The Great Rebellion ~ The American Civil War
Accounts of Action and Rosters of the Men From
Wabasha County, Minnesota

WABASHA COUNTY NATIVES THAT SERVED
IN MISCELLANEOUS OTHER UNITS

NameRankCo.TownRegiment
Rufus C Wright PrivateBMinnieska1st US Volunteer Sharpshooters
W S GrifflinCaptainMWabasha19th US Infantry
Max LaChapelle??WabashaUS Marines
John Brindle ? ?WabashaNavy served on ironclad "Silver Lake"

WABASHA COUNTY NATIVES THAT SERVED OUT OF STATE

1st Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry

NameRankCompanyTownRemarks
Chas A BangsPrivateBWabashadsch 8/21/1861

Biography of Ernest Raymond and Archie Glenn Ames
Including the service record of their father, Alonzo G. Ames

From the book
"HISTORY OF WABASHA COUNTY, MINNESOTA"
Compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge and Others
Published Winona, MN by H. C. Cooper, Jr., & Co., 1920
Republished Currently by Higginson Books


Ernest Raymond and Archie Glenn Ames (page 473), proprietors of a 320-acre stock farm in section 30, Minneiska Township, are well known throughout southeastern Minnesota as successful swine and cattle breeders. They were born at Gilmanton, Buffalo County, Wisconsin. Earnest R. on January 30, 1880, and Archie G. on June 10, 1882. The parents were Alonzo G. and Emma (Hyatt) Ames. The father, born in the state of Maine in 1836, was of English ancestry, and when young came with his parents to Sheboygan County, Wisconsin, where about 1848 they settled on a farm. There Alonzo G. was brought up and remained until reaching the age of 21. His marriage to Emma Hyatt occurred September 25, 1859, and soon after that event he went with his wife to Missouri. A year and a half later the Civil War broke out, but Alonzo G. Ames saw the trend of events, and before Fort Sumter was fired on, he escaped in the night, accompanied by his wife, in order to avoid forcible enlistment in the Home Guard. After reaching Wisconsin he enlisted in the First Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry and served with that regiment until the close of the war. It was attached to the Army of the Tennessee and Mr. Ames served under Generals Meade, Buell and Rosekranz, taking part in the principal battles participated in by the army, including that of Chattanooga. Near Hingham, Sheboygan County, Wis., he bought a farm of 90 acres, on which he resided nine years. At the end of theat time he removed with his family to Buffalo County, in that same state, and for about nine years operated a farm of 300 acres in Gilman Valley, near Alma. He then sold out, intending to go to Nebraska, but, having changed his mind, took a farm of 201 acres in Dover Township, Buffalo County, which property still remains in the family. Alonzo G. Ames died very suddenly on January 9, 1906. He and his wife were the parents of six children: Minerva E., born in Missouri, November 11, 1860, and now Mrs. L. J. Patterson, of St. Charles, Minn.; Eulah Ethel, born August 11, 1866, who married Warren Alt, of Mondovi Township, Buffalo County, Wis., and is now residing in Los Angeles, Calif.; Mary L., born August 13, 1869, who is also a resident of Los Angeles; Charlotte E., born November 12, 1872, who is the wife of Christian A. Berg, residing in Hollywood, a suburb of Los Angeles; and Ernest Raymond and Archie Glenn, the dates of whose nativity have been already given. The subjects of this sketch both attended school in Dover township, Buffalo County, Wis., Ernest Raymond also taking three terms in the agricultural college at Madison, and Archie Glenn one term in the Winona Business College. Under their father's instructions and direction, they acquired a good practical knowledge of agriculture and stock raising, and after his death remained for one year on the farm in Dover Township, Buffalo County. They then came to Minnesota, Ernest R., or Ray, as he is usually called in the family, becoming clerk in the hardware store of C. A. Berg, his brother-in-law, at Winona. Within a year or two Mr. Berg sold out and went to California, and the two brothers, in 1909, formed a partnership and took their present farm, which they have since operated, making a specialty of stock breeding. In this line of industry they have made a wide reputation, and their sales are attended by farmers from many miles around and all parts of the United States. At one of these sales, in September, 1919, they sold 55 head of swine, realizing an aggregate sum of $15,210. This is said to have been one of the largest sales ever held in the state. On January 27, 1920, 37 head of hogs were sold for $22,470, and average price of $607 per head, the highest average attained in the state to that time, one sow selling for $2,525. On March 2, 1920, 42 head sold for $25,100, including Leader of Fashion, the boar which sold to the Underwood Farm, of Lake City for $10,000 and other consideration valued at $2,500. This is the world's record price for under one year old boar; it was sired by Premier Sensation. During the winter of 1919-20 the Ames Brothers purchased at leading sales in different states about $30,000 worth of breeding sows, paying for one $4,000, which is the highest price sow in the state. They figure on an average about 400 Duroc-Jersey hogs, and about 100 head of cattle of the Guernsey breed; the hogs being registered, high-priced stock, and the cattle part registered and part grade stock. Before engaging in the breeding of registered stock, the Ames brothers were engaged in the silo business, erecting many silos in Wabasha County and southern Minnesota. When they first came to their present farm, it had been rented out for 20 years previously, and was in a poor and dilapidated condition, the land being overgrown with wild oats, mustard, and other weeds, and for some time it was uphill work to get the place into good shape. This task, however, they have accomplished, and now have a splendid piece of property, with excellent buildings of modern type. Archie G. is secretary of the local creamery at Weaver, and of the state Duroc Fellows. Ernest Raymond Ames was married, in May, 1907, to Clara Kahl, of Winona, daughter of H. G. Kahl, and has three children: Ronald, aged 12 years; Charlotte, aged 8, and Roberta, aged 3. Archie Glenn Ames was married, at Mondovi, Wis., October 25, 1911, to Emma A. LaDuke, and has three children: Eleanor Ailee, born November 6, 1913; Glenna Jean, born May 24, 1915; and Audrey Emma, born May 7, 1917. Mrs. Emma Ames, the widowed mother of the Ames brothers, resides with them on the farm during summers and the winters in California with her daughters.

Since the above article was written news has been received of the death of Ernest Raymond Ames, who passed away at the Winona General Hospital, on Wednesday, June 30, 1920, after an operation for appendicitis, performed on the previous Sunday at midnight. The funeral was held Friday afternoon, July 2, from the home, and burial was at Hillside Cemetery, Minneiska. Hosts of relatives and friends from the immediate neighbors and surrounding states attended. The Rev. Jesse Kenderdine, of Winona, and Rev. Stanley Kenderdine, of Minneiska, conducted the services. At the cemetery the I.O.O.F. Lodge of Plainview performed the ceremonies according tot he ritual of the Order.

5th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry

NameRankCompanyTownRemarks
Charles Bayard1st LtKLake Cityresigned 10/25/1862
Myron BayardPrivateKLake Citypromo corp wnd at Spotsylvania Court House 5/10/1864 dsch 7/11/1865

Company B, 10th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry

Biography of Alfred R. Allen

From the book
"HISTORY OF WABASHA COUNTY, MINNESOTA"
Compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge and Others
Published Winona, MN by H. C. Cooper, Jr., & Co., 1920
Republished Currently by Higginson Books


Allen, Alfred R. (page 319), one of the pioneer settlers of Plainview Township, now deceased, was born in the Green Mountain region of Vermont, January 6, 1837. In 1857 he accompanied his parents to Wisconsin, where he subsequently married Elizabeth Bignell. She was born in England, January 29, 1840, and came to this country with her parents when six weeks old. After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Allen came to Wabasha County, Minnesota, and settled on 80 acres of wild land in Plainview Township, on which they erected the usual pioneer log house, and afterwards other buildings, continuing improvements for many years. They also increased the size of their farm by an additional purchase of 40 acres, and in time became prosperous through hard work and thrift. After the breaking out of the Civil War, Mr. Allen enlisted in company B, Tenth Wisconsin Volunteers, and was in the service three years. He escaped death, wounds and imprisonment and returned safely home to resume family life and his labors on the farm. There this worthy pioneer was called away by death on January 9, 1909. He was survived by his wife, who is now residing in Plainview. He was a Republican in politics and affiliated with the Methodist Episcopal church. At an early period of his active career he had spent three years in Watonwan County, Minn., where he attempted farming, but left on account of the grasshoppers, which devoured his crops. His ultimate choice of Wabasha county as a location proved fortunate. The house in which his widow now resides in Plainview is owned by herself and her son Julius.

1st WI Cavalry

NameRankCompanyTownRemarks
Archibald BakerPrivateMLake Citydsch dsbl 5/9/1863
John R Baldwin"MLake Citydsch dsbl 1/13/1863
Ransom Clothier"MLake Citydsch dsbl 10/23/1862
Henry Dwelle"MLake Citypromo corp dsch dsbl 1/1/1862
Wm T Goodrich"MLake Citydsch dsbl 1/5/1863
Dennis GunnSaddlerMLake Citypromo sgt trans to Veteran Reserve Corps 9/30/1864
Marcus M HillsPrivateMLake Citydsch 2/19/1865
Albert Moorhead"MGillforddsch 2/19/1865
Alfred Parks"MLake Citydsch dsbl 10/27/1862
Wm H Rice"MLake Citydsch dsbl 10/23/1862
Henry Wakefield"MLake Citydsch 2/19/1865
Orrin E Waters"MLake Citydsch dsbl 12/13/1862

4th WI Cavalry

NameRankCompanyTownRemarks
Peter Moore1st SgtGWabashapromo Sgt Major reduced to ranks

13th Illinois Infantry

NameRankCompanyTownRemarks
Wm H McMillinPrivateBChesterdsch with regiment


Biography of William Harvey McMillin

From the book about Wabasha Co. Minnesota
"HISTORY OF WABASHA COUNTY"
Compiled by Dr. L. H. Bunnell
Published Chicago by H. H. Hill, Publishers, 1884
Republished Currently by Higginson Books


William Harvey McMillin (page 1146), barber, Lake City, is the third son of James M., and was born September 30, 1839, at Wilkesville, Ohio, and was but three years of age when the family removed to Illinois. After he was eighteen years old he cared for himself and worked at butchering three years. He came to Minnesota in 1859, and assisted his brother in farming at Bear Valley, attending school there one winter term. Returning to Illinois he was among the first to respond to the call of his country in its hour of danger. Entering Co. B, of the 13th Illinois Vols., he saw a great deal of hard service in the western army. The following endorsement, which is found in red ink upon his discharge, explains itself: "Said W. H. McMillin was with the command in the actions at Chickasaw Bayou, Arkansas Post, Jackson, May 14 and July 10-16, 1863, siege of Vicksburg and assault May 22, 1863; Tuscumbia, Lookout Mountain, Mission Ridge and Ringgold; has marched over thirty-five hundred miles and faithfully performed the duties of a soldier." Among other notable engagements in which he participated may be named Wilson's Creek, Pea Ridge, Buzzard's Roost, Snake's Gap and Milligan's Bend. He was detailed in the Mississippi scouts, and for five months commanded a squad of seventy-five mounted men, doing excellent service, losing only three men while passing through many hot skirmishes. At one time, after being driven seven miles under the spur, his party of ten men was driven over a steep bluff, where the horses slid down on their haunches, killing one man and a horse. After thus excaping, Mr. McMillin laid an ambuscade, and killed or captured nearly the entire force of rebel pursuers, eighty in number, being reinforced by two companies of infantry. After this he was detailed with nineteen comrades as body guard to Gen. P. J. Osterhaus, where he served till the close of the war. At Chickasaw Bayou his colonel, John B. Wyman, was killed by a sharpshooter, and "Sandy Bill," as our subject was best known to his comrades, crept through the bushes for fifteen rods and picked off the sharpshooter. Mr. McMillin was never wounded by a bullet, but was knocked down the bursting of a shell in front of Vicksburg, and his head and neck partially paralyzed so that he was not fit for duty for some time. He was laid up with dropsy in the old marine hospital at St. Louis for three months at another time. Was never in the guardhouse or under arrest. While serving as body guard to Gen. Osterhaus he acted most of the time as dispatch-carrier. While on this duty on one occasion, he rode half a mile under galling fire, and thus saved two thousand comrades from captivity and the pangs of hell in Libby prison. Another time, with three companions, he charged over the rebel pickets, gained the bluff across Chickamauga creek, and after running a half-mile gauntlet, gained a covered bridge; here they placed their horses across the entrance of the bridge, and by firing beneath their bodies kept the rebel cavalry at bay until artillery and reinforcements were brought to bear. In this movement the Union forces did not lose a man. Returning to Minnesota at the close of the war, Mr. McMillan engaged in farming a short time; removed to Lake City and worked in a butcher-shop three years; for past nine years has kept a barber shop-last two with a partner. February 22, 1865, he was united in marriage with Miss Caroline Culver, who was born in Walnut, Illinois. They have one adopted daughter, Bertie, born July 16, 1880. Mr. McMillin is district G.D.M.W. in the A.O.U.W. He is chief of the Lake City Hook and Ladder Company, and has had many narrow escapes in the pursuit of his duty.

66th Illinois Volunteers

NameRankCompanyTownRemarks
Benjamin KniffinPrivateBWabashaKilled 6/20/64 near Big Shanty Indian War

147th Illinois Infantry

NameRankCompanyTownRemarks
Robert JacksonPrivateIWabashadsch 1/20/1866

93rd New York Infantry

NameRankCompanyTownRemarks
John A TupperPrivateBMt Pleasantpromo corp, sgt dsch 6/29/1865 at Washington DC

Co. K, 150th Ohio Volunteer Infantry

Biography of John C. Doughty

From the book
"HISTORY OF WABASHA COUNTY, MINNESOTA"
Compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge and Others
Published Winona, MN by H. C. Cooper, Jr., & Co., 1920
Republished Currently by Higginson Books


Doughty, John C. (page 588), one of the founders of the Jewell Nursery Co. and for many years actively identified with the commercial progress of Lake City, was born at Rockaway, Long Island, July 4, 1846, son of Samuel and Hannah (Rider) Doughty. He came to Bloomington, Ill. With his parents in 1852, and to Lake City, this county, in 1855. After due preparation in the public schools and at home, he entered Oberlin College at Oberlin, Ohio, where he took a two years' course. In May, 1864, when not yet 20 years of age, he responded to the call for "100 Day Men" and enlisted in Co. K, 150th Ohio Vol. Inf. Serving in the Defense Before Washington during the Early Raids, after which he was duly discharged. In 1866-67 he went to Minneapolis with the view to learning the hardware business, working a year with Nichols & Bean and a year with Hedderly & Vroman. In 1869 he returned to Lake City, and became a construction contractor, specializing in bridge and warehouse work. In 1875 he formed a partnership with F. Hachett under the firm name of Hackett & Doughty, which continued until 1879 when Mr. Doughty became the sole owner. W. H. Hobbs became a partner in 1882, and on February 4, 1884, the establishment was sold to Anson Pierce. At that time it was said to be the best business house in the city. In the meantime the agricultural interests of the county had been constantly increasing, and the commercial horticultural possibilities had been fully demonstrated. It was therefore felt that the time and location were both suitable for the growth of a large nursery. As early as 1868, D. P. A. Jewell had started a small nursery, which was largely under the care of his brother-in-law, Joseph M. Underwood, who at the time of Dr. Jewell's death in 1879 became the sole owner. A year later Sloan M. Emery became Mr. Underwood's partner, and the two conducted a fine stock farm in addition to the nursery. Conditions were thus ripe for a decided increase in the scope and plan, when in 1884 John Coleman Doughty, the subject of this sketch, associated himself with these two gentlemen, and with them on February 26 of that year incorporated the Jewell Nursery Co., each holding a third interest. For some years Mr. Doughty acted as secretary and treasurer of this company. Of recent years he and his wife have led a retired life, making their home in the family residence on High street. The public service of Mr. Doughty has been considerable. For six years he aided the cause of education as president of the Lake City school board. For two terms he did satisfactory work as city recorder. For five years he had most responsible duties as president of the public board of Water and Light Commissioners. Fraternally he is a member of Carnelian Lodge, No. 40, A. F. & A. M., Hope Chapter, No. 12, R. A. M. and Lake City Commandery, No. 5, K. T., all of Lake City. He has been active in all three, and in the Chapter has passed through the chairs. Mr. Doughty was married March 24, 1869, to Mary C. Herron, daughter of Samuel and Nancy Herron, of Lake City. She died January 11, 1874, at Brazil, Ind., leaving two children: Mary Emma, who was born December 18, 1860, and is now the wife of Leo Henschel, of Kansas City, Mo.; and Kate D., who was born March 26, 1872, and is now the wife of Henry Stoes, of Las Cruces, N. M. Mr. Doughty was married September 23, 1877, to Mary F. Brill, of Lake City, who died October 27, 1880, at Lake City, leaving one son, Jesse Edward, born July 13, 1879, secretary of the Gillette, Eaton & Squire Foundry & Machine Co., Lake City. Mr. Doughty was married November 20, 1890, to Mrs. Lucy C. Hill, of Lake City.

WABASHA COUNTY MEN THAT ENLISTED BUT WERE DENIED FOR HEALTH REASONS

UNASSIGNED MEN

NameRankTownRemarks
Robert StillmanPrivateElgindrafted unassigned dsch per orders

MEN WHOSE SERVICE RECORD IS UNKNOWN

Biography of Robert W. Bartz
Including the service record of his father Julius Bartz

From the book
"HISTORY OF WABASHA COUNTY, MINNESOTA"
Compiled by Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge and Others
Published Winona, MN by H. C. Cooper, Jr., & Co., 1920
Republished Currently by Higginson Books


Robert W. Bartz (p. 771), proprietor of an up to date plumbing establishment in Elgin village, was born in Elgin, August 4, 1886, son of Julius and Amelia (Radle) Bartz. The father, born in Germany, came with his parents to the United States when eight years old, locating in Potsdam, Minn. After his marriage here he and his wife took a farm in Elgin Township, Wabasha County, on which they spent 20 years of their lives. Julius Bartz died in 1914 and his widow is now living in the village of Elgin. They had twelve children, all of whom are now living, namely: Herman, August, Julius, Edward, Alfred, Robert, Emma, Alvina, Amelia, Bertha, Otellia and Luella. The father was a Civil War veteran, having enlisted at the age of 15 years and served two years. Robert W. Bartz was reared on the home farm, attending the district school and the Elgin high school. He remained at home until 24 years old, and then for five years operated a rented farm on his own account. Coming to Elgin at the end of that period, he engaged in the plumbing business with his brother Herman. This was in 1915, and in 1918 Robert purchased his brother's interest and has since conducted the business alone. He handles a full line of plumbing and heating equipment, employing a journeyman assistant, and enjoys a monopoly of the trade here, his place being the only plumbing establishment in town. Mr. Bartz was married in 1911 at Pine Island, Minn., to Anna Radke whose parents came from Germany, locating on their farm in Pin Island in 1900. Their children, four daughters and two sons, are all now living. Mr. and Mrs. Bartz are members of the Lutheran church, and industrious and useful members of the community. Mr. Bartz's brother Alfred served 28 months in the U. S. navy during the recent World War.