Bates County News



 

The Adrian Journal
Adrian, Bates County, Missouri

Jan. 13, 1893 - Dec. 29, 1893

(Missing: June 23, Sept. 29)
 

Gutshall-Shepherd
Married, at the residence of the brides  parents, 4:30 Wednesday afternoon, Mr. D. Gutshall, of Adrian, Mo., and Miss Eliza Shepherd, of this city, Rev. Sherman officiating.
Fairfield Neb. News Herald
The bride and groom arrived in Adrian on Friday’s noon train Jan. 6th where they found friends in waiting to convey them to the spacious residence of Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Gutshall, the grooms parents, six miles northeast of this city, where they found every preparation made for a grand reception. By 7 o’clock the huge parlors were filled with specially invited guests, friends of the family. While Mr. C. J. Surtain and daughter, Miss Cora, rendered some most excellent music on the organ and violin, the bride and groom were ushered in the parlor where congratulations and good wishes were extended, as the conclusion the guests were invited to the partake of an elegant supper, here we re…. lying down our pen, for a description  of this table would require one better versed in the culinary arts than we are, suffice it to say that the supper was grand in every detail and did credit to Mrs. Gutshall, who has some notoriety as a most excellent cook.
The groom was raised in this (Deer Creek) township and is an exemplary young many, his many friends will be glad tomorrow that he will locate in this neighborhood. -- The Adrian Journal, January 13, 1893, Page 4 Column 3, Marriage
 

Bryant, baby girl
Mr. and Mrs. R. Bryant are happy over that new girl at their home. -- The Adrian Journal, January 13, 1893, Page 5 Column 2, Birth
 

Cherry, infant son
Died, at the residence of the parents, Kansas City, Jan. 16, 1893, the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Cherry.  These young people have the sympathy of a host of friends in this their first great affliction.
Funeral services were held in this city at the home of the grand parents Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Fair Tuesday evening, Rev. J. N. Estep officiating. -- The Adrian Journal, January 20, 1893, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

Taggart, John J.
Died, January 15, 1893, at his residence in this city, of paralysis, John J. Taggart; aged 73 years.
Deceased was born in Virginia and came to Missouri in 1849, locating in LaFayette county, from there he moved to Johnson county in 1858, where he resided until 1886 when he came to this city which has since been his home.
Uncle John, as he was called by everyone, will be missed by his many friends, he was always pleasant and liked by all who knew him, there is not a person who could say aught against him as an upright man.
Being successful in business he had amassed quite a fortune, with which he was always liberal, every charitable cause or public enterprise received liberal contributions from him.
He had no disposition to oppress or injure anyone, but was always charitable toward his fellow men.
He leaves one son, John, of the firm of Taggart & Hamilton, and a host of friends to mourn his loss.  The remains were taken to Rose Hill, Johnson county where they were laid to rest beside those of his wife. -- The Adrian Journal, January 20, 1893, Page 1 column 2, Death
 

McCombs, James Edgar
Died January 15, 1893 at the home of his parents, near this city, James Edgar, youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Jeff McCombs , after a brief illness. Deceased was 14 years 2 mo. And 20 days old.
Ed., as he was familiarly known by almost everyone in this city, was an exemplary boy, always quiet and gentlemanly, and was admired by his associates and acquaintances for his manly habits.
He was bright and industrious in his school work, being well advanced in the high school of this city.
Funeral services were held at the family residence on Monday, the pupils of the public school, of this city, attending in a body.  The sight was very impressive to see 250 pupils with moist eyes march by the bier of one whom they had learned to love on account of his many amiable traits of character.
The parents and Warren, the only surviving child, have the deep sympathy of the community in this great affliction.  The remains were laid to rest in the France cemetery near Altona. -- The Adrian Journal, January 20, 1893, Page 1 column 2, Death
 

Williams, A. J.
Word was received yesterday that A. J. Williams, formerly of Archie had bee killed at Seattle, Washington on the 18th inst. No particulars were given.
The reported death of Jack Williams at Seattle Wash., proved to be a mistake, it was his little boy that was killed by falling from a building. --  The Adrian Journal, January 20, 1893, Page 5 Column 3, January 27, 1893, Page 5 column 3, Death
 

Eastburn, child
The three year old child of Jobe Eastburn, which wandered from the home of the parents near Cornland on the 11th, inst. Has not been found the supposition is that is was drowned in Maria Des Cygne river.  The parents are poor people and are unable to prosecute the search further than the liberality of a sympathetic public will assist. -- The Adrian Journal, January 27, 1893, Page 1  Column 2, Missing/death
 

Prine, Sarah
Ms.  Sarah E. Prine, died at her home in this city, Jan. 11, 1893, of pneumonia, after a brief illness.  Miss Sarah E. Morris was born in Sumner co., Tenn., July 12, 1844 and came, with her parents to Mo. In 1857, locating in Jackson Co. where they resided until 1858, when they moved to Cass co, locating near Dayton.  She married Daniel Prine in 1863.  To this union were born 9 children, eight of whom, with the father still survive to mourn the loss of a kind mother and an affectionate wife.  In 1858 she was converted and united with the South Methodist church. The membership of the church becoming scattered she joined the Baptist church in 1872.  Her life has always been a living witness for the Master she served.  She was an ardent Christian woman with the word implied.  As a mother, wife and neighbor she was an example. Her many friends extend their sympathy to Mr. Prine and family in this hour, and point them for comfort to their mothers God.  The remains were laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery, Rev. Smith of Dayton preached the funeral sermon. -- The Adrian Journal, January 27, 1893, Page 4 column 3, Death
 

Mead Marriage
Lee Mead married a fair Missouri girl last Wednesday and the happy couple are visiting this city with the grooms parents Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Mead. -- The Adrian Journal, January 27, 1893, Page 5 column 3, Marriage
 

Crow, twin baby boys
Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Crow are rejoicing over the arrival of twin boys at their home Wednesday night. -- The Adrian Journal, January 27, 1893, Page 4 column 3, Birth

One of Rev. Crow’s infants died last night the funeral will take place today. -- The Adrian Journal, February 3, 1893, Page 5 Column 3, Death
 

Beckett, Cordelia
Died-Cordelia, daughter of J. W. and Emiline Beckett, Jan. 8, 1893, after a short illness. Everything possible was done to bring her back to health, but her Creator willed it otherwise, and now she is where there is no sorrow or care. With loving hands they robbed her in her burial garments and with sad and aching hearts, they laid her to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, February 3, 1893, Page 8 column 3, Death

Another one of Mr. Beckets children was buried last Sunday, the family have the sympathy of the community in their affliction. -- The Adrian Journal, February 24, 1893, Page 5 column 2, Death
 

Burner, E. G.
E. G. Burner died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Jno. Herrell  Feb. 9th, after an illness of several months.
Deceased was born in Virginia 67 years ago, he moved from W.  Va. To Ind., from Ind. to Iowa, he moved to Neb. During the war being one of the first white settlers in that territory, in 1875 he came to Bates county. Mr. B. was faithful member of the Baptist church and had for many years been a consistent Christian, about one year ago he lost the faithful companion of his life, they are now united in that brighter land where parting will be no more.
Eleven children, five boys and six girls, all grown, to mourn the loss of an indulgent father.
Funeral services were held at Mr. Herrell’s residence today Rev. Wilson officiating, remains were laid to rest in Butler cemetery. The family have the sympathy of a host of friends in this sad hour. -- The Adrian Journal, February 10, 1893, Page 8 column 5, Death
 

Moles-Sloan
On Wednesday of this week, in Adrian, John W. Moles and Miss Melle Sloan, both of Altona, were united in marriage, Rev. Frank P. Reno officiating.  After the ceremony the happy couple returned to Altona. -- The Adrian Journal, February 17, 1893, Page 1 column 3, Marriage
 

Wilson, Dollie
Died, Feb. 14, 1893, at 9 o’clock, a.m. of congestion of the brain, Dollie, the 14 months old babe of Rev. and Mrs. O. L. Wilson.  The little prattler had arrived at that age where they have the tenderest affections of the parents, on those who have felt a parents love can know how near they are to them. They have the sympathy of the community in this great affliction.
Funeral services were held at the U. B. church Wednesday Rev. Tresenriter officiating, the remains were laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, February 17, 1893, Page 4 column 3, Death
 

Walters-Concklin
Married, at the home of the bride’s parents, near Passaic, on Tuesday evening, Mr. Charles Walters and Miss Bessie Concklin.
These young people are of high social standing in the community and have the esteem of a large circle of friends in wishing them a life of usefulness and joy.
The above named parties were married on the 14th at 8:00 o’clock p.m., Rev. Blair of Butler officiating.  Immediately after the ceremony an elegant supper was served, to which all did ample justice.  Only the relatives and a few intimate friends were present.  A number of  useful and handsome presents were received.
Mr. and Mrs. Concklin have our thanks for a choice selection of cake, it proved Mrs. C’s skill in the culinary art. -- The Adrian Journal, February 17 1893, Page 4 Column 3, Marriage
 

Rogers, Wilfred
Died, at the home of his parents, Lynn county, Kansas, Wilfred, the ten year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Jno. Rogers.  This is indeed a sad loss tot the parents, whose lives were so wrapped up in the life of the departed he had become endeared to them by his ability and willingness to aid them in performing the duties of life.
They have the sympathy of their friends, in this dark hour. -- The Adrian Journal, February 17, 1893, Page 5 Column 3, Death
 

Wilson-Hunter
In the town of Adrian on Wednesday at 2 p.m. 22 Feb., Woodford J. Wilson, living near Fair View and Amanda Hunter of Altona, were united in marriage, Rev. Frank P. Reno officiating. After the ceremony the happy couple repaired to their home about three miles and a half of Adrian.  May Mr. and Mrs. Wilson have a useful, prosperous life and see many happy days in their new relation. -- The Adrian Journal, February 24, 1893, Page 5 Column 2, Marriage
 

Cox, Ada
Died, at the home of the parents, Feb. 28th, Ada, the 17 months old babe of Mr. and Mrs. Monroe Cox.  The little one had suffered intensely for several weeks, ad all that human skill could do did not stop the progress of the disease; she was called to the children’s home above, a fairer clime than this.  The little ones are hard to give up, yet the thought of their fitness for the beyond makes the burden of grief much lighter for the aching hearts of the parents.  Mr. and Mrs. Cox have the profound sympathy of their many friends in this sad hour. -- The Adrian Journal, March 3, 1893, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Shook, Daniel
Died-In Adrian, Mo., Feb. 20, 1893 Daniel Shook.  Mr. Shook was a native of Penn., from which state he moved in 1856 to the state of Iowa, where he resided until the eighties when he moved to Downs, Kan., from thence he started to seek a more congenial clime in which to spend the remaining portion of his days on earth.  He located in the vicinity of Adrian, in the autumn of 1890, and later bought property in this city, where he lived until the angel of death came suddenly and called him to his final rest. The funeral sermon was preached at the Christian church on the 23rd at 2 o’clock by elder P. S. Garman of Center View, Mo., from these words “He hath set me to heal the broken hearted” Luke 14, 18th.  Accompanied by his eldest and youngest sons the remains were taken to Downs Kan. Where they were laid to rest on the 24th inst.  In the death of Uncle Dan, as he was familiarly called, Adrian loses one of her most worthy citizens  and the church one of her most worthy members and deacons; but we bow in humble submission to Him that doeth all things well, esteeming that what is our loss is his eternal gain. -- The Adrian Journal, March 3, 1893, Page 8 Column 3, Death
 

Mitchell, Thomas N.
Thomas N. Mitchell, youngest son of Mrs. A. J. Satterlee of Adrian, after a brief illness from rheumatism of the heart, passed out of this life in St. Louis, at 11 o’clock, p.m. on last Sunday night. Deceased was born in Bates county Nov. 30, 1870.  For some five years he had been away from home, the last two years of which were in St. Louis.  He leaves a mother, three brothers and one sister to mourn his loss.  One of the brothers, James is door keeper at the House of Representatives in Jefferson city, another, Charles is bookkeeper for Karger & Cartwright in Kansas City.  The other brother, Rasmus, resides in Adrian as does his sister Nellie. Funeral services were conducted at the home by Rev. Frank P. Reno, after which all that was mortal of Thomas Mitchell was taken to Crescent Hill cemetery for interment. -- The Adrian Journal, March 3, 1893, Page 8  column 4, Death
 

Lanham, infant
Died, March 3, 1893, the 5 months old babe of Mr. and Mrs. Dick Lanham. The little one had suffered untold miseries before death claimed it, but its little spirit was transplanted in a land free from pain.  The many friends of the family extend their heart felt sympathy in this sad hour, and hope that there will be a joyous reunion in the beautiful beyond. -- The Adrian Journal, March 10, 1893, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

DeJarnette, Polly
Died, March 5, 1893 at the home of her daughters Mrs. H. H. Wyse, in Grand River township, Aunt Polly DeJarnette, seventy five years old.
Deceased was born in Kentucky and came to Mo., in 1839 where she has since resided. She was widely known and was liked by all who knew her.  Her life was one of usefulness and went out on earth to dawn brighter on the other side of the river. She leaves two daughters, Mrs. Wyse, and Mrs. T. M. Broaddus, of Stillwater, O. T. to mourn her loss. Funeral services were held on Monday, Rev. Chas. West officiating, and the remains were laid to rest in the France cemetery.  Aunt Polly will be missed the sympathetic heart has ceased to throb, the helpful hands are inactive, the tongue from which so many words of encouragement is still, the spirit has gone to its long abode.  Peace to her ashes. -- The Adrian Journal, March 10, 1893, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Shelton, John
Died, at the home  of his parents, this city, March 23, 1893, John, the youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. M. A. Shelton.
John Shelton was born Jan. 15, 1869 died March 23,1893 age 24 years 2 mo. 8 days.
Deceased was  born in Bates county and was well and favorable known to a large circle of friends.  He was a quiet manly young man and being the youngest child, was looked to by his parents as their main stay.  He suffered several weeks from fever and was patient in his suffering.  The parents have the sympathy of the community in their hour of trouble. -- The Adrian Journal, March 31, 1893, Page 4 Column 3, Death
 

Heavilin, Abraham
Abraham Heavilin died Monday afternoon at 5 o’clock at the residence of his son-in-law, F. D. Miller, on Main street.
Mr. Heavilin had been feeble for the past two years, and attract of lagrippe, combined with his great age.  He would have been 85 in June.
The funeral services were conducted at the Presbyterian church, of which he was an elder, Wednesday morning at ten o’clock, Rev. J. S. Simrall officiating.  Interment in the city cemetery.
Mr. Heavilin was one of the oldest citizens of Sweet springs, having here with his family from Harrison county, O., in 1859.  His wife died two years later.  He has since made his home with his daughters.
He leaves four sons, on near Adrian, Bates, county, one in Carthage, and two in Montana, and three daughters, Mrs. A. M. Stauton of Richmond, Mrs. Ed Kirby of Marshall, and Mrs. F.  D. Miller this city.  He had been a consistent member of the Presbyterian church for over a half century, and had conducted himself in relations to his fellow men so as to win the respect and esteem of all  whom he came in contact. -- The Adrian Journal, March 31, 1893, Page 4 column 1, Death
 

Cox, Lucinda
Died; Sunday April 2, 1893, at the home of her parents in Kansas City, Mo., Lucinda, the 21 months old babe of Mr. and Mrs. S. P. Cox.  The remains were brought to this city Monday night and funeral services were held Tuesday evening at the residence of Nelson Moudy. Rev. Bell Officiating, after which the little one was laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery. The parents were among the earliest inhabitants of this city and have a host of friends who will regret to learn of their loss.
While there will be a vacancy in the home circle, the little one is happy in the paradise above. -- The Adrian Journal, April 7, 1983, Page 8 column 4, Death
 

Moody-Dennison
Married March 23, 1893, at Big Plain, Ohio, Mr. Jno. Moody, of this county and Miss Sarah Dennison, of Big Plain.
Mr. Dennison is one of Bates county’s most energetic and prosperous young farmers, we understand the companion that he has chosen is in every way worthy of his affections.  They immediately left Big Plain for their home here where the many friends of Mr. Moody will make Mrs. Moody feel that her lot is cast among a hospitable people. -- The Adrian Journal, April 14, 1893, Page 8 column 5, Marriage
 

Blount, E. J.
Died: April 16, 1893, E. J., wife of Allen Blount, after an illness of several weeks. Deceased was born August 27, 1832, and had resided in this county, with her husband for many years.  Her many friends will be pained to learn of her demise.  She was a kind wife, a loving mother and a generous freehearted neighbor endearing herself to all with whom she became acquainted.  From many years she was a consistent member of the Baptist church always reflecting credit on the cause of the Master.  Funeral services were held at the family residence on Monday conducted by Rev. A. Showalter, after which the remains were laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery. She leaves a husband and several children to mourn her loss. -- The Adrian Journal, April 21, 1893, Page 8 column 3, Death
 

Donohoo-Wilson
Dr. Jos. Donohoo, of ElReno, O. T., arrived last Saturday and was married Wednesday to Miss Ollie Wilson one of Bates counties fairest maidens.  He displayed good judgment in his choice of a companion. -- The Adrian Journal, April 28, 1893, Page 5 column 3, Marriage
 

Martin, Ann
Mrs. Ann Martin, was born in Devonshire England on the 13th day of  Sept. 1819 and died at her son’s residence in Higginsville, Mo. April 1, 1893. Sister Martin was a member of the English Episcopal church.  She with her husband emigrated to American in the year 1851.  Her husband, and two children have preceded her to the land of endless day and unfading happiness.  Sister Martin leaves two sons and one daughter, and several grandchildren with a host of friends whose hearts are filled with sorrow. -- The Adrian Journal, May 5, 1893, Page 4 column 3, Death
 

Young, baby girl
Mr. and Mrs. J.H. Young rejoice over the arrival of a girl baby at their home last Sunday. -- The Adrian Journal, May 5, 1893, Page 5 Column 2, Birth
 

Berry-Haas
Married, at the home of the bride, in this city, Wednesday at 2 o’clock p.m., Miss Lu Haas and Mr. G. S. Berry, of Pendleton, Oregon.
Miss Lu was one of Adrian’s best young ladies and was held in high esteem by all who knew her.  The groom was raised in Bates county but about five years ago left for the far west to make that his home, he has been quite successful and the choice he has made, of a life  partner demonstrates his wisdom.  The wedding was a quiet affair, only the relatives and immediate friends of the family being present.  The groom’s parents who live in West Boone township gave an elegant supper, Wednesday evening in honor of the event at which only the immediate friends of the family were present.  The happy couple left this morning for Pendleton, Oregon, where they will make their home. -- The Adrian Journal, May 12, 1893, Page 1 Column 1, Marriage
 

McRoberts, baby boy
J. W. McRoberts reports the arrival of a ten lb. boy at his home last Saturday night. -- The Adrian Journal, May 12, 1893, Page 5 column 2, Birth
 

Brown, Mrs.
Mrs. Brown an aged lady living a few miles east of this city, died last Monday and was buried Tuesday. -- The Adrian Journal, May 19, 1893, Page 1 column 2, Death
 

Russel, Claud
Rev. Haunts, a prominent minister of Altona was in the city Tuesday, and from him we learned the death of Claud, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Russel, at their home near Altona on Monday night. The little fellow had been in his usual good health until Sunday when he was taken suddenly ill, with the above result.  The attending physician pronounced his disease Spotted Fever.  The remains were laid to rest in the France cemetery on Tuesday evening. -- The Adrian Journal, May 26, 1893, Page 1 Column 1, Death
 

Burch, Lyman J.
Lyman J. Burch died at his home on West Walnut St. yesterday morning at 5:45 o’clock of paralysis.  He had been ailing since last February, but until the past week was not considered dangerous, and though his death was unexpected  by his family and a few of his near neighbors and friends, to the majority it was a sad surprise.
Mr. Burch was a prominent republican politician, having served for two years as chairman of the county Cen.-Rich Hill Review -- The Adrian Journal, June 2, 1893, Page 8 column 4, Death
 

Shook, infant
Died, June 7th at the home of its mother, in this city, the infant of Mrs. Shook.  For several days the little one had suffered untold miseries until death came to its relief.
The mental afflictions of the mother have been almost unbearable, yet she has braved the tide of adversity in earning an honest living.  In this last affliction the noble hearted woman lent all the  aid possible for human being to render, and were it not for the tender ministrations of friends and neighbors, the gloom of this world would be much greater than it is now. -- The Adrian Journal, June 9, 1893, Page 4 column 3, Death
 

Wright, John
Wright, Dan
Stricken By Lightning
Two brothers killed and four badly injured
The thunder storm which visited this section on Wednesday afternoon, left a vacancy in one home.  At the home of the Wright brothers four miles west of this city, the lightning done its terrible work.  The six brothers had been in the field at work and being driven to the house by the rain were standing in a group under a shed near the barn.
The lightning struck the shed and two of the brother, John and Dan were instantly killed, the other four being more or less seriously injured.  Pete, George and Dock were considered seriously injured while James escaped with but slight injury.  A messenger was immediately dispatched to this city for medical aid which was soon on the ground doing everything to relieve the suffering of those who were injured.
The matter is more serious when memory brings up the fact that less than three years ago the father of these boys was shot down by an unknown person, two years a go the mother was called to her last reward and now two of the sons lie cold in death.
Funeral services were held yesterday.
The surviving brothers and sisters have the deep sympathy of the community in this sad hour. -- The Adrian Journal, June 16, 1893, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Enyart, Ebenezer
Ebenezer Enyart, June 25th at the home of his son, Humphrey, in East Boone township, from the effects of injuries received two years ago.
Deceased was born  in Kentucky 80 years ago, and came with his parents to Mo. When he was three years old. He moved to Bates county about nine years ago.
Funeral services were held at the Edgewood church, on Tuesday, Platt Connell officiating.  Nine children survive to mourn the loss of a kind father. -- The Adrian Journal, June 30, 1893, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

Clark, baby girl
Mr. and Mrs. Clark, of near Burdett, record the arrival of a girl baby at their home. -- The Adrian Journal, June 30, 1893, Page 5 column 2, Birth
 

VanRiper, Joseph
Died: June 28, 1893, at his home 2 ½ miles west of this city, of dropsy, Joseph VanRiper.
Deceased was born in J. J. seventy four years ago last February, and came to Missouri, from Ill., in 1871, locating in East Boone township.
He was preparing to move to Harrisonville, where four of his children reside, but death is no respecter of earthly plans.  Deceased leaves a  wife and six children to mourn the loss of a kind husband and father.
Funeral services were held yesterday from his late residence, Rev. West, pastor of the Christian church of this city, of which deceased was a member, officiating.  The remains were laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery.  Peace be to his ashes. -- The Adrian Journal, June 30, 1893, Page 8 Column 2, Death
 

Oates, baby boy
Born to Mrs. Oates July 2nd a boy. -- The Adrian Journal, July 7, 1893, Page 4 column 4, Birth
 

Wyatt, baby boy
Mr. and Mrs. A. Wyatt report the arrival of a boy baby at their home. -- The Adrian Journal, July 7, 1893, Page 5 Column 2, Birth
 

Welden, George
Died, July 12, 1893, of cholera infantum, George, the two year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Welden.
Little George was taken ill last Saturday and suffered intensely until death came to his relief.  The sorrowing parents have the sympathy and regret of the entire community in this their great affliction. Funeral services were held yesterday at 3 o’clock from the U. B. church, and the remains laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The  Adrian Journal, July 14, 1893, Page 8 column 3, Death
 

Miller, Henry
Died, July 9, 1893, at his home in East Boone township, Henry Miller.
Deceased was born in Penn. 87 years ago, while yet a small boy his parents moved to Ohio where the subject of this sketch resided until he reached his majority, from Ohio he went to Ill., where he resided many years.  He was a veteran of the Black Hawk War, and was able to give some interesting reminiscences of that historical event.  His talks on manners and customs of the people, at the time he appeared on the scene of life, were both interesting and instructive.  He lived  to associate with several generations of people and had studiously watched the so called progress of the Americans.
Twenty three years ago he moved to Bates Co. which has since been his home, and where he had formed a wide acquaintance.
His life was full of deeds of kindness and charity.  He leaves an aged companion and seven children to mourn his loss.
Deceased was a member of the Baptist church and died in the faith.  Funeral services were held at the home. Rev. A. Showalter officiating, and the remains laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery.  The funeral was largely attended by his neighbors and friends. -- The Adrian Journal, July 14, 1893, Page 8 column 2, Death
 

Akers, baby girl
Born to Mr. and Mrs. Lou Akers, on July 22nd, a girl, all parties are doing well. -- The Adrian Journal, July 28, 1893, Page 4 column 5, Birth
 

Kimberlain, Robert
Died, July 24, 1893, at his home, Dayton, Mo., of pneumonia, Robert Kimberlain.  Deceased was one of the oldest and most highly respected citizens in this section of the country.  Funeral services were held on Tuesday. -- The Adrian Journal, July 28, 1983, Page 8 column 3, Death
 

Crow, W. J.
W. J. Crow, who lived near Altona, died last Friday after a lingering illness. -- The Adrian Journal, August 11, 1893, Page 5 Column 3, Death
 

West, baby boy
Rev. and Mrs. West record the arrival of a boy baby at their home this week. -- The Adrian Journal, August 18, 1893, Page 5 column 3, Birth
 

Reed, baby boy
Mr. and Mrs. Ben Reed rejoice over the arrival of a boy baby at their home Wednesday night, Dr. Gilmore reports all parties doing well. -- The Adrian Journal, August 25, 1893, Page 4 Column 3, Birth
 

Heath, Mrs. J. C.
The funeral of Mrs. J.  C. Heath was held last Sunday, Rev. Bell, preaching the sermon, we are not in possession of particulars regarding the late sickness of deceased. -- The  Adrian Journal, August 25, 1893, Page 8 Column 5, Death
 

Marr-Graham
A quiet wedding occurred on the 22nd, at the residence of Mr. Graham of Elkhart township, the groom being W. W. Marr of Neosho county, Kansas, the bride was N. E. Graham of Johnson county, Mo.  The wedding was on the quiet order, there being none invited but the near relatives, the ceremony was conducted by Rev. O. L. Wilson of Adrian.
The parties started immediately, after partaking of a sumptuous dinner, to their future home in Kansas, followed by the best wishes of all that knew them. -- The Adrian Journal, August 25, 1893, Page 8 Column 2, Marriage
 

Ohler-Simpson
Married, at the home of the brides parents Aug. 17, 1893, Mr. Riley Ohler and Miss Carrie Simpson, Rev. Chas. West officiating.
The groom is one of Bates county’s most industrious and worthy young men. The bride is a handsome and worthy young lady, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jas. Simpson, of this township.  The happy couple will be at home to their many friends in Crescent Hill in a few days. --   The Adrian Journal, August 25, 1893, Page 8 column, Marriage
 

Nichols, baby boy
Dr. Gilmore favors us with the following news items: a fine boy baby came as a permanent border at the home of Wm. Nichols last Sunday night. -- The Adrian Journal, September 1, 1893, Page 8 Column 4, Birth
 

Mefford, baby boy
Dr. Tuttle reports the arrival of a fine boy baby at the house of J. O. Mefford. --  The Adrian Journal, September 8, 1893, Page 5 Column 3, Birth
 

Grider, Ella
Died-At the home of her parents, in West Point township, Aug., 29, 1893, Ella daughter of S. E. and Mary Grider.  Deceased was born in Tenn., 21 years ago. When she was but six months old her parents came to Mo., which has since been their home.  For 13 months deceased had been a patient sufferer from consumption, bearing with fortitude her affliction.  Funeral services were held at Vinton, on Aug., 30th, Rev. Lewis performing the last sad rites over the remains.
Something of the esteem in which the deceased was held may be gathered by the large attendance of friends at the funeral.  The family have the sympathy of the community in this hour of their great affliction. -- The Adrian Journal, September 8  1893, Page 8 column 5, Death
 

Haas-Fair
Married, at the residence of the brides parents, this city, at high noon, Wednesday September 6, 1893, Mr. Chas. Haas and Miss Nettie Fair, both of this city, Rev. Scott was officiating clergyman.  These young people are among Adrian’s most esteemable and highly respected citizens, and they start out on life’s voyage with bright prospects and the good wishes of their many friends.  Only the immediate relatives of the contracting parties were present to witness the ceremony.  A sumptuous dinner was served, after which they took the 3 o’clock train for Kansas City where they will visit for a few days with Mrs. Haas sister, Mrs. E. A. Cherry. -- The Adrian Journal, September 15, 1893, Page 8 column 3, Marriage
 

Jones, baby girl
Mr. and Mrs. J. C.  Jones are rejoicing over the arrival of a girl baby at the home of their son William on the 7th, inst. 
-- The Adrian Journal, September 15, 1893, Page 5 Column 3, Birth
 

Nickolls, Tom
Tom Nickolls, age 41, died very suddenly last Monday morning while at work in Mr.  App’s field. -- The Adrian Journal, September 15, 1893, Page 8 Column 4, Death
 

Whitley-Wright
Married at the home of the brides parents, in Mound township, on Wednesday evening Sept. 12th, Miss Lena Wright and Mr. A. C. two of Bates county’s best young people, Elder Shrout of Butler officiated.  A supper consisting of the delicacies necessary to make a sumptuous meal, was served to which about 50 invited guests done ample justice.
The young couple have the best wishes of a host of friends for their future happiness.  The left Thursday morning for a visit with friends in Henry county. -- The Adrian Journal, September 15, 1893, Page 8 Column 2, Marriage
 

Rexroad-Coberly
Married, Wednesday, Oct. 4, 1893 at the home of Rev. J. M. Tresenriter.  Mr. William Rexroad and Miss Nellie Coberly. These are two of Bates county’s best young people, and start out on the journey of life with bright prospects for their future happiness.  They left Thursday morning for a visit with friends in Clay county. -- The Adrian Journal, September 22, 1893, Page 4 Column 2, Marriage
 

Judy, Mr.
I desire through this medium to return my heart felt thanks to the kind neighbors and friends for their help and sympathy during the late sickness and death of my husband.  May God bless you all. Mrs. Emma Judy -- The Adrian Journal, October 6, 1893, Page 5 Column 2, Death
 

Hartsall, baby boy
Dr. Hall reports the arrival of a boy baby at the home of William Hartsall Wednesday night. -- The Adrian Journal, October 13, 1893, Page 5 column 2, Birth
 

Hawk, Philip S.
Died, October 14,1893, at his home in Mound township, Philip S. Hawk.
Deceased was 47 years old and had been an active and successful business man.  He moved from Kansas City last spring locating on his farm.  A wife and four children, one son and three daughters mourn his loss.  In this sad affliction the family have the deep sympathy of the entire community.
Funeral services were held at the home Sunday and the remains laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, October 20, 1893, Page 4 Column 4, Death
 

Rodman, H. L.
Died-Tuesday morning Oct., 24, 1893, at his residence in this city, H. L. Rodman, age 56 years.  For several years deceased had been a great sufferer and almost helpless, and death was indeed a relief to him.  Funeral services were held at the Baptist church on Wednesday, Rev. Geo. Scott officiating.  The remains were laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, October 27, 1893, Page 4 column 5, Death

Brother H. L. Rodman was a native of Kentucky, having been born in that state, Nov. 12, 1837.  When he was eleven years old the family moved to Calloway co., Mo., where he lived for thirty years coming to Bates co., fifteen years ago, where he had finished his course.
In the morning of life Bro. Rodman gave his heart to the Savior, and united with the M. E. Church South.
He lived a devoted Christian life, always faithful in the discharge of his duty, giving his sympathy and energy to the cause he loved so well.
But, now, his voice is still in death, no more will it be heard in the home, nor in the assembly, but we expect, if we are faithful to the relations, which we sustain to each other, and to our God, to sing with him in the new song in the heaven unalloyed happiness.  The last ten years of Br. Rodman’s life was full of suffering, having been confined to his bed the greater part of this time, but amid it all he was patient, submissively  to the divine will, ever recognizing the fact that he doeth all things well, he often expressed a desire to die, that he might leave this world where he suffered so much, and go to that home over there, where no sorrow ever comes, where death is felt and feared no more. Bro. Rodman leaves a wife and two children who deeply mourn their loss, but they sorrow not, as those that have no hope for they expect to meet again in a better world, their father and angel brother.  On the morning of the 25th of Oct., we laid him to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery to wait the resurrection. -- The Adrian Journal, November 3, 1893, Page 1 Column 1, Death
 

Cox, Alice
Died; at the home of her mother, Mrs. G. James, in this city, of consumption, on the 20th day of Oct., 1893, Mrs. Alice Cox, wife of Wm. Cox, one of Adrian’s most respected citizens.  Mrs. Cox was born in Jackson county, Mo., Sept. 15, 1859 her maiden name was Alice Hackett.  Her death was the legitimate result of an attack of pulmonary lagrippe which she had three years ago this winter.  Deceased was almost raised in this county, and has a clear record.  She embraced Christ in early life  and a true Christian, a kind and affectionate wife,, an attentive mother, exceeding kind and accommodating to all of her neighbors and friends.  She bore her long and extreme suffering with Christian fortitude never murmuring but completely resigned to the will of God.  About her last words were my hands are clean, I am prepared to go.  Oh what a consolation to live so as when we face the grim monster and his icy tendrils begin to tighten about the vital chord, that we can exclaim my hands are clean, I am prepared to go.  She leaves a mother, companion and one dear little boy to mourn her loss.  Who will sympathize with a motherless little boy while she is gone.  She carried with her to the grave the love of mother, husband, babe and a host of friends, who weep at her departure.  And she has left a bright record to guide her companion and babe in the path that will lead them to the happy home she now occupies and from which she is beckoning them on. -- The Adrian Journal, October 27, 1893, Page 8 column 3, Death
 

Ohler, Wilhite
Miss Laura Wilhite, daughter of Henry Wilhite, and Jacob Ohler were united in marriage, at the home of the bride’s father, on Wednesday evening, Nov. 9th.. These worthy young people start out on their journey with bright prospects for success. -- The Adrian Journal, November 10, 1893, Page 1 Column 3, Marriage
 

Foster, George R.
Died, at the residence of his parents, in Mound township, on the 7th of Nov. 1893, of typhoid fever Geo. R. Foster.  Deceased was born in Johnson co., on the 5th day of May 1872.  He lived his short and beautiful life in the vicinity of his birth place, so his record is known to all of his friends.  And what a consolation to his kindred and friends to know that his character is unspotted, but in all the relations of life, as a son, brother and neighbor he reflected those commendable virtues of obedience, kindness and benevolence characteristic of the highest type of Christian manhood, commanding the undying love of his parents entwining his youthful nature into every piece of their existence, loved and revered b y his brothers, sister and all of his relatives.  Among all of his acquaintances, old and young, he dwelt high in their affections, merited their esteem.  Truly it can be said, George thou art gone, thy earthly star has sunk; thou art gone out in the great ocean of eternity gazing upon worlds more lovely than this, mingling with voices sweeter than those that whispered around your dying couch, powerless to help thee.  George there is no enemy left behind, no one that would tinge your earthly record, but the beating of the heart of every acquaintance sends out after you along deep throb to call you  back or bids thee a kind and long farewell.  We all do fade as the leaves.  How true, he has faded in youth, how soon we made fade and die. -- The Adrian Journal, November 10, 1893, Page 8 Column 3, Death
 

Dinsmore, Samuel
Died, at his residence, in Shawnee township, on Nov. 11th, Samuel Dinsmore, aged 72 years.
Deceased was a highly respected citizen, bearing with him the esteem of his many friends, he had never been married, and leaves no near relatives in this state, except Mrs. Z. B. Sloan, a niece.
Funeral was held Sunday at the home and the remains laid to rest in the France cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, November 17, 1893, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Murphy-Hughes
Married, at Pleasant Hill, on Wednesday evening, Nov. 24, 1893, Herman Murphy and Miss Emma Hughes, both of Adrian.
These worthy young people are well and favorably known in Adrian and vicinity, and their many acquaintances and friends united in extending hearty good wishes for their future happiness and success. -- The Adrian Journal, November 24, 1893, Page 1 column 3, Marriage
 

Axelson, Charles
Charles Axelson, a machinist employed at the Kansas City Boiler works, located on eighth street near Santa Fe in the west bottoms, died at city hospital at 6:15 o’clock last night from injuries received by being run over by a Kansas City, Fort Scott and Memphis switch engine shortly before noon yesterday.  Axelson attempted to cross the tracks near the factory where he was employed in the rear of a passing freight train.  An engine approaching on an adjoining track from the opposite direction of it.  In a moment the wheels had passed over him and both legs were almost severed near the knees.  After being attended by Police Surgeon when he was taken to the City hospital where he died.-K.C. Times
Deceased was a son-in-law of Dan Cothrien, of Burdett, and the remains were brought here and laid away in the Burdett cemetery.  The Odd Fellows of this city attended in a body and performed the ceremonies of the order over the remains.
Rev. Everett preached the funeral sermon.  The wife and fatherless child will receive the watchful care of the fraternity, as well as the sympathy of the community at large. -- The Adrian Journal, November 24, 1893, Page 4 Column 4, Death
 

Hartley, baby boy
A bouncing boy baby arrived at the home of J. W. Hartley Tuesday evening.  Jake says that Missouri isn’t such a bad place after all. -- The Adrian Journal, December 1, 1893, Page 5 Column 2, Birth
 

Lentz-Huff
Married, on Sunday Nov. 16, 1893 at the residence of the brides parents, in Spruce township, Mr. John A. Lentz and Miss Viola Huff, Rev. Mosier was the officiating clergyman.
John is one of Adrian’s best young men, honorable and upright in all his dealings, having the respect of all who know him. His many friends had become some what  solicitous for him lest he should sin away the day of grace and become a confirmed old bachelor, like Joe Bower, for instance, but it seems that he has been redeeming the time.  The bride is the only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Huff, is an accomplished young woman standing high in the estimation of those who know her, although a stranger to Adrian people, she will receive a hearty welcome to our town. -- The Adrian Journal, December 1, 1893, Page 8 Column 3, Marriage
 

Owen-Hall
Married, at the home of the bride’s parents, in this city, on Wednesday, Nov. 29, 1893, Mr. P. M. Owen and Miss Minnie Hall.  The groom is a prosperous young farmer, and a highly respected gentleman, the bride is the handsome and accomplished daughter of Dr. and Mrs.  W. P. Hall, a leader in social circles.
At 6:30 p.m. the guests began to arrive and at 7:20 the spacious parlors were filled.
Promptly at 7:30 to the strains of the Fairy Wedding March, played by the bride’s sister, the bride and groom made their appearance, when Rev. Bell proceeded with the ceremony, which was indeed very solemn and impressive.  After congratulations, the happy couple led the way to the dining room where a bountiful supply of all the luxuries life were served, attesting the culinary skill of the hostess.  The bride was attired in a costume of New Pink Tan, richly trimmed in cream lace and ribbon, and carried in her hand a bouquet of natural flowers.  The groom wore a becoming suit of black.
They will reside on their farm one and a half miles east of this city. -- The Adrian Journal, December 1, 1893, Page 8 column 3, Marriage
 

Purkey-Wagaman
Married, at the home of the bride’s parents near Carrolton, Mo., on Nov. 30th, W. G. Purkey and Miss Anna Wagaman.  The happy couple took up their residence on the farm belonging to the groom’s father four miles east of this city. -- The  Adrian Journal, December 8 1893, Page 4 Column 3, Marriage
 

North, Hannah Rebecca
Hannah Rebecca North, was born in the year of our Lord 1822, in Berkeley Co., near Winchester, Va.  She was but a child when her parents, Wm. Bell and Hannah, his wife, removed to Ohio and settled in Coshocton county, where she married Archibald North, with whom she lived for nearly forty seven years until his death only one year ago.  She has always been a faithful Christian and for the greater part of her life a member of the M. E. church.
She was converted in her home in Ohio in early life and had the abiding peace and comfort of her Savior as a present help in every time of need.  Her exemplary life, while a resident in this community, is often spoken of by her many friends, and her loving disposition soon made her a place in the affections of strangers.  She had gone to Ohio to visit her daughter Martha Hopkins, and family, when she was stricken with pneumonia and asthma, after nearly four weeks of intense suffering she died in peace on Dec. 1st.  Her moments, when free from pains, ere full of joy and comfort, she looked forward to crossing the river with a very happy anticipations of meeting her loved ones in a brighter happier home.  Her faith in God was simple yet powerful, and she expressed herself often as in His hands to live or die.  Her last words were “Oh how light it is” as though the eternal morning broke upon her without a cloud.  She died surrounded by friends and kindred and has gone to reap the rich reward that awaits the people of God.
Deceased was 73 years of age. The funeral services were held at the U. B. church, this city, conducted by the pastor, assisted by Rev. Bell.  The remains were laid to rest in the Nichols cemetery. -- The  Adrian Journal, December 8, 1893, Page 4 column 3, Death
 

Wilhite-Lemmon
Married at the home of Richard Wright, in Butler, on Thursday Nov 30, 1893, Mr. Henry Wilhite and Mrs. Amanda Lemmon.   The contracting parties are among the most highly esteemed people in this community, and they start out on their married life with the hearty good wishes of a host of friends. -- The Adrian Journal, December 8, 1893, Page 8 column 4, Marriage
 

Roliey, baby girl
Born to Mr. and Mrs. John Roliey on Thursday, Dec. 7th a daughter. -- The Adrian Journal, December 15, 1893, Page 4 column 3, Birth
 

Hill-Zinn
Our young friend Wallace Hill was married last week to a Miss Zinn, of Elkhart township.  While we are not in possession of the facts regarding the marriage, we untie with the friends of thee worthy young people in wishing them a life of happiness and usefulness. -- The Adrian Journal, December 15, 1893, Page 8 Column 4, Marriage
 

Brewer-Brown
Married, at Butler, Dec. 8, 1893, Miss Flora Brown, of this city, and Granville Brewer, of Archie.  The bride was well known to Adrian people, and highly esteemed by all who knew her.  The groom is a stranger in this city. -- The Adrian Journal, December 15, 1893, Page 8 column 4, Marriage
 

Feely, Mrs. Frank
Mrs. Frank Feely of near Burdett died on the 20th inst.  She died in the bloom of youth, having been married less than a year.  The bereaved husband has the sympathy of friends in this affliction. -- The Adrian Journal, December 22, 1893, Page 4 column 3, Death
 

Boswell-Timmons
Married, at the home of the bride’s mother, near this city, Dec. 21st, Mrs. S. E. Timmons and Crawford W.  Boswell, Rev. I.N. Parker officiating.  Both parties are well and favorably known in this community and a host of friends bestow upon them their hearty good wishes for their future happiness.  The happy couple took the three o’clock train yesterday for Caldwell and Galveston, teas, where they will remain for several week before returning to their home near this city.
-- The Adrian Journal, December 22, 1893, Page 8 column 2, Marriage
 

Whitney, Lucy M.
Died, Dec. 16, 1893, at her home three miles west of this city, Lucy M. Whitney, wife of James H. Whitney.
Deceased was almost 74 years old, for over 50 years she and her husband had traveled life’s rugged pathway together, bearing each others burdens and dividing the joys that crowd life’s voyage.  She was a member of the M. E. church.  Funeral services were held at the family residence Sunday morning.  Rev. Bell conducting the services.  A husband and five children remain to mourn her loss, and in their sorrow they have the sympathy of friends. -- The Adrian Journal, December 22, 1893, Page 8 column 2, Death


Submitted by: Sandee Hubbard

Note: The information provided by Sandee Hubbard has been made available for personal genealogy research.
It may not be copied or reproduced without gaining her written permission to do so.

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