LGS NEWS

Volume 19, Issue 03 (March 2008)

Gregory Stanton Claypool, Editor

Louisville Genealogical Society
PO Box 5164
Louisville, KY 40255-0164

HOME


Meetings & Workshops:

MARCH 11th -- Women at the Forefront in Kentucky, 1775-1810

This program is funded in part by the Kentucky Humanities Council, Inc. and Brown-Forman Corporation.

Genie Potter was born in Mobile, Alabama but has lived in Louisville for the past 35 years. While she was an elementary school librarian, she realized there were few materials about Kentucky women, so she resigned and published the book called KENTUCKY WOMEN. Some of the women’s biographies were turned into The Kentucky Women Radio Project, and several play productions have been written by Louisville playwright Nancy Gall-Clayton. Later, Genie was director of the Kentucky Commission on Women, where she and her staff produced Our Legacy, Our Future, an educational website and video based on Kentucky women’s history.

What was life like for the pioneer women who came to Kentucky in the late 18th and early 19th centuries? Drawing on oral histories court records, dissertations, archival collections, letters, books and diaries, Potter tells their story. Her illustrated talk deepens our understanding of the complexities women moving to the First West faced, whether they were free whites or enslaved blacks.

MARCH 25th --How to have a successful Oral History

Lynn Olympia is going to join us for this workshop to discuss how to do an oral history. We all would really want to know how you go about doing this, how to approach someone to provide an oral history, how to get organized, what do you ask to get the most from an oral history inquiry. This should be fun since Lynn is a great speaker and full of valuable advice.

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As a Reminder to the Membership

Regular LGS meetings are held at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints at the corner of Linn Station Road and Hurstbourne Lane from 1:00-3:00 p.m. Caffeine, Tobacco and Alcohol are not permitted on the premises.

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Online with Ivan

Beginning with this column, I will examine what Ancestry.com, Heritage Quest Online, and Footnote.com offer for genealogical research. This column explores Ancestry.com.

Ancestry.com, as of February 23, 2008, offered 25,097 databases for subscribers’ use. By the time you read this, it will probably exceed 25,100 as they regularly add new databases and update existing materials. Ancestry.com is a part of The Generations Network which also includes MyFamily.com, Genealogy.com, Rootsweb.com, TGN.com, FamilyTreeMaker.com, and AncestryMagazine.com. They group their databases under these headings: Census & Voter Lists, Birth, Marriage & Death, Military, Immigration & Emigration, Family Trees, Newspapers & Periodicals, Directories & Member Lists, Stories, Memories & Histories, Court, Land, Willa & Financial, Reference Materials & Finding Aids, Pictures, and Maps, Atlases & Gazetteers.

Their databases include information from the United States, United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, Deutschland (Germany) Italia, France, and Sverige (Sweden). They offer two types of subscriptions: U.S. Deluxe and World Deluxe. The type of subscription you choose determines the areas to which you have access. You may subscribe for a month, a quarter, or a year. They offer a 14 day free trial period. Before subscribing to the World Deluxe, you will want to check to make sure the materials offered cover the timeframe for your research. For my Baugh line, I needed English records in the 1600s; their English records start in the 1800s. You may need to contact Ancestry.com to determine the timeframe for the country in which you want to research. I have found their personnel very friendly and capable.

When using the free trial period, plan the things for which you want to search before activating the trial; this helps you get the most from the free time. It will also help you decide the type of subscription you want, if any. They do have a limited number of databases available at no charge.

One feature I particularly find helpful is the census records on line. They have images of the actual census which can be quite useful in noting the neighbors which may lead to information about families that intermarried. The census records are indexed to facilitate your searches. Another feature I find useful is the magnifying glass which enables you to examine a small area in close detail when the handwriting isn’t as clear as it could be. You may also print the census images when you have a printer attached to your computer. You may also print blank census forms to know the type of information a particular decennial census includes.

They offer online tips (Learning Center), webinars (online seminars), and will give suggestions to help you in your research. Some libraries have subscriptions which enable you to spend time researching the materials offered at Ancestry.com.

Is it a perfect site? No, but I find it provides me with many tools to help me narrow my research to help me decide if the information I seek is available in their online resources.

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LGS NEEDS YOUR HELP:
"As you may know our computer LCD projector we had just acquired from the successful clock raffle went missing from the LGS library. The LGS board has voted to ask for volunteer contributions to replace it. We have already received $763 toward replacement. (The missing projector cost more than $800.) If you would like to contribute, please send a check marked Projector Fund to: LGS Treasurer, PO Box 24566, Louisville KY 40224-0566 or give cash to our Treasurer, Ross Sherer. Contributions are tax deductible and a note confirming your cash contribution will be provided. “ Thank You Very Much ”

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New Members:
Beverley Ballentine, 1209 Navajo Court, Louisville, KY 40207
Anne Stokes Moore, 9805 Reynolds Road, Louisville, KY 40223
Mary E. Roe, 3505 Williams Ave., N.E., Salem, OR 97301

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Alexander Hamilton Society of Kentucky

March 29th—10:30a.m. Washington’s Crossing by David Hackett Fisher, Dr. Krebs, a native of Germany, will discuss the treatment of Hessian soldiers after the Battle of Trenton.

April 19th — 10:30 a,m. Bellarmine history professor, Dr. Aaron Hoffman, will review the book, Revolutionary Characters by Gordon S. Wood.

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Bullitt County Genealogical Society meets Saturday, March 15, 10 a.m., at Ridgway Library, Shepherdsville. Program: Online Resources, Ivan Baugh.

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Spencer County Historical and Genealogical Society dinner meeting, Monday, March 24, 6 p.m., Elk Creek Restaurant, Taylorsville. Dr. John Kleber will speak on Abraham Lincoln. For reservations, contact Hilda Snider, 502-477-2980.

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Ancestral Trails Historical Society will host its 6th annual Genealogy & History Book Fair on Saturday, Apr.12th from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. at the Prichard Community Center in Elizabethtown, KY. Entertainment and a Lincoln Workshop throughout the day. Info http://www.aths.com or call Rosa at 270-765-4305.

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The Kentucky Historical Society and the Kentucky Genealogical Society
Present
Online Databases for Genealogy Research
and
LDS Records for Genealogy Research
Saturday, March 8, 2008 10:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.
Thomas D. Clark Center for Kentucky History
100 West Broadway
Frankfort, KY 40601

Family historians can miss valuable information by not knowing about all the different kinds of information that a resource provides. In the morning program, Louisville genealogist Ivan Baugh will explain the variety of databases available online to researchers and highlight the benefits of each. In the afternoon, Valerie Edgeworth of KDLA will discuss the kinds of information that can be found in LDS records.

Registration before noon on Friday, March 7, is required. Workshop participation is complimentary. A light lunch is available for registrants only from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., for $6, payable at the door. To register, call 502-564-1792, ext. 4460 or email Refdesk@ky.gov.

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MARYLAND TO KENTUCKY REUNION

A genealogy convention of descendants of Marylanders to Kentucky will be held on June 6 to 8, 2008, at St. Thomas Farm, Bardstown, Kentucky. Convention plans include family lineage research and sharing, tours of local churches, motherhouses and other historical sites, receptions, presentations, book selling and highlighting the bicentennial of the Diocese of Bardstown, forerunner of the Archdiocese of Louisville. For further information, email: mdtoky@yahoo.com , or log on: http://www.geocities.com/mdtoky/page1.html , or write: Registrar, P.O. Box 7, St. Mary, KY 40063.
Registration fee is only $15. Please register as soon as possible due to space limitations.

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Palatines to America: German Genealogical Society National Conference. June 19-21, 2008, in Columbus, Ohio. For information, go to http://palamnationalconference.org/registration/

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Louisville Genealogical Society would like to extend its sympathy to the Hamm Family over the untimely death of Earl Hamm, 80, of 711 McAlister in Sun City Center. Mr. Hamm is the brother in law of Jane Turner Hamm and brother to her husband, Clyde Hamm.

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The Beargrass-St. Matthews Historical Society program The History of Civil Rights Movement in Louisville. Speaker: U of L History Professor Tracy K'Meyer, 2pm, Sunday, March 16 Please note change of date from March 9 St. Matthews City Hall/ Eline Library Building 2nd floor 3940 Grandview Avenue between Browns and Breckenridge Lanes.

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LGS Spring Trip:
The Louisville Genealogical Society will be having groups going to the Atlanta National Archives and to the Ft. Wayne, Indiana Library. The tentative dates will be May 18-25 for both groups. Travel by car availability is on a first come first served basis. Hotel accommodations and travel questions are to be directed to Larry Selby 502-244-1240, lselby1@bellsouth.net.

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