Burgoyne, Sir John Fox
B: 1782
D: 07 Oct 1871 in his 90th year at his home, 5 Pembridge Square, London and was buried in the Tower of London.
M: He married and had several daughters but only one son, Captain Hugh Talbot Burgoyne V.C. Some of his sons-in-laws were Lieutenant Colonel Hon. G. Wrottesly; Rev. James Spurgeon; Edward Woodhouse, A. Gretton, Esq.; and a Stopford.

Sir John Fox Burgoyne, British Field Marshall, was a son of General John Burgoyne (QV). He was educated at Eaton and Woolwich.

He obtained his commission in 1798 and served in 1800 in the Mediterranean.

He took part on the Egyptian expedition of 1808 and in Portugal in 1808 - 1809.

In the Corunna Campaign he held the very responsible position of Chief of Engineers with the rear guard of the British Army.

He served with great distinction throughout the Peninsular War and after the Battle of Vittoria in 1813, he became commanding Engineer on Lord Wellington's staff. At the end of the war he received the C.B.

In the campaign of 1814 - 1815, he served at New Orleans and Mobile.

Burgoyne was largely employed during the long peace which followed Waterloo in other public duties as well as military work.

In 1851 he was promoted to Lieutenant General and in the following year received the G.C.B.

When the Crimean War broke out (1833 - 1856) Burgoyne accompanied Lord Raglan's Headquarters to the east, superintended the disembarkation at Old Fort and was in effect the principal engineer advisor to the English Commander during the first part of the seige of Sevastopol.

In 1868, on resigning his post as Inspector General of Fortifications, which he held for more than 20 years, he was made a Field Marshal and parliament granted him a pension at the same time of 1,500 pounds. He died 07 October 1871, a year after the tragic death of his only son, Captain Hugh Talbot Burgoyne, V.C. (1833 - 1870) who was in command of H.M.S. "Captain" when that vessel went down in the Bay of Biscay, September 7, 1870 on an experimental voyage.