans who fought so valiantly for the Confederacy entered fully into the enjoyment of the occasion. The address of welcome was given by Hon. Ira Julian, and was responded to by Col. Joseph Lewis, Hon. W. C. P. Breckenridge delivered a splendid eulogy on Gen. Preston and Col John Caldwell spoke freely of the life and work of Col James Moss.  In the evening a reception was tendered by Gov. and Mrs. Buckner.  The next reunion will be held in Louisville.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 29 September 1888
Volume 2, Number 3
Page 1, Column 4
Neighborhood News

Ruddell's Mill

Miss Addie Goodman is very low with pneumonia
Mrs. Belle Harper and children and George and Miss Lucie are visiting James Vice, in Winchester

Died

Infant child of W. M. Lang, in Paris, buried Wednesday
Mr. & Mrs. J. R. Montgomery and Miss Anna Ballinger visited Mrs. Peggy Wornal, a Lair Monday.  Mrs. W. is very low with heart disease and with little hopes of recovery.  She is seventy-seven years of age

Our little town has once more been cast in sorrow by the death of Mrs. John Stoker "Aunt Peggy" as she was known, was loved and respected by all who knew her and her death has caused much sorrow.  She was formerly Miss Howard, sister to Matt Howard, the well known stockman. She leaves a husband and twelve children to morn her loss.  The funeral service was conducted by Rev. Barnwell, of Paris.  Burial at Paris.  The remains were followed to the grave by a large concourse of relatives and friends.  The bereaved family have the profound sympathy of this community.

Connersville

Rev. J. D. Redd preached his initial service for the ensuing conference year at Mr. Hope last Sunday

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 29 September 1888
Volume 2, Number 3
Page 1, Column 4

Married

The wedding of Miss Ida Warder Victor, of Millersburg, and L. Ware Foster, of Omaha is announced for Wednesday evening, October 3, at 7 o'clock, at the Christian Church, after which there will be a big wedding feast at the residence of the bride's mother.  The following are the attendants; Miss Mary Beardsley, of Maysville, first bridesmaid, Miss Lizzie Scearce, of Chillicothe, Ohio; Miss Fannie Whaley, of Cynthiana and Miss Maude Smedley, Mrs. Richards, of Wyoming, bestman, Jno.. Cromwell of Cynthiana, Allen Cole, of Maysville and W. F. Hays, of St. Paul.  The groom will be accompanied by Mr. Saxe and wife, nee Stitt, of Omaha.  The romantic part of the affair is that the parties met first as attendants of Mr. and Mrs. Saxe on the occasion of their wedding.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 6 October 1888

Volume 2, Number 6
Page 1, Column 3

Married

Leslie C. Maffett and Miss Sallie Lang are to be married the latter part of this month
The marriage of Thomas McDowell and Miss Mary Goodloe, both of Lexington, is set for November
Miss Jennie Withers, of Lexington, and T. Earl Ashbrook, of this city, are reported to be married this fall
It is rumored that Mrs. Bessie Miller Orton and Mr. J. H. Seats, editor of Sunny South, will be married soon.

The following mention by Madame Rumor as being in the matrimonial whirl, soon to be started J. R. Stevens, Irwin Cox, Bob Carroll, Wm. Smith, L. Lang, Cliff Lydick and most likely Dave Snyder.

Mr. Brown, the man who married 33 women, goes to prison for 4 1/2 years.  It is pity to tear a man away from his family in this manner, but the majesty of the law cannot consider domestic affections.  He giver this legal wife and adopted son about 50 acres of land

Mr. & Mrs. Allen Bashford invite you to the marriage of their daughter
Janey, to Henry A. Porter, Thursday, October eleventh high noon, Methodist
Church, Paris, Kentucky 1888

Mr. & Mrs. S. M. Wilmoth request your presence at the marriage ceremony of their daughter
Mary Louise to Mr. Edward H, Ditchen, Monday afternoon, October fifteenth 1888 at two o'clock
Paris, Kentucky at home after November first 614 Third Street, Detroit, Michigan

Mr. J. Ware Foster, who moved about two years ago from Omaha, Neb to Douglas, Wyoming Territory, became imbeded with the idea that “it is not good that a man should be left alone,” so he came to Kentucky, wise man that he is, and selected from Millersburg’s fair bevy of damsels, a fair, winsome and accomplished helpmate in the person of Miss Ida Victor.

Wednesday evening at a quarter past seven o'clock in the Christian Church in this city, in the presence of God and the face of many witnesses, Mr. J. Ware and Miss Ida, with “golden circlet and clasped hands, were made one by President J. Augustus Williams, of Daughters’ College, Harrodsburg.Long before the time announced for the ceremony to take place, the church was filled with anxious and interested friends, whose minds, while not engaged in eager, expectancy, were busy with the problem who next will be lead as a lamb to the hymenial alter?”A few minutes after the schedule hour, Miss Ida Howard, seated at the organ in the recess over the baptistery, and hidden in a beautiful glove of artistic and emerald decorations, began to tickle our ears with the inspiring notes of the Wedding March, while the bridal party entered the church and marched to the altar in the following order.

Ushers: Mr. Bartlett Richard accompanying the groom; Mr. R. J. McMichael and Dr. C. B. Smith; Messers, Royce Allen and Will Warren.

Attendants: Mr. John Cromwell and Miss Maud Smedley; Mr. Allen D. Cole and Miss Fannie Whaley; Mr. Will Hays and Miss Lizzie Scearce

Last the bride leaning upon the arm of Miss Mary Beardsley.The bride wore cream faille fancaise, duchess lace and pearls and in her hand a rich bouquet of “bride roses.”The following are the costumes of the bride-maids:

Miss Lizzie Sceacre, of Chillicothe, OH, cream mousslcine de sole trimmed in point lace; diamond ornaments, Catharine mermets.

Miss Mary Beardsley, of Maysvillssleine trimmed in point lace, pearl ornaments.

Miss Fannie Whaley, of Cynthiana, delicate pink moire and sirrah; diamond ornaments and Mareschal Neil blooms.

I ‘twas the fairest set of brides-maids our town has ever seen, and stony indeed must be the hearts of those stalwart young men, upon whose arms they leaned and into whose eyes they so bewitchingly looked that evening, if their pulses did not quicken and they saw no visions of future connubial felicity.But I degress.

The groomsman wore the conventional cutaways, with low necked vests.

After the ceremony, a goodly number of select guests found their way to the home of the bride’s mother, where a feast that would have tempted the palate of an epicure, was spread in rich and royal abundance.The bridal presents were exceedingly numerous, aesthetically beautiful, useful, ornamental and highly suggestive of expended shekels. Mr. & Mrs. Foster left shortly after nine o'clock for Paris where they took the train and started upon a tour of Eastern cities.In the language of Snyder, “May they live long and prosper.”Millersburg Correspondent to Bourbon News.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 6 October 1888

Volume 2, Number 6
Page 1, Column 4

Died

On Wednesday, of consumption, David Crombie, aged about 26 years.He leaves a wife, (nee Miss Murphy) whom he married last March. Burial in the Paris Catholic Cemetery. Wornall – On last Friday, Mrs. Rebecca Wornall.At the funeral at Lair church Sunday, Rev. C. T. Thomson paid tribute to hospitable and charitable disposition, and Mr. Montgomery added a tribute, he having lived with Mrs. Wornall while erecting the family mansion.There was such a large attendance many could not find room in the church, and the remains were followed to the Paris cemetery by a large concourse.

Mrs. Wornall, as Miss Bean, wedded Those. Wornall in 1830, and they located on the farm where she died.She joined the Presbyterian church in 1841.She would have been 77 years old Nov. 1 next.Her charities were such she leaves no estate, the farm going to T. J. McGibben who purchased it some years ago subject to her dower.The floral tributes by friends at the grave were beautiful.Mrs. Cunningham, of this county, now aged 94 years is the only living one of Mrs. Wornall’s ten brothers and sisters.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 6 October 1888

Volume 2, Number 6
Page 1, Column 6

Neighborhood News

RUDDELL'S MILLLS
Miss Addie Goodman is convalescent
"Jack" Ballinger mourns the lost of his dog, Shep
Miss Lizzie Dimett, of Cynthiana, spent Saturday with Miss Bette Harper
Mr & Mrs. J. R. Montgomery and Mr. & Mrs. L. Ballinger attended the funeral of Mrs. Wornall at Lair, 1st Sunday

Leesburg

Died, the infant son of Robert Gano and wife, nee Dora Gleen

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 17 October 1888

Volume 2, Number 7
Page 1, Column 2

Died

Near Broadwell, Chas. Faris, aged about 17 (son of R. K. Faris) of typhoid fever
Mrs. John McGibben died Saturday from typhoid fever.  Mrs. McGibben was a daughter of Jas. Gray, and was a most estimable lady

Foot Amputated

Chas. Overfield, of Morgan Station, attempted to seal a ride Tuesday morning's express, and when near Boyd's station jumped off the train, but is some manner fell under the cars, and had his right foot mashed.  He was brought to this place, when the foot was amputated by Dr. McDowell.  He is doing very nicely.

Married

Joe Richer and Miss ____ will be married shortly

The following license has been issued:
Mr. & Mrs. James McClintock invite you to the marriage of their daughter, Margaret, to Arch Paxton, Tuesday, October sixteenth, at half past 2 o'clock, Second Presbyterian Church, Paris, Kentucky

Licenses issued Monday, for the marriage of Mr. Ernest Cassiday, a clever young merchant at Shawhan, to Miss Sallie, daughter of Capt. T. E. Moore.  The marriage took place Wednesday evening at the Gibson House, Cincinnati
Irwin Cox and Miss Ida Kennard are to be married this month
Look out for a surprise wedding about November 1
Johnson Rogers, of Bourbon County, and Miss Janie Harris, will wed at Flemingsburg next Tuesday

Typhoid fever is raging to an alarming extend in the Broadwell neighborhood

Marriage license:
Chas. Smith to Mrs. Orpha T. Chamberlain
J. T. Speakes to Miss Tate
W. E. Yarnell to Miss Ida M. Eckler


Harrison County Courier
Saturday 13 October 1888

Volume 2, Number 7
Page 1, Column 4

Neighborhood News

Leesburg

C. T. Smith and Miss Orpah Chamberlain were married Wednesday

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 13 October 1888

Volume 2, Number 7
Page 2, Column 2

Neighborhood News

Connersville

Several from this vicinity attended the funeral of Mrs. John McGibben, at Broadwell, last Saturday
The funeral of Mrs. Jane Humphrey will be preached at White Oak, the first Sunday in November by W. W. Chamberlain

Died

On the 8th inst, at the home of his father, L. D. Levi, Motie Levi, aged about 18 years.  Burial at Battle Grove Cemetery

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 20 October 1888

Volume 2, Number 7
Page 1, Column 2

Married

At the residence of the bride's parents in Paris, on Monday afternoon the 15th at 2 o'clock, by Rev. E. H. Rutherford of the Second Presbyterian Church, Mr. Edward Ditchen of Detroit, Michigan, and Miss Mary Louise, daughter of Mr. S. M. Wilmuth.

Marriage is always an interesting event. In this instance the interest of the occasion was heightened by the social position of the two parties.The bride is a lovely brunette, possessing many graces of young womanhood, and recognized in society circles as one of the most charming belles of the Blue Grass region – so much noted for the beauty and accomplishment of it daughters.A favorite in society lovable and attractive the fortunate groom is to be congratulated and envied in having won so fair a bride one who will adorn with her loveliness any home over which she may preside.The groom is a prosperous and popular merchant of Detroit, Michigan.

A large assemblage of friends were present on the occasion.It was a home wedding, and the house was tastefully and beautifully decorated.The marriage ceremony by Dr. Rutherford was strikingly happy and impressive.

The presents were numerous, tasteful and valuable.

An elegant lunch was spread for the invited guests after partaking of which the bridal party left on the afternoon train for New York and other Eastern cities.

Among the guests from a distance were: Mr. Reed Roberts, Miss Mable Roberts, Mrs. Fred Ditchen and Miss Emma Ditchen, Detroit Michigan; Mr. Will Ditchen and wife, Cincinnati, OH; Mrs. Nan Carly, Miss Nannie Penn, Felicity, OH; R. V. Bishop and wife, Mrs. E. W. Bramble, Mrs. J. C. Copper, Miss Minnie Parks, Cynthiana; Miss Emma Gunsaula, Miss J. J. Hounts, Mr. R. S. Reeves, of Lair.

The following has been received:

Mr. & Mrs. J. W. Caseldine invite you to the marriage of their daughter, Matty, to Rev. Harry G. Henderson
Wednesday eve, October twenty-fourth at eight o'clock Methodist Church, Eminence, Kentucky 1888

Rev. R. B Baird and Miss Mary Overstreet were married at Nicholasville, Wednesday, and were given a reception by F. P Baird, brother of the groom, at Lexington, that night.The party passed down in Harrison County and were given another reception by the father of the groom.

Miss Efie Wadell, one of our popular and bewitching little blondes, was married in Covington, Tuesday, at 2:30 p.m., at Rev. Mr. Noland’s to Mr. Prather, of Mason County. Millersburg correspondent.

Charles Held and Miss Bettie Thomas surprised their friends Tuesday evening , October 6, 1888 by getting married.The left on the fast line and went to Cynthiana where the knot was tied by Judge Lafferty.The happy pair returned next morning and went to Cincinnati Centennial. They will probably return Saturday and Will begin housekeeping at once.M. L. Carmony escorted them through.The guide wishes them long happiness.– Falmouth Guide

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 20 October 1888

Volume 2, Number 8
Page 1, Column 3

Death of Mrs. Virginia Hanson

Mrs. Virginia Hanson, the State Librarian of Kentucky, fell dead from heart disease Tueday evening in Frankfort.She was librarian through the term of Gov. Knott, and was re-elected on the accession of Governor Buckner, over a great many formidable opponents.

She was born in Mt. Sterling, and was a niece of Judge Peters.She was about sixty years old, and was generally enjoyed fine health.She was the only wife of General Rodger Hanson, who was killed in the Confederate service at Stone rivers.They never had any children.From the time of her husband’s death, her life seemed to be absorbed in active sympathy for the people and the cause for which her husband gave his life. She took an active part in the establishment of asylum for indigent widows and children of Confederate soldiers at Georgetown, but it was not much of a success.She was a member of the Christian Church.

Mrs. Rodger Hanson was called The Mother of the Orphans Brigade, and mingled freely with the old soldiers at the last reunion at Frankfort and was apparently in the best of health.

The funeral was preached Thursday at the Christian Church at Frankfort, by. Rev. Geo. Darsie and Prof Pickett, and her remains were brought to Lexington and buried beside her husband.

The following gentlemen were pall-bearers:

Honorary – Gov. S. B. Buckner, Judge Pryor, Joseph H. Lewis, General Fayette Hewitt, Col. Steve Sharpe, Col. Stoddard Johnson, of Frankfort; Col. Harvey McDowell and Major Joseph Desha, of Cynthiana.

Active – Col. Joseph L. Rodman, Gen. Sam E. Hill, Henry B. Ware, Virgil Hewitt, W. D. Ringo, John Stuart, Cal Corbett and Ed W. Hines.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 20 October 1888

Volume 2, Number 8
Page 1, Column  4

Neighborhood News

RUDDELL'S Mills

Mrs. L. Ballinger is visiting relatives in Brown Co. Ohio.
Born to the wife of Wm. Faris, on the 13th inst. a daughter.
Mr. G. A. Harper went up to Winchester Friday looking after the interest of his grocery.Mrs. Harper and children, who have been the guests of Harper Bros. for several weeks, left for her father’s in Campbell County, Saturday.

Lair

J. T. Mcgibben has been confined to his bed for a few days with exhaustion (fat). His physician prescribes for him, “less to eat and go to work.”This is tough on Jim.
Mrs. Houts and Capt. Reeves attended, the wedding of Miss Mamine Willmouth at Paris, on the 15th inst., to Mr. Ditchens of Michigan.

Connersville

Married, on the 17th inst at the home of the bride’s parents in Jacksonville, James McLoney of this place to Miss Mary Eads.

Wednesday, October 10th a glorious autumnal day with golden hues of sunlight, witnessed the marriage of C. T. Smith, one of Harrison’s best society young men to the most charming Miss Orpah Chamberlain, in the presence of a large and brilliant assemblage of friends and relatives, at the home of the bride’s father, Rev. W. W. Chamberlain, near Leesburg.Theirs is, indeed, a case of first love, having been sweethearts since they were mere children.Prof. Wm. M. Barkley and Miss Lillie Cozzens, of Millersburg walked in front of the bride and groom and as they entered the parlor they were greeted with the gladsome notes from the organ, Miss Zena McLoney presiding, who even excelled herself, as with happy inspiration of a joyous future she welcomed the beautiful bride and the proud partner of her choice with a glad and brilliant strains of the wedding march. The father of the bride performed the ceremony in a most pathetic and impressive manner, The superb bride bore herself with quiet ease and dignity, and never looked prettier and happier in her life.She was clad with unusual elegance in the richest olive green silk, trimmed in gold braid and hat to match, a lovely bouquet of Marechel Niel rose buds adorned the corsage giving a happy contrast to the rest of the toilet, and emphasizing the sweetness and purity of the fair bride.She also wore handsome diamonds.The trousseau throughout was elegant, softened and beautified by many inventions to adorn women, known only to the most skillful modeste.he groom wore a handsome suit of black, a white satin tie and lavender gloves, and was looking his bests.Immediately after the ceremony they left for Cincinnati.The leave taking was coupled with many generous wishes of a safe journey and a return home to live happy and prosperous the rest of their days.The bride received many useful and handsome presents.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 20 October 1888

Volume 2, Number 8
Page 1, Column  5

Connersville

Died: on the 8th inst at the home of his father, L. D. Levi, after a lingering and painful illness of some weeks, H. M. Levi, Jr. aged 19 years.How many when the bright reveries have taken possession of our minds and the star of Hope gleams brightly in the future, there comes with one fell swoop King Death and crushes all into nothingness.Thus it is with Motie, as he was familiarly know by his schoolmates and young friends.Only a few brief weeks since he mingled with us buoyant with life, but now his has bid farewell to mother, father, sisters and friends, all so dear, and gone to solve the mysteries of another world. He was a young man of exceptionally good traits of character, was never known to be angry or to swear an oath.Kind to his parents and devoted to his sisters, six small, he being the only son.

In last week’s Courier we stated that Dr. McDowell was attending physician to young Overfield, who was injured by the cars.The surgical attendance was rendered by Dr. Huffman, of Berry, who is one of the finest physicians and surgeons in the county.

Died:

Mrs. Nancy Smith, mother of Prof. N. F. Smith, died at her home in Columbia, MO, Sunday.Her remains were brought here and then taken to Jacksonville for burial.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 20 October 1888

Volume 2, Number 8
Page 4, Column 2

Ad:

For Sale - A large "Argan" anthracite stove; only in use four months; in good repair and will sell at a bargain
O. L. Ballinger & ro.

Lair

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 27 October 1888

Volume 2, Number 9
Page 1, Column 2

A special from Flemingsburg says "Dispatches have been received here from San Francisco, Cal. Stating that M. H. Stitt, a bright young lawyer, who went from here to the Pacific coast a few months ago, had in a moment of despondency, shot himself fatally through the body.  He was alive at last accounts, but the ball having passed through the left lung, near the heart, the wound is considered fatal.

Stitt will be remembered as a young lawyer who located here last fall, but owing to wild dissipations was called home by his parents.  A friend tells us that while here he threatened to kill himself.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 27 October 1888

Volume 2, Number 9
Page 1, Column 3

There was more drunkenness in town Monday than any Court day for years

Irvin Cox and wife, nee Kennard, returned home Saturday from their trip to Cincinnati, and were tendered an elegant reception at the home of the groom's parents on Millersburg pike.  Among those present were; Mr. & Mrs. A. Shields, Robert and Miss Emma Thompson of Jessamine County; Sam M. Lowry, of Bowling Green, Mo., Arthur Kennard, of Kansas City, and Mrs. Sheppard, of Hamilton, Mo.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 27 October 1888

Volume 2, Number 9
Page 1, Column 4

Died

George W. Givens died at Dallas, TX, aged 65 years.  He was a candidate for Lt. Governor some years ago.He was grandson of George Givens who lived in Bourbon and son of Matthew Givens who moved from Bourbon Co. to Louis County, MO, thence to Texas. Deceased leaves a wife nee Overton, and three children in fine circumstances. He had visited California for his health but returned to Texas to die.David and George Givens of this city and James Givens of St. Louis, are his cousins.

In Columbia, MO, Sunday October 14th 1888 at the residence of her son-in-law S. H. Elkins, after a lingering illness Mrs. Nancy Lyter Smith, aged about 76 years.

The remains were taken to Bourbon County, KY for burial.The deceased was a consistent member of the Christian Church.She leaves five children.They are Prof. N. Frank Smith of Cynthiana, Mrs Mary Edwards, Auburn, CA, Dr. T. B. Smith, Cincinnati, N. D. Smith, St. Louis, MO and Mrs. S H. Elkins of Columbia, MO.

Married

Col. Craddock writes the Paris Kentuckian, that Miss Chamberlain, of Harrison County, KY, who wedded the other day to Thomas Smith, of the same county, is a greater beauty than her Ohio relative and namesake, who created so much admiration across the ocean.She is a relative of ex-Speaker Will Owens, the handsome bachelor.Her father Rev. W. W. Chamberlain officiated.

In Covington, Tuesday, at the residence of Rev. Keene, R. A. Woolenus operator of Springs Station, Woodford County and Miss Minnie Letton, of Paris.The groom is said to be a very deserving young man.His bride is one of the prettiest young ladies in Paris.

W. A. Parish the boss brick layer, has completed the burning of a brick kiln of over 300,000 bricks, which he will use in erecting the residence of B. T. Riggs and others. Mr. Parish is one of the finest mechanics in the state, and his thriving business attests the peoples appreciation of his skill.

Indians. – The party of seventy two Sioux Indians, with their agents and interpreters, who went to Washington to treat with the government in regard to the sale of a part of their reservation, passed through here Sunday evening on their return.Among the party was Sitting Bull, of Custer Massacre fame and John Glass, the orator of the nation.Next afternoon a car load of Buffalo Bill’s Indian Company went down the same road.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 27 October 1888

Volume 2, Number 9
Page 2, Column 4

Neighborhood New

Trincum

Born, to the wife of Hyse Rees, a fine daughter

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 27 October 1888

Volume 2, Number 9
Page 4, Column 4

News of Adjoining Counties

Nicholas County

Marriage of Mr. ____ Coons and Miss Cresha Coons
Mr. McCormack and Lizzie Coons will soon be announced

Montgomery County

Born at Wade's Mill to Sam R. Hastings, a son
Married, at Grassy Lick Church, Richard Hunt and Jessie Wilderson

Clark County

Born, to John Tanner, a son
Married, James Rupard and Alice Snowden
The recently organized temperance lodges are booming at Tulip
Samuel Hadden, a prominent citizen of near Kiddville, died, leaving a wife and several children
Joe Ramsey took his parents, Gordon and Miller and his niece, to the Widow's and Orphans Home at Louisville

Fayette County

John S. Pearson, died 8 miles from Lexington at his home on Ironworks Pike
Miles McGrath and Margaret Norton, both of Lexington, were married in Covington

Bourbon County

Married, John Smith, of Knoxville and Miss Ada Hill.  The bride was formerly Principal of the Public School and is a brilliant yount lady.
Miss Currie Duke successfully passed the examination at the Conservatory of Music at Berlin.  Out of sixty applicants only nine passed
Born:  Monday to wife of Emmett M. Dickson, son
Sunday, to the wife of O. T. a daughter, Lucille, weight 10 pounds; fifth born

RUDDELL'S Mill

Mr. Claude Redmon, of Colorado, is visiting his mother
Geo. and John Harper went up to Winchester, Saturday and returned Tuesday

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 3 November 1888

Volume 2, Number 10
Page 1, Column 2

A handsome new organ has been placed in the Methodist Church.

Died

On Sunday morning Mrs. C. H. Horner, mother of Dan and Lizzie Durbin and Mrs. Darwin Fisher.  Funeral services were held Tuesday morning.  Burial in Battle Grove

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 3 November 1888

Volume 2, Number 10
Page 1, Column 4

News of Adjoining Counties

Clark Co.

Married G. W. Owen and Lucy E. Jones
J. Milton Lawrence taken to penitentiary for five years’ term for killing his wife.

Fayette

Timothy Harrington, aged 58, died in Lexington.
Married – In Lexington, Wm. McFarland and Mary J. Dodson.
Born – In Lexington, to W. T. Robertson, a daughter, to T. J. Cassell a son.
Wm. Wallace, in Lexington, ate 10 pounds of grapes in fifty minutes, on condition that another party pay for them.
Houston Crittenden, son of ex-Governor T. T. Crittenden, of Missouri, recently married Miss Dasier, of St. Louis, is in Lexington on a bridal tour, and are guest of General James F. Robinson’s family.

Married William Mason Shirley and Lora Zena Hinton.

Bourbon

Died – Sunday night, Wm. H. Downey, aged about 35 years.He was formerly a well-known druggist of Paris, but sold out on account of failing health to his partner, W. T. Brooks.Mr. Downey leaves a wife, formerly Miss Bettie Odgen, and three children.The funeral services were held at the Methodist Church, conducted by his pastor, Rev. W. T. Roland, assisted by Eld. J. S. Sweeney.
John O.Leary, white, died a few days ago at the County poorhouse, this being the first white death at that place for the past five years.There has been there during that time an average of thirty paupers, and the ages of those now there range from 65 to 90 years.It has is customary to bury the dead in the pauper burial grounds, but in this case the deceased was a Catholic, and J. H. Smith purchased a nice coffin for him and the remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery.
Born – To the wife of Hume Clay, formerly Miss Mary Thomas, a son, second born.
John S. Garland, who has been in the county for the past two years, left Sunday for New York, from which place he sailed on the City of Rome for his home near Warrington, England, to fill his old situation as under steward on Bewsey estate at $75 per month.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 3 November 1888

Volume 2, Number 10
Page 1, Column 5

News of Adjoining Counties

Sunrise

Rabbits are plentiful and slaughter is immense.

Married, near here on the 25th inst. Mr.Duncan Slade, a well known society jets, to Miss Harriet Six, a most lovely young lady. The attendants were Mr. Ben Branock and Miss Jennie Sandy, Mr. Elmus Martin and Miss Maggie Elmer.The knot was tied by Rev. John Cummins in a very pathetic and impressive manner. After the ceremony the party were driven to Mr. Sam Slade’s, father of the groom, where a sumptuous supply awaited their arrival.The table was heavily laden with every thing designed to please the most fastidious.

RUDDELL'S Mill

Born to the wife of Geo. Redmon, on the 23rd a daughter
Mrs. Lucy Quinby, nee Redmon, and two children of Colorado are visiting relatives and friends here.
Geo. Harper has closed out his stock of goods and will leave this week to take charge of his grocery at Winchester.
Died, on the 28th at the county house.John Lary.He had long been an inmate. He and Mrs. Brown were married the a few years ago
The writer called to see Captain Gano Hill on Saturday last and found him in a invalid or reclining chair asleep.He has not been able to lie down for a month.His friends entertain no hope of his recovery
John L. Shuff of Jacksonville, FL, is at his old home buying a car load of horses for the southern market.Capt. McGinnis, with whom he was in business, died a short time since, and a foreman of the stable died last week of yellow fever. Mr. Shuff will return as soon as the fever is over.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 3 November 1888

Volume 2, Number 10
Page 1, Column 6

Neighborhood News

Finell

Mrs. Mason Shirley and Miss Lorena Hinton, while attending the Centennial last week, got married, to the surprise of their many friends.  May they have a along life of peace and happiness

The calf was give Mr. John Lair, of Lair, in favor of the building a new church at Gilead, was sold at public auction at Cynthiana October 22and for $35.  The purchaser was M. L. S. Milner

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 3 November 1888

Volume 2, Number 10
Page 2, Column 1

An Aquatic Monster

Cynthiana, Kentucky, 25 October 1888

(Full column article about 12 men who went fishing in the Licking River and encountered a huge monster in the water.  It would appear either an article put out by the Liars Club or they were all drunk.  The Liars Club reported in Courier issue of 20 October 1888 on page 3, col 2 had all the same names as in this article to it is my considered opinion that it is all a spoof DH)

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 3 November 1888

Volume 2, Number 10
Page 2, Column 2

Neighborhood News

Deferred from last week

Lair

If O. L. Ballinger buys a horse for $30 goes to the trading alley Court day, pays $12 difference for another horse and is offered $14 for this horse, how much is he ahead?  His business manager, Ned Goode says he made a fine trade for it is a good "hoss"  Orie says he never had such fun in had life as he had on the trading alley.  He has employed Mr. Goode to attend to this branch of his business in the future.

FOR SALE – An old black horse, 32 years old, no style and warranted to work no place.  Blind in both eyes and crippled in fore legs.Address Ned George.

Sunrise

Married, near here, on the 17th Mr. Joseph Arnold aged 20 to Miss Laura Athe, aged 23.May their union prove a long, happy and prosperous one.
Died near Antioch Mills, Mr. Wm. Miller, aged 27.He leaves a wife and two children to mourn his loss.Mr. Miller was a son of Captain Miller of this vicinity.

Connersville

On Tuesday of last week Hannah Porter, colored, shuffled off this mortal coil.

Tricum

Died, near here, October 26th at his residence on upper Twin Creek, Mr. Thomas Edwards, a highly respected citizen, aged about 76 years.He leaves a wife and several grown children to mourn his demise.His two sons, of Dry Ridge, Grant County, attended the funeral. He was interred in the Lemons Cemetery.
Born, to the wife of Willie Martin, on October 19, a daughter.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 10 November 1888

Volume 2, Number 11

Issue missing

Wanted

20,000 good fat turkeys.  I will pay the highest market price.  All turkeys are intended for Thanksgiving must be delivered not later than the 20th
S. Renaker

The ladies of the exchange of the Baptist Church will have their annual Thanksgiving cake sale, Wednesday, November 28th at the Baptist Church.  The
ladies will be glad to meet their friends on another Thanksgiving eve.

Wanted 10,000 turkey

R. D. Wentworth of Boston, is here and ready to by turkeys at the highest cash price.  I would prefer to buy my turkeys direct from the farmers, and pay them the commission that is paid to agents and they would have all the turkeys sell for.  All turkeys for Thanksgiving must be here on or before the 20th
R. D. Wentworth
Smith House

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 17 November 1888

Volume 2, Number 12

Page 1, Column 2

Married at Aberdeen

George W. Perkins, of this County and Miss Lizzie Daley, of Scott County, Kentucky aged respectively twenty-one and fifteen years eloped to Aberdeen, Ohio, Monday night and were married by Rev. Beasley.  They were accompanied by Benj. Rulon.  The entire distance 130 miles was traveled in a small one horse buggy.  The happy couple is now sojourning here for a few days preparatory to a visit to the bride's father, who is a prosperous merchant in Sadieville

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 17 November 1888

Volume 2, Number 12

Page 1, Column 4

Neighborhood News

Leesburg

John W. Barclay and Miss Nannie Fleming were married near Oxford last week

RUDDELL'S Mill

Mr. Nathan Goodman is visiting near Oddville, Harrison County
Born, to the wife of C. L. Hough, a son
Died, at the county house Monday, John Moore, quite an old man. Burial at old Presbyterian Cemetery, Tuesday

Sunrise

George Morrow, of Kansas, who has been visiting friends and relatives is in this vicinity for the past two months has returned home.  So a certain one of the fair sex is a little sad, you see
Louis Williams and wife, and Mrs. Joe Beckett and son, Louis, left for Jasper County, Illinois on the 5th to visit relatives.  Mr. Williams also think of locating there in the near future

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 17 November 1888

Volume 2, Number 12

Page 1, Column 5

Neighborhood News

Sunrise (Continued)

Died, Mrs. Newt Blackburn of consumption.  She was a devoted member of the Methodist Church and leaves a host of friends and relatives to mourn her untimely demise.

Connersville

Died, on the 8th inst. At the home of her husband, Edward Swinford, near Boyer Chapel, Mrs. Fannie Swinford, with apoplexy, aged 56 years. She was a devoted Christian and a member of the Methodist church.

Died, on the 12th, little Motie Roberts, with throat disease; aged five years and some months.

James T. Goodnight, wife and daughter who have been living in Kansas for the past three years, have returned to Kentucky to remain in the future.Same old tune no place like old Kaintuck.

Married on last Wednesday afternoon at the residence of the brides father, Mr. James Gray, near Broadwell Mr. Nelson Martin, a widower, to Miss Addie Gray.Rev. C. T. Thompson officiated in his usual pleasant way.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 17 November 1888

Volume 2, Number 12

Page 1, Column 6

News from Adjoining Counties

Fayette County

Marriage license granted to Horace Roach and Carrie Stamps
Married in Lexington, Ed Johnson and Mary Warren

Lizzie, seven year old daughter of James Smith, died in Lexington

Scott County

Married:

John H. Barkley and Mamie Fleming
John Bennett and Berretta Noel
W. H. Ellis and Ida M. Mefford

Harrison Linn and Henrietta Sharpe

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 1- 15 December 1888

Issues Missing

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 22 December 1888

Volume 2, Number 17

Page 1, Column 1

Notice of Dissolution

On and after January 1st, 1889, the firm of O. L. Ballinger & Bro. will by mutual consent be dissolved and after that date be known by the firm name of O. L. Ballinger Bro. & Company.  All accounts and notes will be due after this date and must be satisfactorily settled at once.
Thanking all of their liberal patronage and soliciting a continuation of same we are
Yours,
O. L. Ballinger & Bro
Lair, Kentucky, December 15th, 1888

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 22 December 1888

Volume 2, Number 17

Page 1, Column 2

Brilliant Nuptials

The Marriage of John M. Cronwell to Miss Eva G. Berry

One of the most notable events of the society season transpired Wednesday evening in the marriage of Mr. Jno.. M. Cromwell of this city, to Miss Eva Berry, of Berry.  The bride is a beautiful young lady, possessing grace and accomplishments, and daughter of Ex-sherif Jno.. M. Berry. Besides being noted for her accomplishments, the bride is one of the  popular young ladies of the county.  The groom is son of Jas.. W. Cromwell and is a clerk in the National Bank and Treasurer of the Cynthiana Building Association.  He is one of society's favorites, popular, clever and industrious.

The wedding took place at the residence of the bride's father promptly at 8 o'clock, Rev. Guerant performing the ceremony.  The attendants were J. K. Northcutt and Miss Minnie Ashbrook, Wm. Walker and Miss Sudie McMurtry, Miller Ward and Miss Evaline Berry.  The happy pair left on the fast line for a trip to Louisville and Cincinnati and will return home next week and take lodgings at Mrs. S. T. Lydicks

Those present were very numerous and handsome.  Among those present were:
Mr. & Mrs. Cromwell
, Mr. & Mrs. W. Victor, Misses Sallie and Bettie Cromwell, Miss Anna Curl, Misses Mattie and I. T. Martin, Mr. & Mrs. George Ashbrook, Mr. & Mrs. J. Thom Martin, Miss Rena Cannon, Miss Sallie McMurtry, Messers, Sam Patterson, Dr. L. S. Grivens, H. Shawhan, T. E. Ashbrook, Lawrence Williams, John Chowning, J. McMurtry, E. R. Oder

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 22 December 1888

Volume 2, Number 17

Page 1, Column 3

Personal

W. S. Haviland went to Carlisle Tuesday to attend the funeral or Mrs. Stewart
Miss Fannie Whaley is visiting the Misses Gilmore, of Lexington

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 22 December 1888

Volume 2, Number 17

Page 4, Column 1

Neighborhood News

Connersville

Married, on last Monday, at Cynthiana, Francis McKinney to Miss Annie Hutchinson, both of this vicinity.  This is third venture of the groom upon the matrimonial sea.  Success to them and theirs.

Philipsburg

Mrs. Jane Humphreys, wife of Abraham Humphreys, and daughter of Jacob Maybrier, died at the residence of her husband near Philipsburg on the 13th. Deceased was about 35 years of age, and for a number of years a consistent member of the Christian Church at Salem

Tricum

Married, at the residence of the bride's father, J. J. Clifford, on the 13th Wm. Richardson, of Robinson Station to Miss Fannie Clifford, by Rev. Carr.  After congratulations they left for Cincinnati and returned to the groom's parents where a fine dinner and several friends and neighbors awaited them.  Too much praise an not to be given mine host and hostess for their very kind hospitality.  Later in the evening came the brass band headed by Dr. Lang, of Antioch, which "discussed" excellent music, and lad but not least came the serenaders with horns, bells and skyrockets.  After amusing themselves for a very short hours, all wended their way homeward feeling that it was an evening of pleasure

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 22 December 1888

Volume 2, Number 17

Page 4, Column 2

Chestnut Hall

The home of Sultan, 2:24, the property of W. T. Handy, Esq.
(Article about Handy, Chestnut Hall, his horse and estate)

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 22 December 1888

Volume 2, Number 17

Page 4, Column 3

News of Adjoining Counties

Clark County

Married, at Ruckerville, James H. Addams and Laura Baker
Mrs. Cora L., wife of Benjamin Crutcher, of Nicholasville, died at the residence of her mother, Mrs. Mary Rash, in Winchester

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 5 January1889

Volume 2, Number 19

Page 1, Column 2

Born:

To the wife of Henry Eales, a son, weight 11 pounds
To the wife of Joe Lane, a daughter

Matrimonial

Miss Mattie Johnson, of Millersburg, and a widower named Meyers, of Missouri, were married Thursday at the residence of Mr. Trundle, near Paris
The following has been issued:

Mr. & Mrs. M. D. Martin request presence at the marriage of their daughter Arabella to Jas.. VanDern, Wednesday afternoon, January 9th at 3:30 o'clock
at their house, Robertson, Kentucky 1889

A surprise wedding is on tap for the first of February, while three marriage bells will ring next month.  All brides live here

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 5 January 1889

Volume 2, Number 19

Page 1, Column 3

Events Which Occurred during the Holidays

The social event of 88 was the marriage of Miss Bird Martin, daughter of Mrs. I. T. Martin to Orie L. Lebus, son of the wealthy farmer, Lewis Lebus, on Christmas Night.  The wedding of a more popular couple was never solemnized in this city.  The couple left for a trip to Washington, Baltimore, New York and other cities, and will return home next week.

Wm. Ellis, colored, returned from hunting Wednesday evening, and Dave Brooker, colored with others took two rabbits from him in a joking manner. Brooker then attempted to take his shot gun from him, and in the squabble the gun went off wounding Brooker in the right side, he dying the next morning.  Ellis gave himself to the authorities.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 5 January 1889

Volume 2, Number 19

Page 1, Column 5

Neighborhood News

Renaker

Allen Henry, of Hinton and Miss Kate Crosswait, of near Rutland, were married on December 26th

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 5 January 1889

Volume 2, Number 19

Page 1, Column 6

Neighborhood News

RUDDELL'S Mill

Messers, John Newman and John Harper returned from a visit in Clark County, Saturday

Sunrise

The protracted meeting at Crow's Chapel closed with no additions
Wm. Becker, who had been on the sick list for some time, is no better at this writing.  He is in a critical condition
The members of Barlow gave a supper on the night of 22and for the benefit of the church, and realized about $70
Prof Hobday has returned to RUDDELL'S Mill

Stevens - Feeback

The marriage of Joseph R. Stevens to Miss Emma D. Feeback

Upper Mins street was the scene of a pretty wedding , Thursday afternoon, in the marriage of Miss Emma D. Feeback to Joseph R. Stevens.The pretty little college home was attractively decorated and the many friends present made the occasion an even happier one.At half past three o’clock Rev. D. B. Cooper pronounced the benediction which made them man and wife, after which the couple retired to an adjoining room to receive the happy congratulations of friends.
The bride is a pretty and popular young lady and will make an excellent and superior helpmate.The groom is a well known contractor and councilman and one of the most popular and energetic young men in the city and is worthy of the bride he has won.
The bridal party left on the fast line for Decatur, Illinois, where they will remain a few days, returning they will visit Cincinnati and then come home, to abide in the groom’s beautiful residence on Walnut Street. Dr. J. B. Adams and Miss Nettie Martin were the attendants.
The bride was attired in blue cloth with tan trimming and hat to match.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 5 January 1889

Volume 2, Number 19

Page 4, Column 4

Died

On Thursday, aged, 102 years, Mrs. Chinn wife of the late Dr. Chinn, the great Christian church advocate.
Jep. A. Lail, of consumption, at Socorra, New Mexico, Wednesday.Jep was well known throughout Central Kentucky, and was a very popular young man. He went to New Mexico last fall with the expectation of recovering or improving his health.He was a nephew of Mrs. T. J. Mcgibben.His remains will be brought here and interred at Battle Grove cemetery by the Knights of Pythias of Lexington.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 12 January 1889

Volume 2, Number 20

Page 1, Column 1

Some Turkey

S. Renaker & Bro. shipped 33,000 turkeys from this section to Eastern markets this winter.  Over $39,000 being the cost to them.  Still this has not been a good turkey winter either

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 12 January 1889

Volume 2, Number 20

Page 1, Column 4

Personal

Mrs. Lucy Cummins visited her father, C. A. Elrod, of Bourbon, last week

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 12 January 1889

Volume 2, Number 20

Page 1, Column 5

Born:

To the wife of Mr. Elgin (nee Carrie Dills) of Hopkinsville, a son

Died:

On Sunday last, of inflammation of the stomach, Mrs. Ellen Shine, aged about 60 years.  Her remains were sent to Ohio, Monday for interment
The remains of Jep A. Lail, of Lexington, who died in New Mexico, were received here Saturday and buried Sunday afternoon under the auspices of K. of P. Lodge Lexington, assisted by divisions from Paris and Cynthiana. A special train was run here from Lexington, Sunday, to bring the order of which he was member

On Saturday, of consumption, Robt. Brunker, a young man residing in the Indian Creek neighborhood.

Mrs. Sam Smith, the dear mute daughter, of the late Henry Hall, died Saturday night at the old homestead, after about eight days illness with pneumonia - Bourbon News

Matrimonial

T. Earle Ashbrook, of Paris, and Miss Jennie Withers, daughter of Gen. W. T. Withers, of Lexington, will wed in April the marriage taking place in Florida.
Miss Belle Martin, daughter of Squire M. D. Martin and Jas.. VanDeren, were married at the home of the bride's parents on Wednesday last.
On the 15th, Miss Lida Urmston, of Broadwell, will wed Wm. Switzer, of Newtown
The little birds tell us that there may be (not certain) a wedding next week but don'd Hedge'(s) you bet on our saying  so
Miss Pattie Chenauth, of Lexington, and Mr. Julian, of Mt. Sterling will be married this month

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 12 January 1889

Volume 2, Number 20

Page 1, Column 6

Neighborhood News

RUDDELL'S Mill

Died - January 7th, Sallie Lee, col. of consumption
G. A. Vice, of Bath County, en route home from Winchester stopped over Sunday night with Harper Bros.

Leesburg

Born - To the wife of Clay Stone, deceased, nee Carrie Allen, a son
We unintentionally omitted noting the death of Jas. Smith, who died in Lexington, about three weeks ago.  He was taken to the asylum a few months ago.  He was a bachelor about fifty-five years old

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 12 January 1889

Volume 2, Number 20

Page 4, Column 3

News from Adjoining Counties

Clark County

David Rallsback, an old citizen of Four Mile Creek, died
Wash Proctor struck with paralysis. As he is an old man his recovery is doubtful
Four year old daughter of Willis Rye burned to death on Dr. Wash Miller's farm

Fayette County

John Mooney, aged sixty two years, died in Lexington
G. D. Hunt, Principal of Morton School in Lexington, died at Greensville, MS
Col. G. W. Muir and wife and Col. W. H. Boswell and wife attended the funeral of Jep Lail at Cynthiana, Sunday

Bourbon County

Born in Clintonsville, Saturday to the wife of Green Barnet, triplets - two girls and one boy.  The boy and one girl died

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 19 January 1889

Volume 2, Number 21

Page 1, Column 2

Stabbed and Killed

John Arnett killed by Negro named Bud Smith Of late our city has experienced a rush of killings.Three have occurred now in a very short time.But of all the most unwarranted and brutal murder transpiring in Cynthiana, occurred Monday morning, when John Arnett was fatally stabbed by a Negro named Bud Smith.The particulars of the affair are as follows:
Smith began the quarrel with Arnett near Broadwell and Boyer’s stable on Pleasant street, Arnett disliked to raise a row and left Smith, proceeded to the saloon of D. M. Howard, on Main Street, going in at the read door.Smith, who is one of the meanest Negroes that ever lived, went to another Negro, named Newt Lee, and borrowed a knife, with full intention of creating further trouble with Arnett.Arnett was met at the saloon by smith, and the two immediately began disputing After a few moments wrangle they started at each other simultaneously, when Smith stabbed Arnett in the shoulder or breast, near the neck. Arnett walked to the back door of the saloon, a distance of about ten feet, and fell dead.Smith left the saloon immediately and gave himself up to officers.When searched no knife or weapon could be found on him and when questioned tried to deny his guilt, but his manner was too confusing. It is evident from the manner in which smith did the stabbing that he had intended for just a scene to occur, and that he must have had his knife open an din his hand all the while.
Arnett was removed to his home on Walnut street, where the Coroners inquest was held, and buried on Wednesday morning.He was a son of Mrs. Brown and a brother of Sam Arnett.
At the call for his trial Tuesday morning, Smith waived examination, and was held over to Criminal Court, without bail.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 19 January 1889

Volume 2, Number 21

Page 1, Column 4

Died

On Monday, of typhoid pneumonia, Mrs. Lail, wife of Dept. Marshall Joe Lail.
Mrs. Walter Karrick, mother of Aaron and Pres. Karrick, died at her home near this city, on Monday.
On Friday last, of consumption, Mrs. Mollie Lafferty, wife of D. Newt Lafferty. A babe, only four days old survive her.
OnTuesday, of apoplexy, Patrick Spain, keeper of the toll-gate on Leesburg pike.Mr. Spain was about 60 years old
Died, on Sunday, George Stump, aged about 90 years.He leaves his entire and large estate to aid in educating the poor.
On Monday, at the residence of his son-in-law (Wm. Cragmyle), Dr. Sam Douglas, aged about 65 years.Dr. Douglas was well known, and was the father of Mrs. J. W. Hopper, of Georgetown, Mrs. Wm. Cragmyle, of this city and Mrs. J. W. Wright of Cincinnati.
On Monday morning, of inflammation of the stomach, C. T. Delling, and old and well-known citizen, aged about 60 years.Mr. Delling was formerly a clothier here, was well acquainted and much liked. He leaved a wife and one child, Mrs. Joe M. Clary.Burial took place Tuesday afternoon at the old cemetery.
The remains of Mike O’Hearn arrived here from Kansas City on the fast line Saturday night, in charge of a committee of the Wolfetone Social Club, of which he was a member, and who, by his kind, social and affable manner, endeared himself in the heart of each and every member of this noble organization which is composed of two hundred of the best Catholic young men of Kansas City.The funeral took place Sunday afternoon from the residence of Wm. O’Hearn, on South Walnut Street.Services at St. Edwards Church and burial at Catholic cemetery followed by a large procession of sorrowing relatives and friends. Mr. O’Hearn, accompanied by Mr. Matt Flynn, left this city September 20th, 1885, for Kansas City, MO. Where they both secured good positions, and where Mr. O’Hearn was the life of all about him until a few months ago when that dread disease, consumption, confined him to his room and finally on Jan. 11th, 1889, claimed him in death at the age of 26.  Those of the committee of the Wolfeone Club met by the scribe were Messers. M. A. Flynn and Wm. P. Hayden.The committee and Mrs. Mary O’Dowd, sister of the deceased left Monday afternoon for home.Too much praise can not be given to the Wolfetone Club for the respect they pay their members in deaths and especially on this occasion.God will surely bless its members.

Born

To the wife of F. Reynolds, on the 15th a son. Caleb West
To the wife of James Gray, a son
To the wife of Mr. Fulton (nee Luttie Smith) of Oskaloosa, Florida, a daughter

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 19 January 1889

Volume 2, Number 21

Page 1, Column 6

News of Adjoining Counties

Montgomery County

Two couples of runaway lovers from Mt. Sterling married in parlors of Palace Hotel Saturday, They were Those. J. McKinney and Fannie Aires and
Henry Judy and Minnie Dale

Nicholas County

Married - Those. Herndon and Miss Millie Boothe

Clark County

Born - To the wife of John Hudson, a son
Died - Ansel, son of Dr. D. S. Price
Marriage - Oliver P. Wills and Tillie B. Raskett announce for tomorrow

Fayette County

Born - In Lexington, to the wife of Wm. Sailiers, a daughter
Mrs. Louisa, wife of William Hunt, Janitor at KY University, died Saturday

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 19 January 1889

Volume 2, Number 21

Page 4, Column 2

Neighborhood News

Sunrise

Mr. Wm. Rodgers, one of our wealthiest citizens, is very low with consumption and there is little hope of his recovery

Tricum

Died - At her residence here on January 1, 1889, Mrs. Jane Marr, aged eight-four years and eight months.  She was buried at Lemons Cemetery, by the side of her husband, Mr. John Marr, who died about eleven years ago, and was a soldier of the war of 1812. Deceased leaves several children, grand children and great grand children, to mourn her demise.

RUDDELL'S Mill

Misses Lucy Harper, Addie Goodman, Anna Ballinger, of this place and Lizzie Collins, of Paris, went up to Winchester Friday the guest of Mrs. Jas.. Vice. Miss Anna returned Sunday, the others will remain a week or two.
The marriage of Miss Mary David and Mr. Ammerman, of Connersville, will take place at her sister's in Rockcastle County, the 17th. Her many friends here wish her much happiness and prosperity

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 19 January 1889

Volume 2, Number 21

Page 4, Column 3

Neighborhood News

Leesburg

Eugene Magee, of Versailles, died at his home on Friday las.  He is the grandson of Mr. N. Switzer, of whom he made mention as having shot himself while hunting.
Walter Switzer and Miss Lida Urmstom were married Thursday at Mt. Pleasant Church, at Broadwell, Rev. Thompson officiating
Mr. Wainscott and Miss Garnett, aged thirteen, eloped and were married.  Her father followed them to Georgetown and on the Lexington on horseback, in close pursuit, but missed them.  After their return has forgiven them and invited them home.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 26 January 1889

Volume 2, Number 22

Page 1, Column 2

No Tobacco in 1889

Farmers and tobacco growers of Richland School District met January 15, 1889, to organize and to protect our interest in and sale of the present
tobacco crop and to curtail the acreage in future crop.  On motion A. T. Rankin was elected temporary chairman, John T. Cummins, Sec'y
Short speeches were made by F. Cummins, John W. Adams, L. Sandy, Mr. Nunnimaker, of Pendleton, John Asbury, Chas. King and others all in favor of raising no tobacco in 1889 and limiting production in future years, and holding the present crop for having prices 15 and 20 cents per pound.
On motion this was made a permanent organization by electing L. Sandy, President and Jno. T. Cummins, Sec.  The following resolution was adopted and signed.
Resolved - That we farmers and tobacco growers of Richland School District, do hereby agree and bind ourselves not to grow any tobacco, or have grown, on our farms, in the year 1889. Otherwise null and void unless we get 3/4 majority of the tobacco growers in the county.
F. Cummins, John W. Adams, Jas.. W. Criswell, Geo. Roberts, Jno.. T. Cummins, Josh Teel, Rich L. Price, A. H. Rankin, Richard Blackburn, Jno.. Teel
Moved by F. Cummins that Secretary furnish copy of proceedings of this meeting to reach each of our county papers, for publication.  Motion carried

Resolved further, that we request a call meeting of farmers and tobacco growers of Harrison to meet in courthouse at 10 o'clock, at our next County Court to thoroughly organize the county and to elect delegates to the General Convention, at Lexington, February 4th
Adjourned to meet 22nd, inst at righ.
Jno. T. Cummins, Sec.

L. Sandy, President

Matrimonial

Last Tuesday afternoon at 5 o'clock, at the Christian Church in the beautiful of Danville, occurred one of the happy events of the season, when Dr. Thomas R. Welch of this city, let to the hymenial alter Miss Josephine Stanley, eldest daughter of Eld. Wm. Stanley, formerly pastor of the Christian Church of this city
The large edifice was crowded to its utmost capacity with Danville's most handsome beau and lovely belles and beautiful floral decorations, deftly arranged by delicate hands, were conspicuous on all sides.
Precisely at the appointed hour the melodious strains of “Mendelssohn’s beautiful wedding march” pealed forth from the large organ, and a death-like silence pervades the auditorium.Then came the ushers, Messers. Harding, Lillard, Banford, and Rogers, followed by the attendants, Mr. Owsley and Louisa Stanley, brother and sister of the bride, who were in rotation followed by the bride and groom.

Elder Wm. Stanley performed the ceremony, which was as beautiful and impressive as words and eloquence could make it., and the scene of the father uniting in holy bonds of wed lock his beloved daughter was indeed touching. – Nicholasville Democrat

On the morning of the 19th at Oakland, California, Mr. R. B. James to Miss A. Laura Wilson, daughter of W. H. Wilson, of Abdullah Park.  Mrs. James had been some months previous to her marriage engaged as managing editor of the Breeder and Sportsman, of San Francisco, Cal.Mr & Mrs. James will make their home at San Miguel, Cal. Mrs. W. H. Wilson, who has been for the past three months with her daughter in San Francisco, is expected home by the 1st of February.

Tom Conway and Miss Annie Ray, of Mason County eloped and were married in Aberdeen, Wednesday.

The following marriage licenses have been issued during the past wee: January 19, John W. Richey, 25, to Josephine Miller, 26; January 22, William Gunnell, 23, to Maggie Shields, 21; January 23, William H. Wilson, 31, to Nannie Jewett, 24, and Edwin Thomas Mullin, 24, to Hattie May Hunt, 19.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 26 January 1889

Volume 2, Number 22

Page 1, Column 5

Correction

The Courier takes pleasure in rectifying a mistake in last week' issue, wherein we stated that Patrick Spain, the well-known toll-gate keeper on Leesburg Pike, was dead.  Mr. Spain informs us that he is in the "land of the living"  and hopes to remain so for many years to come.

Died

In Covington, Monday, January 21st, 1889, Ollie P. four year old son of Hon. & Mrs. A. P. Gooding, of Mayslick, died at 4 a.m at his grandfather's Capt. Williams. The disease that carried him away was cerebral meningitis, and the suffering he endured was very great.  He was a brother of Mr. Abe Gooding, of near this city.
On Tuesday, Mrs. Louisa Renaker, wife of Geo. Renaker. Burial took place at Battle Grove, Thursday

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 26 January 1889

Volume 2, Number 22

Page 1, Column 6

The nuptials of Miss May E. McCallay, of Middletown, OH and Mr. Morris W. Renick, of Paris, KY was solmnized Thursday evening.  The bride is the only daughter of Mr. Daniel McCallay, President of the First National Bank, of Middleton.  The groom is Cashier of the bank and an energetic business man.  The presents were numerous and costly, a mont were 100 shares of National Bank stock, valued at $15,000 from Mr. McCallay, a deed for a valuable piece of property on which is handsome dwelling, from Mrs. McCallay, and a complete set of solid silver tableware from Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Renick, parents of the groom.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 26 January 1889

Volume 2, Number 22

Page 4, Column 2

Neighborhood News

Philipsburg

Married - At the residence of the bride's father, Wm. Smith, near Saltwell, Nicholas County, Mr. Curry Pope, of this neighborhood, to Miss Carrie Smith, Rev. M. Mann officiating.

Tricum

Died - Mr. Geo. Stump, aged 91 years and 8 months.  He was buried beside his wife, who died about four years ago.  He leaves his large estate, consisting of 800 acres of land, some stock and cash, to be used for the purpose of educating the orphan children of Harrison County.

Died - Near here, on January 22, 1889, Mrs. Eliza, wife of Mr. Geo. Renaker.  She was a kind Christian lady and leaves a husband and two sons.

Died - Mrs. Molly Lafferty, wife of Mr. Newt. Lafferty, aged about 28 years.  Leaves a husband and little babe to mourn her loss.  She was a consistent member of the Christian Church at Unity.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 2 February 1889

Volume 2, Number 23

Page 1, Column 2

Died

At Nashville, Tenn., on Tuesday last, Mr. Clarence Bryan, aged about 75 years.  Burial took place at Paris, Thursday.  He leaves two sons, Lieutenant-Governor Bryan and ex-Senator M. T. Bryan, of Nashville, Tenn.  His three daughters were Mrs. P. White, of this city, Mrs. Campbell of Nashville, and a single daughter.

Yesterday morning at his residence in this city, J. Schradski, age about 60 years.  His remains were taken to Cincinnati, where they will be cremated.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 2 February 1889

Volume 2, Number 23

Page 1, Column 4

Matrimonial

The James-Wilson Wedding

The residence of Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Cairn Simpson, 2111 Adeline Street, was the scene of a happy event on Saturday afternoon, the 19th inst., in the marriage of Robert Bruce James and Miss Annie Laurie Wilson.  The ceremony was quiet and without display, and occurred in the presence of a few acquaintances and relatives. The Rev. Dr. Horton, of the First Presbyterian Church, performed the service which took place at 2:30 p.m.  The bride was attired in a plum colored traveling dress, hat and gloves.  After the ceremony and congratulations the guest sat down to a dainty wedding dinner, served by Mrs. Simson, in the dining room, which was prettily decorated for the occasion.  The groom is a gentleman of means and resident of this state, where he has large land interest and the bride is from Kentucky, famous for its beautiful women and blooded horses. She is the daughter of W. H. Wilson, of Abdullah Park, Cynthiana, KY, one of the best known breeders of fast horses in the Bluegrass region, the owner of Simmons, Sulton and Wilkes Bros.  Miss Wilson came to California some months since upon a visit, and was the guest for some time of the family of A. L. Rose, at his Los Angeles county estate.  While in Oakland she visited Joseph Cairn Simpson, the veteran horseman and proprietor of the Breeder and Sportsman, an old time friend of her father's, who was impressed with her knowledge of stock maters and literary ability, that he offered her a position as assistant editor and business manager of his paper, which is one of the best authorities upon stock matters and the most widely circulated upon the Pacific Coast.  Although the position is somewhat novel one it is not unusual for a lady to be up in stock lore.  Miss Morgan had made fame and fortune as the live stock reporter of the the New York Tribune and Mrs. Frank Leslie, who is most successful publisher, is no mean judge of the points of horses and cattle.  Previous to coming to California Miss Wilson refused a flattering offer from J. H. Wallace, of Wallace's Monthly, a publication well known a mont stockmen and breeders, and was also offered charge of a young ladies seminary in Iowa.

The New York World says of Miss Wilson, "She is reputed to be on of the best informed woman in American on pedigrees and the history of trotting horses. Very few men are as well posted on turf matters.  She is besides an able and graceful writer." Miss Wilson is a graduate of Wellesley College, of rare personal charms and a pleasing and brilliant conversationalist.  It was while at Santa Monica that she met Mr. R. B. James, who was sojourning at the beach with his mother, and formed the acquaintance which ripened into an engagement and marriage.

The wedding was held on Saturday as that day was the anniversary of the marriage of the bride's parents, which took place twenty-seven years before.  There were presents at the wedding.  Mrs. W. H. Wilson, mother of the groom, Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Cairn Simpson, Mabel Simpson, Minnie Culver, Laura Berry, Helen Berry, Messers: Milton Philbrook, Charles Treration, J. H. Kennedy, A. A. Denison and  Master Edwin Culver.

Among the wedding gifts was noticeable a handsom onyx French clock, with a care inscribed "Mr. & Mrs. R. B. James, with best wishes of friends in Breeder and Sportsman office."

Mr. & Mrs. James expect to make their home upon their ranch in Monterey County, where they will engage in stock raising, bringing some animals from Kentucky. They have taken their residence temporarily in San Francisco - Oakland (Cal) Enquirer.

Born to wife of Frazier Remington of Le Grand, Oregon, a son

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 2 February 1889

Volume 2, Number 23

Page 1, Column 5

News from Adjoining Counties

FAYETTE COUNTY

Married in Lexington, F. L. Clements and Lizzie C. Umpton
Mrs. James Scully died suddenly in Lexington, Monday morning
On Keene Pike, Allen B. Duncan, aged 31 years
Frank O'Toole, aged 22 years died in Lexington.  He was eldest son of John O'Toole, formerly engaged in marble business.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 2 February 1889

Volume 2, Number 23

Page 1, Column 6

News from Adjoining Counties

(continued)

SCOTT COUNTY

Thomas Taylor, died in Georgetown under mysterious circumstances.  He had about $50, which he lost gambling.  That evening he gave his trunk and contents to a negro man, saying he would not need them, as he was going to Cincinnati.  Next day he was groaning and vomiting in his room and died soon after.  A half empty bottle rat poison was found on the table.  One of his legs was cut by cars last May and he had been in bad health ever since.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 2 February 1889

Volume 2, Number 23

Page 4, Column 2

Neighborhood News

Leesburg

John Moore of Centerville, and Miss Jennie, daughter of John A. Shropshire, were married Wednesday.

To the memory of little Mary, only daughter of J. S. and Sallie Bishop, who died of pneumonia, near Leesburg January 26, 1889 aged on year, three months and two days.  Funeral services were conducted at Silas Church, by Rev. Geo. Varden.  Burial in Jacksonville Cemetery, Monday, January 28th.  The death of this little darling was peculiarly sad, for so many hopes and loves were bound up in its tender life.

Born on 26 inst. to the wife of Pete Younger, twin boys

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 9 February 1889

Volume 2, Number 24

Page 1, Column 2

The scheme to manufacture ice has fallen through.  The daily consumption has been found to be insufficient to warrant the erection of the works.

Died:  Mrs. Caroline Smith, died Tuesday, aged 62 years.  She was widow of a Confederate soldier, who was killed at Chicamauga, in Capt. Ben Desha's company. She was mother of Mrs. Clay Pullum.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 9 February 1889

Volume 2, Number 24

Page 1, Column 3

Matrimonial

Miss Bessie Frazer, daughter if Capt. J. N. Frazer, will be married on February 27, to John Garnett, son of Wm. Garnett.

Elder Geo. T. Walden, who was formerly pastor of the Christian Church at Indian Creek, married on December 12th to Miss Alice Burke, in Melbourne, Australia.  In leaving Melbourne seven years ago to come to the United States to educate himself for the ministry, Mr. Walden made a noble sacrifice in breaking the engagement with Miss Burke, in order to leave her fancy free during his long absence.  But absence did not conquer love, but made their young heart grow fonder. So, after graduating from the Bible College of the Kentucky University, he returned to his native land, where he again met his lady love, and their fondest hopes were consumated.

Electric Light at Last

A Company organized and to be incorporated.  Deliverance has come!  Cynthiana will undoubtedly have Electric Light Works.  On last Tuesday evening the Cynthiana Electric Company was organized by the combination of a number of our best citizens.  The capital stock of the company is $15,000.  Among the gentlemen interested are: Wm. Addams, W. T. Lafferty, F. M. Cosby, N. W. Frazer, J. T. Simon, J. T. Hedges, J. S. Withers, T. J. Megibben, Jno.. W. Mattox, J. F. Musselman, Lewis Lebus, J. I. Blanton and others.

Articles of incorporation have been filed and in a few weeks the company will be ready for work.  Beyond all doubt the Council will at its next meeting pass an ordinance requiring the city to be illuminated with Electric light.  This franchise will be sufficient to guarantee the company success, and immediate arrangements will be made for the erection of the works.

The introduction of Electric light will be both a novelty and a convenience and its inauguration will assist our city to the "Boom" she so badly needs.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 9 February 1889

Volume 2, Number 24

Page 1, Column 4

Neighborhood News

Ruddell's Mill
Miss Anna Balinger's school closed here last week
John Grimes is very low with black erysipelas

Leesburg

Ration Ryels, of Jacksonville, aged about 20 years, and quite a nice young man, died on Thursday last, with fever.  This makes the second son of Mr. Ryels' that has died in the last few years that was just merging into manhood.

Died - At her home in Vinita, Indiana Territory, Mrs. Nat Skinner, with cerebral spinal meningitis.  She only lived four days after taking sick. She was the wife of Nat Skinner, Jr., who moved from this section when a child, something over thirty years ago.  Ira Holland, who lived with them, said she was a most excellent lady.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 16 February 1889

Volume 2, Number 25

Page 1, Column 3

Matrimonial

O. L. Ballinger, of Lair, and Miss Helen Zoller, of this city, will be wed on the 20th

On February 3rd, at the residence of Chas. Waits, of Indian Creek neighborhood the following nuptials occurred:
B. E. Hilen, of Broadwell, a widower, to Miss Mattie Waits
Windsor Riley to Miss Bettie Waits
Elmer Waits to Miss Sallie Mullins
(The first two brides and the last groom are children of Mr. Chas. Waits)
The marriages all occurring on the same day, at the same time, made the incident remarkable.  If the several pairs have the success and happiness in life that their many friends wish them their's will indeed be a happy one.

The following has bee received:
Mr. & Mrs. S. Williams request the presence at the marriage of their niece, Ella T. Howe, to Ben M. Frishie, at their residence, Wednesday 20, 1889,
at 10:30 a.m., Cynthiana, Kentucky

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 16 February 1889

Volume 2, Number 25

Page 1, Column 4

Died:  On Saturday morning of paralysis of the brain, Capt. Frank Adams, aged about 50 years.  He was a well known and popular man, and fought
valiantly in the "late unpleasantness."  Burial took place Sunday afternoon.

John C. Craig, Sr., died at his home in the county, Friday morning, in the 86th year of his age.  He leaves a wife, who is his junior ten years, and three sons, Messers., Will and James Craig, well known farmers of this county and Frank Craig the popular distiller at Berry.  The deceased about four years
ago celebrated his golden wedding, and was probably one of the oldest married men in the county.  He leaves his family in good circumstances, owning about 500 to 600 acres of the best land in Harrison County.  His remains were placed in the vault at Battle Grove, Saturday.  The six pallbearers; P. C. Ammerman, Geo. Craig, W. H. Craig, Jos. Craig, Jr., and Frank Craig, Jr., were all grandsons of the deceased, except Mr. Ammerman, who is a grand-son-in law.

(Draws his own pension.  Long article about a fellow from Mexican War, who was supposed to be dead.  When his wife applied for pension based on his service it was found that he was drawing a pension in Virginia, with a new wife and two children.  His name of Major John Franklin, who lived some three miles from Williamstown about 25 years ago.  He moved to Lewis county and sold stock in Cynthiana,  Then disappeared and a body was identified as him from the Licking River. DH)

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 16 February 1889

Volume 2, Number 25

Page 4, Column 2

Neighborhood News

LEESBURG

Married - Mr. Cooney Henderson and Miss Dora Welch
Miss Sallie Corbin and Mr. Bedford, of Missouri, were married in Cincinnati last week and went direct to Missouri, where the will reside in the future.
We unintentionally failed to note the marriage of Wm. Grunnell, of Scott County, to Miss Maggie, daughter of the late Those. Shields, some two weeks ago.

RUDDELL'S Mills

Mr. L. Ballinger had rented Mr. Jas. Tate's farm near Shawhan
Miss Iva Shaw, of Harrison, was the guest of Miss Dixie Knight, the past week
Mrs. Jas.. Vice and G. A. Harper attended the reception at Harpers Bros, Tuesday night
Mr. & Mrs. Lea Harper, Misses Lizzie Collins and Lucy Harper and Mr. O. L. Ballinger, spent from Saturday till Monday at Mr. Jas.. Vice's in Winchester.

CONNERSVILLE

Died - On the 7th inst., at his home two miles east of here. Mr. John Craig, aged 86 years.  He is the father of F. G. Craig of Berry and James and Wm. Craig, Sr., of this vicinity.

BERRY

Mrs. Patton and daughter, Miss Mattie, left Monday for California, their future home.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 16 February 1889

Volume 2, Number 26

Page 1, Column 2

Matrimonial

Mr. C. S. Lydick will wed Miss Barker, of Missouri, on the 27th inst.

Mr. Joe Sallinger, of Paris, will wed Miss Tillie Alschueler, of Louisville, March 20th

Marriage licenses granted:
O. L. Ballinger and Helen Zoller
Hanson Harney and Mentie Brinker
S. M. Lyter and Miss Eliza Smith
B. M. Frisbie and Ellan T. Howe
Joe Elliot and Lucy Garnett
Henry Vernard and Mary Ellen McGrath

At the residence of the bride's mother, on Wednesday last, Miss Helen Zoller and Orie L. Ballinger.  The nuptial consummation of a more popular couple never occurred, and it happiness and prosperity attends then in the same abundance as good wishes, their life will indeed be a happy one.

In Cincinnati, on Tuesday morning, Miss Maymie Spohn and Harry C. Veach.  The bride is the daughter of the well-known butcher, Jno.. Spohn, and is pretty and accomplished young lady.  The groom is the son of Grundy Veach, a farmer, and is a cleaver and industrious young man.  The will couple will return today and will reside with the groom's parents.

Thursday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, at the Ashland House, Lexington, Mr. R. A. Rose of Winchester and Miss Mace M. King, of this city, were joined in the holy bond of wedlock.  Mr. Rose is connected with the Central Hotel at Winchester, and is well known here.  The ceremony was performed by Rev. Raymond in his usual beautiful and impressive manner.

On Wednesday, February 20th at 10:30 a.m. at the residence of Mr. S. Williams, on Court Street, Mr. Ben M. Frisbie, of Spencer, Montgomery County, to Miss Ella T. Howe.  The bride wore an elegant costume of zinc-blue broadcloth, with hat to match.  The attendants were Mr. Lee Frisbie and Miss Jennie Sparks, Mr. W. H. Howe and Miss Anna Sparks. Eld. J. B. Greenwade of Mt. Sterling Christian Church officiated.  Among those present from a distance were: Mr. & Mrs. Sam Shout and son; Mrs. John Howe and son; Mrs. Tom Martin and daughter of Paris, KY; Miss Henrietta Howe; Mr. & Mrs. Richard Sparks, Misses Anna and Jennie Sparks, Lair, KY; Mr. Lee Frisbie, Mt. Sterling, KY.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 16 February 1889

Volume 2, Number 26

Page 1, Column 3

Died

Bishop Holland N. McTyre, President of the trustees of Vanderbilt University and senior bishop of the M. E. Church South, died at his residence in Nashville, Friday, February 15th, at 65 years of age.
Charles E. Haviland, at his home 784 Lafayette Ave., Brooklyn, NY, February 17th, 1889.  He was born in the city of New York, November 12th, 1814 and was an uncle of the Havilands of this county, and no family could more lament the death of one whom they so much revered.
On Tuesday, of spinal meningitis, Nathan Prouse, aged 18 years.  Burial was held Wednesday at Battle Grove

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 23 February 1889

Volume 2, Number 26

Page 4, Column 2

Neighborhood News

TRICUM

Born - On the 18th inst to the wife of A. J. Tucker, a girl

Died - Mrs. Jennie Kendal and little babe, wife and child of Mr. Pat Kendal, brother of the Deputy Sheriff. W. A. Kendal.  Mrs. Kendal was a most estimable lady, and a member of the Mt. Zion Methodist Church.  She was buried near Mt. Zion.

RUDDELL'S MILLS

Mr. J. L. Harper killed seven wild ducks out of a flock of eight at one shot.
Mr. G. A. Harper, of Winchester, made a business trip to our neighborhood this week
Miss Lizzie Collins, of Paris, visited friends and relatives in the neighborhood a few days the past week.
Mrs. Vine Wills, of Columbus, IN and Mrs. Iva Milam, of Birmingham, AL, were in atttendance at their father's funeral Monday

Died - After a brief illness from pneumonia, Mr. Paris Howard, a highly respected citizen of this place, on Saturday last, aged about 70 years.  Ten children survive, his wife and a son having died within the past five months.  He belongs to the Howard Family of Kentucky, note for their great height - the highest being 6 feet 11 inches - average height upwards of 6 feet.  He was member of the Christian Church for 35 years and an honest upright man, and will be sadly missed by all.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 2 March, 1889

Volume 2, Number 27

Page 1, Column 2

Assassinated

On Saturday night a atrocious murder occurred on Main Street in Paris, when Jas.. Abnee assassinated by Pat Hunt.  Abnee was the chief witness in the case of Hunt's wife accused of the murder of Rick Thomas several years ago wen Hunt's wife was sent to the penitentiary.

The following is a report of the coroner's jury.  We, the jury, find that the dead body now before us, is that of James Abnee, of Bourbon County, KY, who came to his death from the effect of a gun-shot wound through the chest, on the night of February 24th 1889.  The said wound being caused from a pistol in the hands of Pat Hunt, further, that we believe it to be a cold-blooded and unprovoked assassination from testimony before us.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 2 March, 1889

Volume 2, Number 27

Page 1, Column 3

Born:

To wife of Horace Collins, of Paris (Flora Tucker) a son.
To wife of Jas. Desha, on 22and, a son.

Matrimonial:

Mis Maggie Gehr, of Berry, and Frank Fisher, of Lenoxburg, were married last week
On March 12th, Miss Emma Hutton, of Berry, and E. W. Clifford, assistant postmaster of this city, will be married.
At Christ Church, Lexington, Wednesday, at 3:30 p.m., Harry R. Whittmore and Miss Lucile Lindner, the sweet singer, were wed.
At the residence of R. J. Rees, Mr. Geo. Wilson to Miss anna Mullens, Rev. Benton officiating, on the 24th.  Attendants – L. M. Florence and Miss E. A. McCauley.
On Wednesday evening, in Clinton, MO, Miss Emma Barker, of that city, and Mr. Clif S. Lydick, of this place. The courtship of this couple was created while the bride was visiting here last summer. Clif. is proprietor of the Walnut street Livery stable and is worthy of the lovely prize he has won. On Wednesday, Feb.20th. At 2 p.m. at the residence of the bride’s parents near Old Union, by Elder Mark Collins, Mr. W. T. Willmoth to Miss Lou W. Boone. The groom is the most prosperous young farmer, and the bride a lovely and highly esteemed young lady, being the daughter of Mr. Noah Boone, Sr. After the ceremony the bridal pair left for Niantic, IL, to visit Mrs. Laura Jackson, sister of bride. At the Episcopal church, Wednesday, Miss Bessie, daughter of Capt. J. N. Frazer, to Mr. John Garnett; Rev. Weeks officiating. The bride is indeed one of the most beautiful young ladies of the Blue Grass, and is as popular as she is pretty and attractive. Her mother was a Keller, being the sister of Mrs. Luther VanHook and D. A. Given’s first wife. Mr. Garnett is a son of Wm. Garnett, brother of Sheriff Larkin and T. A. Garnett, who are sons of the late Col. Tom Garnett. The families of the bride and groom are distantly related. Mr. Garnett and bride have taken their residence on the farm of F. S. Ashbrook which he has leased a few miles from town. May their life be as happy as a rose is fragrant, and may nothing but the blessing of God be with them. The Courier joins with the hundreds of friends.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 2 March, 1889

Volume 2, Number 27

Page 1, Column 4

PENDLETON'S SOLDIERS

The following communication in regard to the drafting of soldiers from Pendleton County during the late war, will be ready with much interest by those therewith connected:
Cynthiana, KY, February 16th, 1889
John H. Marshall

Boyd, KY
Dear Sir:
In reply to your letter of 13th inst to say you and other citizens of Pendelton County, Kentucky were drafted under the calls of the President made February 1st and March 14th, 1864.  No draft was made under the call of December 19th, 1864.

J. S. Nixon, as receiver of commutation money under the act of March 3, 1864 and the amendments there to on February 24th, 1864, after receiving $300 from each drafted man gave you exemption papers signed by Henry A. Mitchell, Acting Provos Marshall and President of Board of Enrollment, E. W. Hawkins, Member and E. P. Buckner, Surgeon.

J. S. Nixon filed all the claims in the War Department, 67 in number, under the Act February 28, 1867, to recover the money because of the fact you had been illegally drafted, Pendelton County not being liable to draft, having furnish the quota.  These claims were referred to Capt. Geo. E. Scott, in Charge of enrolling branch A.  G. O.  He held the claims did not come under the law.  But when he examined them he found that they were just, and had them properly filed and registered in view of the passage of an amendment to the act of February 8, 1867, to pay them.

On Nat 5th, 1884, Mr. Clay introduced H. R. Bill 6888, for the relief of certain drafted men of Pendleton County, KY (48th Congress, 1st Session).  That bill went to the Committee on War Claims, which referred these claims to the United States Court of Claims, under the act of March 3rd, 1883.  That court on May 1st, 1886, rendered opinion in your congressional cast No. 106 and other drafted men of Pendleton County, KY dismissing them for want of justification.  The papers in these cases are now in Clerk's room in House of Representatives, where your representative, Hon. John G. Carlisle can at any time see them.

The style of the case in Court:
Court of Claims
Congressional Case No. 106
John H. Marshall and others, drafted men of Pendelton County, Kentucky

VS

The United States
J. Scofield delivered the opinion of the Court:

I hereby return Mr. Carlisle' letter.
Truly yours,
W. S. Haviland
Washington, D. C. , February 22, 1889

Jno.. H. Marshall, Boyd, Kentucky

Dear Sir - I herewith return the letter of Mr. Haviland

The papers were found in the Clerk's Office.  The claims were dismissed by the Court at Mr. Haviland states, and the War Department has come to the conclusion that the draft was properly name, which precludes a successful prosecution of the claims. Nothing further can be done.

Very respectfully,

J. G. Carlisle

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 2 March, 1889

Volume 2, Number 27

Page 1, Column 5

HORRIBLE HYDROPHOBIA
Dr. Jas. Smiser, the Physician, in a Precarious Condition

Our city is a present excited over a case of apparent hydrophobia, and the excitement is all the more intense over the fact that it is a physician and a man of wide reputation - Dr. Jas.. H. Smiser.

About a month ago a horse belonging Mr. A. Calhoun, residing on Leesburg Pike, was attacked with a malady of some sort, but which afterward developed in hydrophia.  Dr. Smiser was summoned to aid the animal's suffering.  He responded and while in the act of applying medicine the horse crushed the bottle, which the doctor held in his hand and a piece of the glass scratched the right hand of the Doctor.  Into this wound some salva from the horse's mouth dropped. Carelessly wiping it off, the Doctor paid no more attention to it.  The animal failed to recover and died in a few days.

Nothing more was thought of the matter until Wednesday, when the Doctor complained of some very peculiar symptoms, similar to those of approaching hydrophobia.  The recollection of attending the diseased horse then came to minds of his family and the worst of fears where realized.  The suffering of acute pain continued until Thursday, when the shock became greater and the Doctor was attacked with several spasms.  At the hour of going to press he was resting east and some better, but a constant watch is entertained, and every one hopes for the best.  A mad-stone was procured yesterday and successfully applied to the wound.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 2 March, 1889

Volume 2, Number 27

Page 1, Column 6

ROME'S RUNAWAY

Matrimonial Mischief Makes much Merriment

When pure love seeks to outdo its objectors you can always count on love being victorious.  An example of true loyalty occurred in this city Wednesday, when Mr. Rome and Miss Petty, of Tricum, eloped to Cincinnati and were married.  The engagement was strenuously objected to by the bride's parents, but it was to no avail.

The groom came to town Monday morning and went to the dress making establishment of Mrs. Redmon, on Pike Street, where left orders for a dress for his bride, to be made by Wednesday.  On the day mentioned the groom and bride came, having escaped the vigilance of relatives, and repaired to Mrs. Redmon's establishment, where the bride could arrange her new toilet.  It was then after 7 p.m.  After due preparation the pair sent a sentinel to the front door to see if the coast was clear, when, lo and behold, there appeared two big strapping brothers of the bride, demanding their sister. Locking the door the sentinel returned and reported the facts as they stood.  The situation was alarming, and after a careful meditation it was resolved to escape by the back way.  A step ladder was procured and the bride and groom  managed to get over a half dozen fences and reach Walnut Street.  They then walked to Poindexter station, a distance of 4 miles, on the K. C. where they remained until the next morning, when the boarded the North bound train for Cincinnati and were duly married.  The anxious brothers stood guard until three o'clock and finally abandoned the matter after a renewed search the next day.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 2 March, 1889

Volume 2, Number 27

Page 4, Column 1

Neighborhood News

RUDDELL'S MILLS

Miss Stella Pugh opened school at Shawhan Monday

Born - To wife of George McDonald, on Saturday, a son, Weight 11 pounds

Messers:  John Newman and John Harper have been visiting in Clark and Fayette the past week.  John Newman went to bid his friends good-bye before taking his departure to Kansas.

LEESBURG

Miss Annie Bradford and Dave Wallace eloped and married
Joe Evans had a ewe that cared for two lambs a week and then gave birth to two more

CONNERSVILLE

Married - On the 13th, Frank Swinford and Miss Myra Crosthwait, of near Boyers Chapel, Rev,. W. W. Chamberlain
It has been remarked that the beautiful, accomplished and facetious assistant "postmistress" at Leeslick, "May" soon possess a Ball(inger) or a Mill(ner), but in either event she "Will" en-Bark(ley) upon matrimonial sea.  Tra la la

BERRY

Mrs. Wesley Howard, deputy county clerk, and one of our oldest citizens died on the 26th after an illness of but a few days

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 2 March, 1889

Volume 2, Number 27

Page 4, Column 3

POST OFFICES ROBBED

The post office at Shady Nook, Joe Scott, postmaster was robbed Tuesday night.  Five dollars in money and several articles from the store were taken. Bout two weeks ago the office at Brunker's store, Colville, was robbed of a small amount.  A month ago the office at Headquarters was robbed.  It seems as if the thief was intent on cleaning out every office in that part of the county.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 9 March, 1889

Volume 2, Number 28

Page 1, Column 2

Marriage Licenses:

J. H. Turner to Mrs. Susan Miller
Wm. W. Rutledge to Mrs. Louise Durbin
J. S. Bothman to Eliza Shumate

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 9 March, 1889

Volume 2, Number 28

Page 1, Column 3

Rev. Julius E. Wright and his beautiful bride were greeted at our depot yesterday.  They were en route to Cynthiana, where he will conduct a protracted meeting for Bro. Cooper, of the Methodist Church. Mrs. Wright's father was one of the Polish patriots exiled when his country was dismembered in 1830.  "How could she change the musical name of Browmski even to be Wright. Love did it", Paris Kentuckian.

A Bride's Good Sense

Last Monday evening Miss Sarah O. McNees, of Berry, accompanied by a lady friend, came to town for the purpose of meeting her lover, Milton K. Million, and be married.  The two ladies repaired to the Robert's House while Million announced his intention of going after the license and preacher. Securing the license, he proceeded to telegraph Rev. J. R. Barbee, who was in Falmouth to come up on the 5:30 train and tie the nuptial know.  Million the proceeded to the elsewhere and got gloriously drunk.  beastly so.  In due time the reverend gentleman arrived, the bride was ready and everything was ready and every detail completed, but no groom was on hand.  A diligent search found that worthy in the above described condition.  When brought before the lady he had so wrongfully treated, he tried to conciliate matters, and desired that the ceremony proceed.  With true womanly grace, the intelligent bride, emphatically refused and left on the morning train for her home a sader woman for having loved to well, but not wisely. The groom when last heard from had sobered and was very sorry for his conduct.

MATRIMONIAL

Thursday, March the 7th at the residence of Rev. J. R. Barbee, Mr. George E. Dowd to Miss Fannie Cobb, both of Harrison County.  Ceremony by Rev. J. R. Barbee

The marriage of Mr. Ed W. Clifford and Miss Emma Hutton, will be consummated at the residence of the bride's parents at Berry next Tuesday, March 12.

The Riverside (Cal) Press says:  "Within the past few months, Mr. A. Martin had built a very neat, convenient residence on Chestnut Street between Eight and Ninth, which caused suspicions to arise in the minds of some of his intimate friends, as to what his future intentions were, and it was not until last Saturday, when he donned a new silk tie, and left for San Diego that it dawned upon their minds that he intended to take unto himself a better half.  Although the announcements in the press yesterday of Mrs. Lida Bowman, of Chula Vista, on Sunday was a surprise many of his acquaintances, some of their intimate friends who were aware that the newly married couple would arrive in this city on the 7:29 motor last evening, arranged to give them a pleasant surprise in their new home.  About sixty of their neighbors and friends gathered at the residence at 7 o'clock and with the lights all in the rear of the house awaited in darkness the arrival of the bride and groom. To say that they were completely surprised to find their home occupied by such a company of jolly people is putting it mildly.  When the lights were brought into the parlor and sitting room the happy pair were overwhelmed with congratulations.  The evening was passed very pleasantly in social converse and the partaking of refreshments, which had been provided by the ladies.  Altogether it was a decidedly enjoyable occasion.

Mrs. Bowman is the youngest sister of Mrs. A. H. Ward of this city, and her many friends unite in wishing her success on her matrimonial sea voyage.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 9 March, 1889

Volume 2, Number 28

Page 1, Column 4

An old colored man named Alexander, was found dead near Shady Nook. His head was bruised in and he is believed to have been murdered.

A certain Roman-nosed individual living near Connersville, is very anxious to marry.  In fact nearly crazy.  He came to town the other day to purchase some goods, and while the lady clerk was awaiting his orders, he proposed to her, but was flatly refused.  A few days previous he had sent a card, desiring to call on one of the wealthiest ladies in town, but had been refused.  Not discouraged, he is continuing his pursuit, and we trust some day may be happy in possession.  Any young lady desiring connubial felicity, can be directed to the gentlemen's address by calling this office.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 9 March, 1889

Volume 2, Number 28

Page 1, Column 5

Neighborhood News

RENAKER

James Garnett, a grandson of widow Kimball, and step-son of the late Louis Furnish, died Friday evening and was buried Saturday, at the family burying ground.

RUDDELL'S MILLS

There is not a vacant house in town.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 16 March, 1889

Volume 2, Number 29

Page 1, Column 1

At a Reunion of Confederate Cavalry Association in New Orleans, the other day proceedings were all suspended at the arrival of Miss Winnie Davis, so great was the enthusiasm.  The veterans formed a line and filed by the charming daughter of their Chief, each with a hearty smile and shake of the hand.

Died:

On the 11th inst Mrs. Jennie Champ, wife of Bruce Champ, editor of the Bourbon News.  The entire press of Kentucky sympathizes, with Mr. Champ and family their bereavement.

Mrs. Alice Edwards, of pneumonia, at her home near Poindexter

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 16 March, 1889

Volume 2, Number 29

Page 1, Column 2

Miss Mattie Todd, Postmistress had received a box of remarkably rare oranges from her uncle, Dr. White, whose deceased wife was Miss Mattie Todd, half-sister of Mrs. President Lincoln.  The consignment read "From C. R. White, of Anita Grove, Daytona, Florida"  Among them are Hemosassas, Tangarien and Kidgrove, King of Siam, Naval and Maltese of spoon orange.

Matrimonial

Thursday evening, March 145h, at Claysvill, KY, by the Rev. J. R. Barbee, Mr. Henry L. Fletcher to Miss Maggie Jackson, both of Harrison County.

Marriage license granted to:
Hubbard Wallingford and W. Kinney
Walker Dunn and Mary Ellen Whalin
James Jones and Anna L. Florence
George E. Dowd and Fannie Cobb
W. Rutledge and Laura T. Dulin

At the Eight Street Christian Parsonage, Cincinnati, OH, by the Rev. Tyler, Edward W. Clifford, the handsome and accommodating post office clerk of this place, and Miss Emma Hutton, the beautiful and accomplished daughter of T. J. Hutton, of Berry, KY.  The happy couple arrived home Tuesday night on the fast line. They will go to housekeeping at his home on Pleasant Street.  They were tendered quite a nice serenade by the serenaders of Wilson 7 Company Minstrels. May they live long happy and prosperous is the wish of the Courier.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 16 March, 1889

Volume 2, Number 29

Page 4, Column 1

BERRY

E. W. Clifford, of Cynthiana, and Miss Emma Hutton, on of our most lovely young ladies were married in Cincinnati, on last Thursday, the 12th:

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 23 March, 1889

Volume 2, Number 30

Page 1, Column 2

Born:

At Chicago, to the wife of Geo. Baker, a daughter, weighing 6 1/2 pounds and astonished all by exhibiting a mouthful of teeth.

Matrimonial

T. Earle Ashbrook, of Paris, son of Mrs. Artie Ashbrook of this city and Miss Jennie Withers, daughter of Gen. W. T. Withers, of Lexington, will be married on Wednesday, April 10th.
A. G. Roper, the grocer, of this city and Miss Flora Neppe, of Brooksville, will be married April 3rd.
A young lady living on Wilson Avenue and a widower of this city, will be married shortly.
Jas.. T. Cannon and Miss Belle Durant, both of Boyd's Station, will be married on 3rd April. The bride is the daughter of G. B. Durant and the groom is one of the most popular and industrious young merchants in the county.

We clip the following from the Cincinnati Enquirer of the 17th inst.

"Mr. Fred Bardes and Miss Julia Hoesli were married last Thursday evening, at the residence of Mr. Christian Bardes, 424 Hawthorn Street. Rev. H. G. Isenlohr performed the ceremony.  After the marriage the bride and from and all the guest went to Washington Hall, where a supper was served, and then dancing was enjoyed until early morning hours.  The bride is the charming young woman and a favorite among her acquaintances.  The groom was formerly a clerk in Probate Court.  He resigned that position and went to Sioux City, Iowa, where he is engaged in the wholesale saddle and harness business.  The couple, accompanied by the mother of the bride, leave tomorrow for their western home."

Mrs. Bardes is the daughter of the late Jost. Hoesli, the tinnier, and formerly of this city.  She has many friends here who will unite in wishing the happy couple all of lifes successes.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 23 March, 1889

Volume 2, Number 30

Page 1, Column 5

Neighboring Counties

Clark County

Died - Benjamin G. Prewitt, Aged 23

Fayette County

Wm. Allen, negro men who was struck on head with an ax by Wm. Dougherty, died Friday night

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 23 March, 1889

Volume 2, Number 30

Page 4 Column 2

Neighborhood News

TRICUM

Born - to wife of James Slade, on the sixth, a boy

Died - Saturday, March 9th, Miss Alice, daughter of Dick Edwards, aged about 18 years, deceased was a member of the Christian Church at Unity, was a clever, kind young lady, and had many friends.  Her death will be sadly deplored.

RUDDELL'S MILLS

There will be a wedding at the county courthouse in May of paupers.  It will be the lady's second venture since an inmate

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 23 March, 1889

Volume 2, Number 30

Page 1, Column 5

LAIR

Mr. Hunt Laycock has moved into Uncle John Rohr's house

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 30 March, 1889

Volume 2, Number 31

Page 1, Column 2

Died

The Funeral of Wesley Howard, will be preached at the Robertson Station Christian Church, on Sunday, March 31st, at 11 a.m. by Rev. S. J. Burgess. Masonic ceremonies are the grave.

Mrs. Nannie J. Kenney, wife of Dr. Wm. Kenney, died Saturday night at 9 o’clock, at the Central Hotel, in the 59th years of her age. Mrs. Kenney was stricken with paralysis early in the winter, but was up and down at different times, and only the Sunday before her death, was able to ride out to the cemetery, and go down into the dining room for her meals. She was a generous, Christian Lady, and spent the last few years of her life in pleasurable task of trying to alleviate the suffering of others in her quiet and unobtrusive way. Her charities were many, and of the bible character – not given for self-glorification, or even known of man. Bourbon News

On Sunday last, the infant son of Lafayette Endicutt, aged about 18 months. A coincident in the death of this child was in the fact that Mr. Endicutt was going to inform his brother of the sad occurrence, he was me by the latter on an errand of same kind, his daughter having died on the same day.

Matrimonial

The following has been received:
Mr. & Mrs. G. B. Durant invite you to be present at the marriage of their daughter, Isabel to James T. Cannon, Wednesday Morning, April third, at ten o'clock.

Boyd, KY - 1889
The marriage of Mr. Earl Ashbrook of Cynthiana, to Miss Jennie Withers, of this city, is already announced in fashionable circles to take place somewhere near the first of April. The marriage will be solemnized in the lad of orange blossoms, where the bride’s father has a winter residence. After marriage the couple will go to Mr. Ashbrook’s home, which will then be in Paris, KY to live. Mr. Ashbrook is a young man whose circle of acquaintance in this city is large. He is graduate of Kentucky University. Miss Jennie Withers is the daughter of Gen. W. T. Withers, of this city. She is a blue-eyed blonde of the purest type, and her manners is as her beauty mild and pleasing. Miss Withers is now having an elegant trousseau made in this city. Lexington Leader

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 30 March, 1889

Volume 2, Number 31

Page 1, Column 5

Annual Report of the Treasurer of the City of Cynthiana for the year ending March 1889

Receipts - $6,456.93
Disbursements - $5,252.61
Balance - $1,204.32

Notes dh.

The balance on 2 April 1888 had been $731.52

The major receipts were:

City taxes - $2,102.00
Poll taxes - $1,184.00
Saloons & Hotels - $1,556.33

Major expenses were:

Hoses and repairs - $541.26
T. J. Whitaker, Salary as Engineer and Lamp Lighter - $760
Jno.. G. Montgomery, Note and interest - $428
J. W. Renaker, City Treasurer Salary - $150
Work on Streets - $190.42

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 30 March, 1889

Volume 2, Number 31

Page 4, Column 2

Neighborhood News

RENAKER

Jas.. Tippett, one of our oldest citizens, died Sunday eve.  His funeral was preached by Revs. Redd and Chamberlain, at Mt. Zion Church.  Burial by the Masonic fraternity, T. W. Hardy officer and Tom Robison Marshall of the Day.

RUDDELL'S MILLS

Miss Lucy Harper is visiting Mrs. Sallie Cunningham, of Shawhan has been quite sick
Mrs. Nath Goodman and Mrs. Jas.. Bramlette are visiting in Harrison County
Mrs. Nan Kendall, of Lair, and Miss Lulu Whitaker, of Oddville, were guest of Nathan Goodman's family last week
Frank Johnson, of Bracken County, was up to see Uncle Willis Collins on business last week.  He married one of the Willett heirs, for which Uncle Willis is guardian.

TRICUM

Born - to wife of Robert Berry (nee Renaker) a boy
The many friends of Dave F. Lemons were much grieved to hear of his death.  He was for many years an influential citizen, but for may years he has been troubled with severe attacks of fits.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 6 April, 1889

Volume 2, Number 32

Page 1, Column 1

Wreck on the K. C.

Wednesday night as the south bound freight entered the cut at Shawhan Station, a misplaced frog threw eleven cars from the track, tearing up the railing and doing some damage before the engine could be stopped, Henry Lair, a negro living in Cynthiana, was caught between cars and crushed to death.  The accident delayed the Thursday morning trains several hours.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 6 April, 1889

Volume 2, Number 32

Page 1, Column 2

Died:

Victor Burk, eldest son of Marie Prescott, the actress, died at Orlando, Fl, Sunday
Mrs. Fowler, mother of Chas. Fowler, died near Oddville, Sunday
At Colville, this county, Mrs. Mary Evans, in the 44th years of her age.  Her death was the result of an operation for cancer two weeks previous

Born:

To the wife of Ben Atkison, on the 31st, a son, 5th boy

Matrimonial

On Wednesday at the residence of C. Moore, Miss Neppie Flore, of Bracken County to Albert G. Roper, of this city.  The groom is a widower with three children.  The couple took a trip to Cincinnati and returned home Friday morning. They will go to housekeeping in the Robitzer property on Main Street
Jerry Entherbus, and Miss Maggie Webber, of Benson neighborhood, were married at the Whitaker House, on Tuesday afternoon, by Rev. J. R. Barbee
The wedding we looked for never came.

The following has been received:

Mr. & Mrs. W. T. Withers announce the marriage of their daughter, Jennie Allan to T. Earl Ashbrook Wednesday, April tenth, 1889 at home after
April twentieth, Paris, Kentucky

At the residence of the bride’s father, G. B. Durant, at Boyd’s, Wednesday morning at 10:30, Miss Belle Durant was united in marriage to Mr. Jas.. T. Cannon. The bride is a pretty brunette of twenty-two and the groom is a man in the prime of life and a son of the late Dr. Cannon. Both are handsome and intelligent and popular. They left on the 11 o’clock train for a visit to Lexington, Louisville and Cincinnati, returning will go to house keeping at Boyd’s, where Mr. Cannon is engaged in merchandising. The Courier extends its heartiest congratulations, and wishes them a long and happy life.

On Wednesday afternoon, Miss Lou Hamilton, to Mr. Phil. Tebbs, at the residence of the bride’s sister, Mrs. Taylor Collins. The couple accompanied by attendants, Holt Smith and Miss Kate Whaley, left on the 5 o'clock train for Lexington, and then to Bloomington, Indiana, to visit the bride’s relatives. The wedding was attended by a large concourse of friends, and many handsome and costly presents were bestowed.

Mr. Robert Black, the widely-known railroad engineer, who escaped so narrowly in the accident on the K. C. R. R. near Paris, KY, some months ago, was married Thursday evening, March 28th at 8:30 o'clock, to Mrs. Sadie B. Horsfall, of Covington, KY. After the ceremony by Rev. Those. F. Garrett, of Shinkle Chapel, refreshments and social intercourse were enjoyed, and Mr. & Mrs. Black were driven to their home on Sixteenth Street near Madison Avenue.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 6 April, 1889

Volume 2, Number 32

Page 3, Column 1

Neighborhood News

Ruddell’s Mills

Joseph Freinds, a veteran of the war of 1812, died at the Poorhouse, aged 102. He was one of the party who helped to tie the rope to hang Mapes and Crouche, who tried to kill Utterback on Dry Ridge, Grant county in 1845.

Connersville

A very pretty and quiet little wedding occurred near here, on Wednesday afternoon of last week, the contracting parties being James W. Renaker, aged 21 years, and Miss Liema Fight, aged 19 years. Elder J. G. Walden, of Cynthiana, performed the ceremony. The young couple will go to housekeeping at the home of the groom’s father, Geo. Renaker, St. with the best wishes of a host of friends for a happy, prosperous and useful life.A Prohib.

Tricum

Born– To the wife of Esq. E. F. Mason, a daughter.

Capt. Frank Adams’ remains will be removed from the vault at Battle Grove Sunday next and buried here in the Lemon Cemetery.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 13 April, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 33

Page 3, Column 1

Matrimonial

Mr. Orville L. Talbott, and Miss Ida Tebbs of Harrison, are to be married on the 23rd inst.

Covington society was probably startled by the departure of Mr. Joel Baker, who left Thursday for New York, and upon arrival sailed immediately for London, England, where he will meet his affiances, Miss Helen Trimble of Covington, and they will be married in London on or about the 15th inst. Miss Trimble, who is one of Kentucky’s most fascinating young ladies, has been traveling in Europe for the past year with her mother and sister, Mrs. De Roode. At a recent reception in Europe the gorgeous dresses of Miss Trimble and her sister were the talk of all London society. Mr. Baker is the son of ex-Mayor Baker, of Covington, and a brilliant and promising young lawyer having completed his legal studies with the firm of Jordon and Jordon in that city. Leaving his firm, he established himself with Mr. H. L. Brown, and he has met with success. He is prominent as a politician and an eloquent and forcible speaker. The Jefferson Club, of Covington, of which he is secretary, will tender him a reception on his return home.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 20 April, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 33

Page 1, Column 1

John Hardin, who shot Lew Wedden with intent to kill, at Falmouth a few months ago, in a saloon brawl over a bucket of beer, has been captured at Birmingham and returned to Falmouth. There was a reward of $200 offered for him. S. E. Voglesong was the man who captured Hardin.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 20 April, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 34

Page 1, Column 2

It is reported that Senator Beck, of Kentucky, will soon take unto himself another wife. The lady is Miss Margaret Cameron, at present a clerk in the Quartermaster General’s office. She is a handsome brunette with a well rounded figure and pleasing manners. Miss Cameron is well-known on the concert stage as a singer of Scottish songs and has traveled extensively both in this country and in Europe. It is understood that the date of the wedding has not been fixed.

President Harrison has issued a proclamation recommending that on Tuesday, April 30, at 9 o’clock in the morning, the people of the entire country repair to the places of divine worship for prayer. April 30th, the centennial of the inauguration of George Washington, has been set apart as a national holiday.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 20 April, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 34

Page 1, Column 3

Died:

Suddenly, Wednesday, Leon Cuson, of Covington, died about 60 years. The deceased’s parents lived in Canada, but in early life he settled at Cynthiana as salesman in McIntosh’s store and afterwards became a merchant himself, but failed in business. He married a Miss Garnett, who survives him with several children. Mrs. Harry Johns of Lexington, Mrs. Cuson’s sisters, passed here Tuesday, en route to the funeral.

Mr. Cuson was the superintendent of Weatherby, Stevens and Co.’s store, on Fourth near Race streets and had just come to begin the duties of the day when death came like a lightning stroke. When he entered the store he was apparently as well as he had ever been. Five minutes afterward he entered a closet in the rear of the establishment. Scarcely a moment elapsed before he came tottering out and fell to the floor, dying almost instantly. The physician who was called pronounced it a case of heart disease. The body was removed to the family residence, No. 112 Scott Street, Covington, KY. Mr. Cuson was sixty years of age and had been associated with Mr. Weatherby for nearly a quarter of a century. He was the second sudden death that has occurred during the past six months, a brother of the proprietor, Mr. Phillip Weatherby, being stricken down by heart disease last fall.

Joe Lee Conrad died at his home in Connersville, Monday night, of brain fever. He was young man, highly respected by all who knew him.

On Tuesday, at her home in Baltzelle town, Mrs. Ruth Renaker, wife of John D. Renaker. Burial took place Wednesday evening at Republican Church

MILFORD'S MISFORTUNE 

The most destructive fire that ever occurred in this section of the state occurred at Milford, fourteen miles north of Cynthiana, on Saturday. The following persons had their property destroyed.

Sam Conley, residence, valued at $2,000; school house, $1,750; Masonic Hall, A. Brough, Residence, $1,600; Hamilton & Kenton, mill store, $4,000; John Coleman, residence, $900; Moore & Jett, drug store, $3,000; Brown & Duncan, grocery, $2,000; A. J. & J. M. Duncan wagon shop, $900; Ogden & Duncan warehouse, $4,000; Marsh estate warehouse, $1,200; Marsh estate, store room, $1,100; John Maun, two residences, valued at $1,800; Mrs. O’Brien, residence, $800; Wm. Hamilton, Residence $900; Jas.. P. Culp, Residence, $1,400; J. M. Browning, store and warehouse, $2,500; W. G. Cooper, (Brother of Rev. D. B. Cooper, of this city.) hotel and contents, $3,000; Mrs. Routt, residence, $500; Church valued at $1,750; A. P. Brown, residence $1,800; Odgen & Duncan, large brick store and contents, $40,000; county bridge, $7,000. The citizens of the town are left almost penniless and there is great suffering for food, shelter and clothing. The City Council of Augusta and the citizens of the place are raising a fund to help supply the stricken people.

Dr. Nim Moore, one of the leading citizens of the place, estimates the entire loss at fully $100,000.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 20 April, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 34

Page 1, Column 6

Neighborhood News

RUDDLE'S MILLS

Eld. O. P. Wallingford, of Milford, preached at the Christian Church Sunday. Everyone was very favorably impressed and he will preach again the third Sunday in May. He reports that every house but two burned there last Thursday.

The Oklahoma fever is raging. Several of our best citizens leave this week to locate. Among them are Dr. Keller, Alex. Keller, Nath Goodman and Clay Bowen. They will be joining a party from Washington in Cincinnati that are going there for the purpose of building up a city.

LEESBURG

Born–to the wife of T. J. Shropshire and Sidney L. Warth, each a son.

CONNERSVILLE

Born–On the 11th inst. to the wife of Geo. W. Goodnight, a girl. Dr. A. Conner, accoucher.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 27 April, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 35

Page 1, Column 3

Died:

Mrs. Malvina Hamilton died at Warsaw, KY. She was born near Cynthiana Nov. 16, 1816; married Larkin Marsh in 1833. After death of her husband she married Joel Hamilton, who died about 15 years ago.

Matrimonial

In Harrison County, Tuesday, by Rev. J. R. Barbee, Wallace Stewart of Moorefield to Miss Effie Johnson, daughter of E. Johnson. Attendants – Mr. Johnson, cousin of bride, and Miss Lida Lewis.

James R. McChesney, of Paris, will wed Monday next, Miss Robb, at McAfee.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 27 April, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 35

Page 1, Column 5

Neighborhood News

STRAIGHT ELM

Died– At the residence of her father, Mr. Leonard Florence, on Sunday evening last, Miss Jennette Florence, aged about seventeen years. She was a devoted member of the Christian Church at Republican, where her remains were laid to rest.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 27 April, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 35

Page 1, Column 6

Neighborhood News

RUDDLE'S MILLS

Born – On the 15th, to wife of John Smith, Twin boys. To wife of John Hanly, a son.
Sam Johnson, colored a first class blacksmith, is employed to work in Mr. Goodman’s shop during his absence.
Mr. G. A. Harper, Mrs. Ida Vice and Miss Myrtie Harrison of Winchester, spent a few days at Harper Bros. Last week. They were called home on account of the illness of Mrs. Power, Mr. Harper’s partner.
Dr. Keller, Nathan Goodman, Alex Keller and Mr. Snapp left Thursday for Oklahoma. Messers. Alex. Keller and Snapp returned Saturday, the Washington party failed to meet them. Dr. Keller and Mr. Goodman will make the trip.

LEESBURG

Died – On the farm of A. J. Morey, Henrietta Allen, a worthy colored woman, a former slave of the late Isaac Shuff. She had the confidence of all who knew her, and was an excellent nurse in sickness.
Mrs. Devers, who moved here about two weeks ago with her son-in-law, Rev. J. H. Walker, died on Saturday last. Her funeral was preached by Rev. W. W. Chamberlain and her remains were interred in Cynthiana.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 4 May, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 36

Page 1, Column 1

Born:

To wife of Geo. Tucker, twin boys
To wife of John L. Waits, twins, boy and girl.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 4 May, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 36

Page 1, Column 2

Mad Dog

A rabid dog went through the northern portion of the suburbs Wednesday night and bit three fine dogs belonging to Fred Reynolds, several belonging to W. T. Handy, and a number of calves belonging to Lewis Lebus. The animal was traced up and killed by Pres. Karrick Thursday morning. All the animals that were bitten will be killed.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 4 May, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 36

Page 1, Column 3

Matrimonial

Jas.. R. McChesney, of Paris, and Miss Mary Lyon Robb, of McAfee, Mercer County, were married by Rev. Mr. Dawes, of Louisville, at the residence of the bride’s father, Mr. Jonas Robb, on Monday last. The ceremony was very impressive.
Miss Robb is an accomplished and charming young lady, and in wining her Mach has won a rare prize. The groom is a well-known young man in Paris, but for the past two years had been on the surveying corps of the Louisville Southern Railroad., and is now stationed at Fort Springs, Fayette county. The bridal presents were valuable and tasteful, from friends in Bourbon, Mercer, Franklin, Fayette and Harrison counties, and from Virginia and Pennsylvania. The railroad officials made him a most elegant present.
Mr. McChesney is a nephew of Mrs. J. S. Withers and Mrs.Dedman, of this city.

In Lexington, Thursday night, April 25th, at the residence of the bride’s father, Rev. John R. Derring, Virgil McClure and Miss Annie Deering, the ceremony being very impressive performed by the bride’s father.

It was a very pretty, though quiet affair, only a few friends being present. The bride was attired in a very stylish street dress of grey cloth, and looked her fairest. The groom is a popular book -keeper of the Transylvania Printing Company. 

The following has been received:

Mr. & Mrs. J. W. Martin invite you to the marriage of their daughter, Addie, to Mr. G. T. Northcutt, at their residence, Wednesday afternoon, May 8th, at 3 o’clock. Cynthiana, Kentucky 1889
Miss Ella, daughter of W. C. P. Breckenridge, is to be married in June to a Mr. Chalkley, of Richmond, VA. After the marriage they will go to Portland, Oregon, which place they will make their future home.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 4 May, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 36

Page 1, Column 4

Fatal Accident

Frank Millinery, of Boston, Mass, a brakeman on the Kentucky Central, met with a horrible and fatal accident here yesterday morning. He was braking on freight No. 26. And in swinging his lantern the light was extinguished, but nothing daunted he went forward to do some coupling. Darkness caused a misstep, he lost his balance and fell directly under the cars, several of which passed over his body and arms. He died about 9 o’clock.

In Memoriam

Departed this life, on the 15th J. L. Conrad, a young man of sterling qualities, and a son of the late Joseph Conrad. He was well known throughout the county and also has many fiends in Kansas who will be shocked to hear of his untimely demise.
In company with his brother, Ben, he in September 1886, left here on a prospecting trip out West, from where he returned the following year and has since superintended his mother’s farm near this place.
He was stricken with fever in February, but after a few days’ confinement was able to be out again. His final illness was inflammation of the brain, which after five days of intense suffering, proved fatal, and Joe, who only a few weeks ago was buoyant with life, departed from his earthly friends forever.

Joe, our own dear friend, gone; To him a crown is given; He leaves dear ones at home; To take a seat in heaven; He passed the dangers of the Western plain; Together with a brother, To succumb to inflammation of the brain, in presence of his mother.  Joe, we miss thee sadly, But there is power to console, and this we welcome gladly, while thinking of your deeds of add.  Sleep the sleep that knows no breaking and we only can surmise, that our souls our Savior is taking to be transferred to Paradise.

W. J. G. - Connersville, KY, May 1, 1889

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 4 May, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 36

Page 1, Column 5

Neighborhood News

Straight Elm

Uncle Alex Rector takes the cake. He says he saw a man in Franklin county whose ugliness was so immense that he couldn’t sleep all night without getting up to rest his face.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 11 May, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 37

Page 1, Column 1

Born:
To wife of Chas. B. Haviland, a daughter.
To wife of I. W. McGibben, a son.

At a called meeting of the Board of Curators of Kentucky University, on April 27th, it was decided to admit women students to all the advantages of the institution. The action was result of a petition presented last June by the Equal Rights Association. In response to this a committee was appointed to consider the advisability of opening the University to women.Prof. C. L. Loos, as chairman of that committee, corresponded with authorities of more than twenty of the principal colleges in the United States – Harvard, Boston University, Columbia, Cornell, Ann Arbor, University of Mississippi, etc. and the testimony was so overwhelming in favor of co-education that the resolution to open Kentucky University to women was carried by a unanimous even enthusiastic vote. An immediate appropriation was made for improvements on the college buildings for the comfort of the women students, and steps taken to raise an endowment of $75,000 to strengthen the college. The opening of the University will be announced in the annual calendar, and women invited to avail themselves of its advantages. We hope many parents will take this opportunity to give their sons and daughters a collegiate education side by side. The Equal Rights Association is to be congratulated on the success of this effort to improve the educational advantages of women in our commonwealth. Laura Clay, Lexington, KY

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 11 May, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 37

Page 1, Column 3

Matrominal

Miss Eugenia Frazer, daughter of Col. N. W. Frazer, and Fred R. Broadwell, will be married at the Presbyterian Church, next Thursday, May 16th, at 5 o’clock.

The marriage of Mr. Bernard Stuempel of this city, to Miss Hannah Harrington, of Cynthiana, took place at the Cathedral at eight o’clock this morning.   The bride is a very handsome lady and was elegantly dressed. Mr. Stuempel, brother of the groom and Miss Harrington sister of the bride, were the attendants.  – Covington Commonwealth

The Cincinnati Enquirer of Sunday said: “Mr. Joel Baker, of Covington, has returned from Europe without his bride. It was announced a few weeks ago that the object of his visit was to wed Miss Helen Trimble, daughter of the late Judge W. W. Trimble, of Covington, and a young lady of remarkable beauty. Miss Trimble has recently been presented to the Queen, and her gorgeous dresses were the talk of all London. Her grace and manners fairly captivated the London people, and the announcement of her marriage to Mr. Baker set society ablaze in Covington. Soon after his departure it was alleged that the cable wires were kept hot with telegrams to the family by a brother, and the wedding did not take place over the ocean. It is said the wedding will not occur now until the return of Miss Trimble to this country.The telegrams evidently had something bitter in them, as the father of Mr. Baker says that the wedding will occur in a few days after Miss Trimble returns home. The gossip-mongers in Covington are having fruit for discussion.”

Religious

Here are the latest religious statistics of the United States, prepared by Dr. Dorchester:
Methodist - 4,801.340
Baptist - 4,051.360

Presbyterian - 1,476,961
Lutherans - 1.036,970
Advertises - 134,577

Various Smaller bodies - 1,374,163
Total 13,877,422
The total number of ministers is put down at 90,368

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 11 May, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 37

Page 4, Column 1

Neighborhood News

TRICUM

Died–The little child of James Slade, with whooping cough and fever. Burial at Rocky Springs cemetery.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 11 May, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 37

Page 4, Column 2

Neighborhood News

LEESBURG

Born–to wife of John L. Waits, of Cynthiana, twins, a boy and a girl. Mrs. Waits was formerly Miss Willie Shropshire, of this vicinity.

Neighboring Counties

Clark County

Died – Miss Orella Winn, aged 19 years.
Born – to wife of Wm. G. Powell, a daughter.
Married – Carter Martin and Nannie Owen.

Fayette County

Miss Lydia Blincoe died in Lexington, aged 76 years.
Married – In Lexington, John McFadden and Maime Roche
Luke Lavin, well-known from having been on continued drunk for years, died at St. Joseph’s Hospital.
Ike Nelson, colored, aged 70 years, fond unconscious on street in Lexington, taken to Station House and expired in a few minutes.
Fayette Equal Rights Association return vote of thanks to Curators of Kentucky University for opening the doors to female students.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 18 May, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 38

Page 1, Column 1 

Born:

To wife of J. Tom Martin, on the 11th a daughter.
To wife of W. A. Hill, Jr., a son – Frank Erringer, weight 5 pounds – Bourbon News.

An invitation is extended to all survivors of General John H. Morgan’s command, who were in the Pennsylvania and Ohio Penitentiaries, to meet in Winchester, August 1st. Ex-confederates from this section will join in the meeting and assist in entertaining visiting veterans.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 18 May, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 38

Page 1, Column 2

General News

At Denver, Colorado, Fred Medley shot and killed his wife because she refused to give him money with which to buy beer.
In Cincinnati, Sunday, Moritz I. Blanc shot and seriously wounded his wife and killed himself and daughter.  Jealousy was the cause.

Officer William Doolin shot and killed young William Watson at Woodstock, KY, Monday. Both were members of very prominent families in the county.

Ex-congressman L. K. Bass died in New Your. He was formerly a law partner of Ex-President Cleveland, in Buffalo. He and Mr. Cleveland were warm personal friends but bitter political opponents.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 18 May, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 38

Page 1, Column 3

Killed by Lightning

Ben Hickman, son of Dr. B. C. Hickman, of this city, was killed at Switzer, near Frankfort, on the Kentucky Midland. He was aged about 30 years and married. He was the head book-keeper for a large tobacco firm and was universally popular. 

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 18 May, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 38

Page 1, Column 4

Matrimonial

Geo. Wilson, of Oaklawn, Orange Lake, FL, to Miss Belle Robinson, of Jacksonville, FL. The groom is a son of Mrs. Dr. Maxwell and formerly Mrs. Stewart, Mrs. Wilson, nee West of Carlisle, KY. This is the groom’s third marriage. They are on a European tour.

Mr. Wilson’s second wife will be remembered was Miss Vandeventer, of Cincinnati.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 18 May, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 38

Page 1, Column 1

CALL ME THINE OWN

The Marriage of Fred R. Broadwell and Miss Eugenia Frazer

Spring with all her resplendent beauty, seemed to smile her loveliest on Wednesday afternoon, and certainly Cupid reciprocated by presenting the prettiest wedding of the season, when Fred Broadwell lead to the altar one of Harrison’s prettiest and sweetest girls – Miss Eugenia Frazer. The ceremony as announced by invitation was to take place in the Presbyterian Church. The handsome edifice had been beautifully decorated, the pulpit rostrum being fairly overloaded with flowers and evergreens of the rarest and choicest varieties. Promptly at five o’clock, organist Miss Walters, began the wedding march announcing the arrival of the bride and groom, who came in the church – preceded by the ushers, Messers. Boyd, McGibben, Ward and Frazer – ascended the pulpit and stood directly beneath an umbrella made of flowers and ribbons.

Rev. Dr. Barlett, of Lexington, then came forward and pronounced the words that made Fred and Eugenia man and wife. The minister’s voice, one of magnificent tone and volume clearly accented he sincerity of the event ad ceremony, full of divine instruction, beautiful sentiments, and wise admonitions, was impressive and eloquent, concluding the services with a prayer and benediction that God’s gracious face may smile upon those who had plighted their vows, and bring the joys of a Christian life to them. The wedding party then left the church and went to the home of the bride’s parents on Locust street where they were tendered a magnificent reception.

The bride is a daughter of Capt. N. W. Frazer, and a more popular and worthy young lady does not live in the Blue Grass. Charming and attractive intelligent, refined and affable, she is truly a brilliant prize for the man who has won her heart and hand. The groom is the son of the late Mark Broadwell, and is one of Cynthiana’s best young and progressive business men.

Uniting in the general benediction, the Courier wishes the newly wedded pair the complete volumes of pleasures in the book of life, that sunshine and happiness may ever create a halo around their existence.

Among those present at the marriage were T. J. Gathright and wife, J. L. Dunlap and wife, Mrs. J. A. Anderson, J. B. Dunlap and wife, T. G. Dunlap and wife, and Miss Mabel Drummond, all of Louisville; Mrs. Jas.. Wakefield, of Indianapolis. Mistresses Gathright and Anderson and Messers. Dunlap are brothers and sisters of Mrs. Frazer.

The following is a list of presents received:
Escritoire, Mr. & Mrs. John T. Gathright
Handsome Marble Clock, Mrs. J. A. Anderson
Carlsbad jug, Mrs. Wakefield of Indianapolis
Antique Oak Rocker, Mr. & Mrs. T. G. Dunlap
Brass Piano lamp, Mr. & Mrs. Joe B. Dunlap
Marble clock and bronze ornaments, Mr. & Mrs. J. L. Dunlap
Cake basket, Mrs. Fightmaster
Cake basket, Mrs. Wells.
Flower holder, Mrs. James Keller
Spoon holder, Mrs. Robin Diltz
Breakfast castor, Mrs. Chas. Reickle
Pair bronze figures, Messers. Sprake and Northcutt
Pair of flower stands, Judge Lafferty and Mrs. H. T. Wilson
One-half dozen painted butters, Mrs. L. Martin
White satin embroidered cushion, Mrs. J. T. Sparks, Louisville
Clock, Ed. R. Odor
Carlsbad Jug, Mrs. J. I. Blanton
Pitcher, Mr. & Mrs. Bishop
Silver tray, Mr. & Mrs. T. H. Hood
Handsome Mirror, Statie Frisbie
Berry bowl, Misses Hedges
Jewel case, Mr. & Mrs. F. Parks
After dinner coffee spoons, Mr. R. L. Jameson
Nut bowl, Bessie & Kate Broadwell
Mirror on bronze easel, Mr. Miller Ward
Tete a tete set, Mrs. Jack Desha
Suit fruit knives, Mrs. A. S. Ashbrook
Solid silver napkin rings, Mrs. Drummond of Louisville
Silver berry set, Mr. & Mrs. L. Garnett and Mr. & Mrs. Orie Lebus
Lace set, Mr. & Mrs. W. L. Northcutt
Head rest and Theatre bag, Mabel Drummond
Piano lamps, Mrs. Lake and daughter
Cabinet, Mr. & Mrs. W. W. Longmoore
Candelabra, J. T. McGibben
A pair of handsome wood cuts, J. M. Lair & Blanche Reynolds
Cake basket, Eliza and Laura Lair
A pair of knives for Beed cake, C. S. Lydick & Wife

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 18 May, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 38

Page 1, Column 5

Land, stock and crop

F. B. Harper sold Wednesday to the Beverwyck Stables the four-year-old mare Lavinia Belle for $12,000. She is a full sister of Freeland.

W. L. Cassidy, of St. Louis, has bought from Sam Bryant, of Louisville, the great gelding Proctor Knott, by Luke Blackburn, for $25,000. Cassiday also offered $30,000 to F. B. Harper, for Valuable, Lavinia Belle and Libretto, which offer Harper accepted. Cassiday afterward backed out of the Harper deal.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 18 May, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 38

Page 1, Column 4

Neighborhood News

RENAKER

Born:  To wife of Geo. Renaker, a 12 pound boy, fifty son

RUDDEL'S MILLS

Lucy Harper is visiting in Bath County.
The hail fell so heavily here Monday that it broke several panes of glass. It was as large as marble.
The report that Dr. Keller had been killed in Oklahoma we are glad to say is false. He and Mr. Goodman are doing well and are delighted. Dr. Keller is City Treasurer, and Mr. Goodman is Town Marshall of Guthrie. Both are having residences erected and will move when completed.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 25 May, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 39

Page 1, Column 1

Matrimonial

At the Moorefield Christian Church Tuesday, May 14, 1889, at 5 o’clock p.m. Mr. Geo. T. Talbert to Miss Lizzie B. Smith. The bride looked beautiful in a pompelian blue henrietta and Marcheal Neal Buds. The groom looked handsome. The ushers were Messers. C. C. Cole, S. Templeman, W. W. Howe, W. F. Templeman, four as handsome users as ever entered a church door. The wedding march was beautifully executed by Miss Callie Robertson. Elder J. B. Greenwade officiated, and a shorter sweeter ceremony was never listened to. After the marriage the bridal party and a few intermediate friends and relations departed to the home of the groom where an elegant supper was served. The following day an elegant dinner was served at the beautiful home of the bride. All participating enjoyed the joyful occasion. The presents received were both numerous and handsome.Friends from Carlisle, Cynthiana, Ruddells Mills and Mt. Sterling attended. They have for the present taken rooms at her father’s.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 25 May, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 39

Page 1, Column 2

Died

Mrs. Claude Cantrell, of Broadwell, died in Cincinnati very suddenly, Friday, at Dr. Rainey’s Sanitarium, where she went for surgical treatment. Her remains were buried Sunday.

On Wednesday morning, of cancer, Mrs. Amanda Fowler wife of Contractor Fowler. Funeral services were held on Thursday morning, and her remains placed in their last sad resting place at Battle Grove. Mrs. Fowler was a severe suffered for many days, but bore her pain with that gracious Christian Fortitude that made her life an example of purity, faith and goodness. Loved by all, her demise is one of general regret, and universal sympathy is extended the bereaved husband and motherless children.

M. L. Bents of Marysville, O, formerly of Cynthiana, died on May 20thin his 66th year.

Two columns of information about the Knights Templar meeting in town and the ball. Names of most if not all the ladies was given and their dress described.

Another column on the graduation at the Cynthiana Graded City School.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 25 May, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 39

Page 4, Column 2

Neighborhood News

Straight Elm

The funeral rites of a Mr. Heck, was administered on Wednesday the 22and at Straight Elm. Pall bearers: Geo. Kuntz, Wm. Ross, Aleck. Rector, and J. Mooreland, the writer, Chaplain, Pro Tem. Reuben Mooreland Chief Mourner. Deceased was Rube’s favorite dog.

Leesburg

Died: At her home at Broadwell this county, Mrs. Clauded Canreill, aged 35 years. She was a most excellent lady. It was ours to know her from childhood, there being only a few days difference in our ages. Her maiden name was Berry. She leaves an interesting family of four girls, the youngest about 5 and the oldest 15 years of age. She was of the Methodist faith. Her funeral was preached at her home and her remains interred at Jacksonville.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 1 June, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 40

Page 1, Column 1

Commencement of Sayre Female Institute at Lexington, will take place in First Presbyterian church at 11 o’clock June 3rd. The following are the graduates: Misses Mary M. Bradford, Elisabeth Browne, Roberta Cliff, Catherine Coons, Mary Davenport, Mattie W. Evans,. Margaret Kinnear, Georgia McClellan, Myra Musselman, Etta Newton, Elisabeth S. Offutt, Jennie Perkins, Anna Sharpe, Eugenia Shepard, Nannie Sayler, Jennie Speyer, Tommie Webb, Mary Zimmerman and Jennie Parks.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 1 June, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 40

Page 1, Column 2

Matrimonial

At the court house, Thursday afternoon by Judge Lafferty, David Layton to Huldah J. Wagner. Attendants Mrs. Belle Hedges, Miss Mattie Rutherford, Miss Lillie Hedges, Miss Whaley, Frank Northcutt, S. F. January, J. Frank Musselman and J. T. Hedges.

Died

On last Sunday, of paralysis, Miss Eliza James. Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon, and burial took place at Battle Grove Cemetery.
Near Germantown, Miss Fannie Pollock, after an illness of several months.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 1 June, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 40

Page 1, Column 1

News from Neighboring Counties

Fayette County

Mrs. Lottie Chapin, wife of Dr. V. P. Gibney, once resident of Lexington, died in New York City. Their four year old son, Virgil Chapin, died a few days ago, his mother having been taken sick while waiting upon him.

Scott County

Jack Castle, a well-known colored man, died in Georgetown, aged above 82 years.
John B. McHatton, dropped dead of heart disease at the home of his son-in-law, Jas.. S. Williams near Owenton. His friends were a legion. He was in his 79th year and was buried with Masonic honors. He married Miss Herndon of Oxford; who died 10 years ago.

Clark County

Born – to wife of John Ware, a son.
Married – James Thompson, of Clay City and Miss Nannie Goosey of Ruckerville.

Bath County

Mrs. Maguire Sanders, after being sick for some time, apparently died. Coffin was got ready and preparations for funeral, when she showed signs of life. Funeral indefinitely postponed.
George Hart, stabbed in a saloon at Owingsville two weeks ago by Coal Shelton, died last Friday night. Shelton is still at large and is thought to be hiding in Cincinnati. He is a bright mulatto, 20 years of age, about five feet eight inches tall, weighing 160 pounds or more.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 1 June, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 40

Page 1, Column 5

Neighborhood News

Tricum

Born – To wife of Wm. Filey (nee Clifford) a nine pound boy.

Ruddell’s Mills

Miss Iva Shaw of Harrison, is visiting Misses Dixie and Jessie Knight.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 8 June, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 41

Page 1, Column 1

Born - On the 5th inst. to the wife of Dr. Howard Jett, a daughter, second born.

Matrimonial

Dame Rumor has it that Will Fraerber is to be married on the 13th of next month.

Died

On Monday, Miss Alice Reynolds, the pretty daughter of Sam F. Reynolds. Funeral services were held at the Methodist Church Tuesday afternoon, and burial took place at Battle Grove Cemetery.

The funeral of Ed. K. Thomas Jr,. Who died at the residence of his father, near North Middletown, on Saturday night, took place on Monday and his remains were interred in Paris Cemetery, the Knights of Pythias of this city and Paris officiating. The deceased was a son of E. K. Thomas, the wealthy short-horn breeder and a brother of Hon. Claude M. Thomas. He was a partner in raising fine trotting horses with the latter, and they are well known as the owners of Edgemark, the three-year-old recently sold by them for $22,000. The deceased was largely interested in real estate in Decatur, AL. He was one of the most respected young men in Bourbon county.

Leon R. Lail was shot and killed in San Pedro, New Mexico, Wednesday May 29th. He was engaged in the dispute with a claim-jumper named Preston, about a piece of land belonging to a friend, when Preston drew a pistol and shot him. Hew as a young man of good reputation and had many friends. He was the brother of the late Jeptha A. Lail and Jas.. Lail of Paris. His remains were brought here Friday and funeral services were held at the residence of T. J. McGibben. Burial at Battle Grove.

One of our exchanges says that in 1855, a few years prior to the late war, the 17-year locusts had the letter “W” on their backs, and in 1872 the letter was “P” appeared there and was followed by the financial panic of 1873, and that this year they have the letter “W” again, which means another war.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 1 June, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 41

Page 1, Column 3

Harrison Female College
Commencement and Concert

Monday Night Graduate, Miss Saida L. Smith

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 8 June, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 41

Page 1, Column 4

Tragedy in Johnstown, PA flood with 5000 people killed. (Half column.)

Neighborhood News

SYLVIAN DELL

Died – On May 25th Mrs. Angeline Sugg.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 8 June, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 41

Page 1, Column 5

Neighborhood News

RUDDELL'S MILL

Miss Lucy Harper has returned from a three week visit to Bath County.
Will Ballinger, of Lairs, is visiting his sister, Mrs. Harper.

LEESBURG

Born – To wife of Gano Shropshire, a daughter – third born and second daughter.

STRAIGHT ELM

Kellar, infant son of Mr. & Mrs. Jas.. Burden, died of whooping cough on Monday night last.

Aunt Dicy Lewis completed her eighty-ninth year on the 20th ult.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 15 June, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 42

Page 1, Column 1

Matrimonial

F. L. Durkee, of Wichita, Kansas, a merchant will wed Miss Mary, the accomplished daughter of Col. John C. Payne, of Scott County, on June 19th at 3 o'clock p.m. at the Newtown Christian Church. No cards.

Herbert Offutt and Miss Mollie Brown, of Scott County, came to Cynthiana one day last week to get married, but the youthful appearance of the bride – she being only 14 – rendered the securing of a license unsuccessful. They left and went to Williamstown, where they succeeded in their hopes.

Miss Virginia M. Bagby, of Frankfort, was married Tuesday morning, at the Baptist Church, that city, to the Rev. A. B. Rudd, of Texas. The ceremony was performed by the bride’s father, Rev. H. A. Bagby, of Cynthiana.Immediately after the ceremony the happy couple took their departure for Richmond, VA, whence they go to Mexico to enter the Missionary service of the Baptist Church.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 15 June, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 42

Page 1, Column 2

Born:

To the wife of T. Jeff Robinson, on the 11th inst. a girl.
To the wife of W. W. Ellington, on the 11th inst, a daughter.

Resolution of Respect

Resolved:  That in the death of sister Amanda Fowler, this society has lost a valued member, the church a true and earnest disciple and her home its chief light.

Ladies Missionary Society at the Christian Church on June 2nd.

Killing of Leon Lail

On May 30th, Leon R. Lail, brother of Jas.. Lail, of Paris was shot and killed near Albuquerque, New Mexico, by a man named Preston. The killing was the result of a dispute over a claim of land. The following is taken from an account of the affair given by a correspondent of San Pedro to the Albuquerque Democrat.

During the past few days a dispute had been going on as to the possession of a triangular piece of land, with a frontage of fifteen feet, between Leon Lail, a cousin of George Lail, Ex-Mayor of your city and George Preston a Hebrew Peddler, who was perambulated to this country for three years past.

Yesterday afternoon about 4:30 o’clock, the parties met on the disputed ground and after hard words Lail raised his hand as if to strike or push Preston, when the latter drew a double-action 38 caliber pistol, and without any warning, fired, the ball entering the upper cavity of the heart, death resulting in about 30 minutes.

A coroner’s jury was at once impaneled, and the evidence given before Judge Barton is substantially as above narrated.

All witnesses agree that Lail was unarmed and no just cause is given for the murder.

The coroner’s jury brought in a verdict that Leon Lail came to his death by a pistol shot in the hands of John Preston and the latter was held without bail to await the action of the grand jury.

The old portion of the camp has had some trouble by reason of lot jumping and the removal of stakes, but the holders of lots on the new town site are peaceably enjoying their possessions and all claims are respected.

Old timers who have lived in and visited many mining camps, concede this is the quietest and most orderly they know of and this awful death has saddened the hearts of many who will long have a kindly remembrance of Lee Lail.”

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 15 June, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 42

Page 1, Column 4

Mitchell’s Mistake

A difficulty between Robert Mitchell and Those. And Chas. Roher.

Thursday afternoon occurred a difficulty between Robert Mitchell, Proprietor of a saloon on the corner of Pike and Walnut street, and Chas. Roher, in which Those. Roher, a brother of Chas. was shot in the abdomen.

Other reports say that the tragedy is a culmination of a quarrel bean at Claysville some time ago.

At the examining trial yesterday, Mitchell was held over to Criminal Court at $800.

Died

Mrs. Emily Conner, wife of J. J. Conner of Connersville, on the 13th.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 15 June, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 42

Page 1, Column 5

Neighborhood News

RUDDELL'S MILLS

Misses Iva Shaw and Nannie Munson, of Scott Station, paid a short visit to friends in town Saturday and Sunday.

Dr. A. H. Keller arrived Friday night from Oklahoma. He reports a very fine country, Mr. Goodman has a farm said to be as good as any land in Bourbon county. The Doctor will go back in a few days.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 22 June, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 43

Page 1, Column 1

Lloyd Cole got into a difficulty with a Negro man named Jim Pryor, at Caden’s saloon in Georgetown, when Cole seized a heavy oak bar and struck Pryor on the head and on the back of the neck several times. It was not thought at the time that Pryor was badly hurt, but he died next morning, and it was found that his spinal column was broken. Cole is about twenty-six years old, and a brother of City Marshall George A. Cole, and has relatives living in Cynthiana.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 22 June, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 43

Page 1, Column 2

Death of Gen. W. T. Withers

Gen. William Temple Withers, one of Kentucky’s most worthy men, died near Lexington, on Sunday last at 12:30 a.m. aged 64 years, leaving a large family consisting of a wife and ten children, eight daughters and two sons. An only brother, J. S. Withers, cashier of the National Bank of this city, and an only sister, Mrs. Jennie Smith, of New York, also survive him.

Gen. Withers was of Virginia parentage, but was born in this county, Jan. 8 1825. He was educated at Bacon College, Harrodsburg, where he graduated in 1846 and was to have delivered the valedictory address of his class, but before the closing exercises of his term, he had volunteered for the Mexican War, and joined the Mercer County company lettered “C” of the Second Kentucky Regiment, commanded by Col. McKee and Lt. ; Col. Clay. At first made orderly sergeant, he rose to the rank of Lieutenant: for a time served as Aide-de-camp with Generals T. Marshal and W. O. Butler, but when the fighting began, returned to his regiment, was with it till wounded at the bloody battle of Buena Vista, where Col. McKee and Lt. Col. Clay were killed.

A Mexican musket ball struck him in the left hip and passed squarely through the body coming out exactly opposite the point of entrance in his right hip. These Mexican musket balls were very large; they were of iron or copper round and being over three-fourths of an inch in diameter. The ball itself would make a hideous wound, but in this case struck a chain that carried the young Lieutenant’s sword and carried a portion of it through the wound making a hideous jagged hole. The desperately wounded man was carried off the field, no one supposing for an instant that he would live beyond a few hours. But a surgical examination showed that the ball had missed the spinal column and the lower intestines. How such a thing was possible is almost beyond conception. But the vigorous young officer soon recovered. The wound healed and not until about seven years ago did he supper any special inconvenience from it. Then the wound broke out afresh; the supposition being that a piece of medal had been left in the wound,, which became encysted as the wound healed. For some reason not known, this encysted protection must have given way and suppuration was set up. At the time of General Withers’ life was despaired of. Dr. Boyd of Jackson, MS came to Lexington and nursed the invalid back on convalescence.

In Harrison County, when only 24 years old, Gen. Withers made a canvass for member of the constitutional convention, and although opposed by such able men as Gen. Desha and Capt. Newell, he demonstrated his ability and force of character. Many of his most ardent admirers, and friends told him he could not defeat the old war horses, but that he could be elected to the legislature without opposition. He didn’t care for a seat in the Legislature, but did desire a higher fields for his ambition. Under all the circumstances the General, though defeated, made a most creditable contest. He never afterwards sought position.

When a young man, Gen. Withers was married to the daughter of Gov. Sharkey of Mississippi. His home as that of his father was in Jackson. His father, Wm. Withers, was murdered in Jackson during the war by some Federal soldiers.

When the war broke out, Gen. Withers espoused the cause of the South, entering the artillery service and raising to the rank of Brigadier General. He was a trusted officer who always did his duty of a soldier.

Before the war Gen. Withers was a wealthy man, but the fierce tide that swept over the South bereft him of all except the naked lands of his plantations. To recover was apparently hopeless. Coming to Kentucky, he met his brother, Jas.. S. Withers, of this city, who said to him: “You fought for the cause which I believed was right, and have lost all, I have stayed home and have made some money; I have ten thousand dollars in gold which I want you to take and if you ever pay me it is all right, if not, all right.” Such timely assistance may have been the foundation on which Gen. Withers built his splendid fortune, but his pluck and indomitable courage would have won under any circumstances.

Gen. Withers funeral took place Tuesday at 2 p.m. from his late residence at “Fairlawn,” the following gentlemen acted as pall-bearers: Mr. W. S. McChesney, Mrs. Jas.. W. Woolfolk, Judge Jerry Morton, Judge J. Q. Ward, Prof. A. Fairhurst, Prof. H. H. White, Mr. Jno.. Allen and Major H. C. McDowell.

Matrimonial

In Lexington, Tuesday, at Phoenix Hotel by Eld. Edmunds, Herman Conway of Carlisle, to Miss Anna Ward of Livingston. Herman is well known in Cynthiana, having been employed here as operator, but is now connected with the Missouri Pacific R. R. with headquarters in Wilsey, Kansas.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 22 June, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 43

Page 1, Column 3 & 4

Walks and Talks

(First of a series of articles about people, business, schools, churches and other interests. This first one is about the National Bank of Cynthiana and its Cashier, Jas. S. Withers. (Full column. DH) Mr. Withers was born September 4th, 1830, in the town of Cynthiana, KY where he has spent his whole career with the exception of the years of his college life. He completed his educational course at the University of Missouri. In June 1857 at the age of 27 he was elected cashier of the Deposit Bank of Cynthiana.

(Article continued in next column)
Licking Valley Mills, operated by Riggs, Garnett & Co., and copartners, B. T. Riggs, Lark Garnett and S. J. Ashbrook
Horner Brothers, a mercantile house
R. H. Wills, Livery stable
V. H. Pate & Co., carriage manufacturer
H. F. Crowmell, blacksmith shop

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 22 June, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 43

Page 1, Column 4

Licking Valley Mills Were the Courier intending a history instead of a descriptive sketch of Cynthiana and Harrison County, it would find much interesting data concerning the structure now known as the Licking Valley Mills. Originally built as a cotton factory as long ago as 1809 by the Cynthiana Manufacturing Company, it was subsequently converted into a whiskey warehouse and as such occupied for some time by Asbury Broadwell. Some fifteen or eighteen years ago another transformation was wrought – this time the structure was fitted up as a flouring mill by Peck, Potts & Co. and has remained a flouring mill ever since. Originally it used the old fashioned bohr stone process, but in the summer of 1884 the full roller system was introduced at an expense of between six and seven thousand dollars. The mills are now equipped with six double sets of rolls - The Stevens’ System – together with other needed and modern machinery, and the capacity of production may be placed at ninety barrels of flour per day.

The brands of flour manufactured are Crown Jewel, Blue Ribbon and Family. The grain used comes from this section and the market for the flour may be called a home one, i.e. it embraces Harrison and adjutant counties, and in such favor is the product held here at home that but few shipments are made to distant points.The “exchange” business held is a very important item, coming, as it does from the radius of fifteen to twenty miles and aggregating 25,000 or more bushels of wheat per year. It affords us pleasure to add that every department of trade of the mill is in excellent shape thus far this year, and the prospects are that its output of flour will be considerably greater than for 1888.

Licking Valley Mills are operated by the firm of Riggs, Garnett & Co., the co-partners being B. T. Riggs, Lark Garnett and S. J. Ashbrook. Mr. Garnett is Sheriff of the county, and we shall have occasion to hereafter refer to him in connections with the county officials; Mr. Ashbrook is a distiller and Mayor of Cynthiana, and will elsewhere be alluded to. Captain Riggs, upon whom the active, every-day management of the business rests, is a native of Falmouth, bur for the past fifteen years Cynthiana has been his home. He was but little more than 20 years of age when the late war occurred, and enlisting as a private soldier in the 18th KY (federal) infantry he passed by stages of promotion to the rank of Captain. After the war had closed he received the appointment of U. S. Gauger, which he held for twelve years, and since January 1882, he has been identified with milling.

The book keeper is Mr. L. N. Monson, who for two years has officiated in that capacity; C. F. Eichorn is the head miller, and Harry Norris is in charge of the cooperage department and John Yager is the engineer. As is sometimes said of jurymen, “all are good men and true.”

Mr. Riggs, when questioned as to the condition of trade, briefly remarked that it was “good.” There was room for improvement in collections but he wasn’t disposed to grumble. Well, the business of the mill ought to be good. For none other in the State can better flour be obtained, and the Courier hopes to record its prosperity for many years to come.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 22 June, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 43

Page 1, Column 4

Died:

The Lexington Observer says: Remus N. Offutt, of this city, died on Thursday morning, after a lingering illness of consumption. Mr. Offutt was one of the best and most favorably known business men in this city. He came here in ‘68 from Cynthiana, where he had long been engaged with the leading dry goods house of that city.He was born in Harrison County in 1843, served gallantly in the Confederate army nearly four years and was as brave a man and true gentleman as Kentucky ever produced.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 22 June, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 43

Page 4, Column 3

Mr. Wm. Skinner, Sr. died at his home near Ruddell’s Mills, Thursday night, aged seventy-six years. He was for many years one of the most prosperous stock traders of this community, and for several years past had devoted his attention to farming. Mr. Skinner was a brother of Mrs. Miller, of this city.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 24 June, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 49

Page 1, Column 1

Born to wife of H. Huerkamp, a daughter.

Those. O'Brien, who murdered Betty Shea, has been sentenced to be hung on Saturday, August 24th

Pat Hunt, the Paris murderer will not be hung today. The case has been taken to the Court of Appeals and can not be decided before the latter part of September.

Dates of Fairs:
Ashland, July 3

Harrodsburg, July 30
Danville, August 6
Sharpsburg, August 6
Maysville, August 20
Lexington, August 27
Paris, September 3
Cynthiana, September 10
Eminence, September 17

Died:

On Friday, last of Bright's disease, D. B. Conway, aged about 60 years.  He leaves a wife and three children.
Mrs. Mary Kinman, sister of W. L. Northcutt, of this city, died at Drewsbury, Indiana, Tuesday

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 24 June, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 49

Page 1, Column 2

Matrimonial:

June 27, by Rev. Dr. Keady, James E. Horton, to Miss Annie E. Filer, both of Harrison County.
Mr. Gus Rogers, son of Rev. John T. Rogers, of Danville, and Miss Ada A. Wardroper, of Maysville, were married Sunday

An exchange asked if a man of 35 married a girl of 5, he is 7 times older than his wife.  They live together for five years, he is forty and she is 10 he is now four times older.  They live together another 20 years, he is then 60 and she is 30, he is now twice as old as his wife.  How long must they live together till both are the same age?

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 24 June, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 49

Page 1, Column 3,4 & 5

Walks and Talks

(Second in the series)

R. L. Johnson, saddles and harness
A. Remington, Grocer
J. W. Dodge & Co., General contracting painting and wall papering
A.E. Colesgrove, stover, tin and house furnishings
W. S. Dale, carriage factory
Givens and Shawhan, Clothiers
J. L. Shawhan, boot and shoe store
T. Y. Cooper, D. D. S., dentist
Samuel Williams, undertaker
Dr. J. B. Addams, dental surgeon
Farmers National Bank

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 24 June, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 49

Page 4, Column 2

Neighborhood News

STRAIGHT ELM

Elsie, the nine year old daughter of Thomas Kenton, died at Shady Nook, on the 21st.

RUDDELL'S MILLS

Geo. A. Harper, of Winchester, was in our midst a few days last week.

TRICUM

Miss Myrtie Hicks closed her school a few days since. The following were placed on the roll of honor: Pearl Lafferty, 96; Stella Lemons, 96; Addie Barnes, 96; Ada Barnes, 96; Meddie Lafferty, 98; Mary Martin, 96; Mollie Berry, 98; Colvin Martin, 99; Iva Martin, 98; Georgia Lemons, 98; Emma Pixley, 95; Case Martin, 94; and Katie Berry, 94.

Will Probate

The will of the late Gen. Withers, of Fairlawn, has been filed for probate. It is eminently a just disposition of his large estate. He leaves the interests of his daughters entirely to their own use. He wishes Fairlawn kept up under the management of his son, W. T. Withers, Jr. Someone who knows about his estate estimates it to be worth $750,000. He provides for the education of five or more, if the income of designated property justifies, young men to go into the ministry of the Christian Church.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 6 July, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 45

Page 1, Column 1

Telephone connection will soon be had with Georgetown.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 6 July, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 45

Page 1, Column 2

MURDER

Mrs. Jos. North Murdered in a Brutal Manner
Her husband Joseph North arrested for the unnatural crime of oxorcide

Interview with the suspected man

Ten miles west of Cynthiana is a little hamlet of Leesburg; all its surroundings are pastoral, the community is a peaceful one, given up to agricultural pursuits, and in or near it one would scarce expect to find located the scene of diabolical crime.

On Friday evening the 28th of June, Squire T. B. Arnett , of Leesburg , was notified that his services were needed – that Mrs. Beckey North was dead, and that her death had doubtless resulted from a fit. The coroner at once visited the North residence – a primitive affair, containing only two rooms.It is located on Jas.. L. Logan’s place near Leesburg, and the house or cabin stands some distance back in the field – perhaps half a mile from Leesburg pike.

The coroner discovered the dead woman upon the floor in the kitchen, about eight feet from the fire place. She was lying upon the left side, one hand under her body and the other crossed upon her breast; her face was bloody, her clothing burned to her waist and blotches of fire marks on her face, neck and breast.

MEDICAL EXAMINATION

A messenger was dispatched for Dr. F. L. Powell; in the course of his examination of the dead woman he discovered numerous cuts and bruises upon the face, and in one place at least the skull was broken. At first the accepted theory was that the woman, who is reported to have been subject to fits had fallen into the fire from an attack of that nature. But soon a suspicion of murder was aroused, and that suspicion was directed against the husband. A score of incriminating incidents were revealed. Suspicion became conviction in the minds of the neighbors; he was on Saturday, arrested by Squire Arnett, and the same evening was placed in jail here.

AN UNFEELING WRETCH

When asked as to the disposition of the body of his wife North exhibited no special interest in the matter. He expressed complete indifference as to attending her funeral, and it was with apparent reluctance that he was induced to take a final gaze at the mangled corpse of here whom he had at the alter promised to love, cherish and protect. Doubtless ghastly images were crowded upon his mental vision – and what fearful images they must have been.

On Monday of this week the Court House was thronged by hundreds who wished to catch a glimpse of the prisoner or to listen to the details of his crime as they should be unfolded from the witness stand. The examination, however, was postponed until Wednesday morning, when at 9 o’clock court was opened, Judge W. T. Lafferty, presiding. The commonwealth was represented by Prosecuting Attorney M. C. Swinford; the counsel for the accused were W. S. Hardin and L. Benton.

THE TESTIMONY

The first witness called for the prosecution was Jas.. M. Anderson. He testified to hearing North’s cries for help when he discovered (?) the body of his wife. He explained the position of the body, said the fire place gave evidence of a struggle, found a sad iron encrusted with blood, evidence of a garment having been burned, and described the general appearance of the room and its dead occupant. Never knew of North and his wife quarreling.

J. L. Paul testified: But slightly acquainted with the defendant, was at work in an adjoining field, heard North making a great outcry, verified Anderson’s testimony as to the appearance of the body.

Jas.. Green – Identified wearing apparel of the prisoner.

Dave Hawkins, colored, immaterial testimony.

Harlan Green, immaterial except to identification of wearing apparel.

Dr. Powell described wounds some penetrating the bones of the head, base of the skull fractured, numerous burns. Hair partially burned off; found print of head in ashes of fireplace; blood on hearth; wounds appeared to have been made by both a sharp and blunt instruments; identified sad iron; it “nicely” fitted the wounds; death was caused by wounds described; death had probably occurred about 4 o’clock p.m.; found pools of blood – blood had run through the floor by the save and other points.

Jas.. Logan, detailed conversation held with North after the crime; North showed where his missing boots were to be found; other testimony immaterial

Mrs. George North – admitted North was inclined to jealousy; had never heard him threaten his wife’s life.

Jas.. VanHook, testimony but a repetition of what had preceded.

Squire Arnett detailed his connection with the affair in quite a dramatic manner, and the large audience listened attentively: I was notified of the death of Mrs. North, reached the house between six and seven o’clock in the evening; from parties present summoned a coroner’s jury. He then described the appearance of the body in its semi-nude state, supposed that the woman had fallen into the fire while suffering from a fit. Investigations Friday night revealed nothing beyond what had already been testified to. Saturday morning found jeans pants with damp mud adhering to them, and shirt also damp, with one sleeve torn off; North said he had worn the garments for months and accounted for the moisture by saying “I reckon the water blew in on ‘em.” I determined to watch North’s movements, apprehensive he would attempt escaping. Finally I placed him under arrest; he resisted arrest, not by action but by words and threatened to kill any one interferring with him or his liberty; finally submitted. I searched him but found only a pocket knife. Turned the prisoner over to Chas. Lail.

John Groves, cousin, testified; North had trouble with his wife two months ago, she left him; he threatened her with a gun; afterwards heard him tell his wife he didn’t mean what he said.

Here the prosecution rested the case. The defense introduced no witnesses, and all argument was waived. Judge Lafferty in substance said: From the testimony of Dr. Powell it appears the woman was killed. I don’t want to say a thing that might be construed as prejudging the prisoner’s case, but the testimony is such that I feel it my duty to remand him to the criminal court without bail.

No surprise was expressed by anyone in the audience, which quietly dispersed, and soon after North was returned to his quarters in the jail. He showed no emotion during the examination.

AN INTERVIEW WITH NORTH

The Courier interviewed North at the jail. He was very communicative at times; at times reticent, and once or twice was startled into somewhat unguarded expressions.  Here in substance, is his story.

I had been working in my tobacco patch and was going home, about 4 o’clock, when my little girl (6 years old), who had gone on ahead of me, came running back and cried out, ‘Mamma is burned up.’ I went to the house and door of the room, and my wife was lying there.” Being questioned he admitted that he did not approach the body; that his wife lay, and yet he took no means to ascertain whether she was living or dead, but rushed off towards a neighbor’s for assistance. Questioned as to what he thought caused his wife’s death, he said “one of her spells, she fell in the firs.” He protested his affections for her and for his children. When the courier told him his little boy has prattled the astounding statement:

PAPA HIT MAMMA

with an iron," he quickly entered a protest, saying the little baby could be induced to say anything, but he was really curious to know if such testimony would be allowed.  He protested his innocence and in the same breath declared his willingness to meet whatever fate should overtake him.  He argued that is wasn't reasonable, if he had wanted to kill his wife, that he should have done so at such a time and in such a manner, declaring that there were too many other safer methods.

THE PRISONER

is an illiterate man, apparently about thirty years of age. He can neither read nor write. Eleven years ago he married Rebecca Ann Wolfe, at Claysville, the bride being less than thirteen years of age. Four children, two of who are living, were the fruits of the marriage. So far as can be learned North and his wife lived together without any noisy dissension, and the surmises are many as to what tempted him to commit the awful crime with which he stands charged.

Before North was apprehended it was noticed that he was not wearing the same boots as on the day before. He was asked where those boots were. He replied “somewhere about the house,” but when told they could not be found he piloted the searching party to a little pond where they then fished out of the water and mud; with the boots were also discovered a child’s dress and a suspender buckle. What part these articles played in the fearful tragedy can only be conjectured as yet.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 6 July, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 45

Page 1, Column 4 & 5

Walks and Talks
(Third in a series)

F. M. Cosby, clothing store
The C. B. Cook Company, distilling and milling
S. J. Louis, tailor
Kehoe Bros., harness and saddler
Chas. Rieckel, jeweler
W. Tom Burns, groceries and hardware, wool buyer

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 6 July, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 45

Page 4, Column 1

Died:

Yesterday morning, of acute rheumatism, Eddie, fourteen year old son of R. M. Hedges.

The following was read at the funeral of Mrs. Mary Kinnan, sister of W. L. Northcutt, at Drewersburg, IN:
Mary E. Northcutt was born at Rutland, Harrison Co. KY May 29, 1834. Before she reached the age of twelve her mother died leaving the entire care of the household depending upon her. Her situation now will be better understood by saying that she had three brothers older than herself and six children younger, including an infant brother but eight days old. If her hands were young and puny, her heart was willing and strong, and she did her duty as she only could have done.

On February 9th 1853 she united in marriage with Henry Kinnan of her own county and state. As a result of this union five children were born, two of whom – daughter and son – survive her, as does her husband.

Be it said to her credit that in the same year of her marriage she cast her lot with the people of God. The Methodist was the church of her choice, and she was a quiet, conscientious and devoted members of the church until three years since, when removing to her late home, being quite a distance from her church and seeing with joyful heart her husband seeking for a better and hollier life, and as a matter of duty, unity and convenience, handed her letter to the Presbyterian church and they became one in a Godly as well as private life.

But Methodist or Presbyterian she was the same tender, loving Mary as true to her friends, her home, her God as the magnetic needle to the pole.

Her two years of wasting, suffering sickness, terminating in her death Wednesday morning June 25th, 1889, at the age of 55 years and 27 days, was one of continuous example of undefined Christianity. Never a child, but always a woman, both mother and sister to brothers and sister, a loving companion, tender mother and staunch friend; none knew her but to love her.

A friend and sister gone, a mother and wife departed. Her vacant place can never be filled. Friends sad, brothers and sister sorrowful, children desolate and husband heart broken, all take comfort in knowing that what is our losses is her gain, and our distress her eternal joy. She did what she could; angels can do no more.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 6 July, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 45

Page 4, Column 3

Neighborhood News

CONNERSVILLE

Born – to the wives of James Renaker and Wm. McLowery, a girl each.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 13 July, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 46

Page 1, Column 2

NORTH INSANE

But, before he loses reason he makes a confession of his horrible crime:
Joseph North, the wife murderer has lost his mind, is a raving maniac. NO false attempt at insanity is he making, but reason has been dethroned by a conscience overburdened by horrible visions, and hideous presentments. But before he lost his mind North had, by the advice of friends and his attorney, confessed the details of his crime entire.

Since his imprisonment North has partaken of but little food and nourishment; and only found consolation when at times he would forget his surroundings while in the presence of his child, who was allowed to visit him. He has, owing to loss of sleep and a troubled mind, been morose and sullen, and passing his heavy hours in conceiving some mode of self-destruction. ON Monday he requested a son of Jailer Lail to secure him some arsenic to wash his child’s head. His request was not being granted from that source he applied to a fellow prisoner to procure him a box of “Rough on Rats.” Failing in this he subsequently tore his bed comfort into strips, tied them together, making a very convenient rope, but is seems that his courage failed, as he went no further in his attempt.

From Monday morning until Wednesday evening North refused absolutely to eat anything, and gave abundant indications of insanity. On the latter day he was approached by Jailer Lail who inquired if he wanted anything to eat. North answered no, that his head hurt too bad. Lail asked him what caused it and he replied: “I have no friends. My children have no one to care for them; my crops are beyond my power to attend to them and are going to waste, and I am in prison.”

Isn’t there something else that causes you more trouble than that?” inquired Jailer Lail.

Mr. Lail my wife was d____m mean woman. That evening when I first went home, as I approached the house I saw some man sneaking along the fence on the far side of the house. When I went in I asked my wife concerning the matter. She professed to know nothing of him. I again urged the matter, she said that if the man had been there it was none of my business. This brought on words, when she hit me in the head with an iron, and then beat me with a shovel. I wrenched the shovel from her and hit her with it, she fell down, and I stamped on her. I did it in self-defense.”

North then ceased talking, and Mr. Lail questioned him further.

The particulars as given by North are not corroborated by the circumstantial evidence produced. The shovel he claims to have hit her with, is a very small and doesn’t look strong enough to crush a skull. Besides the wound gives no indication as being caused by such an instrument. As for the adulterous habits that he charges against his wife, this matter has been current rumor ever since the tragedy, and it has been authentically stated that North has been cognizant that such relations have been existing for several years, and it proves his cowardly nature conclusively, by living in such knowledge.

Since Wednesday North has been insane, and a close watch is necessary to be kept on him.

Lead Mines to be Worked

Dr. T. B. Smith, the well-known manufacturer of Smith’s Liniment, has succeeded in organizing a company, with capital of $8,000, to work the lead mines discovered on Those. Hinkson’s farm, near Lairs, adjoining the Kentucky Central.

Several years ago evidences of rich bearing ore were found on this farm, but our people were too dilatory and refused to furnish sufficient means to develop matters, thought abundant evidence was given of success.

Dr. Smith, with a strong faith in the outcome, has induced foreign capital to test the results of a practical investigation, and as several members of his company have been here to look at the mine and all were pleased with the prospects, work will be begun at once and we dare say the investors will realize handsomely on their investments; at least we hope they will.

As an evidence of the great quantity of ore here, Mr. Hinkson says it is no uncommon thing for his employees, when plowing, to turn up great lumps of lead, frequently weighting as much as a hundred pounds.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 13 July, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 46

Page 1, Column 4

Walks and Talks

(Fourth of a series)
The C. B. Cook Company, distilling and milling (previously printed in third of series)
V. H. Pate & Co., carriage manufacturer and sales
Gano Ammerman, mercantile house devoted to groceries and hardware
Geo. H. Givens, tin stove manufacturer and sales
L. C. Maffett, clothing, boot, shor, hat and furnishing goods house
A Berman, dry goods, notions, clothing, boots, shoes, hats and caps "Cynthiana Cheap Shop"
Electric light and a company formed to work the Harrison County lead mines, all in one week!  Look out for the railroad, we are going to have it.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 13 July, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 46

Page 4, Column 1

On last county court day, a man by the name of Barlow, from Lexington, traded a colt to George Brannock, who lives near Havilandsville. It was discovered in a few days that the colt belonged to Mr. Tilton, of Nicholas County, and had been stolen on the Saturday night before the trade was made here. As soon as it was known that the colt had been stolen Mr. J. H. Shields, a local dealer in horses, in company with Brannock started out to find the thief. He was caught in Lexington and returned here and placed in jail.  – Falmouth Democrat

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 13 July, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 46

Page 4, Column 2

Neighborhood News

RUDDELL'S MILLS

Dr. Keller will leave in a few days to locate at Hot Springs, Ark. (Wonder what happened to the great plans to run Oklahoma towns. DH)
Uncle Willis Collins is 80 yeas old and has never used tobacco.
Nathan Goodman has returned from Oklahoma. He is delighted with the country, but will not return there on account of not getting to hold his claim. He is now confined to his bed with a fever.

LEESBURG

Born – To wife of Wm. Carrick, nee Sallie Ward, a daughter. The above parties live at Oxford.
Jas.. North, who was arraigned for the murder of his wife, was held over without bail. The feeling is greatly against him here, and Judge Lynch would have done his work had some things been developed that is now known.
At the examination for common school graduates, held at Cynthiana on Friday, June 28th, $60 was given out in prizes – thirty dollars to first, twenty dollars to second and ten to third. Miss Emma E. Anderson, of this place, received first prize, and Johnnie Hehr, of Browdwell, received second prize. This, we think, is quite a compliment to Miss Emma, and her friends are quite proud of it, but none more than Miss Mary Barkley, her teacher, who has taught her all she knows. Hehr was also a pupil of Miss Barkley for eighteen months.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 20 July, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 47

Page 1, Column 1

North, the wife-murderer, continues to remain in his insane state. Many believe he is simply acting, but to those who have seen him he is certainly demented.
Robert R. Myall, a resident of Shawhan Station, a well-known merchant of that place, was examined on writ of lunacy Saturday, adjudged to be of unsound mind, and sent to the Asylum at Lexington. He has been confined in that place before, and this present ailment is but a renewal of the old one.
The Electric Light Company are making great efforts to begin immediate work on their plant. Their charter requires work to be actually begun within ninety days from passage of the franchise, and the company hope by that time to have the light fully completed and in running order.

Born:

On Wednesday, to the wife of H. K. McAddams, of Abdullah Park, a daughter.

Died:

D. Howard Smith, Ex-auditor of Kentucky died in Louisville, Monday, age 68 years.
On Wednesday last, the 2 year old daughter of Mr. & Mrs. John Fitzpatrick. The remains were interred in the cemetery at Cynthiana. Winchester Democrat

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 20 July, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 47

Page 1, Column 3

Neighborhood News

RUDDELL'S MILLS

Mr. Goodman continues quite ill.
Dr. Keller’s family will leave this week to join him in Hot Springs.
Mrs. Jas.. Neal and son, of Austerlitz, spent Sunday with Nathan Goodman’s.

TRICUM

Died – On the 12th inst. near Robinson Station, Mr. Moss Monson, aged nearly 81 years. Deceased was a clever old gentleman and leaves several grown children and a host of other friends who will be pained to hear of his death. His remains were interred at old family burying ground, Brusam cemetery

Born- To wife of Joe Eadon, nee Richardson, a daughter

LEESBURG

Jos. North, the wife-murderer, confessed on Thursday last to the killing; said it was done in self defense. As he came into the house his wife attacked him and struck him and he struck her. Jealousy was the cause. It is said he is losing his mind. There is a streak of insanity in his family, several having been affected in that way. If he escapes the rope he will apt to get imprisonment for life.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 20 July, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 47

Page 1, Column 4

Walks and Talks

(Fifth of a series)

Howard Jett, druggist, notions, paints, and oils
J. L. Juett, livery stable, feed store
Geo. T. Mattox, groceries, hardware, harness, wool & grain buyer
T. A. Frazer, clothing store

J. D. McLain, photographer
W. L. Northcutt. dry goods and notions oldest business in town

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 27 July, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 48

Page 1, Column 1

Died:

On Wednesday, at his home at RUDDELL'S Mills, Willis Collins, aged 85 years.
At Lairs, Mrs. Sarah Cunningham.

North, the wife-murderer, has ceased his efforts at insanity, and is now as sane as ever. It has been discovered that the injury on the back of his head no doubt caused his mind some trouble, but not as much as he gave evidence. His effort at insanity only makes his case stronger against him.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 20 July, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 47

Page 1, Column 3

DROPPED DEAD

William Victor, a well-known farmer dies suddenly of heart disease

Yesterday morning, about 11 o’clock the startling intelligence was circulated on the street that William Victor had suddenly died of heart disease. The report was extremely hard to believe, as Mr. Victor was in the prime of his life, being 38 years old, and only a few minutes before the announcement of his death had been walking around the street.

He had been complaining though, for several weeks, and yesterday morning feeling so unwell he had driven to town to procure some medicine to try and get relief. Returning home he took his medicine, and went to his room, seated himself and began reading a newspaper. He suddenly became sick, and his wife seeing his peculiar actions went to him to reliever him if possible. He said he felt so bad that he would lay down, and this he did on a lounge in an adjoining room. He became weaker immediately, and his wife’s screams called attention of friends and neighbors, who rendered every assistance but to no avail, as he gasped his last breath of life and his heart ceased, to beat no more, in a very short time. Physicians pronounced his death to have been caused by heart disease.

William Victor was one of the most prosperous, popular and energetic farmers in Harrison Co. E had lately purchased the beautiful and magnificent home owned by Judge J. Q. Ward, where, surrounded by a charming and estimable wife and loving devoted children, he enjoyed the fullest of life’s sweetest pleasures, and to be cut down in its midst is a realization that none but those who knew him can know or feel. His death is a loss to the whole community, and a more general bereavement we have never witnessed toward any citizen. An honorable upright life, an affectionate, amorous father, a loving, attentive husband, a noble, pure Christian has this been sacrificed to the inevitable fate of mankind, but his was all the more sorrowful, for no word or sign of admonition had been given.

Mr. Victor’s father and mother died of heart disease, and it thus seems hereditary. He was a brother of Mrs. L. W. Whaley, Mrs. R. M. Hedges, Mrs. B. F. Martin and Mr. Alex. Victor.

Born:

At Connersville, on the 22nd inst. to the wife of J. C. B. Levi, a son.
To the wife of J. K. Smith, (nee Ada Hill), of Paris, a daughter.
J. T. Argo, of Poindexter, has been granted a patent on an automatic switch for railroads.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 27 July, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 48

Page 1, Column 4

A PARIS LYNCHING

A lecherous Negro Brute Meets a Deserved Fate

Thursday night about 7 o’clock, John Pryor, Geo. Horine and Green McDonald armed with shotguns, brought a burly black man, aged about 30, to Paris and placed him in jail, charged with assaulting Mrs. Peter Crow, wife of a section boss on the Winchester branch of the K. C., about two miles from Paris, near Sam’l M. Pryor’s. The brute knocked Mrs. Crow down and accomplished his lecherous designs, during which time the poor woman scratched his face and tore his lip in her efforts to free herself, but all to no avail. After having been released, the terrified woman ran and attracted John Pryor from his uncle Sam Pryor’s residence two hundred yards away, and he proceeded to Mrs. Crow’s residence, where the brute was found loitering around playing innocent, but was fully identified by Mrs. Crow, who described scratches on his lip and face which she would be found. When arrested, Kelly said that he had been pounced upon by a ragged tramp while lying down in a shade in the woods, and that he had beaten the tramp off and he ran up the railroad.

Kelly was taken before Mrs. Crow and fully identified.

Thursday night a number of masked men went to the jail, secured Kelly and took him to the railroad bridge near town, and hung him, where the body was found yesterday morning. The lynching was deserved and meets with the approval of citizens.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 27 July, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 48

Page 1, Column 4

The Methodist Church at Oddville

The first Methodist Church at or near Oddville was 1 ½ miles east of Oddville, built perhaps as early as 1820, and before the division of the Methodist church into North and South is was known as the Episcopal Chapel. Josiah Whitaker, widely known at that time throughout Northern Kentucky as a strong but somewhat peculiar preacher and who lived then within the limits of what was after to be the village of Oddville, was a leading spirit of the church. It was through his influence, when the Episcopal Chapel burned in 1849, that the new church was located only ½ mile east of Oddville, on a tract of land given by himself.

J. C. Crow was a contractor and builder of this new church, though without all the “plans and specifications” of modern workman. His work was to be well-done and hones. In about 1875 or ‘76 J. C. Crow, at his own expense, enlarged the church building, adding about 15 feet in length and otherwise improving it.

But the church building was found still to be too small to accommodate the congregation that went there regularly and not in keeping with the tastes and desires of the people. Something better was wanted, and very rightly, for the house of the Lord should be equal to the means of the people and worthy the worship that should be offered within. By the death of Mrs. Zerilda Wilson, who lived in Oddville, the church received by will an amount which now has increased to something of $900, and years ago J. C. Crow deeded to the church at Oddville his house and lot in Oddville to come into the possession of the church at his death. He died in 1885 and his property recently sold by order of the Court by the Commissioner added $750 more to the funds of the church.

With this the people have gone to work and with the subscriptions of friends at home and abroad, propose to build a new church on the site of the old one that shall be worthy the neighborhood and pride of the congregation.

It will be completed some time in September and delivered over to the Trustees, when it will be dedicated according to the usual forms of the church.

[This history of the Methodist Church will be placed in the corner stone of the new foundation to be laid next week.]

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 27 July, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 48

Page 4, Column 1

Neighborhood News

CONNERSVILLE

Born – To the wife of J. C. B. Levi, a son.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 27 July, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 48

Page 4, Column 2 & 3

Walks and Talks

(Sixth of a series)

Renaker Bros., druggist
Jas.. W. Smiser, furniture and undertaker
Broadwell & Frazer, livery sales and stable

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 3 August, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 49

Page 1, Column 1

Marriage license was granted Thursday to Harmon M. King and Tinsa Belle Langley.
Chas. Dilger and Harry Smart, two murderers, were hung in Louisville, Wednesday morning.
Wm. Winkel, of Rutland, was tried and adjudged insane in Court on Monday morning, and sent to the insane asylum.
Will A. Faerber was twenty-two years old Monday, and was the recipient of a handsome gold watch from his sister, Mrs. Fisher. Will is now ready to marry; a widow preferred.

Died:

Mrs. L. C. Mattox, mother of Geo. and J. W. Mattox, merchants of this city, died Wednesday noon at her home on the Lair Pike. Burial Thursday at Mt. Zion.

Matrimonial

The following explains itself:
J. J. Good invites you to be present at the marriage of his daughter, Katie to Mr. Jas.. T. Earle, Wednesday afternoon, Aug. 7th at 3 o’clock 1889Cynthiana,

Think on it.

In looking over some old county records the other day we ran across the following in Order Book of date June 1861:
Ordered that the tavern rates for this county for the ensuing twelve months are as follows:
Whisky, per drink, 5 cts.
Wine and Brandies, per drink, 5 cts.
Cider, per quart, 10 cts.
Beer, per quart, 10 cts.
Cider Oil, per quart, 15 cts.
Breakfast, dinner and supper, each 25 cts.
Lodging, 25 cts.
Horse with corn, oats, etc. per night 50 cts.Single feed 25 cts.

The heirs of Gen. W. T. Withers, the lately deceased trotting horse breeder, have decided to dispose of his entire stud of horses at public sale. This offering will take place in early October. It was his dying wish that the place be carried on after his death, but to settle up the estate it was thought best to place it on the market. It will be the greatest sale of trotting stock ever held sat one establishment in the world, there being over 300 head of high bred stallions, brood mares, colts and fillies to be disposed of. As “Fairlawn” this place earned a national reputation, and the disposition of its horses and its breaking up is news which startle the trotting horse world.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 3 August, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 49

Page 1, Column 6

History of the Episcopal Church

The following interesting extract is from the sermon of Rev. Geo. A. Weeks, delivered at the Episcopal church last Sunday morning:
(Full article that outlines the beginning of the church in Cynthiana in 1838, in the next 15 years only twelve conversions had been made. DH)

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 3 August, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 49

Page 4, Column 3

Neighborhood News

RENAKER

Died: – Jennie, little daughter of Mr. Patrick Kendall and wife. Burial Saturday evening at the family burying ground.

LAIR

O. L. Ballinger has bought of John Rohr his house and lot on the east side of the river. Terms equal to cash.

RUDDELL'S MILLS

Mr. Nathan Goodman is on the mend.
Miss Lucy Harper is visiting relatives in Winchester.

CONNERSVILLE

The above named place is situated on the pike leading from Cynthiana to Sadieville, seven miles west of the former and eight miles east of the latter, and contains 150 inhabitants; has three nice country stores as will be found, which are successfully operated by B. M. Tucker, J. W. Boyd and J. C. B. Levi. Mr. Tucker is our postmaster; J. W. Boyd is deputy County Clerk and Mr. Levi keeps the Central Hotel, to which is attached a bar.W. B. Gossett sells whiskey by the quart; E. D. Fight is our wagon-maker and blacksmith. The firm of T. J. McGibben, J. M. Boyers and W. B. Gossett operate the corn and flouring mill and distillery. We have mail tri-weekly – Monday, Wednesday and Friday. Dr. A. Connor is our practicing physician. The surrounding country is rolling, the soil productive and the people are prosperous and happy. I am sorry to say we have no church nearer than Mt. Hope, Methodist one and a half miles distant, Rev. J. D. Reed, pastor. An excellent Sunday School is in a flourishing condition there, B. M. Tucker, Superintendent. The village was called for John H. Conner, who was the first merchant of the place, and once a man of position and affluence, but owing to his intemperate habits was reduced to poverty and disease and is now spending his last days at the county poor farm.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 3 August, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 49

Page 4, Column 5

Walks and Talks

(Seventh of a series)
John R. Daly, proprietor of the Railroad House & Bar, Machinist and engineer by trade.
D. M. Howard, handles pure and old Harrison Count whiskies, also lager, wines, cigars

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 10 August, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 50

Page 1, Column 1

Born - to wife of H. A. Powers, of Maysville, formerly Miss Janie Bashford, a daughter

Mrs. Hamilton, proprietor of the Falmouth Rolling Mills, has purchased of H. C. Kehoe his handsome residence on Millersburg Avenue, and will move to this city. Price $4,000.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 10 August, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 50

Page 1, Column 2

Died

Matthew Brennan, aged about 18 years, of malarial fever. Burial at the Catholic Cemetery.
On Wednesday, Miss Mollie Henry of Tricum.

Matrimonial

Miss Saxie Adair, daughter of Dr. G. W. Adair of Carlisle, and Mr. Guion Roberts of Kansas City, were married in Cincinnati Wednesday. The couple had never before met, and only knew each other though correspondence.

One of the prettiest “home weddings” of the year, occurred Wednesday afternoon, when Jas.. T. Earle, of Texas, was united in marriage to Miss Katie, the pretty daughter of J. J. Good. Rev. Harry A. Bagby officiating.The bride is one of the most popular young ladies in our county, while her husband is a young man of sterling qualities, and is liked by everybody. The happy couple left on the fast line for their home in Tyler Texas where Mr. Earle is engaged in the railroad business.

We unite in the general wishes for their prosperity and welfare.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 10 August, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 50

Page 1, Column 3

A house near Renaker post office the property of Dave Renaker, and occupied by Mrs. Kamer Hiley and her three daughters, all of whom bear not the best of character, was burned down Saturday. It is not know whether the parties who set fire to the house call themselves “White Caps” or not. Renaker says he will make it hot for the incendiaries.

(Four column picture of Public School Building, of Cynthiana, Kentucky. DH)

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 10 August, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 50

Page 1, Column 4

BERRY

Jas.. T. Earle, formerly railroad agent here, but now in the employ of the Int. & Gr. N. R. R. located in Tyler, TX, after a visit of two weeks to his parents, has returned. He took with him one of Kentucky’s most lovely daughters. Jim is a noble, good fellow, and his host of friends wish him and his new wife God speed on their journey and an endless joy in their western home.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 10 August, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 50

Page 4, Column 2

The Battle of Cynthiana

(Copied, three columns DH)

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 10 August, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 50

Page 4, Column 4

Neighborhood News

RUDDELL'S MIll

Died – Infant daughter of Oscar Rankin, near Steele’s Ford, last Sunday.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 17 August, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 51

Page 1, Column 1

The citizens of Louisville are making extensive preparations to entertain the “Orphan Brigade” at the annual reunion.

H. Register is the possessor of an ear of corn that is of rather peculiar formation, having a large center ear, fairly developed, surrounded by five smaller ears. Who has anything in the corn line to beat it?

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 17 August, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 51

Page 1, Column 2

THE GALLOWS

Cheated of their victim – North the wife murderer, commits suicide

Joe North, the wife murderer, committed suicide by hanging at jail, Tuesday evening at half past six o’clock.His body was found that time by Jailer Lail, when life had just become extinct.

The manner of the suicide clearly demonstrated that it fully preconceived. North had been allowed the privilege of roaming through the upper corridor, which adjoins his cell. Opposite his compartment is a cell occupied by John Miller, a Negro boy imprisoned for theft. At some time North had secured a leather strap about two feet long from the boy’s bed. At the time of the suicide the boy was in the jail yard, and no one was up stairs. Taking the rope North made a single knot in one end, and then ran the trap through a crevice between an iron bar, which extends across the top of his cell door, and the stone wall. This make a most durable fastening. On the other end North made a running noose, and then he climbed up on the cell door in order to permit the fastening of the noose around his neck. Everything being ready he jumped from his position to the floor, alighting so that his feet barely touched. The fall was not strong enough to break his neck, so he slowly strangled to death. The coroner’s jury so decided.

Lately accumulating evidence in the prosecution of North would certainly have established his guilt beyond any doubt, and his punishment fixed at death. North knew such to be the case and preferred to take his own life.A fitting finish to a fearful tragedy.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 17 August, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 51

Page 1, Column 3

Fire at Blue Licks

Sunday night between the hours of 12 and 1 o’clock, Hotel Arlington, at the Blue Licks Springs, burned to the ground. The fire broke out in the roof of the kitchen, and was quite small when discovered by a colored waiter named Sam Turney, who had taken a pitcher of water to a guest up stairs. The alarm was given to Capt. Turney, who was posting the books in the office, and the guests were all awakened in ample time to save their baggage.

The house was crowded with guests, there having been 300 registered at dinner Sunday. A great deal of hotel furniture was saved and much was lost. The hotel was insured for $14,000, and the furniture for $1,000, in the following companies: Underwriters $3,000, Fire Association, $3,000, Niagara $1,500, Home $3,000 and North British and Mercantile $1,000.

During the fire, Tom Gregory, of Paris fell from a roof and severely sprained his ankle.

Miss Minnie Ashbrook lost two handsome dresses; Mrs. Ashbrook lost an elegant gold headed umbrella; and F.M. Cosby had to come home without his unmentionables.

Mrs. Maxwell, of Cincinnati, lost a pair of diamond ear-rings, a pair of bracelets and a breast pin. Mrs. Ashbrook, Miss Lizzie Browning, F. M. Cosby, W. T. Lafferty, J. T. Lake, of this city, Mrs. Judge Peck, of Cincinnati, and others from here were at the hotel at the time but all escaped successfully.

The hotel was erected nine years ago, at a cost of over $30,000. This makes the second time the building has been burned on this spot – the other being burned during the war by incendiaries. We understand the hotel will not be rebuilt by Capt. Turney. This season was his most prosperous for years, and he claims that he would have made $1,500 more had he run on until the usual closing time in September.

Personals

Mr. & Mrs. B. T. Riggs entertained a large gathering Thursday evening in honor of their guests, Misses Wilson, Riggs and Dickerson, of Falmouth.
Born, on the 9th, to the wife of R. S. Haviland, a fine boy – William Smith Haviland.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 17 August, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 51

Page 1, Column 5

Matrimonial

During the latter part of next month, Gottlieb Huber, of Rutland and Miss Louise Blickenstarfer, of Switzerland, will be married. The couple have been engaged for five years and the bride will travel 4000 miles to meet her husband.

Died

Mr. Wm. Cassidy, a prominent lawyer of Rushville, IN, died Saturday last, aged over 60 years. He married Miss Amelia Lilly, daughter of the late Pleasant Lilly, of Leesburg, and a sister of Mrs. W. T. Burns, of this city.Mr. Burns and Miss Clay Lilly of Richmond attended the funeral.

Mr. Cassidy had been a life long Democrat, and was the leader of the party in his county for the past forty years. His funeral Tuesday was attended by the Eastern Indiana Bar. He left no children.

Mrs. Demaree, mother of Prof. W. Y. Demaree, of Millersburg Wesleyan College, died at Mt. Olivet Thursday.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 17 August, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 51

Page 1, Column 6

News From Neighboring Counties

Bourbon County

Born, to the wife of J. W. Bills, a son, to the wife of Wm. Fisher, a son.

Fayette County

Born, to S. S. King, a son.

Died, Mrs. Martha Maydwell, aged 73 years.

Salvation Army will soon strike Lexington

On Saturday evening Steve Rozelle the little boy who was accidentally shot by his playmate, died. He had apparently recovered from the effects of his injuries, and was about the streets at play when death overtook him.

Judge W. T. Lafferty was tendered and has accepted a position on Brig. Gen. Fewlass’ staff with the rank of Colonel. The General could not have made a better appointment.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 17 August, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 51

Page 4, Column 2

Neighborhood News

LEESBURG

Born; To the wife of Smith Bishop, a son, also to the wife of D. A. Worstell, a daughter.
O. P. H. Shropshire died at his home near Oxford, aged seventy-six years. His funeral was preached by Dr. Manly, of Louisville, and burial was at Georgetown.

MILLERSBURG

W. Y. Demaree returned Sunday from Mt. Olivet where he was summoned Thursday to see his mother, who was stricken with paralysis that morning about 8 o’clock and who died that night at a quarter past seven. She was buried at Mt. Olivet Friday afternoon about six o’clock, but will be removed to College Hill this fall or winter and buried beside her husband, the late Rev. D. G. B. Demaree.

TRICUM

Mr. James Renaker writes from California that he is doing well and that he and his wife are satisfied; that they will visit Kentucky this fall.
Mrs. J. J. Clifford was taken seriously ill Tuesday. Dr. Scott was called in and owing to his skill she is better at this writing.

CONNERSVILLE

Some fiend burned the Coppage school houses Monday night. Miss Cora Anderson had been teaching there.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 24 August, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 52

Page 1, Column 1 Members of the “Orphan Brigade” who are going to attend the reunion at Louisville on Sept. 19th, will please notify Secretary Norborne G. Gray, that proper preparations may be made.

Capt. Dan Turney is getting up a stock company with $250,000 capital to rebuild the Arlington Hotel, recently burned at Blue Licks, and also to build a railroad to the springs. A large amount of the stock has already been subscribed and the remainder will be readily obtained. The purpose of the company is to build a large, three story brick hotel, with all the latest conveniences. The railroad will be run from Myers station, on the Maysville railroad, across the country to the springs, a distance of six miles, and could be constructed at a cost of $40,000.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 24 August, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 52

Page 1, Column 2

Born:

To the wife of W. T. Handy, a daughter

Died:

On the 21st, Miss Tillie Kendall, wife of Wm. Kendall of Sylvan Dell.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 24 August, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 52

Page 1, Column 4

Religious

The Catholics of Falmouth are making extensive preparations to entertain the multitudes which are expected there tomorrow, to witness the blessing of the bell of St. Xavier church. Special trains will run each way. The Catholic Knights of Newport and Covington will be present and an excellent choir and brass band from Covington. Father Gadker invites all to attend.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 24 August, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 52

Page 1, Column 5

Neighborhood News

RUDDELL'S MILLS

Miss Iva Shaw, of Harrison, was the guest of Miss Dixie Knight several days last week.

TRICUM

Charley Renaker found a piece of money on his father’s farm one hundred and eleven years old.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 31 August, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 53

Page 1, Column 1

Neighborhood News

The store of Jas.. Terry at Poindexter burned Saturday night. Contents all destroyed.

Battle Grove Directors

At a meeting of the Directors of Battle Grove Cemetery, at the National Bank Saturday afternoon, August 23, 1889, J. Alex McKee tendered his resignation, which was accepted. On motion of Miles, S. McKee was elected to fill the vacancy thus created, and Alex. R. Victor was elected to fill the vacancy created by the death of J. W. Victor. J. A. Thorn was elected Secretary. The Board of Directors are: Alex R. Victor, M. S. McGee, J. Q. Ward, S. J. Ashbrook, C. R. Kimbrough, J. S. Withers, Treasurer, D. A. Givens, Pres.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 31 August, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 53

Page 1, Column 2

Neighborhood News

Interesting correspondence

(Letters between Co. William Price and others. Copied DH)

Born:

To the wife of A. Goldberg, on Tuesday morning, a girl.
To the wife of Felix Lake, a son.
To the wife of Lafe Dills, a son, Walter Sharp Dills.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 31 August, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 53

Page 1, Column 3

Died:

Mrs. Lida Lair Ammerman died at the home of her husband, J. H. Ammerman, Monday afternoon, Burial took place Tuesday afternoon.
Mrs. R. B. Kimbrough died Friday night last. Burial at Old Union Saturday. She had been a member of Union Baptist church for eighteen years, and was a daughter of Americus Craigmyle.
On Sunday morning last, Mrs. Lou Young,. Burial took place Monday morning at Battle Grove Cemetery.

Matrimonial

At the Bourbon House in Paris, at 5 p.m., Wednesday, Mr,. Beale Howard of Ruddell’s Mills, was married to Miss Artie Ewalt, of Lair.
This was not a runaway, but the parties preferred coming to Paris to be wedded and were accompanied by several friends, R. C. Sparks acting as best man. The bride is the daughter of Henry C. Ewalt, and a son of the late Paris Howard. The ceremony was performed by Rev. W. T. Rowland, in a most impressive manner, after which the party left for the home of the bride’s parents where a reception was given.

Religious

Fully 3,000 people were present at Falmouth Sunday to witness the blessing of the bells of the Catholic Church at that place. The ladies of the church set an elegant dinner on the grounds attached to the church, which was liberally patronized. The services were conducted by Rev. Bishop Maes, of Covington, assisted by Rev. Father Godker, pastor of St. Xavier’s Church, and several priests in the diocese. There were three bells. The Uniformed Knights of Bellevue, Dayton and Covington were present in a body, accompanied by bands of music and made a splendid appearance. There was a large crowd present from the surrounding district. The excursion netted a neat sum for Father Godker.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 31 August, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 53

Page 1, Column 5

Neighborhood News

LAIR

Born – To the wife of J. L. Scott, a daughter, on the 24th inst.
Wm. Ballinger and Geo. Houston attended the funeral of their uncle in Bracken county this week.
Mrs. Sam Pollitt, of Bracken county, and Mrs. Lee Harper of Ruddell’s Mills, visited relatives here last week.
Miss Fannie Zoller, of your city, has been the guest of her sister, Mrs. O. L. Ballinger

LEESBURG

The little two and a half year old son of Rev. E. C. Savage fell in a pool at Mr. John McLoney’s on Friday evening last and was drowned. The yard gate was left open and he wandered out into the lot. The remains were taken to Dover, Mason county, for interment. His parents have the sympathy of the entire community in the sudden and sad loss of their only child.

Harrison County Courier
Saturday 31 August, 1889
-
Evans D. Veach, Publisher
Volume 2, Number 53

Page 4, Column 1

The three leading fraternal orders of the world stand numerically about as follows:
Oddfellows, 1,226,000
Masons 1,085,000
Knights of Pythias, 300,000.

Microfilm owned by Charles Felix, Cynthiana, KY 2002-3
Loaned to Col. Doug Harper, Biloxi, MS, for extraction of data of interest to him. Finished in Aug 2003
Transcribed by Doug Harper


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