The Departure from the Wood River Encampment, May 14, 1804
By Gary R. Lucy

History of Lewis, Clark, Knox, and Scotland Counties Missouri.
Pendleton & Grant County Biographies.

Most generously transcribed and submitted to me by Nancy Bray.
Thank you so much Nancy, you are vital asset & a wonderful supporter of the site!

The following biographies were taken from the book : History of Lewis, Clark, Knox, and Scotland Counties Missouri. This book was originally published by the The Goodspeed Publishing Co in 1887. I ordered my copy from Janaway Publishing, Inc. It had to be reprinted, so it took about 8 weeks to receive. The book contains 1229 pages and deals with the history of the above mentioned counties, and has a section of biographies. I have scanned through it and pulled the ones that mention Pendleton County. There are some that are also Grant Co,. If I knew the connection to Pendleton County, I also included that. There were several people mentioned in the book that had Kentucky connections, but did not give the county. If you think one of your ancestors settled in any of these counties, I will be happy to check for you. I hope that you enjoy these selections, and also hope that maybe some will break down a brick wall or two. There will be about 32 different biographies, so just bare with me, because it may take a while to type them up. 
Nancy Bray
CBray53321@aol.com




Lewis County, Missouri

O. S. Barker, furniture dealer and undertaker, was born in Grant County, Ky., August 21, 1834. He was reared and educated in that county, and followed the carpenter's trade until about 1862, when he engaged in his present business. He had come to La Grange in 1855, with his father, and at the latter's death, about 1875, he took charge of the business, and in 1883, added a line of furniture. He was married in 1857 to Sarah F. Smith, a native of this county. Their children consist of four daughters and three sons, two of the latter and on of the former now deceased, as is also the mother. Their eldest daughter is a graduate of La Grange College. The father, Reuben L., was a native of Grant County, Ky., where he was born in 1813. He was a carpenter, and in 1855 came to La Grange, where the mother, Bertha (Brown), a native of the same county, is still living. They have three sons and two daughters. The paternal grandfather, Stephen, was a soldier of the Revolution, and died in Kentucky.

David Newton Glaves, farmer, was born in Pendleton County, Ky., in 1821, the son of Michael and Patsy (Clarkson) Glaves, the former of Irish ancestry, and born in Virginia, and the latter a native of Bourbon County, Ky., born about 1801. The grandfather, Michael, Sr., was a native of Ireland. The father came to Pendleton County, Ky., as a young man, and was married in 1819, and died only four years later. He was in the war of 1812. The mother came to this county in 1857, where she died in 1872. Our subject was reared by his mother, chiefly, and with few educational advantages. When nineteen he began farming independently, and caring for his mother. He was married in 1847, to Nancy, a daughter of Graham and Elizabeth Wallace, and a native of Harrison County, Ky. Their children are James H., Elizabeth, John N., Martha, William M., Robert G., and David J. (a lawyer, and present clerk of the State Senate). Our subject came to this county in 1857, and four years later bought 120 acres of his present farm, which now embraces 360 acres of finely improved land. He also owns forty acres elsewhere. He is a Democrat, and first voted for Polk, and is a prominent member of the Masonic order. He and his family are Baptists.

James R. Glaves, farmer and stock raiser, was born in Pendleton County, Ky., in 1830, the son of Thomas T. and Elizabeth (Dance) Glaves, the former of English descent, born in Virginia in 1972, and the latter of the same State, born in 1800. The father came to Pendleton County, Ky., in his youth, and died in 1843. The mother lived in Kentucky from infancy, and in 1864 came to this county, where she died November 6, 1884. Our subject, the fourth of seven children, educated himself, and lived with his mother from his twelfth year to his majority. At the age of eighteen he began learning the blacksmith's trade, and three years later began independently, excelling especially in horseshoeing. In 1855 he came to this county, and farmed with his brother. Olivia N., the daughter of Nimrod Walters, became his wife October 24, 1858. She was born in this county in 1842. Their children are John T., Mary A. (wife of P. M. Day), William E., Sarah E., Emmet, Robert C., Charles N. Nimrod, Alma and Albert (twins), Archie, Daisy M. and Franklin P. He came--after six years in Highland Township--in 1863 to his estate of 160 acres, and in 1879 traded it for his present home. He has four farms in this county, and erected many buildings; he owns at present 400 acres, and is an influential citizen. He is a Democrat, and voted for Pierce. He is a Mason, and he and his wife and three children are members of the Christian Church, of which he is a deacon.

William M. Glaves, merchant, was born in Lewis County, September 9, 1858, the son of William M. and Mary A. (Wallace) Glaves, the former born in 1820, in Pendleton County, Ky., where he married in 1846. In 1851 he came to this county, and finally became owner of 560 acres of land, and died in August, 1881, as a prominent citizen. The mother, born in the above county in Kentucky, in 1827, has had eleven children. Our subject, the seventh, was educated at La Grange College, and lived at home until twenty-three years of age. January 31, 1884, he married Emma, daughter of Walton True, and born in Knox County, Mo., in May 1865. Their only child, Elbert V., was born February 14, 1885. Since April, 1884, our subject has been a merchant at Monticello, the only one in the place, and has met with marked success. He is a Democrat, and first voted for Hancock. He has been a steward and superintendent of Sunday schools in the Methodist Episcopal Church, serving four years in the latter position. His wife is a member of the same church.

Robert G. Glaves is a farmer and stock raiser. He was born April 6, 1859, in this county, the sixth of seven children of D. N. and Nancy A. (Wallace) Glaves, the former of Scotch-Irish ancestry, born in Pendleton County, in 1821. The grandfather, Michael, was a Virginian, the son of Michael, Sr., a native of Ireland. The younger Michael went to Kentucky, where he married and had two children. He was accidentally killed by a horse, when D. N., the father, was about eighteen months old. The father was meagerly educated, and was married December, 1847. In 1857 he came to this county, and since 1861 has lived on his present farm, which embraces 360 acres. Both parents are Baptists. Our subject attended La Grange College for one term, and was married December 24, 1884. His wife, Sallie T., is the daughter of John N. and Martha A. Turner, and a native of this county. He has since lived on his present farm which includes 160 acres on Oyster Prairie. He is a thorough business man, and has engaged largely in stock raising. He voted for Gen. Hancock, the candidate of his party. He and his wife are Baptists. The grandfather, Michael, was a lieutenant in the war of 1812, and his sword and watch are in possession of the family of the father, D. N. The watch has served as time-piece for two generations.

John W. Johnson, farmer and blacksmith, was born in Pendleton County, Ky., in 1833, the third of eight children of Jeremiah and Jane (Humphrey) Johnson, born in the above county in 1809, on October 5 and October 9, respectively. The grandfather, Nelson, came to this county in 1835, and located near Monticello as a farmer. The father was reared in the above county, and married in 1830. He removed to this county with his father, and in 1844, went to Canton, where he engaged in blacksmithing. He was a captain in the militia, and started to help to adjust the Missouri-Iowa boundary line question, but which was settled before his arrival. He died in January, 1849. He held to the Methodist faith, while his wife belonged to the Baptist Church. Our subject remained at home until he was twenty-four years of age, and received a good business education. In his youth he was the main support of his father's family. He was married in 1857 to Christenah, a daughter of William and Frances Cave. She was born in Marion County in 1836. Their children are Frances Mary, the wife of F. M. Wagner; Rebecca, the wife of J. S. Shackleford; Walter D.; Edna; William; Jerry; David and Abner. He lived for a time at Barr's mill, and since then has been on his present farm, with the exception of three years at Durham, where he has been engaged in blacksmithing. Farming has been his chief occupation, and he has also been successfully engaged as a teacher. In 1878 he became a justice, but resigned about a year later. He was reared a Whig, but since the was has been a Democrat. He is a member of the I.O.O.F. and he, his wife, and six children are members of the Baptist Church.

A. C. Levengood was named in honor of Alexander Campbell. His birth occurred in Pendleton County, Ky., in 1843, he being son of Rev. Peter and Catherine (Orr) Levengood, natives of Bourbon County, Ky. The father was a minister of the Christian Church until his death in 1848, having spent his entire life in Kentucky. Our subject came to this State when he was about seventeen years of age, and , after ten years in Scotland County, he moved to his present home. His estate embraces 200 acres of fine land, well improved. He married in Scotland County to Nancy, a daughter of James Hook, a native of Kentucky. Their children were Lillie M., Lizzie, Stella (deceased), Sarah C., Oral and Eva. Our subject is a Democrat, and is of Irish-German origin.

David Peterson, farmer, was born in Luzerne (now Wyoming), county, Penn., in December, 1835, the son of Jarius and Hannah (Post) Peterson. At an early day three brothers came from England, and located in Orange County, N. Y. The father, a descendant of theirs, was born in 1803, in that county, and the mother in 1809 in Luzerne County, Penn. She died in 1854, and the father married Clarinda Sprague, who now lives in Lake County, Ind. The father was a farmer, and in 1850 left Pennsylvania, and went to the latter county. He died in 1869. Our subject, one of twins in a family of eleven children, lived in Indiana after his fourteenth year, but had lived with his grandparents from his eight year. He worked at various things in Indiana, and in 1856 went to Iowa and the following year removed to this county. March 10, 1859, he married Mary E., daughter of John and Annie E. Wright, and born in Scott County, Ky., in 1833. Their children are Eliza A., and James H. He then began farming in this township, where he bought property. In August, 1865, his wife died, and seven years later he married Eliza A., a daughter of G. B. Sharp, and born in Pendleton County, Ky., in 1850. Their children are Lucretia, Janie, Jarius, David, Ollie and George. She died in October, 1886. He had begun the carpenter's trade in 1865, which he has continued, until about three years ago. Since 1870 he has been on his present estate, which embraces 207 acres. He first voted for Bell, has since been a Republican. He is a member of the Baptist Church, and of the Anti-Horse-Thief-Association.

John S. Shackleford, farmer and stock raiser, was born in Palmyra in 1836, the eldest of nine children of John B. and Sarah (Abell) Shackleford, natives of Kentucky, and born in 1815, the former in January, and the latter in October. The grandfather, John, was a pioneer of Palmyra, where he was a hotel proprietor, and spent his later years. The father was reared in Kentucky, and married in 1835. He then came to this State, and after a year at Palmyra came to this county. The following year he bought several hundred acres of land near the site of Durham, where he became an influential farmer. He died February 1, 1881, and the mother followed him October 9, 1886. Both were members of the Baptist Church. The common schools, gave our subject few school advantages, and in 1858 he married Mary, a daughter of John and Julia Wallace, formerly of Kentucky. She was born in 1838 in this county. Their only child, Sarah, is now Mrs. Quinn. Our subject has been on his present estate since 1869. It comprises 520 acres of well improved land at his home, and 160 acres not far distant. He has been a successful stock raiser as well as farmer. He was on Porter's raid in Northeast Missouri, was captured in 1862, taken to Palmyra and St Louis, and finally imprisoned at Alton. He has always been a Democrat, and he and his family are members of the Baptist Church.
(Julia McCann Wallace was the daughter of Leanty and Mary Dawson McCann of Pendleton County, Ky. Leanty, and his first wife Margaret, were the ggggrandparents of Nancy Bray).

G. B. Sharp, farmer, was born in Lexington, Ky., in 1820, the son of James and Jane (Calahan) Sharp, the former of English stock, born in 1797 in Kenton County, Ky., and the latter in North Carolina in 1793, of Welsh-Dutch origin. The father lived in Fayette County til 1827, when he moved to Kenton County, where he died two years later. He was a soldier of 1812. The mother died in 1852. Their children are Margaret A. (the widow of J. P. Hughes), G. B., Louisa J. (the wife of L. Van Landingham), and Anna M. (the wife of W. Van Landingham). Our subject was seven years old when they went to Kenton County, and made his home with his mother for twenty years after. In April, 1847, he married Harriet Norton, of Grant County, Ky., who was born in 1831. Their only child is George B. In 1852-54 our subject taught penmanship, and then moved to Schuyler County, Ill., in the same work. In 1856 his wife died, and he returned to Kentucky, and in February, 1858, married Mary J. Lummis, who was born in Grant County, Ky., in 1839. Soon after marriage he went to his 120 acre estate in Illinois, but in 1868 sold out and bought eighty acres of his present home, which now embraces 247 acres. He is a Mason; as a Democrat, he first voted for Polk. He and his wife and four children are members of the Baptist Church, of which he is a trustee. His children are Arnold D., James O., Newton E., Ollie E., Richard E., Charles W. and Martha A.

Hon. R. M. Wallace, editor and proprietor of the La Grange Democrat, was born in this county in 1846. He was reared on a farm, and graduated from La Grange College in the class of 1872. The Democrat was founded the same year by T. O. Towles & Co., with our subject as local and Mr. Towles as managing editor. Three years later our subject purchased the entire outfit, and has since published the paper as an advocate of Democratic principles. Mr Wallace was public administrator from 1876 to 1880, and was a member of the Legislature from the later date until 1884. He is a present clerk of the Agricultural Committee of Congress. The year of his graduation he married Hattie A., a daughter of Henry H. Downing, a pioneer of Scotland County. They have had two sons and one daughter. Our subject is a Mason, an Odd Fellow and member of the A. O. U. W. He and his wife are members of the Baptist Church. The paternal great-grandfather, a Scotchman, located in Virginia. Graham, the grandfather, was reared and married in Kentucky, and long after came to this county, where he died. He was in the war of 1812, under Gen. Harrison. The father, John, was born in Pendleton County, Ky., in 1812, and there married Julia A. McCann, and in 1832 came to what is now Dickerson Township. They afterward settled in Highland Township, where they died in 1864 and 1868, respectively. Our subject is one of twelve children, eight of whom grew to maturity.
(Will add just a little information here on John and Julia McCann Wallace, which is taken from the Barton Papers: They were married in Pendleton County, Ky., and emigrated to Lewis County, Missouri shortly after marriage with her mother's family. The Wallaces settled on a Lewis Co. farm about 3 miles directly south of what is now the town of Ewing, Mo. Ewing, Mo. is either on the land or the edge of the land once belonging to Julia's half brother William Dodd Ewing. They spent the remainder of their lives on this farm. They had one daughter who was named Mary, and who married Sam Schackleford and spent her entire life on the Wallace homestead--The Schacklefords had but one child, a daughter Elizabeth who married Wm. Quinn. The Quinns had three children-a daughter, and Sam and Wm. Quinn. The youngest of the Quinn boys is now our State Rep. to Jefferson City, Mo. The daughter married a doctor and moved away--the other boy is a prosperous farmer. John and Julia Wallace had among others a son, John (II) who married and spent his entire life in Lewis Co., Mo. John (II) Wallace's children were Bob Wallace, still living (about 85)in Lewis Co.-no children; John Wallace deceased, left heirs in Lewis Co., Mo.; Sally Wakefield deceased left one daughter (Mrs. Roberts, Canton Mo.); Dr. Earnest Wallace deceased left a daughter married and living LaBelle, Mo. The old Wallace homestead which joined the Ewing homestead has been sold. Just prior to coming to Missouri John Wallace was made guardian of the two Ewing children who were half-sister and half brother to his wife Julia McCann. William Ewing lived with his half sister Julia McCann Wallace until he married in 1851. The other Ewing child was named Elizabeth. Julia's father Leanty died in 1820, and her mother, Mary "Polly Dawson McCann" remarried to a John Ewing. They had two children, and after John's death, she came with John and Julia to Missouri. Mary Dawson is buried in the Ewing-Wallace-McCann burial ground about 3 miles south of Ewing, Lewis Co., Mo. She died 9-28-1838 age 55--she is named as Mary, the wife of John Ewing).

William H. Wallace, farmer, and breeder of Shorthorn cattle and good stock generally, was born in 1849, in this county, the fifth of seven living children of John and Julia (McCann) Wallace, natives of Pendleton County, Ky., born in 1812 and 1815, respectively. The father was of Scotch ancestry, the son of Graham, a Virginian by birth, and a lieutenant in the war of 1812, from Kentucky, who served in the Northwest and afterward in the South. He headed a company to New Orleans, and arrived the day after the battle. He had few advantages, and spent his young manhood in Kentucky, learning the millwright trade, with a Mr. Makemson, whose daughter he afterward married. His wife taught him to read, and his studious habits afterward made him well informed in history. He died about 1870. He had erected mills in Kentucky, Ohio and Missouri. The father was reared and married in his native State, and in 1835 came to this county, where he soon became a prominent farmer and stock grower. He died in 1864, and his widow five years later. Both were devoted to the Baptist faith, and the father was a deacon of the church for many years. Our subject lived with his parents until their deaths, and received few school advantages. On December 25, 1872, Anna E., a daughter of John B. and Sarah (Abell) Shackleford, became his wife. Their children are John R., Mellie, Elbert, James, Sallie, Hester and Maggie. He soon removed to Salem Township, and in 1875 bought his present estate, a fine farm of 326 acres. He also has about 100 acres in another tract. A part of this was inherited. He is a Democrat, and first voted for Greeley. He is a Master of the A. O. U. W. lodge, at Lewiston, and he and his wife are members of the Baptist Church.

James B. Wallace, farmer, was born in 1814, in Pendleton County, Ky., the son of Graham and Elizabeth (Makemson) Wallace, the former of Scotch descent, born in Fayette County, Ky., in 1789. He was a millwright, and in later life a farmer, having married in Harrison County, Ky., and moved to Pendleton County, and then to this one, where he became owner of 240 acres. He was a soldier in the war of 1812, and died in 1870. The mother of Irish descent, born in Harrison County, Ky., in 1792, and deceased in this county in 1861. Our subject, the second of eleven children, was educated in his native county, and lived at home until of age. In 1836 he married Parthena, a daughter of John and Cleopatra (Clay) Turner, and who was born in Pendleton County, Ky., in 1815, and deceased in June, 1882. Their children are Lucretia, the wife of Thomas Piner; Lizzie, the wife of W. H. Brisco; Graham S.; Cleopatra F. and Thomas C. He then began farming, and in 1857 bought 440 acres, where he has since resided. He has been most successful as a farmer and stock raiser. His two-story brick residence was erected in 1875, at a cost of $2,400. He is a Democrat, and first voted for Harrison as a Whig. He was a captain in the militia, and is a Mason. He has been deacon for the past twenty years, and for thirty-five years a member of the Missionary Baptist Church.

This is the conclusion of the Lewis County biographies.

 

Clark County, Missouri

John M. Crook, a prominent pioneer of Clark County, was born May 13, 1823, in Grant County, Ky. His is the only living child of William and Nancy (McCann) Crook, the former of English origin, born in 1796, in Bourbon County, Ky., and the latter a native of Virginia, of Irish descent. After a youth spent in Mason County, Ky., the parents married and came to Pendleton County, and thence to Grant County, from which place they immigrated to Quincy, Ill., when our subject was twelve years old. They lived chiefly at Burton until 1838, when they came to Winchester, and here died, the mother in 1850, and the father in 1879. The father was a skillful cabinet-maker, but during his western residence was devoted chiefly to farming. Our subject lived with his parents until the age of twenty-four, and in the meantime had leaned the plasterer's trade. He continued this business until 1854, when he married, and after two years in Winchester began farming. It was three years later that he moved to another farm, and about the same length of time afterward he went to Kansas. He spent but a short time there, and then came to his present home. In 1868 he spent a few months working on the Union Pacific Railway, in Colorado. His wife, Armilda, a daughter of Lawrence and Mary (Norton) Buskirk was born September 25, 1831, in Grant County, Ky., and was married May 7, 1864. Their children are Mary E., Nancy A., Sarah J., Mattie and Willie. Our subject is a reliable and respected citizen, and has held the political principles of the Whig and Republican parties in succession. He served as constable for eight years. He and his wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church.
(Another bit of added information: Nancy McCann Crook was the daughter of Leanty McCann and his first wife Margaret. Leanty and Margaret McCann, along with 4 other family members came to America from Tyrone County, Ireland in the year of 1789, and settled in Berkley County, Virginia.)

John Ewing was born in Pendleton, Ky., December 1, 1821, and is the son of Elijah and Susanna (Makemson) Ewing, both natives of the same county in Kentucky, and of German and Irish descent, respectively. They were married in Kentucky, and the father farmed here for some time, when an anxiety to go west came over him; consequently he immigrated to Northeast Missouri, and located in Lewis County in 1835, where he was numbered among the pioneer settlers. In 1836 he moved to Clark County, and remained here for thirty-three years, or until his death in 1869, at the age of seventy-two. He was a Democrat in politics, and was for many years a worthy and useful member in the Baptist Church. His wife was a member of the same church. Our subject was but fourteen years old when brought to Clark County. His father and others of his neighbors built a rude log house, split logs for seats and desks, and hired a teacher for the winter term of three months' school. These advantages our subject had for an education. He had property which he improved up to the age of twenty-eight, when he left the paternal roof, and immigrated to California during the first gold fever excitement. After remaining in the Pacific State for two years he returned to Missouri, where he has ever since lived. He married Miss Mary Frances Cornelius, daughter of Reuben and Elizabeth Cornelius, both natives of Kentucky. By hard work and economy he has reared and educated his three sons, all of whom are intelligent, enterprising men. The eldest son, James H., was married in November, 1884, to Miss Elmira I. Suter, of Clark County. J.S. and B.F., are single, and make their home with their parents. Our subject is one of Clark County's most enterprising farmers. He has over 240 acres of land well stocked and well improved. During the war he was in the militia for a few months, and in several skirmishes in Northeast Missouri. Our subject is a Democrat in his political views, but was formerly a Whig. He is a member of the Grange society, and he and wife are members of the Baptist Church.

William T. Turner was born in Scotland County, Mo., July 27, 1857, and is the eldest son of John M. Turner, a native of Pendleton County, Ky. The mother, whose maiden name was McMana, was also a native of Pendleton County, Ky., born June 2, 1823. John M. Turner was nine years old at the time of his father's death, and he made his home in Kentucky with a cousin, Joseph Wallace, by whom he was partly raised. At the age of twenty-one he became desirous of immigrating to the West, and this he finally did, locating in Lewis County, Mo., where he followed agricultural pursuits. At the age of twenty-two he moved to Scotland County, where he resided for over twenty years, engaged as before in tilling the soil. When he first came to the latter county he married Miss Ellen McMana, a native of Kentucky, and the daughter of Joseph McMana. The fruits of this union were five children: Mary F. (Mrs. John St Clair), William T., George H. and Henry W. (twins), and Robert F. (died in 1867) In 1877 the father sold out in Scotland County and farmed on rented land one year, in Knox County, while prospecting. By the following year he had located a place in Clark County, which he purchased, and lived upon until September 3, 1886, when death claimed him as a victim. He was a Democrat in politics, and a member of the Baptist Church. His widow resides in Clark County, and her son, George H., lives with her and manages the farm. She is also a member of the Baptist Church. Our subject is the eldest of five children. He secured a good education in the common schools of Scotland County, and at the age of eighteen he married Miss Isabella Russell, a daughter of Thomas Russell, of Schuyler County, Mo. For the first year after marriage our subject and wife resided in Knox County, but the following year they moved to Clark County, where they rented land until 1882, when they purchased a farm--the same which Mr. Turner has since nicely improved. It consists of 160 acres, all well stocked and well improved. He is a Democrat in politics, and a member of the Baptist Church.

This ends the biographies of Clark County, Missouri.

 

Knox County, Missouri

Samuel G. Holmes, long a resident of Knox County, and a business man of Newark, was born in Kentucky, September 5, 1809, and is a son of Thomas Holmes, who was born near Pittsburgh, Va. in 1787, but afterward came to Kentucky, and settled on a farm in Harrison County where he ranked among the leading citizens. He was a soldier in the war of 1812, serving as a volunteer for six months under Capt. Brown (afterward a lawyer of Harrison County). He also served as justice of the peace in that county for many years, and after selling his farm in Kentucky in 1839 purchased one in Marion County, Mo., where he resided until 1861, and then sold all his possessions and came to Newark to spend the residue of his life with his son. He died in 1869. The mother of our subject, Jane (Vance) Holmes, was born in Virginia in 1786, and was married in Pendleton County, Ky., in 1808. She died one month before her husband, at the residence of her son in Newark, leaving many friends to bemoan their loss. Our subject is the eldest son, and came to Marion County, Mo., in 1837, his family following in 1838; here he entered land until he owned 200 acres, upon which he lived until the spring of 1857, when he sold his farm, and entered into mercantile life at Newark, where he is now in business, owning a nice stock of groceries and controlling a good trade. While in Kentucky, in the year 1835, he married to Judith E. Applegate, and to them the following children were born; William, Mary S. (wife of William M. Bromson), Elizabeth and Samuel G. Mrs. Holmes died in 1856, in the month of December, and our subject then married Martha A. Bromson, and to them John M. and Addie have been born. Mr. Holmes is a Republican, and assisted in the organization of the I. O. O. F. lodge at Newark, and several other places. He is public-spirited, taking interest in the general welfare of his county, and donates to all laudable enterprises.

Dr. Robert McReynolds is a native of Missouri, and was born in Knox County in 1847. His father, Burditt McReynolds, a pioneer of this county, was born in North Carolina, and is of Irish descent. Our subject's mother was born in Kentucky, and is of German descent, her maiden name being Catherine Dale. Our subject's father came to this county in infancy, and his grandfather, Dale, an only son, became the father of one son and seven girls. In the family of our subject's grandfather, McReynolds were eight children--five boys and three girls. Burditt McReynolds became one of the most prominent men of this county. He was enterprising, public-spirited, and was honored by all. He was a practitioner of medicine, and an active member of the Democratic party, and his life was mainly spent in Knox County. He educated a family of sixteen children, twelve of whom grew to maturity, and these twelve yet survive. Burditt McReynolds died at the age of sixty-four years, and his wife at the age of fifty-three. Both were members of the Missionary Baptist Church. He was in the late war six months, and spent a considerable time in prison. Dr. Robert McReynolds, the eldest son of Burditt, remained with his parents until the age of nineteen, having previously received a liberal education. He then attended the seminary at Monticello one year, after which he taught four years in Northeast Missouri, meeting with fair success. His father had designed him for the study of medicine at an early age, and hence, at odd intervals, he read and studied medical works. At the age of fifteen he was reading under Dr. Alonzo Condict, a talented physician, and later read under Dr. McReynolds, whose biography appears elsewhere. In 1868-69 he attended medical lectures at the St. Louis Medical School, where, in due time, he graduated. He then practiced medicine, and taught school for nearly four years, and in the winter of 1873-74 took up his old text-book and again attended medical lectures at St. Louis. He also received a few lectures at Keokuk, Iowa. He then located in Myrtle Township, where he practiced until this town was laid out, and here he has resided ever since, engaged in active and remunerative practice. He now owns several small farms in Myrtle and Jeddo Townships,--500 or more acres in all. In 1877 our subject was united in marriage to Miss Nettie Marksberry, a native of Grant County, Ky. She is a daughter of John S. Marksberry, a prominent citizen of that State. To this marriage two children have been born--Uriel and Ralph. Our subject, like his father, is a strong Democrat, and is a social, genial gentleman. His wife is a member of the Christian Church.

Dr. James Myers, a leading physician of Knox County, was born in Kentucky February 11, 1848. His father, Rev. William Myers, was born in Pendleton County, Ky., in 1806; came to Scotland County, Mo., in 1837, and located upon a farm, but has since lived at various places in Knox, Clark and Scotland Counties, and is now living with his son in Greensburg. He is a minister of the United Baptist Church. The mother, Paulina T. (Hogan) Myers, was born in Garrard County, Ky., in 1809, and died in Scotland County, Mo., in 1876. Our subject began to study medicine at Memphis, Scotland Co., Mo., at the age of twenty-one, and there remained for five years, after which he attended a course of lectures at Keokuk, Iowa, and then practiced his chosen profession until 1872, when he again attended lectures, and that year he graduated. He then practiced until 1883 in Adair County, but is now in Greensburg Township, Knox Co., Mo., where he enjoys a large practice, and is considered one of the first physicians of the county. In 1870 he was married to Georgie A. Pettet, daughter of George and Elizabeth Pettet, and to this union six children were born, five of whom are living, viz.: Anna E., Della, Ednie, Arthur and Rosa. Our subject is a Democrat, but has never aspired to political office. He is a public-spirited man, and interested in the general welfare of the county. Himself and wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church.

This ends the biographies of Knox County.

Scotland County, Missouri

George Buskirk, county treasurer, was born in Grant County, Ky., September 26, 1812. He is the son of Lawrence and Mary A. (Norton) Buskirk. The grandfather was a Pennsylvanian, who went at an early date to Nicholas County, Ky., in one of which States the father was born. The name was originally Van Buskirk, but the prefix has been dropped. The mother was a Kentuckian. They came to the Northwest about 1838, and after three years in Adams County, Ill., the came to near Winchester, this State, and bought a farm. The father died in April 1872, at the age of eighty-one years, and the mother followed him the next September at about the age of eighty-two. Their children were George; Martha A., the wife of T. S. Myers; Eliza, the deceased wife of Judge Collins; William; Amanda (deceased wife of J. Morris, also Armilda, the wife of J. Crook. Our subject was reared on a farm, and had the meager advantages of the old log schoolhouse. He left home in 1834, and two years later came to Missouri, and bought a claim when the land was not surveyed; the next year sold his claim, and settled three and a half miles east of Memphis, near Fort Donelson and Edinburg, where he has a fine estate of over 198 acres. Our subject is an "Old Hickory" Democrat, and has never wavered from those principles. He has served in various local offices, and in November, 1886, was elected to his present position by his party, and is serving in an efficient manner. He was married, on October 28, 1834, to Louisa Clark, of his native county, who died in August 1876. They had a family of ten children, and those living are Lucinda, the wife of W. H. Walker; Mary J., the wife of A. B. Baker; Susanna, the wife of J. Gilbert; Elizabeth, the wife of L. S. Farmer, and William H.

Judge James M. Clark, a well respected citizen of Jefferson Township, Scotland County, was born in Grant County, Ky., July 4, 1843, and is the son of Eli and Mary E. (Draper) Clark. The father was born in Grant County, Ky., was of Irish descent, and died in Scotland County, Mo., in 1869, being about fifty-six years of age at the time of his decease. He came to Missouri about 1864, and followed agricultural pursuits all his life. The mother of our subject was a native of Grant County, Ky., was of German descent, and died in Scotland County, Mo., in 1870. She was a member of the Baptist Church for many years, and at the time of her death was also about fifty-six years of age. Of their large family, five now living, our subject is the fourth. He received the rudiments of an education in Kentucky, but in the fall of 1862 he left his studies, and enlisted in Company G, Fourth Kentucky Cavalry, Confederate Army, and served in a brigade organized by Gen. Buford, but was afterward assigned to the command of Gen. John H. Morgan, and served with credit until taken prisoner in Ohio. He was then taken to Camp Morton, Ind., where he was kept a prisoner about three months. He was then taken to Camp Douglas, Chicago, Ill., where he remained until December 15, 1863, where he was one of the seventy-nine who escaped through a tunnel dug out for that purpose. He then came to Scotland County, Mo., and after visiting in Illinois returned to Scotland County, and since then has been engaged in agricultural pursuits at his present place of residence, since the spring of 1867. In 1866 he married Miss Martha E. Baker, who was born in Memphis, Mo., in 1849, and is a daughter of H. C. Baker. To our subject's marriage was born a large family of children, two of whom are deceased--one son and one daughter. In 1882 our subject was elected judge of the western district of Scotland County, and 1884 he was re-elected. He is a member of the I. O. O. F., and decided Democrat. His wife is a member of the Christian Church.

Judge John C. Collins, a retired farmer, was born November 24, 1813 in Pendleton (now Grant) County, Ky. He came to Scotland County, in September 1836, and has acquired his education by habits of study since his maturity. He was married, July 14, 1836, to Eliza J., a daughter of Lawrence and Mary (Norton) Buskirk. They had eight children: William L. (deceased), James R., George T., Judson S., Joseph H., Margaret J. (deceased) and Charles S. (deceased). The first mentioned died in the Federal service. Joseph H. is the president of a college at Springfield, Ill., and George T. is a member of the Legislature. February 5, 1882, his wife died, and October 14, 1884, he married Martha A. (Makemson) Moore. He and his wife are members of the Baptist Church. Our subject is a Democrat in politics, and was elected judge of the county court in 1850, and re-elected twice afterward. He was appointed to that position under the provisional government of 1861.He was again elected in 1872, and served six years. He served as justice for about six years also. He is the sixth of seven children of Ralph and Margaret (Wharton) Collins, natives of Durham, England, and Pendleton County, Ky., respectively. His father, Ralph, took part in the battle in which Gen. St. Clair was defeated.
(It mentions that there were eight children, but only seven are listed. (If this is your ancestor, there is also a biography for Hon. George T. Collins, the son of Judge John C. Collins).

George T. Collins, a citizen of Schuyler, County, and resident of Independence Township, was born in Adams County, Ill., April 18, 1834, and is the son of Hosea and Sarah A. (Wheeler) Collins, both natives of Pendleton County, Ky. The father was a farmer and died in Schuyler County, Mo., May 6, 1874, and was a few days beyond his sixty-sixth year. The mother was of English descent, and died in Schuyler County, Mo., February 14, 1885, and was over seventy-four years of age at the time of her death. Both parents were members of the Missionary Baptist Church. Our subject is the eldest of eleven children, ten now living. His parents moved to Illinois shortly after their marriage, settled five miles west of Memphis in March, 1838, when our subject was but four years of age. He remained with his father until June 8, 1854, when he married Miss Samantha J. Slavin, a native of Marion County, Mo., born February 8, 1836, and died in Scotland County, Mo., April 18, 1874, or on our subject's birthday. She was a daughter of George D. Slavin, and a member of the Missionary Baptist Church. To this marriage were born five children, all living: Elizabeth A., Oscar F., Albert H., Sarah A., and James L. Our subject after marriage purchased part of the old homestead, and to this he added more land until 1860, when he sold out and rented land for six years in different portions of Scotland and Schuyler Counties. In 1864 he went across the plains to Idaho, but returned the same year. In 1867 he moved back to his old farm, which he purchased before the war, and after remaining on this farm until 1881, he sold out and purchased a farm in Schuyler County, and three years later again sold out and purchased where he now lives. November 4, 1875, he married Sarah J. Pryor, a native of Pike County, Ill., born November 14, 1841, and the daughter of James B. Pryor. To this union one daughter, Rosalie, was born. Our subject is a Mason, and one of the old settlers of the county. He can remember when the Indians were numerous, and when all kinds of game were plentiful.

Henry H. Fugate, a prominent farmer and stock dealer in Sand Hill Township, was born February 2, 1827, In Pendleton County, Ky., and for several years was not permanently located, residing in Lewis and Clark Counties, Mo., and also spending some time in California. He located in Scotland County, in February 1856, where he has since remained. He has acquired his education by reading and observation since grown. He began life for himself at the age of twenty-one, a poor man, and what he is now worth is the product of his energy and practical business ability. He owns a nicely improved farm of 440 acres, upon which he resides. His father dying when our subject was but ten years old, he became the main support of his widowed mother and her children. He was married in 1856, to Miss Mary Matilda Davis, daughter of Nathaniel and Nira (Jones) Davis, natives of Ohio. He afterward moved to Iowa, and in 1853 came to Scotland County, Mo., where Mr. Davis also resides. Mrs. Davis died August 7, 1851, and Mr. Davis was married to Mrs. Martha Case, formerly Scott. Mr. and Mrs. Fugate have had seven children, only two of whom lived to be grown; they are named as follows: William H., aged twenty-seven when he died; Mary Janette, who died at the age of four; Almon Franklin, died as the age of two; Nira Jane, died at the age of fifteen months; Joseph Howard; Nannie Martha, who died at the age of three, and one who died unnamed. Mr. Fugate is a Democrat, and is the second of seven children of Henry and Maria (Ewing) Fugate, natives of Pendleton County, Ky. His grandfather was a native of Virginia, and an early settler in Pendleton County, Ky. Mrs. Maria Fugate was a daughter of John Ewing, of Virginia, an early settler of Pendleton County, Ky.

Samuel E. Jayne, an old and prominent citizen of Scotland County, and a resident of Mount Pleasant Township, was born in Campbell County, Ky., November 23, 1816, and is the son of Ebenezer and Debora (Egleston) Jayne, both natives of Steuben County, N.Y. The former was born in 1786, and died in Pendleton County, Ky., when about seventy-three years of age. He was a farmer all his life, and after his marriage, which occurred in New York, moved to Kentucky. The mother was born in 1791, and died in Pendleton County, Ky. Both parents were members of the Baptist Church for many years, but later joined the Christian Church. Our subject is the second of eight children, four of whom are now living. His advantages for an education were limited, but by general reading, contact with all kinds of business transactions, and being a close observer, is indeed a well-informed man. He remained with and worked on his father's farm until twenty-one years of age, when he began on his own resources. He purchased land in Pendleton County, Ky., and engaged in agricultural pursuits, which occupation he has since followed. He sold his property in 1850, and moved to Scotland County, Mo. He now owns 470 acres of exceedingly good land, and in a high state of cultivation. In February, 1846, he married Louisa Ann Payne, a daughter of Gaze Payne, a Virginian. She was born in Pendleton County, Ky., and died in Scotland County, Mo., in 1853. To this union were born four children, all of who are deceased. They were named as follows: Mary M., Alexander D., Ebenezer and an infant. The latter part of the year 1853 our subject married Miss Fannie E. Crowley, a daughter of John Crowley. She was born in Missouri, on the banks of the Missouri River, either in Howard or Clay Counties, in May, 1836. The fruits of this union were three children: Miranda O., John N., and Augustus S. Our subject is a Democrat, but was formerly an old line Whig. He started in life with but little means, and by industry and good management, has succeeded beyond his most sanguine expectations.
(The son of Samuel E. and Fannie E. Crowley Jayne is listed as John N. in this biography, but is listed as John M. in the biography below).

John M. Jayne was born in Scotland County, and is now a prominent lawyer of Memphis. He was born November 27, 1858, the son of Samuel E. and Fannie E. (Crowley) Jayne, natives of Pendleton County, Ky., and Clay County, Mo., respectively. (Their sketch appears above) Our subject was reared in this county, and attended La Grange College. He began the study of law at the age of eighteen, under E. R. McKee. He was admitted to the bar July 18, 1879. After some practice with Hon. Lewis Meyers, he became partner with is preceptor in December, 1883, with whom he has been in successful practice ever since. The firm is the peer of any in this region. He was married, November 27, 1884, to Minnie P., a daughter of the late Judge J. T. Redd, of Palmyra. She is a native of Marion County. Our subject is an uncompromising Democrat in politics. He is a Royal Arch Mason, and he and his wife are members of the Christian Church.


Capt. James W. Morris was born in Worcester County, Md., September 29, 1826, and is the son of Philip and Mary (Hall) Morris, also natives of Worcester County, Md. The father was born in 1837, of Irish descent, and died when fifty-five years of age. He began in early life to follow the sea, and made many voyages to different countries. The mother was of English descent, and died in Scotland County, Md., when eighty-one years of age (July 13, 1872). Her father and four brothers were sea captains, and when not on a voyage the former taught navigation. The mother of our subject was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church for over sixty years, and by her marriage became the mother of seven children, only three now living. Our subject began his education in Maryland, and finished in Missouri. He was eleven years of age at the time of his father's death, and the following year the family moved to Hannibal, Mo., where they lived for two years. They then spent some time in Shelby County, after which they moved to the wilds of Scotland County. In 1849 our subject crossed the plains to California, where he was engaged in mining, and was also engaged as a packer on the Trinity River. He also made trips to Oregon, and other States and Territories. The adventures of Capt. Morris while in California would alone make a volume. This venture proved successful, and he returned to Scotland County, Mo., in 1854, by way of Nicaragua and New York. The 14th of September, of the same year, he married Miss Martha Talbott, a native of Pendleton County, Ky., born February 1, 1824, and the daughter of Peter and Martha Talbott. This marriage was blessed by the birth of five children, four now living: Annie, Ella F., John T., and Jennie. James died December 6, 1881, when in his twenty-third year. Our subject purchased the farm on which he is now living, but later engaged in merchandising in Memphis, Mo., which he continued until the breaking out of the late war, when he moved back to his farm, and has continued there ever since. During the early part of the war he was made lieutenant, but was afterward promoted to the rank of captain of Company I, of the State militia. Before the war our subject was a Democrat, but since then he has been a supporter of the Republican party. He is a good man, and a prominent and influential citizen. His wife and three children are worthy members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, of which he is a ruling, elder, in Pleasant Hill Congregation, Kirksville Presbytery, Missouri.

McCandless & Mount,
dealers in hardware, stoves, tinware, agricultural implements, and agents for Nichols & Shepard's threshing machines. This firm has been established since 1880. The senior member, Robert S. McCandless, is a native of Pendleton County, Ky. He was born September 16, 1850, and came to this county with his father in 1857. The following year they came to Memphis, and resided here on a farm until 1866. They then went to Schuyler County, where the father died the following fall. The mother survived him until February, 1884. The parents names are Mitchell M. and Priscilla (Orr) McCandless, and were natives of Kentucky. Their children living are our subject, Elizabeth (the wife of J. Thompson). George H., Louisa (the wife of W. D. Guinn), Herschel V., Rosella (the wife of W. Davis), James W. and Perry (deceased). Mr. McCandless engaged as clerk in 1865 for the first time, and continued in this and in Schuyler Counties, until 1879, when he engaged in the grocery business in Allerton, Iowa, and the following year embarked in his present business. He married in 1870 to Helen L. Purmort, a native of Essex County, N.Y. Their children are Roberta and Helen. He is a Democrat in politics, and member of the A. O. U. W. The junior member, Jasper E. Mount, was born in Oldham County, Ky., July 17, 1847, the son of Jasper and Sarah E. Mount, natives of Indiana and Kentucky. The father died in 1852, in Oldham County, and the following year the mother came to Memphis, and lived there until 1870. After seven years on a farm in Clark County she moved to her present home in Chase County, Kas., in 1877. Her children living are Lucy A. (the wife of J. Standiford). Jasper E. and Walter E. Mr. Mount secured a good education in this county, and was a pedagogue for seven years, together with his farming. His first venture at merchandising began in 1877, in Memphis. He was a member of the firm of Crook & Co., proprietors of the New York Store, for two years, and spent 1879 in Kansas. He returned in 1880, and engaged in their present business. They have the best stock of goods in their line in Memphis, and control a large county and city trade. Mr. Mount was married, February 18, 1881, to Linnie B., a daughter of Judge D. B. Cooper. He is a Democrat in politics, and a member of the I. O. O. F.

Samuel D. Norton, a prominent citizen of Mount Pleasant Township, was born in Grant County, Ky., August 17, 1834, and is the son of Archibald and Nancy (Nichols) Norton. The father was a native of Grant County, Ky., born in 1797, and died in the same county about 1847. He was a farmer, and as he started in life with very little means, was obliged to work at the weaver's trade at night, in order to get a start. The mother of our subject was also a native of Grant County, Ky., born about 1799, and died in her native county in 1855. Her father, as well as the father of Archibald Norton, was an early pioneer of the county. The Norton family originally came from Virginia. Our subject is the fifth of ten children, eight of whom are now living. He received a fair education in the schools of Grant County, and was not yet fourteen years of age when his father died, but still remained on the old homestead, and worked for his mother until twenty years of age, when he came to Clark, Scotland and other counties of Missouri, and after spending the winter returned to Kentucky, but the next fall moved back to Missouri, where he has since remained. He worked at the carpenter's trade for about a year, and then engaged with an older brother, John J., in the mill business in Scotland County, near where he now lives, and continued at the same business for about three years, when they traded the mill for the farm that our subject now owns. This was in 1860, since our subject has lived on the farm, which consists of 240 acres of excellent land. In the early part of the war he belonged to Company A, of the enrolled militia of Scotland County, Mo., but in 1864 he enlisted in Company I, Thirty-ninth Volunteer Infantry, Federal service, and was mustered out March, 1865. December 27, 1860, he was married to Mrs. Mary J. McGee, widow of Elijah McGee, and daughter of J. F. Timmons. She was born in Tippercanoe County, Ind., September 18, 1836, and by her marriage became the mother of eight children, all of whom are living: Nancy A., Eliza N., S. Grant, Samuel A., Joseph N., John H., George L. and Minnie. Our subject is a democrat, and an active and enterprising citizen of the county.

A. J. Phillips, a fine mechanic, and one of Johnson County's successful farmers, was born in West Virginia in 1830, moved to Whiteside County, Ill., in 1854, and in 1865 came to his present abode in Missouri. He was brought up on a farm, and learned the carpentering trade when eighteen years of age. He has acquired his education to a great extent by reading while attending to his daily duties. He began life for himself a poor man, and what he now possesses is the result of his own labor and practical business knowledge. He has a well-improved farm of more than 500 acres. He was married in the spring of 1854 to Miss Martha E. Rowan, daughter of Frank Rowan, an early settler in Randolph County, W. Va., and a native of Baltimore, Md. To Mr. and Mrs. Phillips eleven children have been born; Elizabeth, Mary, Francesson M., William H., Randolph, Benjamin, Edward J., George, Emma (deceased), Thomas and Lewis. Mrs. Phillips is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and Mr. Phillips is a professed Christian. He is also a stanch Republican, and served as constable of Whitside County, Ill., for four years. He has never sought office, but has frequently been offered and requested to accept various offices at different times. He was the eighth of nine children of Benjamin and Phoebe (Walker) Phillips, natives of Randolph and Pendleton Counties, respectively. Benjamin served for many years as justice of the peace, and was an old time Whig, predicting twenty years before that the war was inevitable. He was a man of considerable erudition, and a son of Thomas Phillips.
(Realized after I had this almost typed up that it was not Pendleton County, Ky., but decided to leave it anyway--Sorry.

T. F. Risk, M. D., is a prominent citizen of Sand Hill Township, and was born in Fayette County, Ky., in 1845, from where he went to Pendleton County, Ky., when five years old; from there he went to California, Colorado and Kansas, in which States he resided until 1877, when he came to Scotland County, Mo., where he has remained. He has traveled quite extensively through several of the States, but resided only a short time in those visited. He received his academic and collegiate education in the State of Kentucky, and is an honorary graduate of "Eminence College" Kentucky, graduating with the highest honors of his class in the classical course, taking both the degrees of A. B. and A. M. He graduated from the Cincinnati College of Medicine and Surgery, in Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1863, where he also took the highest honors of his class. After graduating he immediately began practicing his chosen profession at Morgan, Ky., and has practiced medicine in California, Colorado, Kansas, and since 1877 at his present location in Missouri. He enjoys the best of success, and has a more extensive practice than he is physically capacitated to attend to. He has also been a close student of botany, geology, astronomy and mineralogy. He has made a specialty of chronic diseases, and has treated all other diseases to which his attention has been called as a medical practitioner. He has at different times been offered positions as teacher in medical colleges, but was compelled to decline on account of ill health. He was married, in 1865, to Miss Martha A. Myers, a native of Kentucky. Seven children blessed this union: Minne E., Lou Ella, Ollie M., Anna K., Eva (deceased), Josephus and Martha. Mrs Risk died in 1880, and Dr. Risk was married a second time in 1881, to Miss Ella Moore. Mr. and Mrs. Risk are members of the Christian Church, and Dr. Risk is a Democrat; he has been urged to accept nominations for different offices, but has always declined. He is a Master Mason, a member of the I. O. O. F., and belongs to the Good Templar fraternity. He was the youngest of six children of John C. and Mary Ann (Hues) Risk, natives of New York State and Virginia, respectively. John C. was of German and French descent. He was a literary man, and a close student, and qualified himself for teaching, but followed agricultural pursuits the greater part of his life. He was a son of John Risk. The maiden name of his mother was Esthel. Dr. Risk's great-grandmother's maiden name was Rothchild, and she was born in Bavaria. His great-grandfather, on his mother's side, was a native of Frankfort, Germany, and his name was Jacob Esthel.

John D. Smoot, lawyer, was born October 18, 1848, in this county. He is the son of Edward and Harriet (Downing) Smoot, natives of Fauquier County, Va. The father came to Missouri in 1838 and settled near West Jefferson. He followed farming and stock raising until his death in 1856. The mother survived him but three years. Their children are Josia (deceased), Henry E., Martha A. (the wife of T. Broadwater), Samuel C., Mary E. (the wife of Dr. J. E. Parrish), and our subject. John D. was reared in his native county, and attended old Memphis Academy under the tutorship of James Donnelly. At his majority he began the study of law, and entered the office of H. M. Durkee. After some time he went to St. Louis, and attended the law department of Washington University, from which he graduated in 1871. He then returned to Memphis, and practiced with (Senator) W. G. Downing, and later with E. R. McKee. In 1883 his present partnership with Mr. Pettingill was formed, and he has contributed much to the success of this well known firm. He has always been a Democrat, and was elected prosecuting attorney by that party in 1872, and served two terms. He was candidate for the Legislature in 1878 but was defeated. He was married, October 15, 1873, to Annie D. Ewing, of Pendleton County, Ky. Their children are John D., Ewing, Hudson V. and Bessie M. Mr Smoot is a Presbyterian in his religious faith, while his wife is a member of the Christian Church.

THE END
Nancy  Bray





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