SALOONS

 

            In 1892 Mr. MANUEL started a saloon located approximately where Julia WEY lives at present.  He retired in 1920.  In 1906 Dick MANUEL left the employ of GEYERMAN’S store and worked in his father’s place of business.  This had been moved up town prior to 1898 and was called the Corner Saloon.

            Joe PLUT ran a saloon in the building now housing Mabel’s Café.  I do not know what year it was opened.  In 1903 Matt WEINANDT who was employed there left to run a threshing machine and P.G. JENSEN, a first class drink mixer, took his place.  In 1904 Barney KRUKEMEYER resigned as bartender to go on the road selling supplies for a Chicago wholesale house.  Fred VOLLMAN took his place.  W.J. BLIEDORN was also an employee here.  In 1907 the village voted on whether or not to relicense saloons.  The ballots were forty-six for, twenty-two against and five blank.  Mr. PLUT advertised:  ‘Wanted: 1000 men to help unload schooners.’

            Another news item read: “J.F. PLUT has been going around lately with a countenance that would take a prize at a beauty show, even with the most prejudiced judge possible to be found.  One evening last week he went into the storeroom of his saloon to draw off some alcohol and as the place was dark, he lit a match.  The vapor from the alcohol cask took fire and the contents exploded with the result Joe’s face and one hand were so badly blistered that he was confined to his house for several days.  Next time he will draw alcohol in the dark, or wait until the morning dawns.”

            In 1907 PLUT sold his saloon to V.C. ANDERSON.  In 1908 the Council decided to grant just one license.  This was granted to Ed MANUEL for the sum of $1,400.  In 1913 it was raised to $1,900.

            In 1914 another vote was taken on saloons.  Fifty-five for and thirty against was the result.

            In 1915 Mr. MANUEL opened a soft drink parlor in his building.  The rest of the occupations in the two buildings will be shown as the histories of the various businesses are depicted.

            In 1941 the old MANUEL saloon which forty or fifty years ago was the oasis for thirsty persons but for the past ten years had become dilapidated was torn down by Ed SCHEPPMAN of Okabena, who purchased it.  Thus disappeared one of Brewster’s early landmarks.