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Thursday, October 06, 2005 - Interior Journal, Lincoln Co. KY
 
Lincoln County aviation pioneer Richard Caswell Saufley was inducted into the Kentucky Aviation Hall of Fame on Saturday.

Saufley was a scholar, an innovator and America's 14th Naval Aviator. Additionally, he was Kentucky's first naval aviator and flew higher and longer than any other man alive.

In an age when no one knew the limits of aviation, Caswell Saufley dared to learn.

In those early days of aviation (the Wrights first flew in 1903, and Saufley's work was in the mid 'teens), no one knew how long, how far, how high an aviator could fly. Modern naval aviation is built on the knowledge his experimentation brought. He experimented with ship-based aviation, and he developed doctrines still in use today.

Sometimes Saufley was launched from floating barges while working with the Navy to develop methods used on aircraft carriers.

With his induction, Saufley joins such aviation greats as Space Shuttle commander Story Musgrave, former Delta Airlines president Whitley Hawkins and Matthew Sellers, who designed, built and flew Kentucky’s first airplane in 1908.

Saufley was born in Lincoln County in 1885 and grew up on Danville Avenue in Stanford. He died in the line of duty in 1916 after his aircraft malfunctioned — and after setting another altitude record.

Among other records, Saufley ascended to over 16,000 feet with no supplemental oxygen ... and no cockpit; he flew in the open, perched on a small seat.

On hand for the ceremonies were Saufley’s great grandnephews George and “Short” Saufley of Stanford and Zach Saufley of Frankfort, as well as their families.

Lincoln County aviation pioneer Richard Caswell Saufley was inducted into the Kentucky Aviation Hall of Fame on Saturday.

Saufley was a scholar, an innovator and America's 14th Naval Aviator. Additionally, he was Kentucky's first naval aviator and flew higher and longer than any other man alive.

In an age when no one knew the limits of aviation, Caswell Saufley dared to learn.

In those early days of aviation (the Wrights first flew in 1903, and Saufley's work was in the mid 'teens), no one knew how long, how far, how high an aviator could fly. Modern naval aviation is built on the knowledge his experimentation brought. He experimented with ship-based aviation, and he developed doctrines still in use today.

Sometimes Saufley was launched from floating barges while working with the Navy to develop methods used on aircraft carriers.

With his induction, Saufley joins such aviation greats as Space Shuttle commander Story Musgrave, former Delta Airlines president Whitley Hawkins and Matthew Sellers, who designed, built and flew Kentucky’s first airplane in 1908.

Saufley was born in Lincoln County in 1885 and grew up on Danville Avenue in Stanford. He died in the line of duty in 1916 after his aircraft malfunctioned — and after setting another altitude record.

Among other records, Saufley ascended to over 16,000 feet with no supplemental oxygen ... and no cockpit; he flew in the open, perched on a small seat.

On hand for the ceremonies were Saufley’s great grandnephews George and “Short” Saufley of Stanford and Zach Saufley of Frankfort, as well as their families.

Lincoln County aviation pioneer Richard Caswell Saufley was inducted into the Kentucky Aviation Hall of Fame on Saturday.

Saufley was a scholar, an innovator and America's 14th Naval Aviator. Additionally, he was Kentucky's first naval aviator and flew higher and longer than any other man alive.

In an age when no one knew the limits of aviation, Caswell Saufley dared to learn.

In those early days of aviation (the Wrights first flew in 1903, and Saufley's work was in the mid 'teens), no one knew how long, how far, how high an aviator could fly. Modern naval aviation is built on the knowledge his experimentation brought. He experimented with ship-based aviation, and he developed doctrines still in use today.

Sometimes Saufley was launched from floating barges while working with the Navy to develop methods used on aircraft carriers.

With his induction, Saufley joins such aviation greats as Space Shuttle commander Story Musgrave, former Delta Airlines president Whitley Hawkins and Matthew Sellers, who designed, built and flew Kentucky’s first airplane in 1908.

Saufley was born in Lincoln County in 1885 and grew up on Danville Avenue in Stanford. He died in the line of duty in 1916 after his aircraft malfunctioned — and after setting another altitude record.

Among other records, Saufley ascended to over 16,000 feet with no supplemental oxygen ... and no cockpit; he flew in the open, perched on a small seat.

On hand for the ceremonies were Saufley’s great grandnephews George and “Short” Saufley of Stanford and Zach Saufley of Frankfort, as well as their families.