MN AHGP Archives-Brown Co. 1882 Bios

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Brown County biographies from the 1882 History of the Minnesota Valley, including the Explorers and Pioneers of Minnesota

NEW ULM


John B. Arnold, a native of Germany, was born in 1847, and came with his parents to America, when two years of age, locating with them in Indiana. In 1856 removed to near Beloit, Wisconsin; was there educated at the public schools. At the age of eighteen began learning the trade of tinsmith and continued it in the southern states several years. Came to the Minnesota valley in 1869, and after residing a short time in Mankato removed to New Ulm and entered the employ of George Schneider; was with him six years. At that time he bought an interest and has since conducted the business. Married in 1871, Miss Rosa Wiedeman, who died in 1874.


Francis Baasen was born in Germany, October, 1830. Came to America at the age of nineteen years and resided in Milwaukee until 1855: in January 1856 came to New Ulm, Minnesota. While in Milwaukee he studied law and was admitted to practice. On arriving here he made a claim near the village and opened a law office; he was the first lawyer to settle in New Ulm. Enlisted in August, 1861, in the First Minnesota, and served until May, 1864. He commanded the New Ulm volunteers who went out against Inkpa-dutah in 1857; was promoted to first lieutenant, and afterwards to regimental quartermaster. On returning from the war resumed the practice of his profession. He was a delegate to the state constitutional convention and in 1857 a member of the territorial legislature and of the state legislature in 1873; was the first secretary of state of Minnesota and has held the office of county attorney. From 1870 to 1876 he resided in Nicollet county, and while there held the office of county commissioner.


C. Bach, a native of Germany, was born in 1837, and left his native country for America in 1867. After remaining a short time in New York he came to Minnesota, and for one year resided at Fort Ridgely, Nicollet county, then located in New Ulm and began the book binding trade, also has a book store. Mr. Bach was for six years secretary of New Ulm fire department.


Frederick Beinhorn, an early settler of New Ulm and Brown county, was born in Germany in 1821. When a young man learned the trade of shoemaking, which he followed until coming to America in 1852. After spending six months in Milwaukee he removed to Chicago and remained until 1855; came to Minnesota as member of a committee from Chicago to select a location for a a colony; he chose the present site of New Ulm, and in the spring of 1856 located here. Soon after he formed the Chicago Mill Association and built the first mill; he was foreman for about a year, then engaged in the saloon and grocery business, after which rented the mill and ran it less than a year,when it was destroyed by fire; he rebuilt it and continued in the business until it was destroyed by the Indians in 1862: he then farmed until 1871, when he built his present grocery store. Married in 1854, Minnie Ware. They have six children.


John Bellin was born in Germany. Since becoming a resident of New Ulm, he has been engaged in the mill business. Was a captain of the local militia and took a prominent part in the defense of New Ulm, at the time of the outbreak.


Jacob Bender was born in Germany, in 1834, and came to America in 1862. After a residence of one year in Ohio, he came to Minnesota. He visited St. Paul and St. Peter then came to New Ulm and for two years was employed in Scheff’s brewery. In 1866 started what is known as the Front Street brewery, in which he has since continued business. Miss Minnie Jacobs became his wife in 1866. They have six children.


Alexander Berghold was born in Austria, October 14, 1838. His father sold his estate and they moved to St. Marein. While quite young he expressed a desire to become a priest, but when his father refused consent, he ran away from home in 1851, and entered school at Gratz; then passed through the gymnasium and university; earning the necessary funds by giving private lessons. In 1864, at the solicitation of Francis X. Pierz, he came to Minnesota, and finished his theological course at St. Paul; was ordained November 1st, 1864, by Bishop Grace, and was appointed to the parish at Belle Plaine. In 1868, he visited Europe; when returning in the fall, he volunteered to come to New Ulm and establish a congregation. Here he has been very successful, having built a dwelling, church and college besides having charge of Catholic congregations in six counties, and building since coming to America eleven churches. He has been instrumental, by his extensive European correspondence, in bringing many immigrants to America. He is a versatile writer, and of high reputation; has published a book of poems entitled "Prairie Rosen," also a "History of New Ulm," the "Indian Massacre" and a "Guide to German Emigrants."


Charles Berry, M. D., was born in Bennington, Wyoming county, New York, in 1838. He studied medicine in Concord, New Hampshire, and in 1859, at the university at Ann Arbor, from which he graduated; is also a graduate from a medical college in Buffalo, New York. He enlisted as assistant surgeon in the 106th New York volunteers, and served three years during the civil war. Came to Minnesota on account of ill-health in 1866, and has since practiced his profession in this state. First located in Belle Plaine, but since 1872, has lived at New Ulm.


H. H. Beussmann was born in the province of Hanover, Germany, in 1825. He came to America, landing in New Orleans in 1847; spent a short time in St. Louis and Chicago, then acted as porter in a hotel, in Louisville, after which he began business for himself in that city. Subsequently moved to Cincinnati, and for five years was in mercantile trade, then moved to the suburbs of the city and started a dairy, which he conducted five years. Came to New Ulm in May, 1861, but settled on a farm in Nicollet county, where he remained until 1876. Since that time has been a dealer in hardware in New Ulm. During the fight with the Indians he took an active part in the defense of the city. Married in Cincinnati, August 5th, 1851, Catharine M. Schapekahm. Anna M. M. H., Margaret C., John H., Derman D., and Emma M., are their living children.


A. W. Bingham was born in Canada, in 1843. Came to the United States in 1860 and settled in St. Albans, Vermont, remaining until 1864. Coming thence to Minnesota he settled in Winona and engaged in lumbering until 1872, then came to New Ulm. Here he gives his attention to lumber and grain business. In 1873, he was united in marriage with Miss Sopha Jewett, of St. Albans, Vermont.


Albert Blanchard was born September 5,1830, in Montpelier, Vermont. Came to Minnesota in 1854 and remained nearly a year, then went to Illinois, but returned in 1856; settled on a farm where the village of Nicollet now is; remained until 1862, then went to Pike's Peak. On returning enlisted in First Minnesota mounted rangers and went with General Sibley's expedition to the Missouri river. After his return he engaged in the sale of farm machinery at St. Peter until 1868, then located in New Ulm and gave attention to mercantile trade until 1877. Since 1874 he has served as clerk of the district court.


Joseph Bobleter was born in Austria, April 19, 1846. In 1858 he immigrated to Dubuque, Iowa; attended school there until September, 1862, when he enlisted in the 13th United States infantry, and in the following fall was discharged on account of sickness; re-enlisted for one year in December, 1863, in the United States navy and served during the Red River expedition. After the defeat of General Banks at Pleasant Hill, he, with others, volunteered to carry dispatches on a small transport to Admiral Porter and General A. J. Smith, who were then within about sixty miles of Shreveport, was severely wounded in the right leg, and barely escaped losing the right foot. At the expiration of his term of enlistment Mr. Bobleter re-enlisted in Company L, Second Iowa cavalry and served until October, 1865. The following December he enlisted in the 13th United States infantry, but was detailed on recruiting service with Major Yates, at Dubuque, Iowa; finally joined his regiment at Jefferson Barracks; was discharged from service in 1868. He then located in New Ulm, and has since resided here. Embarked in the drug business in 1872 with also a stock of stationery. Was appointed postmaster; re-appointed in 1877 and again in 1881. Began the newspaper business in 1877, and in 1878 issued the "New Ulm Review," of which he is the present editor. Since 1871 he has been prominently connected with the National Guards of Minnesota. In the fall of 1869 he married Miss Mary Schneider.


H. William Bonne was born in Germany, in 1851, and immigrated to America in 1869. He located at that time in Henderson, Sibley county, Minnesota, and there remained three and one-half years. After spending two years in Milwaukee, Wisconsinj returned to Sibley county in 1874, and soon after engaged in general merchandising for four years in New Rome. During the spring of 1879 he came to New Ulm and has since given his attention to the farm machinery trade. He married in 1879, Miss Frances Huber.


Ernst Brandt, judge of probate, was born in Germany in 1838. There he received a liberal education, which was completed at the gymnasium in 1852. At the age of fourteen he came with his parents to America; lived in Cleveland, Ohio, until 1856. Coming to Minnesota he settled in Sigel, Brown county, which town he was instrumental in organizing; also named it. He was town clerk many years, also held other town offices and was county commissioner three years. In 1869 he moved to New Ulm and for the past eleven years has been connected with the German paper, the "Post." In 1880, he was elected probate judge of Brown county, and still continues in that office. In 1860, married Miss Elise Wendlandt.


Charles Brust was born in Germany, in 1847. Coming to the United States in 1862, he located in Illinois, but soon after went to St. Peter, Minnesota; engaged as a clerk in a store one and one-half years, then went to Indiana for six years. In 1870 returned to this state, locating in New Ulm. His attention was given to buying wheat for three years then to the hotel business, in which he still continues. He is doing a good business in the Merchant's Hotel. Married in 1873, Miss Anna Haeberle, who has borne him five children, of whom three are living: Charles, Fritz, and George.


Louis Buenger, whose native country is Germany, was born in 1839. He moved to Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1856, and learned the trade of carpenter, which business he followed there until coming to Minnesota in 1863. Locating in New Ulm, he continued in the pursuit of his trade until 1875, then began in the furniture business, in which he still continues. Miss Henrietta Ipps became the wife of Mr. Buenger in 1865. Louis, Emma, Anna, Charley, Emil and Minnie are their children.


Frank Burg, a native of Germany, was born in 1840. At the age of fourteen years he entered the army in his native country, and continued as a soldier until coming to America in 1867. He lived in Milwaukee two years, then spent one year in Chicago, after which he went to the mountains on a prospecting trip. Settled in New Ulm, Minnesota, in 1871, and for three years had charge of the City Hall. In 1874 started a cigar manufactory, which produces from three thousand to four thousand per year.


Dr. C. B. Carl was born in Bavaria, Germany, in 1839. He was educated at Ludwigs University, graduating in 1861. At the same time began the study and practice of medicine, and the same year entered the army in his native country; served as surgeon till 1868. Until 1879 he practiced in Bavaria, and in that year came to the United States and to New Ulm, Minnesota, where he has since resided and pursued his profession. Dr. Carl was united in marriage in the year 1857 with Miss Fannie Eibner.


H. B. Constans was born December 10, 1840, in Germany. He immigrated to St. Paul in May, 1854; engaged with his brother William in a wholesale and commission house of that city, and in 1859 went to St. Louis, but one year later returned to St. Paul, and was in the mercantile business until 1872, then removed to New Ulm. His first business engagement was wheat buying, after which he was assistant cashier of Brown County Bank until 1877. During the fall of 1876 he was elected county auditor, re-elected in 1878, and again in 1880. Mr. Constans has discharged the duties of his office in a very creditable manner.


Charles Dietsch was born in France in 1829, and left his native land for America in 1855. He settled in Chicago, remaining in Illinois eighteen years. When about thirteen years of age he began learning the trade of baker, Which he has since followed. In 1873 came to Austin, Minnesota, where he engaged in business until 1878, then located in New Ulm and opened his bakery. Married in 1856 Mary Burke, who died in 1861. His second marriage was with Phedora A. Gains. Charles, Mary, Delia, Hattie, Helena, Joseph, Artemus, Alphona and Josephine are their children.


George Doehne was born in Germany in 1834. Came to America after reaching man's estate, and until 1861 lived in different states, then came to Minnesota and settled in New Ulm. In 1862 he went into the army in the mounted rangers and served one year. In 1865 located on a farm in Cottonwood township, which he cultivated till 1874, then came again to New Ulm and engaged in lumbering one year, then purchased one-third interest in the Eagle mill, in which business he has since continued. While a resident of Cottonwood he held many of the town offices, and was for one term county commissioner. Married in 1865 Anna Boeck.


Edward Dunkel, whose native place is Prussia, was born in 1853. Came to America and to Minnesota in 1870, and for four years lived in Mankato, St. Peter and Henderson. He then became a resident of New Ulm, and began business as a tailor, and has since continued as such. In 1873 he married Miss Caroline Korth. Elmer is their only child.


Jos. A. Eckstein was born in Austria, in 1857. He came with his parents to America, in 1864, and located in Cottonwood, this state; in 1866 they removed to Sigel, where they lived on a farm. At the age of thirteen he started in life for himself. In the fall of 1874 entered the State Normal School at Mankato; during the summer of 1875 he taught, but returned to school in the fall and graduated in May, 1876. He taught in the public schools of New Ulm four years, and in the meantime began the study of law with B. F. Webber, was admitted to the bar in May, 1880. The same year he entered the United States signal service at Washington, and was ordered to Fort Meyer, Virginia, for instructions; he was at the head of his class when he finished the course in December, 1880; was ordered to Texas and stationed at different points: October 15, 1881, he was discharged on his own application. Returning to his former home, he opened a law office at New Ulm, and enjoys a good practice. In November, 1881, he was appointed city attorney.


Andrew J. Eckstein, a native of Austria, was born September 9, 1861 and came with his parents to America in 1864. During the same year he came to Minnesota and until fourteen years of age lived with his parents on the farm; then entered the State Normal School at Mankato, from which he graduated in 1878. He afterward taught school in the towns of Stark and Milford. until 1879; then entered the drug store of Dr. C. Weschke as clerk; here he has since remained.


Meinrad Epple was born in Germany, in 1840. Came to America in 1866, and settled soon after in New Ulm, Minnesota, and engaged in the butchering business. In 1872 he started his present shop, which is one of the finest and best in the city.


Louis Filkel, was born in Austria in 1847. Came to this country with his parents in 1853, and located in Watertown, Wisconsin. At the age of fourteen he began learning harness making; worked at Watertown until 1864, then went south and continued in the pursuit of his trade for the government about one year. Returning to Wisconsin, he soon after located in La Crosse; worked at his trade a short time, then went on a boat on the Mississippi. In 1873 he began the saloon business in La Crosse, which he continued until 1877, then came to New Ulm and opened a saloon, known as the Center street sample rooms. Married in 1873, Louisa Fay. Julia M. and Alois A. are their children.


Richard Fischer was born in Baden, Germany, January 29,1821; came to America in 1851; went to New York, Pennsylvania, Wheeling, Virginia; remaining a number of years in the latter place. In 1857 came to New Ulm, and was engaged in the Globe flouring mill three years; enlisted in 1861 as second lieutenant in the First Minnesota battery and was ordered to the south, but resigned on account of poor health, at the end of the year. He arrived about three weeks before the Indian massacre, and took an active part in defending the village. Was elected register of deeds in 1862 and served two years; then engaged in lumbering.


Gustave Fischer was born in New Ulm, Brown county, Minnesota, in 1860. After receiving an elementary education in the public schools of this city he finished his studies at the State University at Minneapolis in 1879. Since that time has given his attention to teaching and in the fall of 1881 was chosen as teacher in the high school at New Ulm.


William Frank, of the firm of Frank & Bentzin, proprietors of the Cottonwood flouring mill, was born in Germany in 1837. At the age of fifteen he began learning the trade of miller, and followed it in his native country until 1860. Coming at that time to America, he remained one year in Illinois, and in 1861 came to New Ulm. During the war he served one year in the First Minnesota Mounted Rangers. Returning, he worked in the different mills of the place until 1879, then in company with Mr. Bentzin, built the Cottonwood mill, which they are making a great success. Mr. Frank married in 1864, Miss Lizzie Gueth. One daughter, Wilhelmine, has been born to them.


Henry Frenzel was born in Saxony, Germany, in 1843. Came to America in 1868, and settled in Oshkosh, Wisconsin, remaining four years. In 1872 came to Minnesota, and the next year settled in New Ulm and started a brewery, which he conducted two years with a partner. He has since given his attention to the manufacture of pop. Married in 1872, Miss Caroline Schmuker.


Fr. Freidman was born in France, in 1832. Came to New York in 1853, and four years later removed to Canada. After remaining two years located in Indiana, and was there engaged in the pottery business until 1861. Enlisted in that year in the Thirtieth Indiana. After serving three years went to Iowa, and there continued working at his trade until 1867. Coming at that time to Minnesota he located in New Ulm, and after two and one-half years in the pottery business, began the grocery and liquor trade, which he has since continued. Married in 1858, Cleora Curtis. They have five children.


Joseph Galles was born in Paris, France, in 1854, and when only two years of age came with his parents to America, remaining two years in Chicago. In 1858 came to Minnesota and lived in New Ulm until the Indian outbreak of 1862, then made his home in Shakopee two years, and in St. Peter six years: in 1870 returned to New Ulm. When a lad of thirteen years, Mr. Galles learned the trades of painting and wagon making, which he has since followed; since 1865 he has been in business for himself. Married in 1877, Miss Mary May. Lena and Josie are their children.


William Gieseke a native of Hanover. Germany, was born in 1831. Came to America in 1849 and after living in New York three years went to Illinois and engaged in farming until 1855, then came to Minnesota. He settled in Courtland township, Nicollet county, near what is known as Swan Lake, and gave his attention to farming until 1866; still owns seven hundred acres in that locality. In 1866 he engaged in the livery business in New Ulm. Soon after locating here was appointed deputy sheriff and in 1867 was chosen sheriff of Brown county, which office he continued to hold about nine years. In 1865 married Miss Matilda Rotermund. Bertha, Willie, Lydia, Matilda, and Hugo are their children.


Fr. Gommel was born in Germany, in 1817. Came to America in 1847, and to New Ulm, in 1861, beginning soon after the manufacture of pottery. At the time of the Indian outbreak, he was chairman of the board of supervisors and took an active part in the defense of New Ulm; was appointed quartermaster by Colonel Flandrau, in which capacity he served through the Sioux war After peace was restored he again established a pottery, his other having been destroyed by the Indians. After a few years he discontinued it and is now the city marshal.


Phillip Gross was born in Germany, in 1809. He came to America in 1855 and remained in Milwaukee, Wisconsin until 1856, then came to New Ulm; he was one of the founders of the town. At that time he engaged in hotel business on the spot where his fine hotel now stands. Since that time has continued in the same business. In 1834 he married Miss Elizabeth Paderman who died in 1850. His second marriage was in 1853, with Miss M. Fisher.


L. Haeberle was born February 8, 1856, in New Ulm, Brown county, Minnesota, and is a son of Jacob Haeberle, who was killed by the Indians, during the siege of New Ulm, in 1862. He received a liberal education at the public schools of his native place, and when fifteen years of age began learning the trade of tinner, at which he has since worked. In the spring of 1881 he associated with A. G. Seiter in the stove and tinware trade, in which they are still doing a thriving business.


E. A. Hattinger was born in Chicago, Illinois, in 1858. There he completed his studies at Bryant £ Stratton's Commercial College. When fourteen years of age he began clerking and continued in that capacity and as a book-keeper for different firms in Chicago, until 1877, then came to Minnesota. Soon after he located hi New Ulm and has since been clerking for Kiesling, Keller & Company. Mr. Hattinger is a member of the Masonic lodge at New Ulm.


Weigand Hauenstein, whose native country is Germany, was born in 1834. Came to America in 1852, and for five years lived in Cincinnati, Ohio. Came to Minnesota and located near New Ulm on a farm, following agricultural pursuits until 1864, after which he engaged in the saloon business, he was united in marriage in 1861 with Miss Regina Grimmer.


John Hauenstein was born in Germany in 1831 and came to America in 1854, locating in Ohio. In 1857 he came to Minnesota and settled in New Ulm. Entered the army in 1862 as second lieutenant in the First Minnesota mounted rangers, in which he served one year. In 1864 he built his present brewery in New Ulm. Married to Miss Henrietta Fritcher in 1862.


C. W. H. Heideman was born in Illinois in 1857. After receiving an education at the public schools of Elgin, he began at the age of fourteen years to learn telegraphing. On coming to New Ulm in 1877, he was made telegraph operator and the next year was appointed as station agent in which position he is at present. He was married in 1880 to Miss Eda Behnke.


P. Herman, a native of Germany, was born in 1849 and was educated at Berlin College, graduating in 1864. He then entered the Prussian army, in which he served until 1871, receiving in the meantime eight wounds. In 1873 came to America, landing in New York city. Spent two years in the eastern states, and while in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, took a course of medical lectures. Came to Minnesota in 1875; he located in New Ulm two years later and has since pursued his profession as a veterinary surgeon. In 1881 was married to Miss Elenor Poster.


Florian Hess was born in Germany, in 1826. Came to America in 1848 and settled in Cincinnati, Ohio, remaining until 1861. Coming thence to New Ulm, he worked in a machine shop until the Indian war of 1862 when he was shot in the left arm, which rendered him a cripple for life. He opened a gun shop in 1865 to which business his attention has since been directed. Was married in 1853 to Miss Elizabeth Gaut. They have one adopted child named Mary.


Jacob Hoescheler was born in Austria in 1843. Came with his parents to America in 1852, and with them located in Dubuque, Iowa, remaining until 1856; went to Houston county and remained until his enlistment in 1862 in Company K, Sixth Minnesota; was mustered out at the close of the war. For seven years afterwards his home was in La Crosse, Wisconsin, and in 1872 he went to New Ulm, where he engaged in the saloon business for five years; then sold and began business with Kiesling & Keller, under the firm name of Kiesling, Keller & Company. Married in 1868 Miss Mary Fay.


C. H. Hornburg was born in Germany in 1850. Came to the United States in 1866 and located in St. Peter, Minnesota. While there he engaged in farming and dealing in machinery until 1880 then came to New Ulm and in company with Mr. Peterson, embarked in the farm machinery business, the firm name being Peterson & Hornburg. During the past year the partnership has been dissolved, Mr. Hornburg still continuing the business.


William Hummel, born in Germany in 1832, accompanied his parents to America in 1845. Until 1848 remained in New Orleans then went to Cincinnati; In 1850 went on a steamer on the Mississippi river; in 1856 accompanied Colonel Pfaender to Minnesota, being a member of the party who laid out the town site of New Ulm. Soon after he settled on a farm in Sigel; until 1868 was chiefly engaged in farming, serving in the meantime from 1863 to '65 in the Second Minnesota cavalry, as sergeant of Company M. In 1868 engaged in the drug trade in New Ulm and has since been in different branches of business. He has been twice married; the second time in February, 1869, to Miss Mary Stud.


George Jacobs was born in Germany in 1837 and in 1849, came to America. He resided in New Orleans and St. Louis until 1857, then came to Minnesota with his father, Charles Jacobs, with whom he opened a general merchandise store in New Ulm in which they did business until it was destroyed by the Indians in 1862. He then joined the Brown county militia and was orderly sergeant of Company A; was elected sheriff the same year; served four years. In 1867, removed to St. Louis, Missouri, where for two years he was engaged in book keeping, then returned to New Ulm. He again engaged in general merchandising and has since continued. Married in 1869, Miss Elizabeth Starch.


Rev. J. C. Jahn was born in Prussia, in 1839, and there remained until the age of seventeen years. Was left an orphan when only fifteen years old, after which he was obliged to earn his own livelihood. In 1856, he came to America and settled in St. Paul, Minnesota, and engaged as a clerk a short time then spent one and one-half years on a farm. Enlisted in 1861, in the 1st Minnesota cavalry which was soon after consolidated with the 5th Iowa, and was sergeant of Company G; was wounded, taken prisoner, and held about three months then exchanged and discharged. Returning to St. Paul, he engaged in farming until 1869, then began his career in the ministry. He joined the Minnesota conference and began preaching at Mankato. Came to New Ulm as pastor in 1879. Married in 1864, Christine Harlung.


Ole Johnson was born in Norway in 1846. Came to the United States and settled in Fillmore county, Minnesota, in 1868, remaining until 1873. He then came to New Ulm and for four years was employed by Kiesling and Keller, after which he engaged in the butter trade for another firm, remaining with them until the fall of 1881; then embarked in the butter and egg trade for himself. Mr. Johnson is a member of the Odd-fellows lodge, in which he has held all the offices. Married in Norway in 1867, Miss Helen Hanson. Mary, John, Anna, Lena, Betsey and Jennie are their children.


M. Juenemann, whose native land is Germany, was born in 1848. When fourteen years of age he began began learning the trade of a harness-maker and followed it until coming to America in 1872. The year following removed to Minnesota and settled in New Ulm. In 1876 he opened a harness-shop on his own account and is now having a good trade. He married in 1876, Miss Mary Lauterbach, and has one son, John.


Benedict Juni was born in Canton of Berne, Switzerland, on the 12th of January, 1852. He is a son of Benedict and Mary Juni; the former is still living near New Ulm but the latter died from nervous prostration produced by fear and anxiety for the welfare of her family during the terrible days of the Sioux massacre in 1862. Benedict came to America with his parents in 1857, and settled near Mankato, Minnesota, till 1859, then moved to near Beaver Falls, where the family lived in peace and happiness until August, 1862, when they were suddenly surprised by the Indian outbreak and compelled to fly for their lives. One sister, the wife of Mr. Zitzlaff, died with her husband rather than accept life with the Indians. Benedict was also captured and held in custody several weeks; was not cruelly treated but was compelled to witness many heartrending scenes during his captivity. He was eventually released at Camp Release, and spent the subsequent few years at school. At the age of seventeen went to Galena, Illinois, and there attended school three years, then returned to Minnesota ^and taught two years in La Fayette and the same length of time at New Ulm. Subsequently attended the State University three years and has since been engaged in the public school of New Ulm. Was special botanist in the geological survey on the north shore of Lake Superior in 1877.


Henry Keller was born in Switzerland in 1842. Came to America in 1864 and resided in Chicago, Illinois, until 1872, then came to New Ulm, Minnesota. Here he located and formed a co-partnership with W. H. and Rudolph Keisling, in general merchandise, where he still continues.


F. Keller, a native of Germany, was born in 1828, and came in 1853 to America, locating in Michigan. His home was in that state for nine years, when in 1862, he came to Minnesota, and has since lived in New Ulm. Until 1876 was interested in the meat trade, since which he has had a saloon. In June, 1876 he married Margaret Myer, who died in July, 1881.


Rudolph Kiesling was born in Germany, in 1841. Came with his parents to America in 1849, and resided in Chicago six years, then in 1855 came to New Ulm, and settled on a farm near the town. He cultivated the farm until 1872, then came to New Ulm and began mercantile business with Henry Kelier, under the firm name of Keisling & Kelier, which continued till 1879. At that time Jacob Hoescheler was admitted as a partner. This firm does an annual business of about $100,-000. Mr. Kiesling was in the town and witnessed the bloody scenes of the massacre of 1862, the first victim being a young girl of about fifteen years of age who was shot while in the act of carrying an infant to a place of safety. The babe's name was Ida Behnke, now Mrs. Heidemann, of New Ulm.


H. Kiesling was born in Germany, in 1837. In 1857 he came to America and proceeded directly to New Ulm, Minnesota; the same year he opened a blacksmith shop and has since given his whole attention to the business. In 1859 he was united in marriage with Miss Albertine Dittbener, who has borne him six children: Frank, Albert, Otilie, Herman, Alvina and Emil.


E. G. Koch was born in 1833 in Saxony, Germany. In 1860 he came to Minnesota and settled in New Ulm.. He anticipated entering the fur business, but his intended partner was killed by the Indians, which compelled him to abandon the project. In 1866 he was elected auditor of Brown county, which office he held continuously for ten years. Since 1876 he has been engaged in real estate and insurance business. He is agent for the Winona & St. Peter and St. Paul & Sioux City land companies, and is also court commissioner of Brown county.


William Koch, who is at the head of the Empire Milling Company, was born in Saxony, Germany, in 1845. Immigrated to America in 1869; coming directly to Minnesota he settled in New Ulm. For some time was engaged in farming, but in 1870 was appointed deputy clerk of court, and was soon after appointed deputy auditor, deputy register, deputy treasurer, and deputy sheriff, holding all these offices at the same time; continued in service six years. After this went into the insurance business, but abandoned it three years later to form the company of which he is the head.


Carl W. A. Krook, a native of Sweden, was born in 1834, and moved to New York in 1869; thence to Chicago, and after a brief stay there and in St. Louis came to Minnesota. Until 1873 he was in different places in the State, located in that year in New Ulm. He opened a grocery store in which he has since continued with a good trade. He married in 1861, Miss Hannah Johnson. Levis B., Carl G. and Frans H. are their children.


Frank Kuetzing was born in Berne, Switzerland, in 1849. Accompanied his parents to America in 1861, and with them located in Montreal, Canada. At the age of thirteen years he began learning the trade of a jeweler; remained in the employ of one man ten years. In 1872 he went to Beloit, Wisconsin, and there engaged in the grocery trade until 1880; came to New Ulm in the fall of that year. He was obliged to borrow money to procure a license to sell his goods, but has since been prospered and is now doing a thriving business.


Eli Kuhlinan was born in Canton, Ohio, in March, 1852. After attending the common and graded schools during boyhood, he entered the university at Ann Arbor, Michigan, from which he graduated in the department of chemistry. In 1874 attended a course of medical lectures, after which he was engaged in the drug trade in Albany, Indiana. Located in New Ulm in 1878, and has since continued as a druggist.


John Lauterbach, a native of Prussia, was born in 1853, and when only one year old came with his parents to America. Locating in Chicago, Illinois, they remained until 1858, then came to New Ulm, where John has since lived. At the age of sixteen years he began learning the wagon making trade, and continued in the employ of others until 1875, then engaged in business for himself. In 1876 his marriage with Miss Mary Henle took place. They have two living children, Creszens and Maggie.


H. Laudenschlager was born in Pennsylvania, in 1843. He resided in that state until twenty-one years of age, and learned the trade of tinsmith. Came in 1864 to New Ulm, Minnesota, and worked for his father two years, then purchased the stock and has since continued the business, carrying a full line of stoves, hardware and tinware. He married, in 1866, Miss Minnie Becker, who has borne him five children: Henry S., Emma J., Mary A., Willie F. and Minnie S.


Charles Leonhard, whose native country is Germany, was born in 1836. His boyhood was passed in the land of his birth, and in 1868 he left Germany for America and settled in Illinois. In 1878 he located in New Ulm, Minnesota, and purchased the foundry and machine shop in which he is at present doing business.


John Lind, of the law firm of Lind and Randall, was born in Sweden in 1854. At the age of thirteen years he came to America with his parents, locating in Goodhue county, Minnesota. He attended the public schools of Red Wing, and taught several terms. In 1873 came to New Ulm and taught in Nicollet county one year; then entered the office of J. Newhart for the study of law. In 1875, entered the State University at Minneapolis, which he attended until the fall of 1876, when he was admitted to the bar in New Ulm. In 1877 opened an office for the practice of his profession, and the same year was elected county superintendent of schools. May, 1881, he accepted the appointment of receiver in the United States land office at Tracy, Lyon county. Although he has entered upon his duties there, he continues his law practice to some extent in New Ulm. Married in 1879, Alice A. Shepard. One son, Norman.


S. Lowenthal, manager of "Cheap Charley's" store, was born in Germany, in 1851. Came to America in 1870, locating in Philadelphia, and where for two years he engaged in business. After remaining in New York for a time, he came west and transacted business in different parts of Iowa and Minnesota, until 1877, locating finally in New Ulm. He began in the clothing trade in a small store with a limited stock, but having been prospered is now situated in a fine building 24 by 90 feet, and is doing a large trade. In 1876 he married Miss Selma Goldman.


Henry Loheyde was born in Germany in 1824. He moved to New York in September, 1846; went to Cincinnati and remained until 1857, when he came to Minnesota and located in New Ulm. The following autumn he embarked in the boot and shoe business; had learned the trade in Germany; he continued in that business until the Indian outbreak, when he lost all. It was he who took the first dispatch from the city to the governor at St. Paul. He went to Chicago, but returned to his former home in 1869, where he has since been engaged in the same line of trade. Married in 1852 Christiana Schumacher. Francis, Bertha and Robert are their children.


Edward Malbzahn, a native of Germany, was born in 1846, where he continued residing until 1872, at which date he located in Cleveland, Ohio, and remained in that state until 1880, when he came to New Ulm; here he has since been interested in the saloon business. His marriage with Miss Anna Hartke took place in 1869.


Fred. Meile was born in Germany in 1826, and came to America in 1851. After spending one year in New York he went to Brazil: returned to the United States in 1856, and came to New Ulm, Minnesota; was engaged in farming until the Indian outbreak, when he assumed command of a company in the defense of New Ulm. Joined the army in 1863 as chief bugler of the First Minnesota cavalry; was in General Sibley's expedition against the Indians, and in 1864 was transferred to the Second Minnesota cavalry, in which he served as chief bugler until the close of the war. In 1870 he came to New Ulm, and after doing business as a tailor for some time, opened the saloon where he is now. He has been twice married, the second time in 1873 to Miss Mary Koerres. Adolph and Matilda are their children.


Jacob Miller, a native of Germany, was born in 1834. At the age of twenty years he came to America and to Minnesota in 1857; located in New Ulm and opened a carriage manufactory, which was destroyed during the siege in 1862. Removing to Ohio he remained one year, then returned to his former home and started a saw and gristmill, which he ran about eight years; subsequently erected a planing mill, which was burned after being in use one year; he rebuilt and operated it two years, then sold; has since been in the lumber business. During the cyclone of 1881; he suffered severe losses of property, and came near losing his life; the injuries received will doubtless render him a cripple for life.


Jacob L. Mueller was born in Switzerland in 1820. Came to America in 1854; resided in Freeport, Illinois, till 1856; coming thence to Minnesota, he has since lived in New Ulm. In 1860 he opened a beer garden which he still owns. At the defense of New Ulm in 1862, he figured prominently. Married in 1864, Mrs. Sopha Stewart, who had three children by her first marriage; Mary, Margaret and Annie. They have by this marriage one child: Sopha.


Alfred Muller, M. D., was born in Berne, Switzerland, in 1825. There he received his literary and medical education, graduating in 1852. He came to the United States in December, 1852, and located in New York city, but came to Minnesota in 1856, and practiced his profession in Stillwater until 1861; at that time was appointed surgeon in charge at Fort Ridgely, where he remained until 1867; since that time he has practiced at New Ulm. Married in 1851, Eliza Eichelberger, who died in 1876. Mrs. Muller was an amiable and interesting lady, possessed of much refinement as well as endurance. During her husband's long siege as surgeon she was with and assisted him, and during the massacre, sieges at Fort Ridgely, Wood Lake and Birch Cooley, none were so tender in caring for and comforting the sick and wounded as she. A just and fitting tribute has been paid to her memory by the author of the History of the Great Massacre, Charles S. Bryant. By an act of the legislature a monument was erected by the state to the memory of Mrs. Muller at Fort Ridgely cemetery, where her remains lie.


Michael Mullen was born in St. Albans, Vermont, in 1839. Moved with his parents to Stevenson county, Illinois, in 1843, where he lived and assisted on the farm until 1865. He then settled in St. Peter, Minnesota, and was engaged in the hardware trade until 1870, at which date he located at New Ulm where he has since resided. He was president of the Brown County bank while it existed; it was sold in 1874; he is now the president of the Citizens' National bank, which started in 1876.


G. H. Nelson, a native of Germany, was born in 1858, and came to America with his parents when ten years of age. For six years he resided in Olmsted county, Minnesota, then commenced learning the trade of blacksmith; after working at that two years he began butchering; this trade he has since followed and for two years previous to locating at New Ulm, in 1881, was in business in Redwood Falls. On arriving in this city he bought the meat market of Captain Nix, where he still does business.


John N. Nenno was born in Buffalo, New York, in 1845. He left Buffalo when a child and came with his parents to Wisconsin, remaining in the state until 1870. Served during the war in the United States army under General Sherman. Returned to his home in Wisconsin, and in 1870 came to New Ulm where he has since lived, as proprietor of a restaurant and billiard hall. Mr. Nenno has a wife and five children.


J. Newhart, attorney at law, was born in Tannersville, Monroe county, Pennsylvania, in 1846. He remained in that state until 1857, then in company with his father, Philip Newhart, came to Minnesota, Goodhue county, where he remained several years. Returning east he remained in New Jersey and Pennsylvania until 1862. He was then not quite sixteen years of age, but enlisted as drummer boy of the 107th Pennsylvania volunteer infantry. After two years in service he re-enlisted and was soon after appointed chief musician of the regiment; held that position until he was mustered out in July, 1865. In 1866 came again to Minnesota, and soon after entered the law office of S. L. Pierce, now of St. Paul, and studied law with him until 1868, then formed a partnership with Mr. Pierce which continued two years. Located in 1871 in New Ulm and opened a law office; he gives considerable attention to real estate, collections, etc. Was judge of probate of Brown county in 1873-'4, and court commissioner in 1873-'4-'5. Married in 1870, Sarah Parker. Horace and Grace are their children.


Jacob Nix was born in Bingen on the Rhine, on the 17th of July, 1822. Came to America in 1849, remained nearly a year in New York, then went to Cleveland, where he lived eight years; in 1858 came to New Ulm which has since been his home. He at first gave his attention to the mercantile trade, and afterward opened a meat market, in which he still does business. In the Indian outbreak of 1862 he commanded the Brown county militia, and during the siege of New Ulm was severely wounded. After recovering he enlisted in the First mounted rangers; was promoted to first lieutenant and was subsequently captain of the Second Minnesota cavalry. He served over three years, then returned to New Ulm where he has since resided.


John Nun was born in Bavaria, on the 17th of April, 1837. Came to America in 1853, landing in Baltimore where he remained three years. Enlisted in the regular army in 1856 and was honorably discharged in 1861 at Fort Kearney, Nebraska. He came to New Ulm in April of that year and engaged in the defense of the town in August, 1862. Afterward enlisted in the First Minnesota mounted rangers, and served one year. On returning to New Ulm he engaged in the butchering business and still continues.


Tory Olesen was born in Norway, in 1849, and at the age of ten years came to America with his parents. He remained in Wisconsin until 1862, then came to Minnesota and completed his education at the State Normal school at Mankato, graduating in 1872. Previously he taught one year, and subsequently was teacher in the district schools in Cottonwood three years. He has since been a teacher in the schools of New Ulm, and for the past six years has had charge of one of the higher grades. He married in 1879, Miss Clara Scherer.


Hon. S. D. Peterson was born in Norway in 1849, and came to the United States with his parents when but four years old. After remaining in Wisconsin about two years, removed to Fillmore county, Minnesota, and there received a common school education. Came to New Ulm in 1872, and has since been engaged in the sale of farm machinery. Mr. Peterson was elected to the state senate in 1880; served on several important committees, among which was the committee on tree planting. At Winnebago City, Faribault countv. in 1873, he married Miss Jennie George, who has borne him two children: Allie and Flora.


William Pfaender was born in Wurtemburg, Germany, July 6, 1826. Came to America in 1848; lived in Cincinnati until 1856, then came to New Ulm in charge of a German colony; he soon after opened a farm near this place. In September, 1861. he enlisted in the First Minnesota battery, and was commissioned first lieutenant; was ordered south and remained until after the Sioux outbreak. He came north on recruiting service, and on his arrival was placed on detached service at St. Peter and Fort Ridgely. Was commissioned lieutenant-colonel of the First mounted rangers, and after its organization held the same office in the Second cavalry; until the close of the war had command of the frontier posts. Returned to his farm and remained until 1870, then came to New Ulm and engaged in the lumber trade until 1875. Was elected state treasurer at that time, and continued as such four years, since which time he has been in real estate and insurance business. Colonel Pfaender was elected to the legislature in 1860, and to the senate in 1870, '71, '72: was one of the first presidential electors from the state of Minnesota.


R. Pfefferle, a native of Germany, was born in 1840. At the age of thirteen years came with his parents to America, and with them lived in Illinois one year, then came to Minnesota and located in St. Paul, where his father opened the first gun shop in the city. In 1856 removed to Kasota, Le Sueur county, and remained on a farm until 1870, except two years in Montana; came to New Ulm in 1870, and formed a partnership with A. Blanchard in the grocery business; bought his partner's interest about 1877, and has since continued the trade alone. During the war he served in the First Minnesota mounted rangers, in Company E. Married in 1871 Elizabeth Laudenschlager. Flora and Willie are their children.


John Piemeisl, whose native land is Germany, was born in 1848. He came to America when about twenty years old, locating a home soon after in New Ulm, Minnesota. After a season on a farm he worked at the brewing trade in different places until the fall of 1881, then returned to New Ulm and bought his present saloon and brewery. He married in 1872 Caroline Frank.


F. Propping was born in Prussia, in 1833. He completed his studies in a gymnasium college in 1851; after this he began military studies and in 1853 was made lieutenant of artillery; served as such until 1858. At that time he came to America and followed farming in Pennsylvania until the late war; in 1861 he enlisted in Company F, 29th New York volunteer infantry, of which he was second lieutenant for about eighteen months, was then discharged, after which he returned to Pennsylvania. Went to Rochester, New York and clerked in a wholesale house some time, also gave private lessons in German and Latin. In the fall of 1880 came to New Ulna to teach German and Latin in the higher grades of the public schools. Miss Louisa Hock became his wife in 1858.


August Quense was born April 22, 1827, in Germany. He served an apprenticeship of three years at harnessmaking, then spent three years in travel and in the pursuit of his trade. He landed in the United States February 13, 1849, and for eight years worked at his trade in St. Louis, Missouri. On the 10th of May. 1857, he arrived in New Ulm; engaged in various pursuits until he enlisted in 1862, in the First Minnesota mounted rangers, and served thirteen months on the frontier against the Indians. In February enlisted in the First Minnesota heavy artillery and went south; remained in his regiment until the close of the war. He returned to New Ulm, and has since continued at his trade. Married at St. Louis September 13, 1849, Mary Pruel, who died August 7, 1868. His second marriage took place December 8, 1868 with Anna Kolb.


Frank L. Randall, son of Benjamin H. and Wilhelmena H. Randall, was born at Fort Ridgely, Nicollet county, Minnesota, September 30, 1856. Subsequently removed to St. Paul, and after a-residence of one year in that city, went to St. Peter. In 1873 he left the St. Peter high school to teach in Le Sueur; in the fall of 3874 became a student in the collegiate course of St. John's college at Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin; remained one year. Entered the law office of G. S. Ives, of St. Peter, in 1876, and continued the study of law with him until 1880. In January, 1877, was appointed county superintendent of Nicollet county; in November of that year elected to that office. Mr. Randall was admitted to the bar in the spring of 1880, and soon after removed to Tracy remaining until May, 1881; he then located in New Ulm; is a member of the firm of Lind & Randall.


J. J. Redmann was born in Chicago, Illinois, in 1854. Came to Minnesota when but two years of age, with his parents: they located near New Ulm on a farm. After living on the farm five years, the father began in business and continued until the Indian outbreak. He with family moved into Sibley county, then again located in New Ulm and embarked in general merchandise business. In the summer of 1881 his son J. J. purchased the business and hat since continued the trade.


Rev. G. Reim, a native of Germany, was born in 1828. There he received an education and graduated from the mission school, which is designed to prepare students for the ministry. In 1855 began his labors as a clergyman; remained in his native country one year more, then, in 1856 came to America and settled in Jefferson county, Wisconsin; removed in 1870 to New Ulm and became pastor of the German Lutheran church. Was married in 1857 to Anna Maria Brunder. Adolph, Julius. Emil and Gustave are their children.


Edward Roden, a native of Germany, was born in 1835. Came to America in 1854 and lived until 1866 in Boston, Cincinnati, and St. Louis. Came to Minnesota and settled in New Ulm; engaged in the manufacture of cigars, and has since continued in the business. Married in 1863 Miss Augusta Daw. C. G., Hermann, Alfred and Alexander are their children.


C. H. Ross was born in Great Falls, New Hampshire, April 2, 1848. When but two years old he accompanied Iris parents to Wisconsin; in 1868 came to Rochester, Minnesota, and entered the banking office of Chadbourn Bros., in whose employ he continued until 1874, when he became a partner in the firm and with them purchased the Brown County Bank at New Ulm. As Mr. Ross is the only resident partner, he has the control and management of the bank.


John C. Rudolph was born in Prussia, December 27, 1828. Came to America in 1850, and after residing at Hartford, Connecticut a short time, removed to Cleveland, Ohio, thence to New Ulm in 1857, and opened a farm where the city now stands. In 1860 he was elected county auditor, which position he held until 1866. During the massacre in 1862, Mr. Rudolph succeeded in saving the county records, for which he received much praise from the citizens; during the excitement he took his family to St. Paul, where they remained till the following spring. While officiating as auditor in 1864, was appointed cashier of the First National Bank, continuing in that position three years. He represented Brown county in the legislature in 1868-'9: was also a delegate to the convention at Chicago, which nominated General Grant to the presidency. In 1869 he was appointed receiver in the United States land office at St. Peter, but resigned in 1874 to take charge of the Brown County Bank. In 1876 became cashier of the Citizens' National Bank, which position he still fills. Mr. Rudolph was also judge of probate while acting as auditor.


Quirin Schaible was born in Germany, in 1828, and when a young man learned the mason's trade. On arriving in America in 1854, he settled in Chicago and the next year came to New Ulm; pursued his trade till 1871, then opened his present saloon. Served one year in the 1st Minnesota mounted rangers. In 1863, he married Mrs. A. Buehr, relict of John Buehr, who was killed by the Indians in 1862. Alfred, Roman and Frank are their children.


August Schell was born in Germany in 1828. He came to America in 1849, and settled in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, but the next year removed to Cincinnati, remained until 1856. Coming thence to Minnesota, he located in New Ulm; was one of the founders of the town. Soon after arriving, he built what was known as the Cincinnati Mill; it was the first in the place. In 1860, he engaged in the brewing business, in which he still continues. Married in 1853, Teressa Herrman.


A. H. Schleuder, a native of Germany, was born in 1833. At the age of fourteen years began learning the trade of jeweler, which he pursued there until coming to America in 1862. Soon after, he located in St. Peter, Minnesota, and two years later moved to Watertown, where he continued his trade till 1873; since that time has been located in New Ulm, engaged in the same business. His marriage with Miss A. Schwand took place in 1860.


William Schmidt was born in Hartford, Wisconsin, in 1833. There he spent his early life, and in 1865 came to Minnesota; stayed a short time in New Ulm, then went east; made his home in Chicago and St. Louis until 1872, when he came back to New Ulm and has since been engaged in the hotel business. In the spring of 1880 he started the Northwestern, which he still runs.


Joseph Schmuker was born in Germany in 1849. Came to America in 1866, and soon after to New Ulm; went to Minneapolis and remained till 1870, when he again came to New Ulm, and rented the brewery which he bought in 1872, and where he is now engaged in business. Married in 1873, Miss Ida Peurer. They have two children.


E. J. Schnobrich was born in Germany in 1851, and when nineteen years of age came to America, locating in New Ulm, Minnesota. He worked as a laborer until 1878, then started a saloon, which he still conducts. Miss Anna Nenno became his wife in 1873.


Ignas Schwendinger was born in Austria in 1831; when a young man he studied painting, photography, and marble cutting. These three trades he followed there until coming to America in 1879. since which time he has made his home in New Ulm, engaged in the marble business. He married in 1857, Miss J. Rein. They have four children, all living.


Adolph Seiter was born in Baden, Germany, in 1826. When seventeen years of age he went to France and remained three years, pursuing the tailor trade, which he learned in his native country. On the 1st of May, 1847, he arrived in the United States, and for two years made his home in New York; went to Cincinnati and engaged in merchant tailoring. Coming to New Ulm in 1856, he, in company with Colonel Pfaender and others, established what was known as the Turners Colony they were the first to make explorations and select a site for the town. He soon after associated himself with Charles Koehne, and opened a store of general merchandise; he sold about two years afterward and began the hotel business; has since been proprietor of the Dakota House. Mr. Seiter was one of the most instrumental in defending New Ulm at the time of the Indian outbreak. What is now the gents' sitting-room of his hotel was then a hospital, and often in the midst of the defense he was called from the barricade to make temporary graves in the garden until passage to the cemetery could be made in safety: during the whole time he was only eight days away from home. Married, September 28, 1852, Helena Erd. Thirteen children have been born to them; ten are living: Gustaf A., William, Otto, Albert, Alma, Oscar, Freddie, Ella, Emma and Mata.


A. G. Seiter was born in Cincinnati in 1854. He is a son of Adolph Seiter, and with him came to Minnesota in 1856 and settled in New Ulm, where he received a liberal education at the public schools; at the age of eighteen began learning the trade of tinner, which has since been his chief employment. In the spring of 1881 he, in company with Leonard Haeberle, engaged in the stove and tinware business. Married in 1876 Miss Augusta Lindeman. They have two children: Freda and Louis.


Wm. F. Seiter was bom in Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1856, and with his father, Adolph Seiter, came to New Ulm the same year, where he has since made his home. At fourteen he went into a bank as clerk, where he remained about three years; leaving the bank he went into the railroad office, where he remained one and one-half years, then went to St. Paul and was employed in the Second National Bank. In 1876 he was made teller of the Brown County Bank at New Ulm, where he has remained since. Married in May, 1881, Miss Ida Vajen.


E. E. Seiter was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, in October, 1856, and in company with his parents came to Minnesota and located at New Ulm. He was educated at the public schools. In 1872 learned the photographing business, and in 1878 opened a gallery for himself in New Ulm, where he has been engaged ever since. Married in May, 1879, Miss Emma Meyer. They have one child: Io.


H. T. Seiter was born in New Ulm, Minnesota, in 1858, where he has since resided, and received his education at the common schools. In 1872 he went to work in a mill, where he remained about one year; In 1874 he commenced learning the barber's trade; worked in a shop for five years, he then started a shop of his own and still conducts the business. Was married in February, 1881, to Miss Emma Swanson.


Amaziah Slocum was born in Tioga county, New York, July 26, 1842. When twenty years of age he came to Minnesota, located in Northfield, and there pursued the trade of cooper, but in 1862 settled on section 20 of Stark township, Brown county. Enlisted in August, 1862, in Company A, Seventh Minnesota, and was honorably discharged at Fort Snelling in 1865. Returning home he followed farming until 1879 and has since been a stock buyer in New Ulm. Married in 1866, Phoebe Meserve, and has five children.


ELIZER STOEMACH was born in Henry county, Illinois, on July 31, 1858, the son of Michael and Mary (Loher) Stoemach. The father was a native of Ohio, and of German and Irish parentage, while the mother came from Germany.


H. A. Subilia was born in Italy in 1819. Removed to Germany in 1839, and came to America in 1848, locating in New Ulm in 1859. He built and operated a distillery here until its destruction in 1862 by the Indians; he then went to St. Paul, and was deputy state auditor two years, but returned to New Ulm in 1864. Engaged in the mercantile business until 1874 when he was engaged in the milling business which he has since continued.


John C. Toberer was born in Wurtemburg, Germany, in 1836. Immigrated to America in 1854; after remaining one and one-half years in New York he removed to Chicago: in 1856 he came to New Ulm; was one of the first settlers here. He worked on a farm in order to regain his health; afterward opened a jewelry store in New Ulm. During the Indian warfare he helped in the defense and then resumed his business. Soon after arriving in New Ulm he married Louise Nagel; they have had six children, four are living.


Henry Vajen was born in Prussia in 1826, and when twenty-three years of age immigrated to New York city; went directly to California, where he engaged in gold mining, trading and farming until 1854, then went to his native country on a visit. Returning to America he lived in Chicago until 1856, then located at New Ulm and engaged in general merchandising until 1868. He was the first treasurer of Brown county. After retiring from business in 1868 he visited in Germany until 1872, when he returned to Minnesota. He married in 1858, Miss Mary Groff. Magdalena, Antonia and Ida are their children.


Charles Wagner was born in Germany in 1830: when nineteen years of age he came to America and to New Ulm in 1857. He has since engaged in the manufacture of furniture, and the store which he now occupies was used as a hospital during the Indian massacre; he was severely wounded during the fight at New Ulm. In the fall of 1862 he was elected judge of probate, which office he held for ten years; has been chairman of county commissioners ten years, also justice of the peace several terms.


J. H. Weddendorf was born in Ohio in 1857, and came to Minnesota with his parents when but three years of age, locating with them near New Ulm. He received his education at New Ulm, also took a course at the Business college at Minneapolis. From 1873 until 1877 he was in the drug store of Joseph Bobleter, as clerk; after spending some time in Minneapolis and St. Paul, he again returned to his position in the drug store; in 1879 he was made assistant postmaster. Married in 1879, Miss H. Plath. Johanna is their only child.


Carl Wescheke, M. D. was born in Prussia March 4, 1831. He was educated in his native land: passed first through the department of military surgery at the university of Berlin, then to the university at Greifswald, and afterwards to Halle University, where he served one year hi the army according to the law. Came to New Ulm in 1860 and was the only resident physician here during the massacre; was employed by the government as military surgeon for the soldiers. In 1868 he went to California: returned the same fall. He started the first drug store in this city in 1865, winch he sold in 1868, but purchased it on his return, in 1870 was elected to the city council, and has since served; was appointed to the office of mayor in 1877; elected in 1878, and re-elected in 1880 without opposition. He is proprietor of the Pioneer drug store.


August Westphal, a native of Prussia, was born in 1813. He learned the trade of jeweler which he followed until 1844, then commenced to learn dentistry and practiced the profession there until coming in 1854 to America. After working at his trade one year in Boston, he removed to Cincinnati, and there resided until coming to Minnesota in 1857. He taught the first term of school at New Ulm, and the next year removed to his farm; continued to teach, however, in Cottonwood and Milford for a number of years. After remaining on a farm ten years, he again removed to New Ulm. Was county superintendent of schools five years, treasurer of county two terms, temporary clerk of court a portion of the year of 1862, judge of probate three terms, and has been county commissioner. His marriage with Miss Florentine Peterson took place in 1844; she died in 1879, leaving two children, Teressa and Mary.

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