PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND SHIPS

INFORMATION & WEBPAGE CONNECTIONS

 

Alchymist
Around 1829, Thomas Chantor took legal action against Alexander Campbell for the collection of debts, and took the new bark, Alchymist.

Alert
The large brigs were the Alert and the Bacchus, both of which made two crossings to PEI in 1822.

Alexander: http://www.isn.net/~dhunter/appdx.html
Brig Alexander

Alma

Amity
In the 1820's Cambridge's vessels John and Mary, and later the Amity and Felicity, brought out settlers from Bristol to his establishment at Murray Harbour.

Aneroid

Ann
Sailed from Hull to Charlottetown in 1819 but carried no reported passengers. A late settlement from Wiltshire was established on the Earl of Selkirk's estate by William Douse, Selkirk's Island agent, who had emigrated from Divizes in the 1820's. In 1842, Douse brought 37 additional settlers from Bristol for the New Wiltshire settlement, Lot 31.

Annie or Anne

Antagonist

Apollo

Arab

Atlanta

Atlantic
Brig Atlantic, 627 tons, built for James Yeo of Port Hill and retained for him and William Yeo, Appledore, England in partnership, until James Yeo's death, at which time William bought the whole vessel. William sold the Atlantic to James Anderson of London in March, 1877.

Attwood

Auriga

Bacchus
1820. A brig that had a bad crossing, losing her deckload of lumber and her boats. In the spring of 1822, the Bacchus came to PEI with Leischester rams and ewes, two Devon bulls - one named for Tommy Chanter - and a Devon cow, for the new farm at Penman's Point.

Baltic
Sailed from Great Yarmouth to PEI. It deposited 24 settlers at Charlottetown in 1833 enroute to Quebec.

Bellona
Built in 1812 by Richard Chapman for Burnard. As soon as she was ready, she was armed with ten guns and sent off to Bermuda in an escorted convoy carrying troops and supplies for the war with the United States. Her master was the Joshua Williams who had commanded the Cleveland. In the summer of 1816, Burnard sent the Bellona (now released from transport service) across to Miramichi and thus resumed her historic North American trade.

Bideford
Other chief owners of Westcountry emigrant ships before 1827 were the Billing and Pope families of Plymouth. Five vessels owned by the Billings, some in partnership with Thomas Butters, made 21 voyages to the Island during that period. However, only the Speculation and the Bideford appear to have carried emigrants to the colony, a total of only 42 passengers in five voyages. These were timber traders that carried mostly rum and manufactures westward, but in 1824 they brought out some fittings for a ship, the Restitution, which Billing and Butters launched the next year at New London. In 1827, the Billings' New London brought out 80 emigrants from Plymouth, but the next arrival of steerage passengers did not take place until 1830.

Bolivar
Arthur Owen launched the Bolivar for Tommy Chanter in 1826 near Georgetown.

Bollina
A brig built in 1830 by William Ellis for William Grigg of Appledore,who later settled on PEI.

Bonita

Breeze
A large ship built in 1827 for Thomas Chappell.

Bride

Bridegroom

Bridesmaid

British Lady

British Queen http://www.isn.net/~dhunter/british_queen.html

Brothers
The Pope family, Plymouth shipbuilders and timber merchants, had established two of their number, John and William, at Charlottetown by 1817 when they built the schooner "Brothers".

Caldicott Castle
Brought 28 settlers in 1820-21, some of whom settled at Springbrook, inland from New London on the northern coast. In 1822, the Caldicott Castle switched to the Plymouth-Quebec run and this trickle of immigration to PEI ran dry.

Calypso

A bark built by William Ellis in 1828 for Thomas Chantor. Westcountry emigrants, chiefly mechanics and labourers, emigrated to PEI in 1832 on the Calypso.

Advertised February 11, 1834 as follows: EMIGRATION to Quebec, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and the United States of America. Regular traders: Bark Calypso, Brig Collina, Brig Isabella, Brig Sappho, Brig Marina.

The above superior vessels will be conveniently fitted up for Passengers. For freight and passage, apply to Mr. T. B. Chanter, Bideford.

Catherine O'Flannagan

Charles W. Morgan

Charles William
Sailed from Hull to Charlottetown in 1819 but carried no reported passengers.

Choice

City of Glouscester

Civility

Clansman

Clarendon: http://www.isn.net/~dhunter/clarendon.html
Tobermary, N. Britain. Departed 1808 to Charlottetown

Cleveland
Among the prosperous shipmasters in North Devon was John Williams, with his wife, Elizabeth. John made his small fortune with a brig named the "Cleveland", the family name of the local squire. Their son, Joshua, became master of the ship in his turn. When the Cleveland was lost in 1810 after adventures with French privateers in the English Channel, Joshua entered Thomas Burnard's employment and became master of one of his brigs and eventually one of the great British shipmasters of his age.

 

Collina
A brig built in 1827 by William Ellis for Thomas Chantor. It was loaded with lumber in PEI and sent to Britain. The Collima and Calypso became ships in which leading citizens of the Island preferred to travel, and the demand from North Devon and North Cornwall for passages in the hold became almost overwhelming.

The Collina arrived in PEI on one of her trips, by May 30, 1830, from Bideford, England. There were 74 passengers - men, women, children. The men consisted of farmers, labourers, and mechanics, and were chiefly from the counties of Devon and Cornwall.

Advertised February 11, 1834 as follows: EMIGRATION to Quebec, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and the United States of America. Regular traders: Bark Calypso, Brig Collina, Brig Isabella, Brig Sappho, Brig Marina.

The above superior vessels will be conveniently fitted up for Passengers. For freight and passage, apply to Mr. T. B. Chanter, Bideford.

 

Commerce: http://www.rootsweb.com/~pictou/commrce.htm
1803 Perthshire, Scotland. Robert Galt, Master.

A large ship belonging to John Cambridge, which around 1823, developed a leak on her way from Quebec to Liverpool with timber. Wrecked on the coast of Cape Breton.

Cordelia

Cosmo

Cutty Sark

Daisy

David
A brig from North Shields whose master was David Crighton, who gave an account of the way trade was being conducted in a memorial to the Lords of his Majesty's treasure dated 20 Feb 1818.

Despatch
A Prince Edward Island schooner built in December 1817, bound for Liverpool put into Appledore in distress. Her master's name was Richard Moys, the son of a Dover carpenter, born in 1792. Thomas Burnard hired him and from him must have heard much about conditions on PEI.

Devonia

Dixon
In 1818 two other vessels joined the Valiant in taking passengers to PEI. The Dixon was advertised for Pictou, PEI, and New Brunswick and landed 28 passengers at Charlottetown on 09 May, before docking at Buchouche on 12 May. The Nancy arrived on 23 Jun, leaving an unknown number of passengers on the Island, and departed then for Quebec 3 days later where she landed 56 settlers on 19 July.

The Dixon returned in 1819, reaching Charlettown on 06 May with 101 passengers but may have taken some of these immigrants on to New Brunswick, as the vessel returned to Hull from Shediac.

In 1820, the Dixon returned for the third time, carrying 23 passengers to Charlottetown and Buchouche.

The Roberts and the Dixon were advertised for both PEI and New Brunswick in 1821 but cleared out directly for PEI. In 1822 no Hull vessels were listed for the Island and no more ever called there.

 

Dove: http://www.rootsweb.com/~pictou/dove1.htm

Eagle
The Eagle sailed from Portsmouth and landed 14 settlers at Quebec in 1820 and others in PEI.

Ebenezer
Owned by John How of Bideford and mastered by William Marshall. Loaded with a timber cargo in 1834.

Was advertised February 12th, 1834 - Emigration to Charlottetown in Prince Edward Island. The fine brig, Ebenezer, 300 tons, J. Marshall, Master. The above vessel is intended to leave Bideford about the 10th of April next and to be neatly fitted up for passengers. Further particulars may be known by applying to Mr. John How, Commercial Wharf, Bideford. The Captain has resided nearly two years on the Island, and can give the Passengers information respecting the country.

Economy
The Inman family of Crapaud is said to have come on a vessel called the Economy in 1819. A possibility exists that the Economy may have carried 285 emigrants from Tobermory to Pictou in 1819.

Edinburgh: http://www.execpc.com/~haroldr/edbrglst.htm

Electric:

Elizabeth
Robert Clark purchased Lot 21 and founded New London in 1774. He led a party on the snow Elizabeth that year then returned to London to assemble a second voyage which left England late in the season. Arriving off New London, PEI, early in November, 1775, she ran aground on a sandbar about a mile offshore to the north of Oyster Point, PEI.

Appears to have been another Elizabeth. Thomas Pope's sons, William and John Pope, had come out in 1817 to cut pine for the family's drydock, and they built a schooner that year in Charlottetown. Brother Joseph joined them at Bedeque in 1819, where they launched the snow Elizabeth in 1821 and followed with four other vessels by 1826.

Another report shows the Nautilas as one of Pope's vessels that brought 23 passengers out from Plymouth in 1820-21 and the Elizabeth brought 19 more in 1822.

Elizabeth and Ann: http://www.isn.net/~dhunter/liz_ann.html
Home Port - Newcastle. Departed Thurso, N. Britain 08 Nov 1806 for Charlottetown, Thomas Wynn, Master.

Elizabeth Yeo

Em B. Heard

Esperance

Euphemia
A brig built in 1829 for Thomas Chantor at Bedeque.

Faithful
Brig Faithful, 175 tons, built on James Yeo's account and sold to David Price of Newport, England in January,
1858 for not less than 1200 pounds.

Falcon

Falmouth: http://www.isn.net/~dhunter/falmouth.html

Fame
In 1816, two Hull ships, the Fame and Nancy, carried some five dozen passengers to Quebec. At least two Hull vessels sailed for Miramichi in 1816, another to St. Andrews, and the Valiant to Pictou.

Fanny: http://www.isn.net/~dhunter/fanny.html

Favorite

Felicity
In the 1820's Cambridge's vessels John and Mary, and later the Amity and Felicity, brought out settlers from Bristol to his establishment at Murray Harbour.

Five Sisters

Flora

Florida

Four Friends
30 Oct. 1812. William Ramsey, master, was entered at Bideford custom house with a cargo of lumber from PEI and established the first direct contact which has so far been traced between PEI and North Devon, England.

Genesta

Georgina

Gleaner
A fifty foot schooner built for Thomas Chanter. There is record of at least one voyage he made in charge of her across to the Miramichi, but her main use was as a fishing schooner to work from the fishing station on Bill-Hook Island.

Glenburnie

Gracie M. Parker
A 91 ton two masted schooner, built at Essex, Massachusetts in 1869 and used primarily for the coasting trade. She was purchased in June 1893 by the firm of J. H. Myrick & Co. of Tignish, which carried on a business of local fish and lumber in the Boston market. In 1893, the Gracie M. Parker was hired to carry a load of lumber to Newfoundland. The crew were mostly from the Alberton area and included Terrence Farrell, Captain, his brother, William Farrell, James Docherty, first mate; John Oliver, cook; and Frank McAlduff and Alfred Matthews, crewmen. This was meant to be the schooner's last commercial voyage of the navigation season. The vessel drove onto rocks and foundered on the coast of Miquelon. Everything was lost in the pounding surf including the crew.

Great Eastern

Haldon

Harmony

Hector: http://www.rootsweb.com/~pictou/hector1.htm
1773

Hellen
Thomas Burnard dealt in soft woods. In June 1812, the ship, Hellen, arrived from St. Andrews with lumber, the first American cargo to have come into Bideford for many years.

Hero
Built around 1827. Owned by Martha Burnard.

Humphreys: http://www.rootsweb.com/~pictou/hmphreys.htm
Brig Humphreys from Toberbory, N. Britain, 14 July 1806, John Young, Master

Ianthe

Ingomar

Irene
A schooner built in 1829 by William Ellis for Samuel Smith Hill, one of John Hill's sons.

Isabella
Advertised February 11, 1834 as follows: EMIGRATION to Quebec, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and the United States of America. Regular traders: Bark Calypso, Brig Collina, Brig Isabella, Brig Sappho, Brig Marina.

The above superior vessels will be conveniently fitted up for Passengers. For freight and passage, apply to Mr. T. B. Chanter, Bideford.

Isabella Saunders

Isle of Skye: http://www.rootsweb.com/~pictou/islskye.htm
1806

Jabez

James
On Nov. 9, 1829, the James, belonging to James Peake of Plymouth, sailed from Charlottetown for Bristol, with Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Burnard Chanter on board. Thomas Peake, who later managed the Plymouth end of the business, was master of the brig James, which was advertised for passengers beginning in 1827, making regular voyages between Plymouth and Charlottetown. The Peakes' vessel Mary Jane made seven voyages to the Island in the early 1830's, but like the James brought only a handful of passengers.

James Yeo

Jane: http://www.isn.net/~dhunter/jane.html
A large bark built in 1829-30 by William Ellis for T. H. Haviland. It was registered in 1831 owned by Thomas Chanter.

Jane Ann & Elizabeth

Jenny

Jessie
A brig built in 1827 by William Ellis. He financed 1/3 to himself and Joshua Williams of the Bellona and Thomas Chappell each 1/3.

At least six vessels brought over 300 passengers from Dumfries between 1819, when the Jessie landed passengers at PEI and Richilbucto before travelling on to Miramichi, and 1822. Seems to be a discrepancy between this report and when the brig was built in 1827.

John (owned by Cambridge)
In the 1820's Cambridge's vessels John and Mary, and later the Amity and Felicity, brought out settlers from Bristol to his establishment at Murray Harbour.

John (owned by LePage)
Some of the entrepreneurs who sold vessels and timber in Britain soon after the wars were Island shipowners, but the only one who brought back passengers from Plymouth was the Guernsey immigrant John Nicholas LePage (1792-1824) of Charlottetown. LePage had his timber buyers, Fox, sons, & Co. of Plymouth advertise his vessels John and Margaret for passengers in the early 1820's; the John had brought out 50 passengers in 1818, and 22 passengers sailed on the Margaret in 1822. Following his death in 1824, his brother, Napoleon, took over the business. His transatlantic ships carried mostly rum and consumer goods, but a new Island built ship, the Mary, brought over some ships' fittings in 1826. LePage also had a small vessel, the Despatch, which he sent to Pictou and Miramichi for coals and salt, and to the Fox Island mackerel fishery.

John Hawkes

John Lilly

Juniper

Kathleen

Lady of the Lake
The earliest documentation of James Yeo's presence in North America is an indictment for larceny of one William Stewart who was accused of robbing Nathaniel Burnard in January 1824 on board the schooner "Lady of the Lake" lying in Egmont Bay.

Lady Seymour

Lively http://www.isn.net/~dhunter/lively.html

Lord Mulgrave
A vessel called the Lord Mulgrave is claimed to have brought the Yorkshire Hodgson family of Tryon in 1830, from Scotland

Lord Ramsay

Louisa:
Probably the last ship to be built under Richard Chapman's direction. The brig was launched in late March 1827.

Lovely Nelly: http://www.rootsweb.com/~pictou/lnell1.htm
Wm. Sheridan, Master. Scotland to PEI.

Lucy: http://www.isn.net/~dhunter/lucy.html

Malakoff

Margaret
Some of the entrepreneurs who sold vessels and timber in Britain soon after the wars were Island shipowners, but the only one who brought back passengers from Plymouth was the Guernsey immigrant John Nicholas LePage (1792-1824) of Charlottetown. LePage had his timber buyers, Fox, sons, & Co. of Plymouth advertise his vessels John and Margaret for passengers in the early 1820's; the John had brought out 50 passengers in 1818, and 22 passengers sailed on the Margaret in 1822. Following his death in 1824, his brother, Napoleon, took over the business. His transatlantic ships carried mostly rum and consumer goods, but a new Island built ship, the Mary, brought over some ships' fittings in 1826. LePage also had a small vessel, the Despatch, which he sent to Pictou and Miramichi for coals and salt, and to the Fox Island mackerel fishery.

Marina
Advertised February 11, 1834 as follows: EMIGRATION to Quebec, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and the United States of America. Regular traders: Bark Calypso, Brig Collina, Brig Isabella, Brig Sappho, Brig Marina.

The above superior vessels will be conveniently fitted up for Passengers. For freight and passage, apply to Mr. T. B. Chanter, Bideford.

Mars
1819. Completed and loaded with lumber from Charlottetown to Bideford. Built by Richard Moys.

Mary
Some of the entrepreneurs who sold vessels and timber in Britain soon after the wars were Island shipowners, but the only one who brought back passengers from Plymouth was the Guernsey immigrant John Nicholas LePage (1792-1824) of Charlottetown. LePage had his timber buyers, Fox, sons, & Co. of Plymouth advertise his vessels John and Margaret for passengers in the early 1820's; the John had brought out 50 passengers in 1818, and 22 passengers sailed on the Margaret in 1822. Following his death in 1824, his brother, Napoleon, took over the business. His transatlantic ships carried mostly rum and consumer goods, but a new Island built ship, the Mary, brought over some ships' fittings in 1826. LePage also had a small vessel, the Despatch, which he sent to Pictou and Miramichi for coals and salt, and to the Fox Island mackerel fishery.

Mary (owned by Cambridge)
In the 1820's Cambridge's vessels John and Mary, and later the Amity and Felicity, brought out settlers from Bristol to his establishment at Murray Harbour.

Mary Ann
A small 35 foot schooner built by Lauchlan McInnes of Seven Mile Bay around 1826.

Mary Jane
On Nov. 9, 1829, the James, belonging to James Peake of Plymouth, sailed from Charlottetown for Bristol, with Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Burnard Chanter on board. Thomas Peake, who later managed the Plymouth end of the business, was master of the brig James, which was advertised for passengers beginning in 1827, making regular voyages between Plymouth and Charlottetown. The Peakes' vessel Mary Jane made seven voyages to the Island in the early 1830's, but like the James brought only a handful of passengers.

May Dundas

Meteor

Minerva
In 1829, 12 steerage passengers came to PEI via the Minerva from the East Anglian area of England. They may have been from the Butcher and Bryenton families, both of whom emigrated from Suffolk that year.

Minna

Mizza Bell
The last ship to have been built on Mill River, PEI, was Mizza Bell by Big Andrew Bell and named for his daughter.

Nancy
In 1816, two Hull ships, the Fame and Nancy, carried some five dozen passengers to Quebec. At least two Hull vessels sailed for Miramichi in 1816, another to St. Andrews, and the Valiant to Pictou.

Nautilas
Owned by Thomas Burnham in 1806. When the war with the United States broke out in 1812, the ship was taken over by the government for use as a transport and put under the command of one Lewis Grossard.

New London
Other chief owners of Westcountry emigrant ships before 1827 were the Billing and Pope families of Plymouth. Five vessels owned by the Billings, some in partnership with Thomas Butters, made 21 voyages to the Island during that period. However, only the Speculation and the Bideford appear to have carried emigrants to the colony, a total of only 42 passengers in five voyages. These were timber traders that carried mostly rum and manufactures westward, but in 1824 they brought out some fittings for a ship, the Restitution, which Billing and Butters launched the next year at New London. In 1827, the Billings' New London brought out 80 emigrants from Plymouth, but the next arrival of steerage passengers did not take place until 1830.

Newton
Built by Richard Chapman, the son of Emanuel Chapman, also a shipbuilder. Richard took charge of his Father's ship building business and became the most important shipbuilder in North Devon. The Newton sailed for 90 years.

Nouvelle Marie

Nugget

Ocean Queen

Oeconomy
A vessel called the Oeconomy returned to Hull from Buctouche in the autumn of 1819.

Orient

Oughton: http://www.rootsweb.com/~pictou/oughton.htm

Pakeha: http://www.isn.net/~dhunter/pakeha.html

Palmyra

Pandora

Parramatta

Peter & Sarah
Richard Chapman's stocks of timber enabled him to build six ships in 1808. The next year, 1809, he built only one, a fifty foot vessel with one mast, rigged as a sloop, the Peter and Sarah.

Ponemah

Prince Edward: http://www.isn.net/~dhunter/pedward.html

Princess of Wales

Princess Royal

Prioress

Queen

Queen of Cardigan
Was struck on Appledore Bar in 1828, with the loss of four out of her crew of seven.

Rambler: http://www.isn.net/~dhunter/rambler.html

Ramona

Raymond

Rhoda

Rita

Rosebud

Rover

St. Ann's

St. Lawrence: http:www.islandregister.com/stlawrence.html
Tobermary to Ship Harbour (Port Hawkesbury), N.S. 1828

Saltern's Rock
A Bideford ship from St. John, New Brunswick.

Sappho
A brig built by William Ellis for Thomas Chanter in 1829.

Sarah: http://www.rootsweb.com/~pictou/sarah1.htm

Sara Jane

Sarah & Eliza

Secret

Sidonian

Spencer: http://www.rootsweb.com/~pictou/spencer.htm

Stentor

Superb
Built at New Bideford in 1826. In the spring of 1828, Martha Burnard's ship was damaged through collision with ice on the Grand Bank.

Susan
Built by William Ellis, as recorded on 4 July 1818.

Susanna
An American brig that was anchored off the tip of Oyster Point, PEI.

Susannah

Swan

Telegraph

Thetis

Three Brothers

Torridge

Transit

Valiant
Some of Valiant's Yorkshire emigrants settled on interior lands north of Charlottetown. The largest number came from Devon and Cornwall.

Venus
Owned by Thomas Burnard, around 1806 , in partnership with her master, James Lowther, of Clovelly.

Vestal
The Vestal, Taylor, from Tobermory, with 301 passengers arrived here on Friday. This was reported in the PEI Register newspaper on 11 August 1829.

Victoria

Water Witch

William Yeo

Passenger Ships to Pictou 1767 - 1849: http://www.rootsweb.com/~pictou/passlist.htm


Nova Scotia Ships

Ships Bound for Nova Scotia Between 1750 and 1862

This is a partial list of the ships that left Europe (mainly Great Britain) for Nova Scotia. The ships highlighted also came to Prince Edward Island. See above list.

Acadia 1848 Paisley, Scotland Halifax

Albion 1774 Yorkshire, England Halifax

British Queen 1862 Liverpool Halifax Aylward April 1, 1862

Charming Molly 1750 London, England Halifax

Charming Molly 1760 New England Annapolis

Commerce 1803 Port Glasglow Nove Scotia

Cumberland 1827 Waterford, Ireland Halifax

Duke of York 1772 Liverpool Halifax

Elisabeth and Ann 1806 Thurso, N. Britain Nova Scotia Thomas Wynn

Frank Flint 1862 Liverpool Halifax Fabeg

Humphreys 1806 Tobermory, N. Britain Nove Scotia John Young July 14, 1806

Isle of Skye 1806 Tobermory, N. Britain Nove Scotia John Thom September 23, 1806

Jenny 1775 Hull, Yorkshire Nova Scotia April, 1775

Providence 1774 Newcastle, Northumberland Halifax

Rambler 1806 Tobermory, N. Britain Nova Scotia James Norris June 20, 1806

Morning Star 1862 Liverpool Halifax McKenzie April 16, 1862

Thomas and William or Prince George 1774 Yorkshire Halifax

Two Brothers 1818 Wales Shelburne June 15, 1818

Two Friends 1774 Hull, Yorkshire Halifax

 


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Please send additions, corrections or other information to:

Dennis L. Matthews
704 - 228th Avenue NE 232
Sammamish, WA 98074

Tel: 425-868-8838 - Fax: 425-836-0333

Email: DLMatthews@mindspriing.com