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Terrebonne Genealogical Society

TGS Newsletter
Vol. 23 No. 5 August 2004

Visit our home page at http://www.rootsweb.com/~laterreb/tgs.htm

Membership, book orders and/or 
     address changes, contact: 
      Corresponding Secretary: Jess Bergeron 
      Email:  jessndot at juno.com
      Phone (985) 876–2348 
      TGS, Station 2 Box 295, Houma, LA 70360-0295 
News items or events, contact: 
     Newsletter Editor  Ed Hicks
      5306 Hwy 1, Raceland, LA 70394-2033 
      E-mail: edhicks at mobiletel.com
      Phone: (985) 532–3586 
NEXT MEETING: Saturday, August 28, 2004      Main Library, Houma, LA 1:00 p.m.

WE NEED YOUR HELP!
We will be collating the summer quarterly on Thursday, 26 August, starting at 12:30 at the
NORTH BRANCH LIBRARY

WELCOME BACK! If you went to Nova Scotia for the CMA 2004, you should be back by now, unless you succumbed to the charms of that beautiful country. A couple of warnings, however. You may grow to like the food, and then, this fall, it is going to get a lot colder than it does in Louisiana in winter. Then the real winter sets in. Take along plenty of reading. You won’t be getting out of the house to go to Wal-Mart® very often. Seriously, one of our members said that the rappie pie tasted better this time. (She went up there a couple of years ago.) Never heard of rappie pie? If you have spent any amount of time in Nova Scotia, you have been talked into tasting rappie pie. When we were there five years ago, it was the low point in our whole vacation. Here is how it is described on the web site of Discover Acadia Vacations. (http://www.novascotiatours.com/recipe.html)
    Rappie Pie, or "Rapûre" in French, is a traditional Acadian dish, made with a savory blend of chicken and grated potatoes. Its unique texture and delicious flavor is nothing less than an authentic cultural experience. Note: Rapûre comes from the French word raper, (pronounced rahpay), meaning to grate. And grating you will do!
    They gave the recipe on that web page, and on a couple of others. I liked the one on the Food Network page the best. (http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/recipes/recipe/0,1977,FOOD_9936_17320,00.html) Oh, heck. Just type “rappie pie” (quotes and all) in a search engine like Google or Yahoo! You’ll find plenty of recipes. Most just boil the chicken, but the one on Food Network browned it in a skillet first. (I bet the chef is from Louisiana.)

REUNIONS: It’s reunion time, again. The Loup(e)-Granier family will be gathering on Sunday, 12 September 2004 at the West Baton Rouge Community Center in Port Allen, LA, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Anyone with Loup(e)-Granier names, their descendants, friends or anyone interested in the history of these families is invited to attend this pot luck gathering and “pass a good time.” The sponsors will have family and ancestry charts on display, as well as books of research on several families: Loup, Granier, Haydel, Pecquet, Hymel, Steiger, Troxler (Trosclair), Berthelot and Hotard for starters. For info, contact Maurice J Pecquet, 2335 Rosedale Road, Port Allen, LA 70767, or phone (225)344-4631, email <mpecquet at cox.net>**
    The Bernard Family is having a get-together the following Saturday, 18 September, at the Lovett Road BREC Recreation Center, 13443 Lovett Road, Baton Rouge, LA 70818 (right behind Uncle Bob and Aunt Noonie). For questions, call Mary Agnes Cokes Hammett, 16548 Vermillion Drive, Baton Rouge, LA 70819, phone (225)273-0320, email <mach10 at bellsouth.net>** [This is a second notice.]
 
CAJUN CULTURE: Terrebonne Folklife Culture Center at 317 Goode Street in beautiful and historic downtown Houma is more than just a museum where you take visiting cousins when they come to town. It is a true Culture (with a capital C) Center. Interested in Soap or Wood Carving? Making Native American Crafts (Indian jewelry, moss dolls, palmetto and pine straw baskets & more)? Dancing Cajun style? Speaking conversational French or Spanish? Making quilts? Believe me, all these parts of our culture and others are being taught at the center. Call Anne Picou, Main Street Manager at 985-873-6408, Judy Navarre at 985-879-1924 or Debbie Martin at 985-873-6545, and one of these nice ladies will be glad to give you more information. For many of these lessons, class size is limited, so call soon (before you forget). It’s better to be able to say “I’m glad I did,” rather than “I wish I had.”
  
BOOKS: If you hear about anyone having a used set of the Diocese of Baton Rouge Catholic Church Records for sale, would you please contact Sylvia Haeberlein, 213 W. Bridge Street, Breaux Bridge, LA 70517-5050? It would be much appreciated.
    Have you been waiting for the 1951-1959 book on Lafourche Daily Comet deaths, births and marriage announcements to be published? Your wait is over. We only publish the number of books we have on order, so don’t delay. Call or write now, before you forget. You know how you are.
    We will sadly miss the publication of L’Heritage, the quarterly publication of St. Bernard Genealogical Society, Inc., of Chalmette, LA. Their website gives no hint of this news, but we received a letter from President Suzanne Doole “Sue” Wessing concerning the end of publication after the October 2004 issue. I quote from her letter “No permanent Editor has stepped forth, funds have diminished, costs have escalated and submissions have waned...The Internet has changed so much of the way we all do research and record it.” Back issues will be available. Consult their website for a price list: (http://www.ccugpc.org/sbgs/sbgs.htm
  
SEPTEMBER MEETING: If you hear of a Book Sale being held at the Main Library on Saturday, September 25, it won’t be us. We’ll be meeting at the North Branch on that day. That’s the Friends of the Library holding the sale, and they would appreciate your support, but if you want to go to our meeting, you will have to go to the North Branch in Gray. Note well: I’m not talking about the meeting coming up at the end of August. That one will be held at the Main Branch just like it says at the top of this newsletter. The last Saturday in September is the one I am talking about. (That’s S-E-P-T-E-M-B-E-R, OK?)
  
VOLUNTEER PROGRAM: We are seeing results. People are starting to get interested in their own family story. It is so gratifying to see interest awaken in a person. There were two or three at the last general meeting. We believe it is a result of a lot of influences. The terrific Genealogy Department in the New Terrebonne Library Houma Branch, the recent newspaper articles, and our library volunteers. Three Cheers!!! I know it is hard to spend a couple of hours waiting for someone to ask for help, but that is the only way I know of to be around when people need help. Our volunteers have been faithful, and we need just a few more to step up to the plate and be counted. We are almost ready to set up a definite schedule that will be published and advertised. Maybe next month.
  
TERREBONNE LIFE LINES: This issue will feature the family of Pierre Michel in an article by Andrea Scott,  andother articles such as the one listing males eligible for Militia, 4 Dec. 1878, abstracts of Lafourche Coroner’s Reports (1935-1941), and Assumption Parish Courthouse Marriage Book Listing. There are over 2200 references in the index.
**As was explained in a previous newsletter, we don’t use the @ sign in order to fool the robot that looks for email addresses on the Internet. This newsletter is published on our website.

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