Bates County News



 

The Adrian Journal
Adrian, Bates County, Missouri

Jan. 3, 1896 - Dec. 25, 1896

(Missing: Jan. 31, Feb. 27)

 

Stratton, Elizabeth
Died-December 30th, at her home one mile north of Crescent Hill, Elizabeth, wife of William Stratton. Deceased was a faithful member of the Dunkard church, and leaves a husband and two sons to mourn her loss. They have the sympathy of the community in this sad hour.  Funeral services will be held later. -- The Adrian Journal, January 3, 1896, Page 8 column 1, Death
 

Six-Hunt
Married, at the home of the bride’s parents, Miss Alice Hunt and Jesse Six.  May peace and prosperity attend them on their journey through life. -- The Adrian Journal, January 10, 1896, Page 1 column 2, Marriage
 

Ramey-Yoder
Married, at the residence of the bride’s father, this city, on Tuesday Jany. 7th, J. E. Ramey and Rebecca Yoder.  These young people are well and favorably known in this community and their many friends join in wishing them life’s greatest blessings.  They will make their home on the Ramey farm east of town. -- The Adrian Journal, January 10, 1896, Page  5 column 1, Marriage
 

Ashbaugh-Balgum
Bagby-Roach
Bushel from Burdett, January 5th, 96 - While we don not possess the necessary articles in Burdett to get the news every week, sometimes something occurs worthy of note in your valuable paper.  Our county is not infected with mad dogs, drunkenness, counterfeiters, rail road disasters, blowing up of mines, bank failures, etc.; however we can county  on a holy row at least once each year, and twice if the pastor happens to die or resign his charge.
Old. Mr. ….acting as secretary of the navy, and wields the regimental colors, his followers are all great men and are good  skirmishers. They are “Like a roaring lion” seeking to devour some poor feller up.
But hold on! We have something to tell you, come near we would whisper it low; this thing must be kept a secret for a least one week, until all danger of the tin can brigade shall have passed.  A man by the name of Cupid passed through this community of even date with the writing of this article, who bears the reputation of being an excellent archer.  He first visited Tory Balgum’s, and finding there Luke Ashbaugh, whose business seemed to be that of courting Miss Minnie.  Cupid at once meddled with their affairs, which at once resulted, as usual, in an unconditional surrender, the arrow passed through the hearts of both, ranging tableward, where a bountiful repast had been provided for the occasion, by Miss Minnie’s parents. Rev. and Cutbertson, who promulgates the teaching of the Supreme being at the Baptist church at Burdett officiating.  After the fateful words which made them one were pronounced, the dining room was invaded by the family relatives.  Rev. Cuthbertson and Cupid.  After this Cupid and Cuthbertson were again on the war path.  They at once repaired to the home of James Bagby, where Thomas Roach and Miss Lizzie were found in waiting, having been duly informed as to who was on their trail had also surrendered to the inevitable and in less time that in takes to tell it they to were placed on a level with the poor married man, where he spendeth his sheckles in the purchase of fine linen, wherewith to come the bosom of his family, while he himself is found at the gates of the city with one suspender only.  At precisely 4 o’clock p.m. the happy couple  ornamented with a pendant bell of artistic design, where the officiating clergyman pronounced them one, which one we can’t say.  It of course became a part of the obligation to eat, which tended to shake the faith of the Rev. and Cupid, and tax the seams and buttons of their paraphernalia, which indicated a wasting of strength, and that too much of a good thing is not enjoyed by even a preacher.  We do not know as to presents, or who acted as “Paranymph” on either occasion, however it is safe to presume they all got horses for presents.  Mr. Ashbaugh and Miss Balgum, Mr. Roach and Miss Bagby are highly esteemed in this community, and we hope that they may have a happy voyage down the river of life, and it might be well to add,  be void of squall, and let each be the first to retract the little differences that may arise.  It is now eight o’clock p.m. and we are tired and sleepy, let us retire.  If either Mess. Roach or Ashbaugh feel like contributing $10 or such a matter to the writer of this article, they may leave the same in the auger hole in Dan Cothrien’s gate post, where in due time it will be absorbed by the author. -- The Adrian Journal, January 10, 1896, Page 8 Column 1, Marriage
 

Jones, John C.
Died, at his home in this city, Saturday, January 11, 1896, after a lingering illness, John C. Jones.
Deceased was born in Wales June 7, 1838, and came to this country at the age of 12 years.  He enlisted in the federal army in 1861 and was in active service until the close of the war, he was in a southern prison three months.  As a citizen deceased was quiet and unassuming, yet kind and accommodating. At the age of 17 years he joined the Baptist church, and later in life united with the Cumberland Presbyterian church, in which faith he died.  In 1867 he was married to Sarah Burns, who survives him.  To this union was born one child, a son  W. G. Jones, who is train dispatcher for this division of the Missouri  Pacific road, with headquarters at Nevada.  Funeral services were held from the M. E. church, this city, Sunday at 10 o’clock, a.m., conducted by Rev. H. C. Case, who preached a very touching discourse.  As an evidence of the esteem in which deceased was held the large concourse of people who attended the funeral services was sufficient proof.  The G. A.R. Post of this city laid the remains to rest in the Mt. Olivet cemetery with the beautiful burial service of the order. -- The Adrian Journal, January 17, 1896, Page 1 Column 2, Death
 

Brown, son
The eight year old son of Thomas Brown died Monday of diphtheria and was buried on Tuesday.  The family have the sympathy of the community in this bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, January 17, 1896, Page 4 Column 1, Death
 

Lentz, baby girl
Chas. Lentz and wife, formerly of this city but now of Johnson county, are rejoicing over the arrival of the finest girl baby on earth at their home.  Their many friends her extend congratulations. -- The Adrian Journal, January 17, 1896, Page 4 column 4, Birth

 The Lentz boys received a telegram Monday announcing the death of the eight months old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Lentz, at their home, Leeton, Mo.  Henry, Warren, Aaron and Sam took the first train for that place to attend the funeral. This is a severe trial for this worthy young couple, and their many friends here united in extending sympathy and condolence in this their hour of gloom. -- The Adrian Journal, September 18m 1896, Page 4 column 3, Death
 

Unknown Tramp
Frightfully Mangled
A Tramp Is Killed Trying To Steal A Ride On A Freight Train
The people of this city were thrown into a fever of excitement Tuesday evening when it was announced that a tramp had been run over by a freight train. The facts are as follows:  Three tramps had been in the city during the day making and selling imitations of water lilies, when the north bound freight came through at 4:30 o’clock they sought passage on the truss rods under the cars.  The brakemen had ordered them off the train, but to no avail.  At the  north end of the switch he fell from his lodging,  six or eight cars passed over his body.  His right arm was cut off between this wrist and elbow, his right leg was severed b between the ankle and knee, two fingers were taken from his right hand, and his skull was badly crushed, the frontal bone being broken into many pieces, in fact he was bruised from head to foot.  He died at 6:45 o’clock p.m.
His companions gave his name as Ed. Kelly, and said that his father was engaged in the grocery business at Decatur, Ill.  Mayor Satterlee sent a telegram to the chief of Police of that city, and received an answer to the effect that no such person lived or was known in that city.
Coroner Renick, of Butler, was sent for and held an inquest over the body. Chas. Stacey, one of his companions, said that he had known him for 18 months and that he had during that time been known by the name of Ed. Kelley and that he was on the train without the knowledge or consent of the train men, that the company was not responsible for the injuries received by him.  Those other companion, Bert Clark testified to substantially the same facts.
Marshal Highley and night watch Hewitt saw him fall from his  lodging. 
Dr. Tuttle,  the company’s physician was present to render any assistance, but medical aid was of no avail. His identity will probably remain a secret as not a thing was found on his person to give any clue as to who he was or where he hailed from.  Undertakers Kidwell & Lentz and J.  H. Neff took charge of the body and gave it a decent burial.  The ladies of the W. C. T . U. and Rev. G. W. Scott held a brief funeral service over the remains.  Mrs. Putnam made some pointed and in our judgment, very sensible remarks.  We are all tramps on the dusty highway of life, and our future is to us a hidden mystery.
How many times this poor man had been refused the cup of cold water, and that too by those who profess faith in the Christ, but his career is ended, his problem solved, while ours is an unfathomable mystery and unknown quality. -- The Adrian Journal, February 7 1896, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

Pulliam, John
Joseph Pulliam was summoned to Mingo township one day last week on account of the serious illness, from pneumonia, of his brother John whose death occurred Jany. 30th. Deceased leaves a wife and five young children. Mr. Pulliam and other relatives have the sincere sympathy of their many friends in the loss of their beloved brother. -- The Adrian Journal, February 7, 1896, Page 8 column 1, Death
 

Johnson, Charles
Accidental Shooting-Daily Democrat
Last Saturday evening Charles Johnson, who had been working for parties in Summit township for several years, accidentally shot and killed himself.  At the time of the accident he was visiting the family of Mr. Bell, living eight miles east of this city.  He had taken a double barrel gun and gone out hunting.  When in the road near  W. N. Crouch’s he met two young men, acquaintances of his, named Bell and Holland, riding horseback; they stopped, dismounted and were standing talking to Johnson who had set his gun on the ground breech downward and had both hands over the mouth of the muzzle, his head resting on his hands, and while in that position and in some unaccountable way the gun went off, the shot passing through both hands and into his neck, killing him instantly. The body was taken to W. M. Crouch’s and Dr. Renick summoned who went there early Sunday morning and held a coroner’s inquest over the remains.  His parents reside in Benton county.  Wm. Naylor and uncle of the deceased, residing in the eastern part of this county, took charge of the body and interment was made in the cemetery at Elizabeth Chapel. -- The Adrian Journal, February 7, 1896, Page 4 Column 2, Death
 

Argenbright, Anna
Died: at the home of her parents, Grand River township Saturday evening Feb. 15, 1896 Anna, oldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Preston Argenbright, age 25 years, 5 months and 8 days.  Deceased was born in this county and all the years of her life had been spent here, where she scattered sunshine and good cheer. She possessed an amiable disposition, and was a leading figure in society.  Her sunny disposition drew about her a host of admiring friends.  In August 1888 she professed faith in Christ and united with the M.  E. church, south, since which time she has lived a consistent Christian life, and during her long illness she was ever resigned to the will of the Master.  Funeral services were held on Monday from the Methodist church at Altona, where a very touching sermon was preached by Rev. Frank E. Winger, of Kansas City, after which the remains were tenderly laid to rest in the Mt. Olivet cemetery.  As an evidence of the esteem in which she was held the large concourse of people who attended the funeral was sufficient proof.  The sorrowing parents, brothers and sisters have the sympathy of friends in this their hour of gloom and sadness. -- The Adrian Journal, February 21, 1896, Page 1 Column 2, Obituary
 

Smith, baby girl
Dr. Tuttle reports a girl baby at Dave Smiths. -- The Adrian Journal, February 21, 1896, Page 5 Column 2, Birth
 

Woods-Leffler
One of the prettiest and daintiest of home wedding occurred at the home of Mr. A. Leffler in West Adrian on Wednesday evening, Feb. 26th at  7 o’clock. The contracting parties being Mr. G. L. Woods, a prominent and highly respected young farmer of Grand River twp. And Miss Pearl, the lovely and accomplished daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. Leffler.  Promptly at 7 o’clock to the beautiful strains of the wedding march deftly executed by Mrs. Annie Smith, the young couple marched into the parlor and standing under a beautiful evergreen and smilax bell, were united in holy wedlock.  Rev Tresenriter of the U. B. church officiating in his graceful and impressive manner.  After congratulations were extended a dainty lap supper was served consisting of various kinds of cake, fruit, oranges, candy, tea and coffee, and then came the brides cake which was excellent.  Misses Ethel Leffler and Ethel Hudelson dressed in white waited on the guests in a very graceful manner.  The bride looked dainty and lovely in a dress of white swiss with natural flowers for ornament.  The groom wore the conventional black.  Many beautiful and useful presents were received.  Among the names of those giving presents we noticed were: Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Moudy of Teller, Colorado.
W. S. Mahan presented the gifts to Mr. and Mrs. Woods in a neat little speech.  Those present were: Mr. and Mrs. Marion Woods, Mr. and Mrs. B. R. Crawford, of Altona, Rev. And Mrs. Tresenriter, Mr. and Mrs. W.J. White of Sheldon, Mo., and Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Hudelson, Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Hudelson, Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Mahan, Mr. T. Wyatt, Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Denton, Mrs. Lydia Hudelson, Mrs. Annie Smith, Misses, Edith and Parrie White, of Sheldon, Mo., Nellie Mitchell, Lulu Wyse, Mrs. J. J. Lacy, of Kansas City, Messers Joe Highley, W. A. Highley, Coleman Woods, Robert Hudelson, Fred Hudelson, Clyde Mahan.
The day following a reception was tendered the young couple at the home of the groom’s parents 3 miles north of Altona.  Dinner was served to about 75 guests. The waiters were  Miss Rena Leffler and Lulu  Wyse and Messer’s Coleman, Woods and Oke Hoagland.  In the evening the young people gathered in to the number of 125, to them was served an oyster soup, cake and float.  The Altona Band furnished delightful music throughout the day and evening. -- The Adrian Journal, March 6, 1896, Page 1 Column 3, Marriage
 

Wolfe-Ball
Married, at the home of the bride’s sister, Mrs. A. W. Prindle, of Elkhart, on the 1st inst.  John H. Wolfe and Maggie  Ball.  The young people are well and favorably known in this community, and their friends join in hearty congratulations.  -- The Adrian Journal, March 6, 1896, Page 4 column 3, Marriage
 

Shelton, baby girl
Milton Shelton rejoices over the advent of a girl baby. -- The Adrian Journal, March 6, 1896, Page 5 Column 2, Birth
 

O’Dea, John
Died, at his home in Mound township, on the 29th, ult., John O’Dea, age 58 years. Deceased was a respected citizen of this community, having lived her e any hears. Funeral services were held on the 2nd inst conducted by the Crescent Hill Lodge No. 368 A.F.& A.M., of which  he was a member. -- The Adrian Journal, March 6, 1896, Page 8 column 2, Death
 

Cantrell, Lillie A.
Died, at her home in Shawnee township March 1, 1896, Lillie A. T. Cantrell, wife of Stephen Cantrell, aged 67 years, 3 months and 11 days.  Deceased was a native of Georgia, and married to Stephen Cantrell April 7, 1844, came to Missouri in 1867, where they have since resided.  She professed faith in Christ in early life but did not untied with the church until the year 1895, when she joined the Baptist church, in which faith she died. She was a highly esteemed lady, loved by all who knew her.  A husband, four sons, and two daughters survive to mourn the loss of a loved friends.  The funeral services were held Monday, Rev J.  A. Smith conducting the services, after which the remains were laid to rest in the Owen cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, March 6, 1896, Page 8 Column 3, Death
 

Purkey, John
Died, at his residence in this city, on the 2nd, inst, after a weeks illness, John Purkey, age 79 years, 4 months and 22 days.  Deceased was born in York county, Pa., Oct. 10, 1816, from there he moved to Ohio, and from thence to Illinois, coming to this state in 1869, and resided here until he was called across the river. He was twice married, two children of the first union still survive, four are dead. To the second union were born twelve children, seven of whom (five sons and two daughters) survive with the mother to mourn the loss of a loved one. Deceased was converted at a United Brethren camp meeting held at Strausburg, Pa., when he was but thirteen years of age he joined the M. E. Church and form many years was a class leader in that denomination, and a faithful member, later in life he united with the U. B. church; but changed his membership to the M. E. church, and at the time of his death was a member of that denomination in this city.  He was perhaps the best Bible student, among the laymen, in this part of the county; and added to this a rich religious experience made him an instructive conversationalist.  Funeral services were held from the M. E. church Tuesday, conducted by Rev. Shoslin and Tresenriter; and the remains laid to rest in the Nichols cemetery.  His life is ended; his work done; he has gone to his rest. -- The Adrian Journal, March 6,1896, Page 8 column 3, Death
 

Chapman, George
We are pained to chronicle the death of our esteemed friend and neighbor Geo. L. Chapman, who departed this life on the third inst, at his home in Grand River township.  Mr. Chapman was born in Madison county, Ohio in 1828, where he married Miss Winnie Keen in 1858.  He served with gallantry in the Union army during the war.  In 1868, shortly after its close, he came to Bates co. with his family, where he continued to reside until the time of his death.  Deceased left a wife and seven children to mourn his loss, five boys and two girls.  The sons, emulating the example of their father, are citizens of sterling worth sober, honest, respected, and industrious, and are numbered among our best citizens.  The daughters are married to worthy citizens of the community.  All were in attendance at his bedside when he passed away.  Death was no surprise to him, he had long suffered from pulmonary trouble contracted during his tern of service in the army, and when it came, he met it with patient fortitude, expressed a willingness to go, and exhorted his weeping wife and children to meet him in Heaven.  Mr. Chapman was a Christian; and Christianity with him was practical.  He followed the Golden Rule, was blessed with many friends, and no enemies.  Our whole community joins in sympathy with the bereaved wife and family. -- The Adrian Journal, March 13, 1896, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Beckett, baby boy
John Beckett is rejoicing over a boy baby at his home. -- The Adrian Journal, March 14, 1896, Page 5 Column 2, Birth
 

Gloyd, Mrs. Daniel
Mrs. Daniel Gloyd died at the home of her father in Altona, on Sunday March 8th.  She leaves a husband and one child, a daughter 10 years of age.  The death of Mrs.  Gloyd’s mother, Mrs. Cantrell, occurred just one week previous.  To the families thus compelled to undergo this double bereavement the sincere sympathy of the community is extended. -- The Adrian Journal, March 14, 1896, Page 8 column 3, Death
 

Rogers, Henry
Henry Rogers died at his home in this city on Tuesday, March 17th, of typhoid fever, age, 53 years.  Deceased was born in Hendrix county, Ind., and came to this county with his parents in 1856 and has resided in this and  Cass county since that time, except a few years spent in Kansas during the war.  He was a member of the Baptist church.  A wife, two daughters and one son survive him.  Funeral services were held yesterday from the Baptist church in this city, conducted by Rev. Harris, pastor of the Baptist church in Harrisonville.  A large concourse of people were present to pay their respects to the memory of the dead. The remains were laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery.  The family have the sympathy of friends in their bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, March 20, 1896, Page 8 Column 2, Death
 

Saighman, Frank
The remains of  Frank Saighman were  brought here from Kansas City Tuesday and laid to rest in the Nichols cemetery.  Deceased died of consumption, was 24 years of age, and leaves a wife and two children to mourn their loss. Her formerly resided in this county. -- The Adrian Journal, March 20, 1896, Page 4 column 3, Death
 

Robins, infant
L. R. Purkey and wife returned Monday from Drexel, where they had been to attend the funeral of their nephew, the infant son of Charles Robins and wife.  Another child, twin, of the one that died has also been dangerously ill, but is reported better at this writing.  The parents have the sympathy of their many friends here. -- The Adrian Journal, March 20, 1896, Page 4 column 2, Death
 

Elkins-Hall
There was considerable surprise in this city Wednesday when it was announced that Thomas Elkins and Nellie Hall had quietly driven to Butler and applied for a license to marry, the bride’s father was notified of their intention by Recorder Hale, the father wired the officer to issue the license, and to Mr. Elkins and his daughter to get married and come home.  The young couple did not remain in Butler long enough to get the message, but drove to Osceola, where they were married, and immediately notified the bride’s parents.  The contracting parties are well and favorably known in Adrian.  The groom is the prescription clerk at Hall & Son’s Drug store, and is a worthy young man, temperate, industrious and economical. The bride is the amiable daughter of Dr. and Mrs. W. P. Hall, and has grown to womanhood in this city, where she has a host of friends. They have the best wishes of all, coupled with the hope that their lives may be a tranquil as the brooklet.  It was an act of youthful indiscretion to take this step without the knowledge of the bride’s parents, but all has been forgiven let the curtain of charity be dropped over the foibles of youth, and greet them as friends.  The Journal extends congratulations. -- The Adrian Journal, March 27, 1896, Page 1 Column 3, Marriage
 

Griffin, baby boy
Rev.  Griffin reports a fine boy baby at his home. -- The Adrian Journal, March 27, 1896, Page 5 Column 5, Birth
 

Kanatzer, James
James Kanatzer died at the residence of his father, in Grand River township, on Wednesday, April 1st, aged 40 years.  The funeral services were held yesterday. -- The Adrian Journal, April 3, 1896, Page 4 Column 2, Death
 

Rains, baby boy
James Rains, living west of this city reports the arrival of a 9 pound boy at his home on Thursday of last week. -- The Adrian Journal, April 3, 1896, Page 4 column 2, Birth
 

Taylor, John
The remains of John Taylor, who died of consumption at his home in Austin last Tuesday night, were buried in Crescent Hill cemetery last Saturday. -- The Adrian Journal, April 10, 1896, Page 8 column 1, Death

 

Harper, baby girl
Dr. Bates reports the arrival of a new girl at the home of Chas. Harper’s Wednesday evening, all parties doing well. -- The Adrian Journal, April 17, 1896, Page 1 column 2, Birth
 

Hamilton, baby boy
Dr. Tuttle reports the arrival of a bouncing baby boy at the home of J. W. Hamilton on the 14th inst., all parties are doing well. -- The Adrian Journal, April 17,1896, Page 1 Column 2, Birth
 

McCraw, child
A very startling and serious accident occurred on the farm of Jack McCraw three miles northwest of town last Saturday.  A number of children were playing along the banks of the creek, when the two year old son of Sam McCraw fell into the creek, and was drowned before help could be secured.  The children gave the alarm, which received a ready response but all efforts to resuscitate the child were in vain.  Funeral services were held Sunday, and the remains were laid to rest in Crescent Hill cemetery.  The parents have the sympathy of friends in this sudden and severe bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, March 17, 1896, Page 8 column 2, Death
 

Shinabarger-Satterlee
One of the most pleasant social events ever witnessed in this city was that, which according to appointment, took place at the beautiful residence of Mayor and Mrs. A. J. Satterlee, on 1st St., Wednesday at high noon.  It was the occasion of the marriage of their beautiful and amiable daughter, Nellie Mitchell to James S. Shinabarger, Esq., of Maryville, Mo.  The ceremony was performed in the presence of a small circle of friends and relatives.  Rev. J. A . Smith, in a very impressive manner performed the ceremony which made them man and wife, at the close of which the bride and groom led the way to the spacious dining room, where a delicate, yet sumptuous repast was served.  The bride is a native of this county, where all the years of her life have been spent. She was one of the beautiful flowers of our city, and was held in high esteem by a large circle of friends.  The groom is a rising young lawyer of Nodaway county, and is now prosecuting attorney of that county, he is a fine appearing young gentleman, and is highly spoken of as a young man of real merit.  There is no reason why this should not be a happy union.  The bridal party took the 1:09 train for Maryville, where they will make their future home. The Journal joins with their many friends in wishing them a life of unsullied bliss.  May their future be as bright as the fondest imagination has pained it, may their joys be many and their regrets few.  A large list of valuable gifts was presented to them by friends.  The Journal extends thanks to the parents for courtesies extended the press, and take this opportunity of expressing our appreciation. -- The Adrian Journal, April 24, 1896, Page 1 Column 3, Marriage
 

Atkinson, baby
Dr.  Tuttle reports a new heir at the home of Bruce Atkinson. -- The Adrian Journal, April 24, 1896, Page 5 Column 3, Birth
 

McCorkle-Davis
J. F. McCorkle and Mrs. Mattie Davis, both of this city, were married at Butler on the 16th inst.  They have the best wishes of friends for their future happiness. -- The Adrian Journal, April 24, 1896, Page 5 column 3, Marriage
 

Moles, baby boy
Dr. Hall reports the arrival of a big boy at the home of D. Moles. -- The Adrian Journal, May 1, 1896, Page 5 column 3, Birth
 

Murphy, Lewis Herman
A deep shadow was cast over our little city last Tuesday morning when the tolling of the church bell announced the death of Herman Murphy, although his death was not a surprise to his friends. For several days his life had been despaired of, he having been afflicted with quick consumption and asthma.  Deceased was born in this township, June 20, 1866, being at the time of his death 29 years 10 months and 15 days old. All the years of his life were spent here, and every one knew him, and no citizen was more highly esteemed.  On November 22, 1893, he married Emma Hughes, an highly esteemed young lady of this city; this proved to be a most agreeable union.  About one year  ago Herman was converted and joined the Baptist church in this city, since which time he has lived a consistent Christian life, peaceful, generous hearted and courteous in his dealings. No one could rise to say ought against his integrity as a  Christian and gentleman.  For several years he has been engaged in the insurance business, having his office with H.  C. Bower, who was at his bedside during his last hours on earth.  The writer had an acquaintance with the deceased, and knew him to admire him for his manly traits of character.  He leaves a wife and sister, Mrs. H. G. Cherry to mourn the loss of a loving husband and kind brother.  Funeral services were held from the Baptist church Wednesday afternoon at three o’clock, conducted by his pastor, Rev. J. A. Smith, under whose ministry he was converted.  The funeral sermon was a most touching one.  The exceedingly large concourse of people present at the last sad rites, attest the esteem in which deceased was held.  The body, encased in an elegant casket, covered with beautiful wreaths of flowers, was tenderly laid to rest in Crescent Hill cemetery, and near relatives and mourning friends look up through their tears, to the beautiful light beyond, and say: It is well. -- The Adrian Journal, May 8, 1896, Page 1  Column 2, Death
 

Petit, baby girl
Lee Petit is rejoicing over a female heir at his home. Dr. Tuttle has our thanks for the item. -- The Adrian Journal, May 8, 1896, Page 4 column 3, Birth
 

Jenkins, baby boy
Dr. Gilmore reports the arrival of a bouncing boy baby at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Jenkins. -- The Adrian Journal, May 8, 1896, Page 4 column 2, Birth
 

DeArman-Bryant
On Wednesday evening at 7:30 o’clock, at the home of the bride’s brother, Reuben Bryant, William H. DeArman and Miss Jennie Bryant were united in marriage by Elder Phil Stark. The ceremony was performed in the presence of the immediate friends of the contracting parties. After the ceremony was over and the usual congratulations, the bridal party led the way to the dining room where a delicate collation was served, by Mrs. R. Bryant and several assistants, this displayed both tack and skill in the art by the agreeable hostess, and those present will ever remember the hospitable manner in which they were entertained.  The groom is one of the substantial and highly esteemed business men of this city, having for many years been actively engaged in business here, where he has a host of friends.  The bride is a most estimable lady, and has a large circle of friends who esteem her highly for her many womanly qualities.  The contracting parties are at home at the family residence on east main street.  Their many friends united in extending congratulations and best wishes for their future happiness and prosperity. Mary their pathway be ever peaceful.  The Journal united in congratulations and returns thanks for courtesies extended. -- The Adrian Journal, May 8, 1896, Page 8 Column 2, Marriage
 

Chitty, infant child
The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Ben Chitty died last Sunday morning after a very brief illness.  Funeral services were held Monday morning from the home, conducted by Rev. T. A. Farley, after which the remains were tenderly laid to rest in Crescent Hill cemetery.  The sorrowing parents have the sympathy of friends in this sad hour. -- The Adrian Journal, May 15, 1896, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

Thompson, Cecil
Little Cecil, the four year old son of Mr. and Mrs. L. M. Thompson, died in Kansas City yesterday.  The remains arrived on the noon train today, and were laid to rest in Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, May 15, 1896, Page 4 Column 3, Death
 

Shore-Hess
On Thursday May 13, 1896, Dr. George J. Shore, of Garden City, and Miss Sophia Hess, of Adrian, were united in marriage, at the home of the bride’s parents, at 11 o’clock a.m., by the undersigned, in the presence of a host or relatives and friends.  After the congratulations and the procession formed with the bride and groom in the lead, and marched to the dining room, where a sumptuous feast was prepared and in waiting. After thanking the giver of all good for his blessings, all heartily partook of the bountiful repast.  Many and valuable presents were given the newly married couple. The groom is an eminent physician, formerly of this county, but now of Garden City, where he and his oldest son have an extensive practice.  The bride, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. L. Hess, is one of our most estimable ladies.  Their future home will be in Garden City.  May the mantle of peace and prosperity ever o’re shadow their pathway in life. -- The Adrian Journal, May 22,1896, Page 1 Column 2, Marriage
 

Keiffer, infant child
The eighteen month old child of Dan Keiffer died last Monday, after a long and painful illness.  The funeral services were to have been held Tuesday, but owing to the heavy storm were postponed until Wednesday. The parents have the sympathy of friends in this affliction. -- The Adrian Journal, May 22, 1896, Page 5 Column 3, Death
 

Fisher, Joseph
Again we are called upon to announce a visit of the grim monster to our city.  This time it took from us our worthy and highly esteemed fellow citizen, Joseph Harvey Fisher, who fell asleep at 2:40 o’clock, p.m. Wednesday, May 27, 1896.
Deceased was born in Franklin county, Ohio Dec. 20, 1823, where he grew to manhood.  On Nov. 9, 1849 he was married to Miss Rhoda Davidson, who has graveled the rugged pathway of life with him to his death.  To this union were born eight children, five of whom are living; they are as follows: John Fisher, of Fairplay, Colo., I. M. Fisher, of Amsterdam, Mrs. John Todd, of Clay county, Mrs. J.D. Simpson, of this city, and Mrs. John Henderson, of Merwin, all were present when their father died.
Deceased enlisted in the Federal army as a member of  Co. E. 133rd, Ohio volunteers , serving as 1st Corporal of his company.
Deceased moved from Ohio to Kan. In 1870, from there to Platt co., Mo., in 1872, from thence he came to Bates county in 1882 and settled on his large farm near Vinton.  Three years ago he moved to this city.
In early life deceased professed faith in Christ and joined the M. E. church, and at the time of his death he was a faithful member of that denomination in this city.
Mr. Fisher had been active and energetic all his life, and by push and business tact had amassed a considerable property.
As a citizen he was honest and upright in his dealings; pleasant and agreeable with his fellowman, he was respected by all who knew him.  Until quite recently he moved about with the agility of a man much younger in years.
The family have the deep sympathy of their many friends in their bereavement.
Funeral services were held from the M. E. church this morning at 9 o’clock conducted by Rev. T. A. Farley, the remains were laid to rest in the Butler cemetery, with G. A. R. honors,  Adrian Post having charge. -- The Adrian Journal, May 29,1896, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Purkey, baby boy
Dr. Tuttle reports the arrival of a brand new boy at the home of William G. Purkey, on last Friday, all parties doing well, especially William. -- The Adrian Journal, May 29, 1896, Page 5 column 2, Birth
 

Dauck, Mrs.
Dr. Hall was called to see Mrs. F. Lowen, of Elkhart, yesterday evening in confinement, while the Dr. was enroute the lady was attended by her other Mrs. Fred Dauck and Mrs. Conard, (her mother was 72 years old).  Just before the birth of the child Mrs. Dauck fell dead from apoplexy.  The Dr. arrive in time to see her breath her last breath.  The excitement was a severe strain on the sick daughter, but she is doing well considering the trying circumstances. -- The Adrian Journal, June 5, 1896, Page 1 Column 2, Death
 

Mefford, baby boy
Dr. Bates reports the birth of a fine boy to Mr. and Mrs. Sam Mefford on June 1st. -- The Adrian Journal, June 5, 1896, Page 4 Column 2, Birth
 

Farley, baby boy
Born, today to Rev. and Mrs. T. A. Farley, a boy. -- The Adrian Journal, June 5, 1896, Page 4 column 2, Birth
 

Saterlee, infant child
The infant child of William Saterlee died yesterday morning, the remains were laid to rest in Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, June 5, 1896, Page 4 column 2, Death

Kohler-Ripley
Married, at the home of the bride’s parents, three miles northwest of Archie Wednesday June 17, 1896, E. D. Kohler and Miss Ona D. Ripley, Rev. Tresenriter officiating.  Miss India Hoover, of this city acted as bride’s maid, and Prof. B. G. Ripley, the bride’s brother, acted the part of best man.  They young people are well and favorably known in this  city, and their many friends united in wishing them a life of unsullied bliss. -- The Adrian Journal, June 19, 1896, Page 8 column 2, Marriage
 

Wills, infant son
The 10 months old son of Mr. and Mrs. George Wills died at the home of the parents yesterday morning after a ten days illness.  The remains were laid to rest in the France cemetery yesterday evening.  The parents have the sympathy of their many friends in this sad bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, July 3, 1896, Page 4 Column 2, Death
 

Hartley, baby boy
J. W. Hartley is rejoicing over the advent of an eleven pound boy at his home last Saturday night. -- The Adrian Journal, July 3, 1896, Page 5 Column 3, Birth
 

McDaniel, William
Died: at his home in Pleasant Hill, on Sunday July 5, 1896, William McDaniel.  Deceased was born in North Carolina and in 1815 and moved with his parents to Indiana in 1835, thence to Missouri.  United with the regular Baptist church in 1835; joined the Masons in the forties, was a faithful church member for 60 years and a member of the Masonic fraternity over 50 years.  Seven children, four girls, and three boys survive him.
S. A. McDaniel, of this city, a member of the firm of Bryant & McDaniel, and a highly respected citizen, is a son of the deceased, and in this bereavement he has the sympathy of friends. Funeral services were held on Monday, and the remains laid to rest near Peculiar, with Masonic honors. -- The Adrian Journal, July 3, 1896, Page 8 column 2, Death
 

Forbes, James
Died: at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Bud Gregg, Mingo township, on Sunday July 5, 1896, after a long and painful illness, James Forbes.  Deceased was born in Miama county, Indiana, April 27, 1844.  For a number of years he had resided in this county, where he was held in high esteem by a large circle of friends.  He was a sincere Christian man always doing what he could for the cause of the Master.
In the closing hours of his life he called for songs and prayer, and gave testimony concerning his experience. He leaves a wife and seven children to mourn the loss of a kind husband and father.
Funeral services Monday from the Little Deer Creek Chapel, Rev. W.  M. Griffin officiating, and the remains were laid to rest in  the Nichols cemetery. The large concourse of people in attendance was sufficient evidence of the high esteem in which deceased was held. The family have the deep sympathy of the community  in this their hour of sadness. -- The Adrian Journal, July 3, 1896, Page 8 Column 2, Death
 

Knowles, John
Horrible Accident
A distressing accident occurred at App’s saw mill on Wednesday, July 1st.  John Knowles, who was engaged in running the mill, was caught in the saw and received injuries which will probably prove fatal.  His left arm was sawed off above the elbow, the lower part of one lung was cut off, and his abdomen was so torn that his bowels dropped out. The mystery is, how has the poor unfortunate man survived? There is some hope of his recovery. -- The Adrian Journal, July 3, 1896, Page 8 column 3, Accident
 

Page, Judge
Judge Page, a prominent citizen of Cass county, died at his home near Dayton last week. -- The Adrian Journal, July 10 1896, Page 4 column 3, Death
 

Herrell, son
Died, at the home of his parents, this city, July 22, Walter Burner, the thirteen months old son of Mr. and Mrs. John Herrell.
It pains us to be compelled to announce the death of this bright and charming little babe, who had been in this world long enough to fill a large placed in the family circle.  He was a beautiful child, and always attracted the favorable attention of all who met him.  The parents, sister and brother, who are among the most highly esteemed citizens of Adrian, have the deep sympathy of a large circle of friends in this bereavement.
Funeral services were held yesterday from the Baptist church, Rev. J. A. Smith conducting the service.  A large audience was present to pay their respects to the memory of the dead.  The remains were tenderly laid to rest in the Butler Cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, July 24, 1896, Page 8 column 1, Death
 

Jones, Eugene
Eugene Jones died at the home of his parents, near Crescent Hill, last Friday night, of consumption, at the age of 22 years. Funeral services were held Saturday. -- The Adrian Journal, August 7, 1896, Page 4  column 3, Death
 

Sweet-Lemon
Married at Pledge Sunday at ten a.m. Jane Lemon to Ebenezer Sweet. -- The Adrian Journal, August 7, 1896, Page 8 Column 1, Marriage
 

Thurman, baby girl
Mr. and Mrs. Burt Thurman are rejoicing over the arrival of a fine girl baby at their home. -- The Adrian Journal, August 14, 1896, Page 4 Column 3, Birth
 

Fenton-Kelly
Married Tuesday evening August 11, 1896, at residence of Rev. Jos. Timmons, this city, Charles  F. Fenton and Irena E. Kelly, both of Mound township. The contacting parties are well known in this community and their large circle of friends unite in wishing them a happy and prosperous future.  The Journal joins in the good wishes and congratulations.
-- The Adrian Journal, August 14, 1896, Page 8  column 2, Marriage
 

Fahnestock, Sol
Sol Fahnestock, a single man about 22 years old, committed suicide at the home of John T. Wise, of Mingo township, Tuesday night, by the shotgun route.  He held the muzzle of the gun so that the contents entered his  mouth.  Death was instantaneous.  No cause is assigned for the commission of the deed, his friends believe that he was crazed from fever from which he had been suffering for several days.
Later: J. Coy of Aaron, called and gave us the following report with is correct: Fahnestock stopped at the Wise’s place to stay all night; in the evening Joe Wise was engaged in milking, Fahnestock ask him if he had any morphine about the house, and was informed that they had not; later in the evening while in the house, he examined the shotgun and asked if it was loaded, being informed that it was not, he asked if they had any loaded shells, to this he received an affirmative answer and took down the sack containing same and examined them. All this time he did not intimate that he had any intention of taking his life.  At bedtime he retired.  About midnight the family was awakened by the report of the gun.  The contents of the gun were emptied in the forehead instead of the mouth, the whole top of his head was literally blown off.  No cause is assigned for the commission of the deed.  Mr.  Coy was one of the first parties to arrive after the deed was done and the facts as briefly given above is all that is known of the matter.  The deceased has always been considered an inoffensive young man, and much surprise is expressed at this sudden termination of his life. -- The Adrian Journal, August 14, 1896, Page 8 Column 3, Death
 

Walters, baby girl
A girl baby gladdened the home of Mr. and Mrs. Hayes Walters last Friday morning. -- The Adrian Journal, August 21, 1896, Page 4 column 2, Birth
 

Hess, Gotthard
Died, at his home two miles northwest of this city, on Tuesday, August 25, 1896, Gotthard Hess, age 52 years 7 months and 7 days.
Deceased was born in Theningen, Baden Germany, and came to the U. S. in 1868, locating near Ottawa, Ill., from there he came to Bates county in 1879, locating on the present homestead.
In 1869 deceased was married to Mrs. Haas, who, with five children, two sons and three daughters, survive to mourn the loss of a kind husband and father.
In the death of Mr. Hess the community loses one if its most enterprising and highly esteemed citizens.  No man possessed a more generous heart than he, and he was ever ready to help the needy and speak a word of encouragement to the disheartened.  He was always in sympathy with every movement that had for its object the promotion of the public welfare. The community has lost one of its best citizens.
Funeral services were held from the home yesterday, conducted by Lutheran Minister, of which church deceased was a member.  The large number of people that assembled at the home is sufficient evidence of the esteem in which deceased was held. The ritualistic ceremony of the Workmen was rendered at the grave.
The family have the deep sympathy of a large circle of friends in this their great bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, August 28, 1896, Page 8 column 1, Death
 

DeJarnate, Mrs. Joe
Mrs. Joe DeJarnatte died at her home in East Boone township, Sunday. She had been in ill health for several months and her death was not unexpected.  She and Mr. DeJarnatt were married last Christmas.  Funeral services were held on Monday. The husband has the sympathy of his many friends in this his hour of sadness. -- The Adrian Journal, September 18, 1896, Page 8 Column 3, Death
 

Manchester-Simons
Married at the home of the bride’s uncle, Calvin Simons, of this city, on Tuesday evening, Sept., 16th, F. W. Manchester of Lamar, and Miss Emma Simons, of Lebanon, Rev. T. Farley officiating.  The young people are not widely known in this city, but they are highly cultured and worthy persons.  The Journal united with their friends in extending congratulations.  The happy couple left Tues. for Lamar, where they will reside. -- The  Adrian Journal, September 18, 1896, Page 8 column 3, Death
 

Abram, James
James Abram, an aged and respected citizen of East Boone township died at his home one mile north of Burdett on Monday evening. --   The Adrian Journal, September 18, 1896, Page 8 Column 2, Death
 

Crouch, E.  C.
Died, at the home of his sister, Mrs. Scott, of Elkhart township, Sunday, Sept. 13, 1896, E. C. Crouch, age 64 years.
Deceased had come from his home at Palmyra, Ill., for a visit with his sister, hoping that the change would benefit his health, which had been failing for more than a year.
He was a member of the Palmyra Lodge No. 463, A.F. & A.M.  the funeral services were conducted by Crescent Hill Lodge No. 368, of this city, on Monday.  The body was laid to rest in the Vinton cemetery.  The surviving widow and relatives have the sympathy of the brotherhood and friends in this sad bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, September  18, 1896, Page 8 Column 2, Death
 

Leown, infant child
Mr. Leown’s infant child died last Friday night after a brief illness. -- The Adrian Journal, October 2, 1896, Page 5 column 3, Death
 

McCues, baby boy
A new boy at Wm. McCues. -- The Adrian Journal, October 2, 1896, Page 8 column 1, Birth
 

Reeder, Lucy
Died, on Sunday evening, Sept., 27th, at a quarter to eight o’clock, of membranous croup, Lucy, only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Reeder, aged 5 years, 7 months and 16 days.  The burial took place on Monday at Mt. Olivet cemetery, Rev. J. A. Smith conducted the funeral services.
Little Lucy’s last illness was of very brief duration and did not appear to be really alarming until Saturday morning when it became evident that breathing was more and more difficult, and it was in vain that every method was tried to relieve, or remove the cause of her suffering.  Lucy was indeed the idol of  her home, and a favorite among her friends, old and young. Possessing a happy and social disposition, she invariably added her glad welcome to that of her mama’s when friends called or visited, and her little form will be lovingly remembered and sadly  missed by all who knew her.  The most sincere sympathy is extended to the sorrowing parents and brothers. The first harsh breath of autumn touching this tender little blossom and chilled its sweet young life, and so around us this, the loveliest among them all, quietly glided away from our cares and anxieties and sank in peaceful eternal rest. -- The Adrian Journal, October 2, 1896, Page 8 column 1, Death
 

Marshall, Mrs. W. R.
Died, at her home in East Boone township, Wednesday night Sept., 30th, Mrs. W. R. Marshall, of consumption age 37 years.
It is painful to chronicle the death of this estimable Lady. She had been a long and patient sufferer, and death was not unexpected to her friends.  She leaves a husband and three children to mourn the loss of a  loving wife and mother. The family have the sympathy of a host of friends in this their deep sorrow. The family is one of the most highly esteemed in this community, and this bereavement will be shared by their acquaintances. Funeral services were held yesterday and the remains laid to rest in the Burdett cemetery.  Rev. A. Showalter conducted the services. -- The Adrian Journal, October 2, 1896, Page 8 Column 2, Death
 

Passwater, Samuel
Died, at his home in Mound township, Oct. 8, 1896, Samuel Passwater, age 72 years.
Deceased was born in Delaware, when he was but six years old his parents moved to Ohio, from thence to Iowa in 1839, and to this county in 1866.  He was married in 1847 and a wife and two daughters survive him.
In 1860 he joined the Christian church, in which faith he died.  He had suffered untold agony for nearly two years, and was anxious to die.
Funeral services were held this morning from the Christian church, conducted by Elder Phil Stark. -- The Adrian Journal, October 9, 1896, Page 1 Column 2, Death
 

Furguson, child
A child of Will Furguson’s died last Saturday night of membranous croup, after a brief illness. Funeral services were held Sunday. -- The Adrian Journal, October 9, 1896, Page 4 Column 3, Death
 

Stone, Ruth
Little Ruth Stone died Sunday morning, Oct. 4, 1896. -- The Adrian Journal, October 9, 1896, Page 8 Column 3, Death
 

Stone, Mary A.
Died, at the home of her parents, on the 18th, inst, Mary A., the 5 year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Stone.  This is the second time that death has entered this home within the past two months, the other time a younger child was taken away.  Funeral services over the remains of little Mary were held yesterday.  The parents have the sympathy of the community in this sore affliction. -- The Adrian Journal, November 20, 1896, Page 1 column 5, Death
 

Lockwood, Dr. C. G.
Fatally shot from Ambush
Dr. C. G. Lockwood Shot Wednesday Night While Going From His Store to His Residence
Nine Buckshot Lodged in His Body and Four in His Arm
Injured Man Died at 9:30 Last Night
This community was thrown into a fever of excitement Wednesday night when it was announced that Dr. C. G. Lockwood, of Burdett, was shot from ambush, and probably fatally injured.
The facts, as nearly as can be learned, are about as follows:
The Dr. was going from his store building in Burdett, to his residence, ¼ mile west, at 8:00 o’clock in the evening. The road leading from the town to his residence is fenced on either side with Osage hedge.  At a point about 100 yards from the Dr’s. residence, on the north side of the road, there is an opening in the fence, and from this point the assassin discharged the deadly weapon.  The aim was true, as the contents  of both barrels of a shot gun were discharged in the right side of the victim.
The report of the gun was heard by Mrs. Lockwood and she immediately ran to his assistance, other persons also came immediately and carried the victim of the cowardly assault to his home.  A messenger was immediately dispatched to this city for medical aid. Drs. Gilmore and Bates answered to the call.  A Journal reporter secured the following statement from Dr. Gilmore.
Dr. C. G. Lockwood died at 9:50 p.m. on the 15th inst.  He was shot at 8 p.m. on the 14th, with buckshot, 9 of which entered his body, and 5 in the right arm.  The Dr. died purely of shock, no vital function was destroyed neither had any inflammatory action developed to produce death.  The shot was from the rear, all the balls entering the posterior part of the body, 3 on the left side of the spine and 6 on the right side ranging from the scapula to the sacrum, and 6 in the right arm.
The assault seems doubly demonic, when one reflects that only a few months ago the Dr. was thrown from his buggy and received injuries which necessitated the amputation of his left leg, from which he had hardly recovered.
He was a genial whole souled man making many warm friends, and was likely to have bitter enemies.  He stood high in his profession, being regarded by his professional brethren as a good physician.  He was a man of unusual physical power, and was unacquainted with the meaning of the word.
The Public Will Ask Who Did It?
This is a delicate subject for a newspaper men to treat, and the journal is not noted for making bold assertions, reflecting upon the character of any one, and in this case we make on statements upon any thing but the dead man’s statement, and the rumors that are abroad.
Those who reached the Dr. first after he was shot, quote him as saying that William F. Nelson had shot him.  He stated that he recognized him at the time he shot, and after he fell. This statement he adhered to , during his conscious moments, up to the time of death.   His friends acting upon this evidence, had Nelson placed under arrest, and we are informed that he is now in jail.  It is rumored that deceased and nelson had had serious difficulty over financial matters, and that each had abused the other severely.
On the other hand Mr. Nelson claims that he was at the home of his brother, some two miles away, at the time of the shooting.  Nelson has resided in the vicinity of Burdett for a quarter of a century, during all of which time he has borne a good name, and even now many of the people are unwilling to believe that he is the guilty party.  He is a very quiet and inoffensive man, and has never been quarrelsome.
The above is all that can be said at this time, of one of the most cowardly assaults ever made in this county, and one which all will regret.
The crime is a blot on the fair face of the community, and can not be looked upon with any degree of tolerance.  To justify such an assault, means to removed all restriction from those who would stealthily take human life, and give the criminal license to magnify the most trivial difference into a crime sufficiently large to justify the taking of a human life.
The public safety demands that a thorough investigation be made, and if possible bring the guilty party to justice. But no hasty action should be taken, nor any thing done to cast reflection upon those who may possibly be innocent.
Dr. Lockwood was 32 years old, a native of Ohio, and graduated from the Columbus Medical College, Columbus, Ohio.  Was married three years ago to Miss Ella Butler, of this county, who with one child, survive.
Deceased was a member of the Masonic lodge, of this city, and of the Modern Woodman lodge, of Burdett.
Funeral services were today at 1:00 p.m. -- The Adrian Journal, October 16, 1896, Page 1 Column 2-4, Death
 

Whitsell, Mrs. J. F.
Whitsell, infant child
Died, at her home in Passaic, Sunday night, Mrs. J. F. Whitsell, also her infant child.  Both were buried in the same grave on Monday. -- The Adrian Journal, October 16, 1896, Page 8 Column 1, Death
 

Walker, Ruth
Butler Daily - The funeral services over the remains of Miss Ruth Walker at the Christian church Sunday afternoon were very largely attended. Elder c. B. Lotspeich, the pastor, conducted the sad service.  He spoke in beautiful terms of the fair young dead and the sweet influence of her pure Christian life.  A quartet choir rendered several touching hymns.
Six young ladies, Sunday School associates of the deceased, were the honorary pall bearers:  They were Misses Lizzie Harris, Hattie Scott, Nora Jennings, Anna Lyle, Mamie Maxey and Edith Brooks.  The following were the acting pall bearers: Chas. Scott, Joe Kendel, Walton Steele, Walter Anderson, Oscar Heinlein and Dan Gingrich.
The floral tributes were profuse and beautiful.  At the conclusion of the church services the remains were conveyed to Oak Hill cemetery where they were tenderly consigned to Mother earth.
The Journal readers will regret to learn of the death of Miss Ruth Walker, which occurred at the home of her mother, Butler, Mo., last Friday night.  Deceased formerly resided in this city, and was admired by a large circle of friends because of her kind disposition, and the beautiful Christian life she lived.
A mother, and two sisters, Mrs.  Anna Smith, and Mary Walker, of this city survive to weep over the loss of their loved one.  The Journal unites with their many friends in  extending condolence in this their hour of sadness. -- The Adrian Journal, October 23, 1896, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Coates, Jacob Kinsey
Died, at the home of his parents near Crescent Hill, Oct. 18th of membranous croup, Jacob Kinsey Coates, aged three years one month and one day.
Funeral services were held from Crescent Hill church on Sunday at 3 o’clock p.m. conducted by W. M. Griffin.  A large audience was present to pay their respects to the memory of the dead.  The parents desire to express their gratitude to the many friends, who so kindly aided them during the sickness and death of their son. -- The Adrian Journal, October 23, 1897, Page 8 column 1, Death
 

Jenkins, Susan
Died, at her father’s residence in Mound township, Bates county, Mo., Oct. 18th, Susan E. Jenkins, aged 24 years 7 months and 4 days.  Funeral services were held at the Mt. Olivet church and interment made in Mt. Olivet cemetery. She leaves a husband and child, father, mother and sister, and a host of loving friends.
She was a highly cultured lady, a kind wife and loving mother; her life might well be an example for all those who desire, when death leaves their places vacant in this world, to have their friends feel and say that the world is better for their having lived.  By her death her friends suffer an irreparable loss, and society pars with one of its brightest gems.  She had been an invalid for a long time with that dread disease, dropsy. What she suffered tongue can not express nor pen portray.  Yet she bore all uncomplainingly, and with that gentleness of spirit with characterizes the noble, the good and the true.
All was done for her that medical skill and loving friends could do, but in vain, and when told that she must die, she answered, that she was ready.  She called her friends around her and told them to prepare for death, saying she would be waiting and watching for them upon that other shore.  To her weeping parents, she said, “weep not for me I am going home to Jesus, where I will suffer sickness and pain nor more.”  As death approached nearer she became oblivious to all things worldly and slowly and calmly repeating the words of that beautiful Psalm, “The Lord is my Shepherd I shall not want,” she softly and peacefully fell asleep in that last sleep of death. -- The Adrian Journal, October 23, 1896, Page 8 Column  3, Death
 

Mittan, Lester
Died at the home of his parents, 1 ½ miles north of this city, on Friday night, Nov. 6th, Lester, the four year old son of Mr. and Mrs. I. B. Mittan.
The little one was seiged with that dread disease, membranous croup from whose grasp it is almost impossible to escape.  The attending physician exhausted all known remedies to no avail, the little was doomed.
The highly esteemed parents have the sympathy of their large circle of friends in this bereavement. Funeral services were held on Saturday at 1 o’clock, from Crescent Hill church, Rev. Wm. Griffin officiating.
A large audience was present to pay their respects to the memory of the dead, and to render every possible assistance to the living.
The parents, brothers, and sisters of the deceased have the sympathy of friends and acquaintances in this affliction. -- The Adrian Journal, November 13, 1896, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

McRoberts, Barton Columbus
Died: At the home of his parents, on Wednesday, Nov. 11th Barton Columbus, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. McRoberts, age 4 years 6 months and 3 days.  The little one yielded to the grasp of membranous croup, from which he suffered several days.  His suffering were great, but ushered him into a brighter life beyond.
The parents, brothers and sisters have the sympathy of their large circle of friends in this dark hour.  The community weeps with them, but above there is a great Comforter who will give strength in every trial.
Funeral services were held from the family residence yesterday at 2  o’clock p.m., conducted by Rev. W. M. Griffin, after which the remains were tenderly laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, November 13, 1896, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

McRoberts John Franklin
Died, at the home of his parents on Tuesday, Nov. 17th, 1896, John Franklin, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. McRoberts age 1 year 4 months and 8 days.
Only last week death entered this home and took away an older child, a bright little boy of three summers and now it seem doubly sad to say the parting word to another child of the same household.  The grief stricken parents have the sympathy of their large circle of friends in this terrible affliction. The real anguish of spirit incident to this loss can only be felt and known to those who have been called to pass under the cloud.  Funeral services were held from the family residence on Wednesday afternoon, conducted by Rev. Griffin, and the remains were tenderly laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, November 20, 1896, Page 8 column 1, Death
 

Pfeil, Harry
Died, at the home of his parents this city, Monday evening, Nov. 9th, Harry, only son of Mr. and Mrs. Ed Pfeil, aged eight years.  Harry had been sick for some time, but his illness was not considered dangerous until Sunday night, when membranous croup set in.  All that medical skill could do was done to save this life, but to no avail; the monster could not be checked.
Harry was one of the brightest boys in the city, and was a favorite with all who knew him.  Both old and young admired him for his manly traits and amiable disposition.  The large number of people who gathered at the family residence to pay a last tribute of respect to the memory of the dead was proof of the high esteem in which he was held.
The members of the Junior Epworth League, and the pupils of the public schools attended the funeral in a body.
The active pall bearers were Carl Maxey, Cap Failing, Grant Laney, Geo. Dowell, Will Berry and Frank Weaver.  The honorary pall bearers were Lucie Mathers, Myrtle Wyatt, Ethel Harrison, Anna Smith, Ruth Stuart and Ida Hoover.  After a brief service at the house, conducted by Rev. Farley, the remains were tenderly borne to the depot, from there they were shipped to Capin, Ill., for burial.
It was indeed a touching scene to see the former playmates of the deceased, gather around the remains at the depot, and join in singing that beautiful hymn “We’ll Never Say Good Bye”.
The family have the deep sympathy of friends in this sad hour. -- The Adrian Journal, November 13, 1896, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

Pratt-Coffey
One of most brilliant social events of the season occurred at the residence of Elder and Mrs. R . R. Coffey, Altona, Mo., on Wednesday, Nov. 17th at 6 o’clock p.m.  It was the occasion of the marriage of their daughter Cecil M., to Charles E. Pratt, of Altona.
The ceremony, which made them man and wife was a most beautiful one, and was rendered in the presence of a large number of invited guests.  At the conclusion of the marriage service the guests were invited to partake of an excellent collation of tempting viands.
Music was furnished by the local orchestra.
The contracting parties are highly esteemed young people and start out on life’s journey with the richest benedictions of their many friends and acquaintances upon them. The Journal joins the friends in extending congratulations. -- The Adrian Journal, November 20, 1896, Page 8  Column 2, Marriage
 

Cole, son
Died, at the home of his parents on Monday morning, the three year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Cole, of membranous croup. Funeral services were held on  Tuesday. -- The Adrian Journal, December 11 1896, Page 4 Column 2, Death
 

Coger, Chris
Our citizens will be paned to learn of the death of Chris Coger, which occurred at Kansas City last night.  He has been conductor on this road for years, and is personally known to a large number of people here.  The remains were brought to Archie today and will be laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, December 18 1896, Page 1 Column 2, Death
 

Koeger, Chris
As announced in last weeks Journal Chris Koeger died at the hospital, Kansas City, Mo., on Thursday night, Dec. 17th of pneumonia fever, after a ten day illness.  The funeral obsequies were held on Sunday, conducted by the Knight Templar, of which the deceased was a member. Fully 2000 people gathered at the Crescent Hill cemetery to witness the last sad rites over the remains of a highly esteemed friends.  A special train was run from Kansas City to bear all who desired to attend, and the passenger train which goes north at 1:20 was stopped at Crescent Hill crossing to let passengers off.  Six conductors acted as pall bearers and a large number of rail road men were present to pay their respects. The floral tributes were profuse.  The conductors offered a beautiful wreath, “Gates Ajar” this was a fitting tribute to pay to one of their number who had long been a tried and trusted friend.
Mr. Koeger had been on the L.  &  S. division of the Mo. P. road for sixteen years and was a kind and obliging man.
The ceremony of the Knights was beautiful and impressive. The family of the deceased have the sympathy of friends in this sad bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, December 25, 1896, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Hemstreet-Walker
At the residence of the bride on Ohio street, Butler, Mo., at 10 a.m. Sunday, Dec. 13th 1896, Mr. Wm. F. Hemstreet, Esq., and Mrs. Francis A. Walker, C. B. Lotspeich officiating.
It was a very quiet affair, only a few friends outside the bride’s family being present.  The contracting parties are well and favorably known in Butler society, and their numerous friends wish them a happy and peaceful life.-Butler Daily  --
The Adrian Journal, December 18, 1896, Page 1 Column 5, Marriage
 

Haggard, baby boy
Dr. Tuttle reports the arrival of a 12 lb. boy at the home of Jackson Haggard last Monday. -- The Adrian Journal, December 18, 1896, Page 5 column 3, Birth
 

Adams-Allen
Married, at the residence of the bride’s parents, this city, Wednesday evening at 8 o’clock, Capt. A. V. Adams and Miss Lena, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. L. R. Allen, Elder Phil Stark officiating.  The young people are well and favorably known in this city, where the bride has grown to beautiful womanhood. Capt. Adams is one of the worthy and enterprising young business men of this city, and is held in high esteem by all who know him.  He is a native of this county, he is a cultured and amiable gentleman and has before him a life full of promise.
The bride is a worthy young lady, who is personally known to every person in the city, and her many friends esteem her highly for her womanly traits of character.  The wedding was a quiet affair, only a few relatives and friends being present to witness the ceremony. A supper consisting of choice viands, was served.  The contracting parties received many costly and useful presents.
The Adrian Fire company, of which the groom is a highly esteemed member, paid their respects by going in a body and presenting the bride and groom a beautiful lamp, as a token of their good will. -- The Adrian Journal, December 25, 1896, Page 1 column 3, Marriage


Submitted by: Sandee Hubbard

Note: The information provided by Sandee Hubbard has been made available for personal genealogy research.
It may not be copied or reproduced without gaining her written permission to do so.

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