Chapter 2
ABORIGINAL REMAINS
Pages 12 ~ 15



From the book
"HISTORY OF WABASHA COUNTY, MINNESOTA"
Compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge and Others
Published Winona, MN by H. C. Cooper, Jr., & Co., 1920
Republished Currently by Higginson Books




That Wabasha County has been the home of man through countless generations is shown by its numerous earthworks. These earthworks follow the course of the waterways, being the more numerous along the Minnesota, Zumbro, the Whitewater, and Indian Creek. The evidences are many that these mounds were not built by a race distinct from the Indians, but that the Mound Builders were in fact no other than the more or less immediate ancestors of the Indians found here by the whites. The relics found in them indicate a state of society and mode of life in every way identical to that of the Indians.

Much interesting material has been written on that subject, and N. H. Winchell's "Aborigines of Minnesota" contains, aside from general discussion of aboriginal inhabitants of Minnesota, a detailed description of some of the remains found in Wabasha County. Since that time many of these mounds have been obliterated by agricultural operations, road construction, spring time freshets and excavations by investigators. The following survey is reproduced from that work:

Zumbro valley Mounds. S.W. 1/4, N.E. 1/4, and N.E. 1/4, S.E. 1/4, section 15, T. 110-10. This group and the one to the southwest, on S.#. 1/4, S.W. 1/4 of the same section, were probably at one time connected. This group consists of 21 circular mounds, situated on a high plateau about 25 feet high, of cultivated land.

S.E. 1/4, S.W. 1/4, section 15, T. 110-10. This group of 21 mounds was probably connected with the last. Three of these are short elongated mounds of the ordinary form, and form part of the series. They are all on a plateau about 15 feet above the bottom. The largest is 48 feet by 4 feet.

N.W. 1/4, N.E. 1/4, section 15, T. 110-10. On a plateau 25 feet above the bottom. The ground now consists of 6 mounds, but formerly many more existed north of these. Three of these are 50 feet in diameter, one is 42 feet, and two are 30 feet.

S.W. 1/4, N.W. 1/4, section 15, T. 100-10. On a plateau about 65 feet above the bottom are two circular and one elevated mound. The largest is 30 feet by 2 feet; another is 26 feet in diameter and has been excavated.

A lone mound is on a spur of the bluff about 150 feet in diameter and 3 feet S.W. 1/4, N.E. 1/4, section 18, T. 110-10. It is 35 feet in diameter and 3 feet high; and another is on a high bluff on N. , S.W. 1/4, section 17, T. 110-10, also about 150 feet above the Zumbro. This is 30 feet by 2 feet. Another is on a point of the plateau about 70 feet above the river, on N.W. 1/4, N.W. 1/4, section 27, T. 110-10, 35 feet by 2 feet. This is west of Kellogg about one mile.

S.W. 1/4, S.E. 1/4, section 21, T. 110-10. Three circular mounds are on a plateau about 70 feet above the Zumbro, the largest being 32 feet by 4 feet.

A lone mound is situated on the S.W. 1/4, N.W. 1/4, section 19, T. 110-10. It is 45 feet in diameter and 2 feet high.

S. , S.E. 1/4, section 21, and N. , N.E. 1/4, section 28, T. 110-10. This group of 22 mounds is on the bluff of the Zumbro, 70 feet above the river, where it flows north. They are all circular but one, which has the dimensions 70 feet by 40 feet by 5 feet. One tumulus, 32 feet in diameter and 3 feet high, has been excavated.

A lone mound is on N.W. 1/4, S.W. 1/4, section 5, T. 109-11, 40 feet in diameter and 3 feet high. Formerly there were several others at this point.

(to be continued ~ good gravy, these measurements are a pain to transcribe!)