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Township Histories

This township history came from the Huron County Centennial History 1859-1959

Bingham

Gore

Rubicon

Bloomfield

Lake

Sand Beach

Brookfield

Lincoln

Sebewaing

Caseville

McKinley

Sheridan

Chandler

Meade

Sherman

Colfax

Oliver

Sigal

Dwight

Paris

Verona

Fair Haven

Pointe Aux Barques

Winsor

Grant

Port Austin Township

 

 

 

Bingham

Bingham township, organized in 1857, was named to honor governor  Bingham of Michigan.  Robert Scott was the first supervisor.  early settlers were:  Deachin Bros. (1856), Scott, McKenzie, Hathaway, McAllister, Franz.

Frantz and Joseph Deachin, first settlers in Bingham, came here from France to "Breathe the Air of Freedom."  The early settlers of this township experienced untold hardships.  Those things not supplied by the virgin forest were toted on the backs of the sturdy pioneers from Forestville, 24 miles away.

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Sand Beach

Sand Beach was organized by the Supervisors of Sanilac County, February 5, 1856.  John Hopson was the first "permanent" supervisor.  Hiram Whitcomb, who was elected first supervisor, refused to accept the office.  Capt. Eber Ward acted as supervisor until Mr. Hopson was chosen for that office.

The original settlers in this township were John Allen and Alanson Daggett, who built a sawmill here in 1837.  George Clark came here in 1838 and Shadrick in 1839.  The Ludingtons followed soon after.  Mrs. Ludington was the first white woman in this section.  Charles Daggett was the first white child born here.   Hiram Whitcomb and George W. Pack were early settlers.

John Hopson, Jeremiah Jenks, Hunting Trescott, Dr. Orange C. cutler, Jerry Ludington Jr., Robert W. Irwin, O. T. Harrington, Mark Carrington, Jesse L. Jenks, Bela W. Jenks, and Robert N. Jenks were early settlers in Sand Beach township.  Rock Falls, thriving lake port, which was located at the mouth of rock Falls Creek, south of Harbor Beach, was prominent in the history of this township.  As Sand Beach, now Harbor Beach, began to boom, Rock Falls soon passed out of the picture.  It played an important part in Huron County history as Allen's Creek, Barnettville, and Rock Falls.

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Winsor

Winsor township, organized in 1880, was laid off from Fair Haven township.  It was named to honor an early settler and writer in Huron County, Richard Winsor.  John Linson, first supervisor, came to this section as a member of the famous Ora Labora Colony.  He was a tanner by trade.  Early settlers in Winsor were Hysers, Warrens, Froebes, Jacobs, Moellers, Korns, Nitzs, Muenteners, Hoffmans, Drahers, Wassermans, Dietzels, roedels, Auchintz, Wilfongs, Newmans, Harders, Notters, Winters, Murdochs.

 

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Sebewaing

 

Sebewaing township was organized February 12, 1853, as part of Tuscola County.  Frederick Schilling was first supervisor.  It was first named Auchville to honor the Lutheran Missionary, Rev. J. J. Auch who came there in 1845.  Settlers in 1849 were: Johngetle, Fredrick Zeigler, John Zeigler, and John Gruenbeck.  Settlers in 1851 were: Godfried Beck, G. Auch, Frederick Schilling families, who came to Lone Tree Island, at the mouth of the Sebewaing river, then Dufill river, Thread river, in French.

Other early settlers in Sebewaing township: Bach, Streiter, Schairer, Volz, ruehle, Mullerweiss, roller, Martin, Krouse, Bauer, Schmidt, Liken, Irion, Kundinger, Job Olmstead, Thomas Simpson, and George Davis took up land in the Sebewaing district in 1839.

Sebewaing is Chippewa for "winding creek."

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Chandler

Chandler township, organized in 1880, was named to honor  Senator Chandler.  William Smith was first supervisor.  It was laid off from Lake township.  Thomas Edwards was first settler in 1860.  Here we have some of the finest agricultural and dairy county.  Soule, named to honor Charles Soule, who built a saw mill, grist mill and general store at this spot in 1876, has vanished.  Because of the two brothers John and Charles, the little settlement was sometimes referred to as Souletown.

Early settlers were: John and James Bedford, 1852; Thomas and Anthony Green, Dan Hare, Robert Smith, Darling Anderson, John Howardth, Daniel Langley, Obed Melick, Christian Flack, The Harveys, Nichols, Devines, Lenawaays, Hedleys, settled there between 1860 and 1870.

Settlers who came to this township the years 1870 to 1880, were: Edward Heaton, the Maxwells.  Youngs, Thompson's, McLeods, Brooks, Wilsons, Fitchetts, Hays, Alexanders, Farvers and Sawyers.  There is a splendid Catholic church at Hewletton and a thriving " Scotch Presbyterian" church in this township.

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Brookfield

Brookfield township was organized in 1867.  First supervisor was Elijah Thompson.  Named by A. H. Burton because of the Shebeon river or creek which drains the fertile acres.  It lead the U. S. A. in production the sugar beets with the highest sugar content.

Mr. Burton, who named the township, was first settler in 1865.  He came to Huron County from Brookfield, New York.  He played a prominent part in the organization of Brookfield township.  King of the forsest, the "Might Oak", thrived here in the days of the pioneer.

Early setlers were Hiram Spitler, 1865.  William Pobanz and Mr. Schnepp settled here in 1870.

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Huron

Huron township was organized by the Supervisors of Sanilac County, February 21, 1854.  It included all of Huron County with the exception of Sebewaing and Fair Haven townships.

The first settler in the township was Theodore Luce who erected a water-power saw mill near the mouth of Willow Creek in 1837.  Mr. Luce soon sold his saw mill to a Mr. Brakeman of Port Huron.  The place was then known as Brakeman's Creek.

The Hubbard family, who later played a prominent part in the development of this part of Huron County, bought the property at Brakeman's Creek in 1856.  Prof. Phelps, when writing about Huron City, stated: "A history of Huron City is simply a history of the life of Langdon Hubbard during the 40 years that he lived there."  Mr. Hubbard employed hundreds of men in his lumber business.  Logs for his mill were floated down Willow Creek.  The lumber was transported to large cities on the boat "Huron City".

Lumber was transported to the boat from the saw mill at Huron City by means of a miniature railroad with wooden rails, according to the late James Richards, who filed the large circular saws for Mr. Hubbard.  Mr. Hubbard lost about everything he possessed in the Great Forest Fire of 1881.  the flour mill, saw mill, store buildings, warehouses and most important the home lost by this early settler were soon replaced with better buildings.  In the building of churches, schools, lodge rooms, and roads, the Hubbard family took a leading part.

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Rubicon

Rubicon township was organize in 1859 with W. d. Ludington the first supervisor.  Much of the history of this township is included in the sketch on the village of Port Hope.   According to early settlers, the creek in this township, in the Spring at high tide, was almost as difficult to cross as the famous Rubicon River on the border of Italy.  By crossing  Caesar cast the die for Civil War with the Roman government.

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Port Austin Township

Port Austin township, organized in 1861, chose Isaac Breber, early day industrialist, as it's first supervisor.   A few years later, Mr. Breber built the first steam saw mill at Port Crescent.  Size considered, Port Austin has established a record for Patriotic Service to the United States that has been unequalled through the years, according to a report made to a former supervisor, Joseph Dupee. 

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Caseville

Caseville township, organized in 1859, the year of the first county election of officers in Huron County, was named to honor Leonard Case of Ohio, who owned about 20,000 acres of choice timberland in the vicinity.  Caseville was the home of the President McKinley family, 1873-1879.  With a population of nearly 2,000 it lead Huron County by having the first electric light plant and the first rural Free Delivery route for mail.  Public spirited citizens of Caseville with commendable foresight established the first Huron County Park.  Now modern in every detail it attracts the record number tourist and visitors.

At the time Alexander Wheeler was chosen first supervisor, Caseville township included what is now Brookfield, Chandler, Lake, Fair Haven, Grant, Oliver, McKinley, and Grant townships.

Early settlers were Dodge, Heath, Smith, Dufty, Gregory, Crawford, Squires, Woodworth, Cleaver, Shelton, Libby, Campau, Adams, Curran, Tack, Smalley Phoenix Conaton, Patterson, Richmond, Loverage, Fisher, McKenzie, Holmes, Drs. Hutchins, Henderson, Johnson and Jackman.

Mrs. Florence Gwinn wrote a history of Huron County in 1922.  Her maiden name was McKinnon.  Other early settlers were Stewart, and Perry.  Near where Pigeon is now, the Notter, Wilfong, Newman, Schubach, Murdock, Morse, Wurm, Sturm, Wallace and Leipprandt families were early settlers.

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Colfax

Colfax township, named to honor Vice-President Colfax, was organized in 1868 with Metzar Granger the first supervisor.  In the early days a large lumber camp, operated by the Wright Co., was located near the center of the township.  A small tribe of Indians made their home on the banks of the Pinnebog river.  The post office at the lumber camp was known as "Maple Grove".  Later it was moved to the Fingerboard at Popple.

The county poor farm was established in Colfax township in 1877 with Tomas Morrow, who later built the Morrow House in Bad Axe, as overseer.  The county poor farm became the Huron County Infirmary and in 1958 became the Huron County Health Center, a half million dollar establishment among the best in the state.

Early settlers in Colfax township: McDowell Bros., Peacock, Haley, (1866), D. H. T. Williams, Nash, Fransworth, Tahash, Story, Wilder, Bordner, McKenzie.

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Bloomfield

Bloomfield township was organized in 1873 with William C. Elliott the first supervisor.   Early settlers in Bloomfield township stated that at the organization meeting the township was named Broomfield township to honor Joseph Broomfield.  Mr. Broomfield was an early settler and helped organize the township.  a simple mistake in spelling changed the name of the township from Broomfield to Bloomfield.

The above version of the naming of Broomfield township was given by Harry MacDonald and Archie Broomfield, early settlers in the township.

Langdon Hubbard, outstanding early day industrialist, who came to Huron City in 1856, was born in Bloomfield township, Conn.  He is given credit for naming the township.  In a case of this kind, where there is an honest difference of opinion as to the facts, the entire story is given without comment.

Early Settlers:  Henry B. Gillard cleared the first farm in 1871.  Ronald  MacDonald, father of Harry MacDonald, settled here the same year.  Other early settlers: John Clark, justice of the peace; Hugh Walker, Robert Beattie, Clinton Gage, Lewis W. Coon, and John Kinch, who was postmaster at Redman.

As an agricultural township and producer of choice honey, Bloomfield deserves special mention.

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Lincoln

Lincoln township, set aside from Dwight township, was organized in 1877.  Felix Filion was first supervisor.  Joseph Minnick, early settler (1870), was given the privilege of naming the township at the organization meeting.  He chose the name of one of our martyr Presidents.  Mr. Minnick served on the first township board.  The land he settled unto is still in possession of members of the Minnick family.

Mr. Minnick and a neighbor, while hauling relief supplies from Huron City into Lincoln township after the fire of 1881, were attacked by a pack of timber wolves.  The men saved themselves and oxen by throwing salt pork to the starving wolves.

Other early settlers in Lincoln township were:  John H. Provorse, who came there in 1865, Leon Church, Brasil Church, William H. parker, John D. Parent, and Anthony Tetreau.

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Lake

Lake township, organized in 1867, was taken from grant and Caseville townships.  John b. Woodhull was first supervisor.  Robert Gotts was first township clerk.  Mr. and Mrs. Gotts, who were married in 1866, were the first couple to be married in the township.  The first school, used also as a "Community Church" was built in 1864.

First settlers in Lake township were William Fisher, who came there in 1859.  Thomas McCormick and Archie McIlhargie settled there a century ago, "Centennial Settlers."  Other settlers:  M. C. Smalley, George Henry,  Samuel Lewis, H. Champagne, Ingraham Harrison, Lewis H. Guyeau, the Musselman, Upthegrove and Chapman families.

Lake township was named because of Rush Lake, which at one time covered more than 1,500 acres of land.  Much of this submerged land was left unsurveyed because of quicksand and swampy land, which in places seemed not to have any bottom.  In late years much of Rush Lake was drained.  There was considerable dispute as to who owned the land that had been drained.  It was settled in court.

In the early days of Huron County Rush Lake was a paradise for wild fowl hunters.  it was also a favorite spot for fishermen.  Babbit stone quarries were located in Lake township many years ago.

In recent years thousands of muskrats were trapped there.  Near the "Island" Rush Lake measured 30 feet in depth.

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Sigel

Sigel township, organized in 1863, was named to honor gen. Franz Seigel, civil War hero.  The "e" in the General's name was omitted.  Watson Robinson was first supervisor.  Settlers who came here in 1859, were Fred Jurges, Joseph Lakowski, Watherhouse Whitelam, Samuel Williams.

Much of the township was settled by German Lutherans.

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Gore

Gore township, named so because it is shaped like the gore of a woman's dress.  It was organized in 1861, with John H. Tucker, first supervisor.  george Allen was first clerk and Robert Hunter, first treasure.  Gore township was laid off from Rubicon township.

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Grant

Grant township, named to honor one of the great generals of the Civil War, Gen. Grant, who was also President of the United States, was organized in 1867, two years after the close of the Civil War.  Levi Williamson was first settler in 1863.   He was also the first supervisor of the township.  First school was taught by Mrs. Gage.  She was followed by Bell Randolph.

Early settlers were: Proudfoots, Tellers, Parkers, Hallocks, Lambkins, Eamleys, Bodeys, Brackenberrys, Hintons, O'Neals, Aldrich, Keatings, Younglove and Strecher.

The post office was established at Canboro in 1870 in the Parker general store.

Early maps of Huron County show Mud Lake covering many acres of land.

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Meade

Named to honor the Civil War hero, Gen. George G. Meade, Meade township was organized in 1869.  Spencer A. Case was first supervisor.  It was taken from Hume township.  Here we have a number of "Centennial Settlers," who came and settled in the wilderness that is today Meade township, 100 years ago in 1859:  Joseph Jeroue, Peter Rivers, Anthony Libby, Charles Gilbert, Vetla Nelson.  A few years later more Nelsons came here from Norway.

Other early settlers in this part of the county, the Mayhews, DeRosies, Bouches, Lackies, McAlpines, Lipsics, Fielix Filion, William and George Kerr, the latter was active in civic affairs.  Charles Armstrong, son of the first Huron County sheriff, Wesley Armstrong, and Leonard R. Thomas, supervisor many years, also supervisor of the city of Bad Axe in later years, settled in the township in 1878.  Mr.. Thomas was also state representative for Huron County a number of years.

The Methodist church in the township was built in 1881.  Pinnebog, partly in the township, was a thriving little town in the early days with its own band and "County Fair."  The late Frank Piper led the band.  Dr. Hogan, living at Bad Axe, taught the school.

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Paris

Paris township was organized in 1861.  Gregoire Des Jardins, outstanding pioneer of the county, name the township.  His birthplace was near the city of Paris, France.  Donald Currie was the first supervisor.

The early settlers of Paris township, mostly Polish, were people of "Great courage and determination."  As a rule, these early pioneers were large, strong people.  They were honest, hard-working and thrift.  These people had the quality that was need to change a land, covered with swamps and forest, into the excellent farm land, with its fine homes, the Paris township of today.

First settlers, in 1854, were John Woytlewicz, Ambrose Chuknowski, and Anthony Slavick families.  Stephen Pawlowski came there in 1855.  These early settlers carried their groceries and other supplies on their backs, wading streams and marshes, bypassing the swamps, as they followed blazed trails in the virgin forests.  John Pyonk walked 100 miles to get a cook stove.  The Pawlowski orchard was the first.

The pioneer mother often was forced to remain alone for months in the forest, while father worked in the lumber camp to provide for the home.  Quite often babies were born without assistance from a doctor.  Frail women carried their groceries 18 miles through a trackless forest teeming with wild animal life, including bears and timber wolves.

Joseph Cook, early settler, was born "two weeks out from New York" on a ship, while his parents were making the trip from Poland to America, which by sail boat was made in 90 days.  Susalla Bros. built their saw mill at Parisville in 1874.  Polewach, Warchock, and Binenza were early settlers.

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Fair Haven

Fair Haven, named by an early day missionary after a name in the Bible used by St. Paul.  It is claimed that Emil Baur picked the name.  The township was organized in 1863 with John S. Davis, the first supervisor.  It includes the Islands in Wild Fowl Bay, also part of Sand Point, where Gen. Meade placed a government marker while surveying to correct the base line at Saginaw Bay.

The Indian Mission, built at the mouth of the Shebeon Creek, in 1845, for the tribe of Chippewa Indians in that part of the county, was moved to Sebewaing by Charles Luckhart in recent years.  The tribe was said to consist of about 300 Indians.  The chief was Soe-ache-wah-o-sah, which translates "Brilliant Rising Sun."  He was said to have bright red hair.

The Indians sold most of the land acquired by them from the United States in 1847 to white settlers in 1856 for small amounts.  A few Indians, listed in this history, did not sell their land until much later, "Green Parrot". "Middle Lake."  small pox and "King Alcohol" took a heavy toll among the Indians.  Civilization destroyed these simple children of the forest, who worshipped the "Great Spirit" and were "Free Men."

Carl Heisterman, well educated veteran of the Mexican War, was first settler, in 1841.  He married Mary Dutcher in 1849 and lived on Heisterman Island many years with Indians.  he learned their legends.  Mr. Heisterman was supervisor many years, and also county register of deeds and state senator.

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Sheridan

Sheridan township was organized in 1866 and was originally part of Bingham township.  It was named to honor a famous Civil War General.  John McIntosh, the first supervisor, took up land here in 1859.  Many of the early settlers in Sheridan were thrifty Scotts, the Campbells, McKinnons, McPhails, McIntyres, McLellans, McGahans, Mac Alpines, M McGillis, McIsaacs, Leitchs, baties, McMillians, and McTaggarts.  Other early settlers were Robbins, Fletchers, shaws, Sherwoods, Gillies, Stoddards, Thompsons, Hendersons, Sweeneys, Wilsons, O'Henleys, Boomhowers, Buchanans, and Whillans.

The early settlers in Sheridan township were described as being "hospitable, industrious and deeply religious.  It could also be stated of these early pioneers, they were honest, intelligent and thrifty, with a canny foresight into the future.

Lumbering, for many years, was the chief industry.  hardwood trees and the great cork pines covered the fertile land.  Clearing this land, cutting down the great giants of the forest with a crosscut saw and an axe and hauling them to the mill, was a tremendous task.  Millions of logs were floated down the Cass and Pigeon rivers.

Huron County is the "Bean Center of the World".  Sheridan township claims credit for planting and growing successfully some of the first navy beans in our county.

The roman Catholic church, St. Columbkille, had its beginning in a log cabin in 1866.  Today it is one of the strong rural churches of the county.  Rev. father E. R. Werm was honored recently for 25 years of outstanding service to this church.

The first school in Sheridan was district #1.  Mrs. Wilson was first teacher.

Sheridan township has two Presbyterian churches.  the Frazer church, established soon after the close of the Civil War, 1866 or 1867,  the Erskine church was organized in 1892.  Both "Scotch Presbyterian," these churches are active today.  A number of the early settlers were sailors on the Great Lakes.  Angus O'Henley bought his 240 acres with money that he earned sailing.  He grew the first navy beans in the township on his farm.  The O'Henly family lived in the wilderness four years before they could see the light in the house of their nearest neighbor.  Mrs. O'Henly stated "Those were the days when you appreciated neighbors.

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Sherman

White Rock, in Lake Huron, famous because it marked the northern limit of land released by the Indians to the United States in the 1807 treaty made in Detroit is in Sherman township.  Sherman township was first known as Rock township. Michael Hanselman, first supervisor, served 13 years.

Sherman township has an unusual history.  In 1861 it was organized as Rock township.  In the Spring of 1865 the name was changed to White rock township.   Late in 1865 the name was again changed to Sherman township with the exception of a few square miles on the shore which remained White Rock township until it was annexed to Sherman in 1891.

Named to honor a Civil War here, Gen. Sherman, the township was organized at the time of the closing year of the war, 1865.

Robert W. Irwin, first Huron County clerk, was an early pioneer.  He owned the large White Rock salt industry established in the township in 1871.  Other early settlers:  Thompson Bros., John Stocks, veteran of Mexican War; Robert Munford, merchant; his son, Clarke Munford, well known county official; John Huersanger, Joseph Willy, L. Tschirhart, Robert Campbell, industrialist.

The thriving little town of Ruth was named to honor an early settler, Michael Ruth.  It was first Adams Corners.

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Dwight

Dwight township was organized in 1856.  It was named to honor a pioneer lumberman, Alfred Dwight, formerly a member of the firm of Smith, Austin and Dwight of Port Austin.  Port Austin was first named Dwightville in his honor.  After P. C. Austin, second member of the firm, built his private dock at Port Austin, many sailors began calling the little settlement Austin's Port and ventually Port Austin.

The little town had two names for a brief period, 1853-1856.  To avoid confusion and settle a growing dispute, the newly formed township in this section was  called Dwight township.  The thriving port was named Port Austin, honoring an early day industrialist who loved the water.

Henry Hellems was first settler and first supervisor, 1856.  J. f. Weatherhead, who came here in 1859, is a "Century Settler."  Benjamin Cartwright came here in 1861.  He owned the first wagon in the township, also first fanning mill and first steam threshing machine.  He built the first brick chimney.  Other early settlers were:  Maguire Fremont, active in community life, who helped plan the first Catholic church, Thomas Sullivan and Peter Smeader.

This township gave a number of its sons for service in the Civil War.  Most of these served in the Third Michigan Cavalry.

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Hume

Hume township was organized in 1859, with Wesley Armstrong first supervisor.  It was named to honor its first settler, who operated a trading post near the mouth of the Pinnebog river in 1844, Walter Hume.  He was called the "Daniel Boone" of this part of the county, as he lived and traded among the Indians.  This early settler cleared the first land and built the first home in the township.  His wife was Mary Schilling of Sebewaing.

The Etzler Bros. came to this township not long after Mr. Hume had taken up the 1,000 acres of land that he owned.  Jonathan A. Stockmen was a prominent pioneer here.

The vanished Port Crescent was in Hume township.  A large part of the history of Hume township is contained in the sketch of Port Crescent.

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Verona

Verona township was organized in 1861 with Thomas Scott, first supervisor.  The name Verona was first used by William Shakespeare in one of his plays.  It was applied to space that had been cleared in the forest.  Thomas Philp, first settler, who came to the township in 1854, and Andre McAllister, who came in 1858, were "scholarly gentlemen."  The men met often at the open space to which they gave the name "Verona."  After Jerry Ludington built his large saw mill, grist mill and shingle mill there in 1866, the spot was known as "Verona Mills."  It was also called "Verona Hills" later.

Settlers who came to Verona township before 1860, were:  Thomas Tear, George Martin, Thomas Scott, George Whitelam, Thomas Philp, Robert Scott.  Other early settlers were the Kuntz, Pangborn, Robinson, McKichan, Burk, Murray, Broomfield, Kneal, Rapson, Talbert, Pethers, Noonam, Braden, Metcalf, Snetzinger, McDonald, Ludington, Gordon,  Willett Hagadon, Kappler, Collins, Grice, McKillen.

John Ballentine established a general store in Verona in 1867.  The general store burned in the Fire of 1871.  Mr. Ballentine then built a saw mill.  After losing all his property in the Fire of 1881, he built a general store in Bad Axe, now Reid's Drug Store.

In the history of Verona township, the name of Jerry Ludington is outstanding.  After building his great mills, he built a general store and became first postmaster in 1867.  The first school in Verona was built in 1867 by Mr. Ludington, who donated the building and equipment.   He donated two acres of land for the site of the Huron County court house, after the original court house burned in 1864, at Harbor Beach.  Verona missed being the "County Capitol" by one vote of the supervisors.

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Pointe Aux Barques

Pointe Aux Barques was organized in 1903.  The first supervisor was F. Demarest.  The township was named by the French many years ago, because of the large rock juttying into Lake Huron at this point and shaped like the forepart or point of a ship.  It is famous as a summer resort with a fine beach and picturesque shore line.

Michigan's own poet, Edgar Guest, had his cottage here and spent many summers in Huron county.  One of his greatest pleasures was to take the local kids to a circus or celebration.  They were "honored guests" of Mr. Guest.

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Oliver

In the Pioneer History of Huron County, written by Mrs. Florence Quinn in 1922, Oliver township was said to have seceded from Lake township in 1879.  It appears to be the only place where the word, "secede" is used in connection with the history of Huron county townships.  No hint was given as to why the reather illomened word was used.   Frank Black was first supervisor.

Oliver township was named to honor John Oliver, one of its earliest settlers.  Because of its location, Elkton was first known as Oliver center.  Other early settlers were S. D. Grimmey, Patrick Bliss, who made several trips carrying the first cook stove into Oliver township.  The stove was purchased in Caseville and taken to the Bliss home in sections.

Dennis F. Smith made hay in the marsh near Elkton in 1859.  The village of Elkton was first the Elkton Camp, headquarters for Bosley Lumber Co. Benjamin L. Tripp, first to operate a meat market at Port Austin, dressed and delivered three elk at the lumber camp.  The combined weight of the three elk was about a ton, according to the account of Mr. Tripp, related when he was past 90 years of age.

There is another story on the naming of Elkton.  Mrs. McGillivary, wife of Blacksmith McGillivray, did the family washing and hung it on the line.  An enormous elk that was passing was annoyed by the red underwear fluttering in the breeze.   The elk, weighing about a ton, charged into the clothesline.  After getting tangled up in the wire, he was killed by Mr. McGillivary.  The name Elkton was then applied to the "Four Corners."

W. J. "Blacksmith" McGillivary built the first house in Elkton.  William Whalen and Simon Hoffman were first to enter retail business.  William A. Stockman took up land in Oliver township in 1860.  David Whitney came there in 1863.

Elkton has been called "God's Country" because of the large number of churches there.  Here a saloon was turned into a church, the bar became the pulpit and the card table was used by the secretary of the Sunday school.  Elkton takes an honest pride in its churches, its school, its band.  For many years the Elkton Baseball team, under leadership of Milton Ackerman, won victories which gave it the pennant in the Huron County Baseball League, organized by Tom Sayres.

It is claimed that Huron County was the only place in Michigan where elk were plentiful.  Today, Oliver township has played well its part in making Huron county one of the leading agricultural, beef and dairy counties of the State of Michigan.

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McKinley

John J. Murdock was the first supervisor of the township, taken from Caseville in 1905.  It obtained its name from members of the President McKinley family who owned property in Caseville.

 

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