Bates County News



 

The Adrian Journal
Adrian, Bates County, Missouri

Jan. 2, 1891 - Dec. 25, 1891
 

(Missing: Feb. 27, March 13, 20, April 3, May 1, 15, July 17, 24, Oct. 30, Nov. 13, 1891)
 

Hiser-McCraw
Married: At the residence of the brides father 2 miles north of Adrian, on Thursday, Dec. 25th, 1890, by Rev. Artz.  Mr. Robert Hiser and Miss Amanda McCraw.
The contracting parties are well known in this vicinity, the groom being an energetic well to do farmer and who has b y his upright dealings won the confidence of all who know him.  The bride is the daughter of J. S. McCraw, and was reared in this vicinity.  She has a host of friends, who join withy us in wishing them a smooth sail on the sea of life, with just enough jare to make them realize and appreciate the pleasures which greet them as they are wafted down the stream of time. We tip our bearers in acknowledgment of cakes, oranges, etc. -- The Adrian Journal, January 2, 1891, Page 5 Column 4, Marriage
 

Fisher-Carman
Promptly at half past seven o’clock on New Years eve. The marriage ceremony of J. M. Fisher and Miss Ina M. Carman was solemnized at the Dana Baptist church.
Though the weather behaved badly and showered occasionally, the church was filled to its utmost capacity, and bride and groom were greeted by a cheerful smiling host of friends.
The popular ushers, Messrs Elam Henderson and Zene Walley by their geniality made all comfortable as possible.  Miss Minnie Forbs presided at the organ, and as the low sweet strains, of the wedding march, pealed forth,, the bride and bridesmaid were ushered up the right isle by E. Henderson, and groom and attendant entered the left isle ushered by Z. Walley.
The ceremony was performed by Rev. J. Sage, in his usually eloquent and impressive manner.  They who had plighted troth, were shortly husband and wife. After congratulations the wedding party left the church, marching to Miss Minnie’s own sweet music amid the cheers and well wishes of all.
The bride is a charming blonde and made on of the loveliest brides, who ever filled that position.  She wore a pure white Henrietta, with white satin corsage, and silk Vandyke lace medici collar.  White plush hat with ostrich trimmings.  For years Miss Ina has filled the position as organist at Dana Baptist church, and Mr. Fisher has won for himself a bride, who by past graces and cheerfulness promises all that the duty of wife demands.
Miss Phenia Cline as bridesmaid wore cadet blue Henrietta with white satin trimmings and toque to match.  Never did Miss Phenia look more radiant.
The groom appeared in the customary black prince Albert, supported by W. M. Crawford as groomsman.  Mr. Fisher is a prosperous farmer of excellent morals and  a well known favorite with all.  Mr. and Mrs.  Carman welcomed bride and groom and guests having provided a delicious and elegant supper.  With the coming of the New Year, guests departed to Mr. and Mrs. J. H.  Fisher on New Years day.  All enjoyed the hospitality and good things usually found at F. V. F. (Fair View Farm).  Bride and groom were remembered by friends with many elegant presents.  May their future  life be but a repetition of the happiness of New Years day. -- The Adrian Journal, January 9, 1891, Page 1 column 5, Marriage
 

Mead, Ella
Died: In Adrian, Mo. On Tuesday Jan. 6, 1891 Mrs. Ella Mead, wife of Jefferson Mead, the deceased had been in failing for the past year, having contracted a severe cold in the fall of 1889, which was followed by a violent attack of the “gripe” from which she suffered until called to her eternal home to join loved ones gone before. -- The Adrian Journal, January 9, 1891, Page 5 column 2, Death
 

Kinney-Quackenbush
McCoy-Hinkle
We have the pleasure of chronicling the marriage of Brackett Kinney to Florence Quackenbush, which took place about a week ago.  Also that of Jack McCoy to Lelia Hinkle.  All of the contracting parties occupy a high social standing and their many friends united in wishing them much joy in their new relations. -- The Adrian Journal, January 9, 1891, Page 5 column 3, Marriage
 

Seighman, James W.
James W. Seighman takes His Own Life
On last Friday night, Jan. 2nd, news reached town, to the effect that Jim Seighman had shot himself. Coroner Orear was summoned and an inquest was held.  The only witness was Jimmie Seighman, son of the deceased.  His evidence was about as follows:  Seen father load his gun about four o’clock, after which he went to the barn. I went to the barn and seen father looking for a stick, he did not find any and tore a piece of board off the barn.  He said he was tired of living and was going to kill himself and asked me if I would not be glad of it.  I told him no,  and then went and told mama. We went to the barn and tried to get the gun.  Papa said for Mama to go back to the house he was only fooling.  Papa and I then started out in the pasture to water the stock.  He told me to go over the hill and drive the stock over and he would cut the ice.  I was just out of sight when I heard the report of the gun.  I ran back and saw papa had killed himself.
The following note was found which he had written the day before he killed himself.
Adrian, Mo., Jan. 1, 1891
To my friends and whom it may concern: This is certify that I have decided to kill myself, and no other person should be held responsible for the deed.  This my hand and seal.  James W. Seighman.
The only thing I have to ask for is that my friends will see that my wife and children are fairly provided for as I deem myself no good any longer, as my health has failed me.  So farewell to all my beloved friends. J. W. Seighman.
He leaves a wife and three children.  His remains were laid away in the Crescent Hill cemetery, on Sunday Jan. 4th.
J. W. Seighman whose terrible death is recorded in this issue, was buried from his residence on Sunday morning at 10 o’clock.  Rev.  C. S. Revelle, conducting the funeral services.  He read the following obituary handed him by relatives of the deceased.
J. W. Seighman was born in Ill., Nov. 23, 1833.  His parents were members of the M. E. church and he was raised in that faith.  He was a dutiful son, a loving husband and an indulgent father.  Conscientious and truthful, he was always faithful to every trust reposed in him.  Kind generous, he was ready to relieve the want of others, and quick to sympathize with those in application.  His conception of Christian charities were of a practical nature, believing more in its application to the needs of the living, than its effect on life after.
He leaves a large number of warm friends to mourn his sudden death.  Conversations with many who have been associated with Mr. Seighman, the last 10 days of his life, seem to make it conclusive that his mind was seriously unbalanced by brooding over his ailments and business complications, and that he committed this terrible deed while deranged. -- The Adrian Journal, January 9, 1891, Page 5 column  4-5, Death
 

Neff, baby boy
Born: On Tuesday Jan. 13th to the wife of J.H. Neff, a fine boy, all parties doing well. -- The Adrian Journal, January 16, 1891, Page 5 column 2, Birth
 

John, Edie
It pains us to record the death of Mrs. Edie John on last Monday night, after a short illness of three days.  Her remains was followed by a vast concourse of mourning friends to their last resting place on Wednesday. She was buried at the Butler cemetery.  She was a most estimable woman and leaves two orphan children. -- The Adrian Journal, January 16, 1891, Page 5 Column 3, Death
 

Glover, baby girl
Born: To the wife of Mr. Glover on last Monday night, a bouncing girl, all parties doing well, and Mr. G. no longer thinks of hard times. -- The Adrian Journal, January 16, 1891, Page 5 column 3, Birth
 

James, Charles
Charles E. James, was born in Perry, Pike county, Ill, Dec. 4, 1862. He was educated at Springfield, Ill., graduated with first honors in the business college at that place, July 2, 1880, at 18 years of age, after completing his education he followed bookkeeping a few years then turned his attention to railroading he spent four years in the South holding prominent position as agent and operator on the main line of the Gulf road.  He was a young man of fine business qualities was always crowned with success and honor.  Being the youngest child and the only one unmarried he concluded it was his duty to his aged parents to go home and take care of them and comfort them with his companionship in their declining years he remained with them on the farm two years and concluded to seek a milder climate and easier business, so in Dec. 1889, he and his parents moved to Deepwater, Mo. Where he engaged in the mercantile business.  He was married March 6, 1889 to Miss Maggie Hudnut, of near Deepwater highly accomplished of a kind affectionate nature well suited for his lifetime companion, these loyal hearts seemed heaven united and the union was one of unalloyed happiness.  In Sept. 1889 Mr. James again turned his attention to railroading that being his favorite line of business, he and his wife went to Clinton where he served as operator for the K. C. & G. road and in one month was sent to Brownington, Mo., to take charge of the station there in Dec. following he had a severe attack of Lagrippe from which he never recovered, it have resulted in catarrhal effection and throat trouble which afterward went to his stomach and his death resulted from bowel consumption.
As a token of the high esteem in which he was held among railroad officials, he was presented an annual pass for himself and wife all over the Rio Grande system.  In June they started on this trip hoping it would improve his health, but it seemed all efforts were in vain, nothing this earth could render was spared toward regaining his health, but it seemed that God must call him home. The last six months of his life were wholly consecrated to God, he prayed constantly and his last moments after a long embrace of his broken hearted wife he prayed.  He was a dear devoted husband so kind and affectionate and by his request he breathed his last breath in his wife’s loving arms who placed a last kiss upon his dying lips, he said he was ready to go and had his wife promise to meet him in heaven. -- The Adrian Journal, February 6, 1891, Page 1 column 5, Death
 

Fair, baby boy
Born to Mr. and Mrs.  H. L. Fair Feb. 1, 1891 a boy.  Weight 12 lbs. -- The Adrian Journal, February 6, 1891, Page 5 column 2, Birth
 

Mullen-Rickard
Married-Tuesday Feb. 3, 1891 William Mullen of Archie, and Miss Rickard of Adrian.  The ceremony was performed in Butler. -- The Adrian Journal, February 6, 1891, Page 5 Column 2, Marriage
 

Simpson-Lewis
Married-At the home of the bride Sunday evening Feb. 1, 1891 Mr. Jep Simpson and Miss Abbie Lewis both of Deer Creek township.  They have the good wishes of a host of friends. -- The Adrian Journal, February 6, 1891, Page 5 column 2, Marriage
 

Majors-Meyer
Married-At Archie, February 4, 1891 Sidney Majors and Miss Bertie Meyer, both parties have a large acquaintance in this town.  After the wedding ceremony, which was private a reception was held at the Merchants hotel.  Supper was served where about one hundred persons partook of the good things.  It was an enjoyable occasion and many are the good wishes which follow the contracting parties. -- The Adrian Journal, February 6, 1891, Page 5 column 3, Marriage
 

Bell, Virgie May
Virgie May daughter of J. C. and Bettie Bell died February 9, 1891 of pneumonia after an illness of three weeks.  Little Virgie was two years five months and twenty-one days old.  The funeral was held at the Baptist church Tuesday at 12:30 p.m. Rev. Shaw conducting the services.
The parents have the sympathy and condolence of their neighbors and friends in this their sad hour. -- The Adrian Journal, February 13, 1891, Page 1 column 4, Death
 

Simpson, Guy
Little Guy son of J. D. and N. E. Simpson died, of malarial fever, Saturday night Feb. 7,1891, age one year.
Funeral took place at the Baptist church on Monday Rev. Shaw conducting the services.  The remains were taken to Butler for interment and Mr. and Mrs. Simpson have the sympathy of a host of friends in this their great bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, February 13, 1891, Page 1 column 4, Death
 

Laney, James
James Laney was born Oct. 1818 in Adams Co., Ohio.  In 1839 during a meeting held in his native Co., at the old Ebenezer church he was happily converted and joined the Methodist E. church.  On Jan. 23, 1840 he was married to Eliza Bowm to them were born eight children 6 of whom are now living, namely Indiana Masters, Amanda Haven, John William, Sarah E. currents, Eveline Evans, James Laney.  These he had the privilege of seeing converted.  In Sept. 1869 he moved from Ohio to Cass co., Mo. Located near 8 miles, but the following year removed near Everett.  During his residence here his wife died and was buried in the cemetery near by.  Eight years ago he moved to the vicinity of Adrian and has been a well known and respected member of society at this place ever since.  For some months past he has complained of not feeling well, although with a vigor unusual with men of his age, he has continued to attend to business.  Three weeks ago he took to his bed with malarial typhoid fever and gradually weakened until Monday Feb. 6th at 7 a.m. he quietly breathed his last and passed from a world of labor, to a world of rest.  Aged 72 years, 3 months and 28 days.  He was a faithful follower of Christ and a member of the Methodist church for 52 years. During his sickness he witnessed a good confession with his dying lips reiterating the convictions of his life and exhorting his relatives to faithfulness. -- The Adrian Journal, February 20, 1891, Page 1 column 4, Death
 

Tyler-Van Pelt
Duffey-Crowder
Married on last Wednesday by Rev. Browning of Butler two of Mounds most estimable young couples, Wm. Tyler and Ruth Van Pelt, Harry Duffey and Rose Crowder. The good wishes of their many friends are most heartily tendered them. -- The Adrian Journal, March 6, 1891, Page 1 column 5, Marriage
 

Beaman, Mrs.
Died at her home near Altona on March 3 of cancer Mrs. Beaman funeral services Wednesday. -- The Adrian Journal, March 6, 1891, Page 5 column 2, Death
 

Duffey-Crowder
By Elder E. C. Browning, at his residence in Butler, on the 25th day of February , 1891 H. Duffey and Miss Rosa Lee Crowder, both of Adrian, Mo.  Also at the same time and place W. A. Tyler, of Adrian, and Miss Ruth Van Pelt, of Butler.-Bates Co. Record -- The Adrian Journal, March 6, 1891, Page 5 Column 2, Marriage
 

Pierce-Woods
J. S. Pierce and Miss Laura Woods, were united in marriage by Rev. J. W. Stockton Thursday night at the residence of Frank Allen.-Daily Democrat -- The Adrian Journal, April 10, 1891, Page 1 column 2, Marriage
 

Boswell, Uncle John
Uncle John Boswell died, at his home, 10 miles west of Adrian April 8, 1891,of paralysis. -- The Adrian Journal, April 10, 1891, Page 5 column 2, Death
 

Howard-Cruse
Mr. John Howard and Miss Anna Belle Cruse, at the home of the bride’s parents three and one half miles east of Adrian, Mo. On the 9th day of April 1891, in the  presence of the family and a few relatives, Rev. Showalter presiding.
-- The Adrian Journal, April 17, 1891, Page 4 column 2, Marriage
 

Wright, Mrs.

 

Died:-At her home, three miles south west of Adrian, April, 17, 1891 Mrs. Wright, widow of the late Frank Wright.  Mrs. Wright had for some time been in feeble health which was supplemented by an attack of pneumonia taking her away after a brief illness.  Deceased was well along in years, the last two or three of which was bitter with grief.  Funeral services were held last Saturday afternoon at the late home of the deceased. -- The Adrian Journal, April 24, 1891, Page 1 Column 2, Death
 

Walls-Chambers
Married: on the evening of April 22, 1891 Mr. I. W. Walls and Miss Delia Chambers, Dr. W. P. Hall of the M. P. church officiating.  The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Chambers, of East Boone township.  The groom is one of Elkhart’s most influential and prosperous farmers, who had come to the conclusion that the life of a bachelor was too great a burden for him to bear.
There were a large number of friends present to witness the ceremony and partake of the toothsome viands prepared by the bride’s parents. -- The Adrian Journal, April 24, 1891, Page 1 Column 4, Marriage
 

Fair-Cope
Married:  At the residence of the brides parents, near Altona, Mo., on Sunday April 19, 1891, at 4 o’clock p.m., Mr. Will U. Fair to Miss Rosa Cope, Rev. J. Shaw officiating.  Only the near friends and relatives of the bride and groom were present. -- The Adrian Journal, April 24, 1891, Page 1 Column 4, Marriage
 

Soper, family
HORRIBLE CRIME AT ARCHIE
A FIEND KILLS HIS WIFE AND TWO CHILDREN
The Wife About to Become a Mother
On Tuesday night April 21, 1891, when the inhabitants of our sister town five miles north, were wrapped in slumber the demon murder entered the heart of a husband and father.  E. B. Soper lived in the south west part of town, in a beautiful home surrounded by blooming trees and fragrant flowers, with him lived his amiable wife and two bright children, one a beautiful girl of five summers the other a little boy three years younger.  After a day of toil and labor on the part of the wife and mother, and one of sunshine and glee for the happy children they had, laid down to enjoy natures great restorative.
Under these circumstances the husband committed the acme of all crimes, that of murdering his family.
The next morning a man steps into the depot, buys a ticket and takes the train for Kansas City.  The inhabitants of the busy little city arise and enter upon their avocations in the usual way, no stir seen in the once happy home, the house is closely curtained, no signs of life about the house, the voices of the children are not heard mingling with the beautiful songs of the birds, all is still as the tomb.  No serious notice is taken of these facts and the world moved on.
Three successive days does this continue until Friday evening,, when the neighbor women became alarmed at the prolonged silence which reigned about the one happy home. They reported the matter to justice Hodges who immediately entered upon an investigation of the premises soon other citizens joined the officer, the doors were broken open and what a horrible sight! greeted their vision, it beggars description. The kind mother and helpless children lay in deaths embrace. The hand of the husband and father, stimulated by the meanest demon of the infernal regious, had cruelly taken their lives.  The mother and her son were found in one bed and in another apartment the little girl was found in her bed.  In the house an ax was found covered with blood. The fiend had killed the victims with this instrument.  All the circumstances support the theory that the parties were killed while asleep.  There was no evidence of a struggle by any of them.  The mother was evidently lying on her back having received a blow squarely on the forehead crushing the frontal bone of the skull in such a way as to let the brains ooze out.  The little boy was struck more to one side of the head, while the little girl had received the death blow fairly on the side of the head.  Death in each case came without warning and evidently without a struggle. After thus taking the lives of those, by the ties of nature, nearest to him, in inhuman creature carefully folds their hands across their breasts in the common attitude of the dead. In the midst of this carnage he sat down and wrote the following letters which thus far throw all the light obtainable upon the subject.
Archie, Mo., April 21-You will find enclosed with this letter a letter for The Kansas City Times.  Please sent it to them, as I wish it published.
My family relations have always been of the most pleasant kind.
Give my wife and babies a decent burial and sell what I have to pay the expenses.
Yours Truly, E. B. Soper
P.S. You will find the key to this house above the door outside.  Also collect what is due me from parties here.  You will find it all on my book here.
The Murderer’s letter to The Times
Editor Kansas City Times
Archie, Mo., April 21-Is life worth living? Eight years ago I was released from the penitentiary.  Since then life has been a failure.  For four years I tried to live in my native country but continually met with reminders of my disgrace.  Sometimes one way and then another.  I went to Arkansas hoping to feel better, but the trouble of my disgrace followed me.  And has been a burden to me all the time.  No matter how well one tries to live after being in the pen, if he has a sensitive nature, there is always someone or something to remind him of his disgrace and make life miserable.  But I might have borne this, if it had not been for another trouble.  Since I came to Archie I have attended church some, and have been studying about my spiritual welfare.
There is a time we know not when, a place we know not where, That marks the destiny of man to glory or despair.
HIS BLOODY WORK NOT YET COMPLETE
In other words a man reaches a point beyond which there is no redemption.  He can not repent if her  would.  This is my condition. Tell me then, is life worth living?  It is only a question of time when I should leave my family forever and ever.  I don’t care to live any longer, and  rather than leave them in this sinful world I’d rather take their lives.  I believe I am merciful., for I don’t want them to suffer as I have. I am gong from her to Clay county to kill a devil that has been mainly the cause of all my trouble.  Then I shall end my miserable existence.
Before this reaches you my spirit will be wandering beyond the shore of time, across the dark Jordan of death, and now with a bruised and bleeding heart I bid farewell to all that is near and dear.  My friends weep not for me. Endeavor to live that you may escape the punishment that has been my lot. Farewell. E. B. Soper
Not a person with whom the family had associated for the past year had ever known of any trouble, the father had been especially kind to his children. Mr. Soper had been honest in his dealing with the people of the town and at the time he left did not owe a cent.  No word or act of his had ever indicated that he possessed such a fiendish character.  The dead bodies were buried in a cemetery east of Archie on Saturday morning at 4 o’clock.  The sheets upon which they were sleeping were used as shrouds and one grave contains the remains of all. -- The Adrian Journal, May 1, 1891, Page 1 Column 3-4, Death
 

Atchison, Harry
Word has just been received that Harry Atchison living a few miles north of here was found dead in his bed Thursday morning.  The cause of death is not yet known but is supposed to be heart trouble.
The verdict of the coroners jury in the inquest held over the body of  Harry Atchison was that death was caused by a stroke of apoplexy. -- The Adrian Journal, May 1, 1891, Page 5 Column 3, Death
 

Shelby-Shannon
Joe B. Shelby and Miss Nellie Shannon, were united in marriage Tuesday evening of last week.  Rev. G. W. Gill of the M. E. church south, officiating.  The wedding took place at the residence of the bride’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Shannon at 7 o’clock and the happy couple took the night train for St. Louis, on a bridal trip.  The groom is the son of Gen. Joe  Shelby, while the bride is the accomplished daughter of J. T. Shannon, proprietor of the Diamond Mills of this city.  On account of the accident which happened Mr. Shannon a few days before the wedding it was a quiet affair, only a few friends being present.  Quite a number of handsome presents was received. -- The Adrian Journal, May 22, 1891, Page 1 Column 2, Marriage
 

Russell, Mary
Died: may 16, 1891, of heart disease, Miss Mary Russell only daughter of Mr. of Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Russell.  Deceased aged 15 years and 6 months, was just blooming into womanhood and was noted for her kind Christian graces. She was a faithful member of the M. E. church having joined it when 13 years of age under the ministry of Rev. Thos. Pingry the parents  and friends have the sympathy of the community in this their sad bereavement.  While Mary has been taken away from them in her youth, they can console themselves with the thought that a shining angel of the heavenly home. -- The Adrian Journal,  May 22, 1891, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

Gutshall, Sarah
The remains of Miss Sarah Gutshall arrived yesterday from some point in Kansas.  The funeral services were held at the Baptist church and the body interred  in the Crescent Hill cemetery.  About one year ago deceased became insane and was taken to the Nevada asylum, but a short time ago her health became so poor that the family removed her to some point in Kansas where death relieved her suffering.  The reporter was unable to get full details. -- The Adrian Journal, May 29, 1891, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

Purington, baby boy
Born Tuesday May 26th to Mrs. J. M. Parrington a son. -- The Adrian Journal, May 29, 1891, Page 5 column 2, Birth
 

Furgeson Mrs. Joel
Mrs. Joel Furgeson an aged lady living several miles west of town, died last Friday night.  Deceased had been taken to Kansas City for treatment and was there at the time of her death. The remains arrived in Adrian last Saturday and were taken to the late home.  The aged husband and his family have the sympathy of friends and neighbors. -- The Adrian Journal, June 26, 1891, Page 1 column 2, Death
 

Crouch, son
Died: June 19, 1891 at the residence of his parents in East Boone township the 13 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. I. Crouch.  Deceased had suffered many years with diabetes.  Funeral services were held on Saturday the 20th inst.  The family have the sympathy of the community in this their sad bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, June 26, 1891, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Reeves, E. G.
Died: June 20, 1891, at his home in Elkhart township, of apoplexy, E. G. Reeves.  Deceased was 56 years old and has been a resident of this county for a number of years.  He was a stout rugged man and plowed corn all day on Friday the 19th, came in at night ate a hearty supper and retired apparently in good health. About nine o’clock p.m. he was taken ill and at once became unconscious, at six o’clock a.m. on the 20th he died.  Funeral services were held Saturday evening at 6 o’clock.
Mr. Reeves was a man highly esteemed by all who knew him.  He leaves a wife and three children to mourn his loss. -- The Adrian Journal, June 26, 1891, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Wilcox, baby boy
Born to Mrs. Wilcox a boy. -- The Adrian Journal, July 3, 1891, Page 4 Column 1, Birth
 

Dunn, baby girl
Born to Mrs. Jno. Dunn a girl. -- The Adrian Journal, July 3, 1891, Page 4 column 1, Birth
 

Hendrickson, baby girl
Born to Mrs. Jno. Hendrickson a girl. -- The Adrian Journal, July 3, 1891, Page 4 column 1, Birth
 

Latham, baby boy
Dr. Tuttle reports the arrival of a fine boy baby at the home of M. W. Latham. -- The Adrian Journal,  July 3, 1891, Page 4 Column 1, Birth
 

Seithman-Nave
Married, June 30, 1891 at 7 p.m. at Valley Chapel, Mr. Wm. Seithman and Miss Mattie Nave, Rev.  A. B. Francisco, of Harrisonville, Mo., officiating.
The following invited guests assembled, at the home of the bride at 5 o’clock p.m. and partook of an elegant supper; T. R. Berry & family, J. W. Chambers and wife, Dr. Hall and daughters; Joe Tipton and wife, W. R. Woods wife and daughter, J. S. Francisco, Claud Hayes, Miss Bettie Hammond, Miss Annie Berry, Miss Susie Berry, Miss Hattie Scott and Mr. Booth.  After supper the party repaired to the church where a large audience had assembled to witness the ceremonies.  The attendants at the church were J. S. Francisco, W. C. Berry, C. H. Hayes and Chas. P. Booth.  As the bridal party entered Miss Hattie Scott of Butler played the wedding march.
The bride was  beautifully attired in a dress cut of steel trimmed in silver lace with a cluster of orange blossoms at the neck. The presents were numerous and costly but space will not permit their being mentioned. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Nave and needs no introduction to the local readers of the Journal, she was raised in this country and is one of her fairest daughters.  The groom is a young business man of Rich Hill and has certainly acted wisely in the selection of his life partner. After the ceremonies the bride and groom took the train at Adrian for Nevada from there they will tour to Ft. Scott and other southern points.  After two weeks they will return to Rich Hill their future home. -- The Adrian Journal, July 3, 1891, Page 4 column 2, Marriage
 

Wilhoite children
A fire occurred last Saturday morning at the home of L. G. Wilhoite near Brosley which destroyed his home and burned two children aged four and six years.  The father and hired hand had eaten their breakfast and gone to the field to work.  The mother had built a fire to heat water with which to bathe the children when they awoke, after building the fire she went to the wheat field, which was only a few lords away, to see the reaper work.  While she was gone the house caught fire from a defective flue and was all ablaze before it was discovered.  The fire started in the upper story where the children were sleeping and was so far under headway that all efforts to save them were in vain.  The younger on of the children was entirely consumed an only the upper part of the body of the older one could be found.  The broken hearted parents are left childless.  Both children were boys and the pride of the parents. -- The Adrian Journal, July 10,1891, Page 1 column 4, Death
 

Smith, baby girl
A.J. Smith reports the arrival of a baby at his home of the female persuasion.  A. J. is at least four inches taller than usual and that smile on his face indicates supreme happiness. -- The Adrian Journal, July 10, 1891, Page 4 Column 3, Birth
 

Ohler, Annie May
Died: at Crescent Hill, July 21, 1891 of cholera infantum, Annie May only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Riley Ohler, aged 10 months. Thus another fair little blossom has passed away to the eternal world on high.  The remains were laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery, followed by a large procession of sorrowing friends and relatives. Services were conducted by Rev. Timmons.  The bereaved parents have the sympathy of the community. -- The Adrian Journal, July 30, 1891, Page 4 column 3, Death
 

Timmons, baby boy
M. L. Timmons is happy over the arrival of a fine baby boy at his home. -- The Adrian Journal, July 30, 1891, Page 5 column 2, Birth
 

Strain, new baby
Harvey Strain reports the arrival of a new baby at his home, his face is wreathed in smiles. -- The Adrian Journal, July 30, 1891, Page 5 Column 2, Birth
 

Timmons-Purkey
Married: at the residence of the brides parents near Adrian, August 4, 1891, Miss Della Purkey and Mr. J. F. Timmons, of Carrolton, Mo.  The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Purkey and was born in this county, she is an amiable young lady.  The groom is a prominent young business man, of Carrol county, Mo., and has every appearance of being worthy the hand and heart he has won.  They departed on the 4 p.n. train Tuesday, for Carrolton, where they will make their home. The ceremony, which thus united two happy hearts, was performed by Rev. Jos. Timmons.  The Journal unites with their many friends in wishing them a long happy and prosperous life, with many joys and few sorrows. -- The Adrian Journal, August 7, 1891, Page 4 column 2, Marriage
 

Richards, Charles
Died: Aug. 8, 1891,  at the residence of Mr. Mansfield, Charles Richards.  Mr. Richards had been sick but a few days and was not permitted to return to his home.  He resided with his mother a few miles north east of this city, and was an industrious reliable young man.  The remains were laid to rest, last Sunday, in the Crescent Hill cemetery.  Rev. Tinsley conducted the funeral services.  The family have the heart felt sympathy of the community in this their great bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, August 14, 1891, Page 4 column 2, Death
 

Saighiman-Hoye
Married: At the residence of the bride’s parents in Adrian, on the evening of the 17th inst., Mr. Wm. Saighiman and Miss Laura Hoye.  Again we have the pleasure of announcing the matrimonial union of two well known citizens.  The ceremony was performed by Rev. Tinsley.  The Journal united with the many friends of the contracting parties in wishing them a life of unalloyed happiness.  We have not learned their future plans but presume that they will reside in Adrian. -- The Adrian Journal, August 21, 1891, Page 4 column 2, Marriage
 

Gipson, Mrs. T. P.
Died: At Butler, Mo., August 16, 1891, Mrs. T. P. Gipson.  Deceased was 20 years of age and had been married but a little over one year.  She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Z. B. Sloan of Altona.  The funeral services were held at the Mt. Olivet church on Tuesday, and were conducted by Rev. C. S. Revelle.  This a great bereavement to the husband and parents of the deceased.  The sympathy of the community will be with them in this their great affliction. -- The Adrian Journal, August 21, 1891, Page 5 Column 3, Death
 

Fenton-Wilcox
Married: at the residence of Rev. J. Shaw, Adrian, Mo., on the 25th day of Aug. 1891; Edward H. Fenton of Butler, Mo., and Miss Bessie M. Wilcox, of Passaic, Mo., Rev. Shaw performed the ceremony that united this happy couple.
-- The Adrian Journal, August 28, 1891, Page 4 Column 2, Marriage
 

Latham, infant son
Died: Aug. 27, 1891, at Medora, Mo., of inflammation of the bowels, the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. M. W. Latham; aged 2 months.  The parents have a large circle of friends, in this community, who will extend their sympathy in this their sad affliction. -- The Adrian Journal, September 4, 1891, Page 4 column 1, Death
 

Howard-Rogers
Miss Emma Rogers, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Rogers, of Adrian, Mo., and Mr. Justus M. Howard, of Cherryville, Kan. Were united in the holy bonds of matrimony at high noon Thursday, Sept. 10, at the home of the bride’s parents.
The ceremony was performed by Rev. Shaw, of Adrian.  The bride, one of Adrian’s loveliest and fairest belles, was even more beautiful in her wedding costume of cream Albatrose, trimmed in cream silk lace, cram ribbon and silk cord, wearing a bouquet of natural flowers.
The groom looked charming in his elegant black suit and cream tie.
After the ceremony was performed the invited guests repaired to the dining room, where a sumptuous dinner had been prepared, to which all did ample justice.
The afternoon passed away very pleasantly, vocal and instrumental music being the chief entertainment.  At an early hour in the evening, after due congratulations on the part of the guests, they returned to their homes, wishing no greater obstacle than roses in their future path together.
They received quite a number of nice presents.  Although the groom was quite a distance from home, he was remember by his parents with a box of valuable and elegant presents.
The happy couple leave in a short time for Kansas, where they will visit the groom’s parents. -- The Adrian Journal,  September 11, 1891, Page 1 Column 5, Marriage
 

Kanatzar, Ethel
Died: Sept. 9, 1891, at the home of the parents in Grand River township, Ethel, the 18 month old child of Mr. and Mrs. Bowen Kanatzar.  The parents have the sympathy of friends in this bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, September 11, 1891, Page 4 column 1, Death
 

Shuster-Groves
Mr. A.J. Shuster and Miss Groves, of Drexel, were married at Butler last Wednesday.  They came to Adrian on the night train and returned to their home Thursday morning.  They were accompanied by Mr. R.R. Gentry and lady of Drexel. -- The Adrian Journal, September 11, 1891, Page 4 Column 1, Marriage
 

Story, baby boy
 
Born to the wife of Mr. Story, a boy.  The family just arrived  a few days from Laclead county, this state. -- The Adrian Journal,  September 18, 1891, Page 8 Column 4, Birth
 

Flesher, Mrs.
Mrs. Flesher, living four miles southeast of this city, died on the 22nd inst. Of consumption.  We have not been able to learn any of the particulars of her death. -- The Adrian Journal, September 25, 1891, Page 4 column 1, Death
 

Hogan-Givins
Married, Sept. 23, at the residence of the bride’s parents, Kansas City, Mo., Mr. E. D. Hogan and Miss Mollie Givins.  They came to Adrian on Thursday’s noon train.  The parents of the groom gave an elegant dinner to which there were a number of invited guests, who enjoyed the excellent repast.  The contracting parties will make their home in Adrian. -- The Adrian Journal, September 25, 1891, Page 4 Column 1, Marriage
 

Revelle, baby girl
Born, Sept 23, 1891 to Mrs. C. S. Revelle, a girl. -- The Adrian Journal, September 25, 1891, Page 5 column 2, Birth
 

Tone, Mrs.
Mrs. Tone who formerly resided in this city died at Worland, this week. The remains were laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery b y the side of her husband. -- The Adrian Journal, September 25, 1891, Page 5 Column 1, Death
 

Mills, Jane A.
Died:  In Adrian, Mo., Sept. 21, 1891, at the residence of her son, C. L. Mills after  a long continued illness, Mrs. Jane A. Mills, in the 61st year of her age.
Mrs. Mills was born in Canandagua, New York, was first married to M. Otto, by whom she had one son, Theodore Otto, now residing in Prescott, Arizona.  Her second marriage occurred in Hastings, Mich., to George W. Mills, who died in 1881 at Butler Mo., and by whose side her remains were deposited.  Her death was peaceful, surrounded by loving relatives and friends.
Mrs. Mills was known and respected for her many excellent qualities of mind and heart.  Funeral services were conducted by Rev. C. S. Revelle.  Her son, C. L., who has resided in this city for a number of years, and has a large circle of friends, has the profound sympathy of all in this his great bereavement.  Those who have not experienced the pains incident to the loss of a parent know but little of their sorrow, how their hearts years after them. -- The Adrian Journal, September 25, 1891, Page 8 column 4, Death
 

Leffler, Mina
Died:  Oct. 4, 1891 at the age of 17 years and 8 months, Miss Mina Leffler, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Leffler.
The funeral services were held at Crescent Hill church Oct. 6, 1891, Rev. J. H. Artz officiating.  The deceased made a profession of religion and faith in Christ before death and told her friends that she was going to her heavenly home not to weep for her. Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord. -- The Adrian Journal, October 9, 1891, Page 5 column 3, Death
 

Baie-Hess
Married, Oct. 6, 1891 at the residence of the bride’s parents Miss  Emma Hess, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. G. Hess, to Wm. F. Baie.  The contracting parties are among the most thrifty and enterprising young people in this community.  Mr. and Mrs. Hess prepared a sumptuous dinner which was enjoyed by about fifty invited guests, seven of whom call all  the way from Ill. To enjoy the festivities.  All present express themselves as being highly pleased with the manner in which they were entertained, before parting, united in hearty congratulations of the newly married couple.  The Journal unites with their many friends in wishing them a long and happy married life. -- The Adrian Journal, October 9, 1891, Page 8 Column 4, Marriage
 

Shelton-Tilley
Married, at Butler, Mo., Oct. 7, 1891 Miss Ida Tilley, of Adrian, and Mr. Milton Shelton of Burdett.  At six o’clock in the evening a supper was served by Mr. and Mrs. S. H. Lewis to which there were a number of invited guests. The newly married couple will make their home near Burdette. -- The Adrian Journal, October 9, 1891, Page 8 column 4, Marriage
 

Ray, Mrs. Andy
Died, October 10, 1891 at her home, 6 miles southeast of Altona, Mrs. Andy. The Journal is not in possession of the particulars. -- The Adrian Journal, October 16, 1891, Page 5 column 2, Death
 

Branch, son
Died:  Last Sunday morning, son of Robert and Frances Branch. The funeral services were held at Johnstown, Monday at 11 o’clock. -- The Adrian Journal, October 16,1891, Page 8  column 2, Death
 

Shepherd, daughter
George Shepherds little girl died last Friday morning, of brain fever. The little sufferer had been sick but a few days.  The father and family have the sympathy of the community. -- The Adrian Journal, October 23, 1891, Page 5 Column 2, Death
 

Rice, baby boy
John Rice is the happy possessor of a bran new 8 pound boy.  You can see him smile a quarter. -- The Adrian Journal, October 23, 1891, Page 8 column 3, Birth
 

Clark-Baum
Married:  Wednesday evening Nov. 4, 1891, at 8 o’clock p.m., at the home of the brides parents, Mr. J. C. Clark and Miss Martha Baum, Rev. C. S. Revelle officiating.
Mr. Clark is one of Adrian’s best young men and has a good position as salesman in the Ohio Cash House.  Miss Martha is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Baum and is one of the finest young ladies in the town.  Her many friends can attest to her many womanly qualities.  The wedding was a very quite affair, only a few immediate friends of the parties being present.  Those present were as follows: Rev. and Mrs. C. S. Revelle, Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Smith, Mr. and Mrs. Aus Moudy, Mrs. Jno. and Eugene Clark, mother and brother of the groom.  The following young ladies from Butler who were school mates and intimate friends of the bride surprised her by appearing at the appointed hour.  Miss Ruby Pyle, Miss Rogue Frizzell, Anna Hannah, Susie Steele, Mabel McKibben and Miss Rice. -- The Adrian Journal, November 6, 1891, Page 8  column 2, Marriage
 

Vail, Mrs.
Died: Nov. 16, 1891 in this city Mrs. Vail. Deceased had been a long suffer from dropsy and her life had been despaired of for some time.  Deceased leaves a husband and six children to mourn her loss.  Death at all times is shrouded in gloom but in this case the gloom assumes the proportions of unfathomable darkness touching the sympathetic cords of human sympathy and generosity.  The family have been followed by a series of adverse circumstances not often experienced in this life. Several years of life in western Kansas
Reduced the family to a financial ebb and to add to this grief the grim monster death has entered the home three times during the past year taking as its first victim the oldest daughter, a young lady, next was taken a little babe and now the cup of sorrow is filled in the death of the mother.  The family have the heart felt sympathy of the community in this sad hour. -- The Adrian Journal, November 20, 1891, Page 8 column 3, Death
 

Sims, Jessie
Jessie Sims, possibly the oldest man in Bates county, died at the residence of R. M.  Perry, in East Boone township, on the 15th.  He was 95 years, 9 months and 12 days of age. He was born in Culpepper county, Virginia, Feb. 3, 1796 three years before George Washington’s death.  He cast his first presidential vote for James Monroe and his last for Grover Cleveland. He was twice married and the father of ten children, four of whom survive him.  He moved to Missouri in the fall of 1835 and settled in Cass county where he lived until 1885, when, being to old and feeble to care for himself, he was taken in and cared for by R. M. Perry, a friend and neighbor, who not let the old man suffer or go to the poor farm. -- The Adrian Journal, November 27, 1891, Page 4 Column 1, Death
 

Music, Chas.
Died, Nov. 27, 1891, at his residence about 3 miles west of Adrian, Chas. Music.  Mr. Music had been in his usual good health until Friday morning when he was taken with congestive chill from which he died the same evening.  Deceased was in the prime of life and was an industrious and energetic man.  He leaves a wife and two children to mourn his loss. They sympathy of the community will be with them in this sad affliction. -- The Adrian Journal, December 4, 1891, Page 8 column 1, Death
 

Sewearinger, Mary
Died, Nov. 30, 1891 Mrs. Mary Sewearinger of Hartwell, Mo.  She was buried in the Norris cemetery.  The subject of this sketch was born in New York City April 10, 1851.  When she was three years old her mother died and she was placed in an orphans home.  Her father was a captain of a ship.  He was lost at sea with the vessel he had  charge of.  When she was seven years old she was given a home by a German family and she was reared to womanhood in McDonongh county, Ill, when she was married to J. V. Sewearinger January 1, 1865 the result of this union was 8 children, 5 boys and 3 girls.  One boy and one girl preceded her to a better land. She was  sick about three weeks and was patient in all her suffering a short time before she died she called her husband and children to her bedside and talked to them earnestly asking them to do better.  She was a woman of good intelligence and sound judgment and was like by everyone.  This is a severe blow on the husband and family but they have the sympathy of their neighbors and we trust they will so live that when time is no more they will meet her again in a better land. -- The Adrian Journal, December 4, 1891, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

Hoover, baby girl
Mr. and Mrs. Hoover rejoice over a bran new  girl which came to their home a few days ago. -- The Adrian Journal, December 11, 1891, Page 5 column 2, Birth
 

Carter, child
Mrs. C. L. Mills has returned to Adrian, having attended the funeral of the little child of Mr. and Mrs. Carter, the latter being her sister. Butler Daily Democrat -- The Adrian Journal, December 11, 1891, Page 4 Column 1, Death
 

McRoberts-Mead
Married at the home of the groom, 5 o’clock p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 16th, Mr. B. A. McRoberts and Miss Emma Mead, both of Adrian.
The ceremony was performed by Rev. Shaw, of Adrian, in his usual simple but impressive manner.  The bride wore a lovely costume of lead Henrietta, trimmed in cut steele and cream ruching. The groom looked charming in his elegant black suit.  Mr. R. L . Leffler, of Adrian, acting as groomsman was dressed in a black suit to match the grooms, and Miss Jennie McCants, of Butler, as bridesmaid wore a Henrietta to match brides costume  After the ceremony was performed the invited guests repaired to the dining room, where a sumptuous repast had been prepared to which all did ample justice. The evening passed very pleasantly.  At late hour after many congratulations on the part of the guests they returned to their homes, wishing them all happiness possible. --   The Adrian Journal, December 18, 1891, Page 1 column 5, Marriage
 

Beck, baby boy
Mr. and Mrs. R. W. Beck rejoice over the arrival of a permanent boarder at their home last Sunday morning.  R. W. says that he will be duly installed as deputy constable. -- The Adrian Journal, December 18, 1891, Page 5 column 2, Birth


Submitted by: Sandee Hubbard

Note: The information provided by Sandee Hubbard has been made available for personal genealogy research.
It may not be copied or reproduced without gaining her written permission to do so.

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