Bates County News



 

The Adrian Journal
Adrian, Bates County, Missouri

Jan. 1, 1897 - Dec. 24, 1897
 

Hoover-Simons
Married on Dec. 27, 1896, at  6 o’clock p.m., at the residence of the bride’s father, ex-alderman C. C. Simons, Prof. John H. Hoover and Miss Alice M. Simons.  The nuptial ceremony was conducted by Rev. T. A. Farley, of this city, assisted by Dr. Price, of Kansas City.  Only relatives and a few special friends were invited to witness this quiet and unostentatious but impressive wedding.  After the ceremony and usual congratulations the guests repaired to the dining room, where they found waiting a magnificent repast, such as constitutes the ideal wedding supper, and one which reflects much credit upon the worthy hostess.  The contracting parties are well and favorably known to the community.  Mr. Hoover is now teaching in Jackson county.  He is an energetic and enthusiastic in his profession; genial and affable in companionship, and is an honorable Christian gentleman, admired and respected by all who know him. The bride is recognized as one of Adrian’s fairest belles, dignified and handsome in appearance, fascinating and charming in address. 
She too, is one of Bates county’s most successful teachers and should the profession lose her it will be deprived of one of its most useful and valued members, for indeed, she possesses a rare faculty to discipline and instruct.  By her marriage society loses one of its fairest flowers, the M E. church a zealous and efficient worker and her parents a loving dutiful daughter.  We congratulate Mr. Hoover on his success in winning such a…………..(paper torn) -- The Adrian Journal, January 1, 1897, Page 1  Column 3, Marriage
 

Deerwester-Lemmon
Prof. Frank Deerwester and Miss India Lemmon were married at Warrensburg on Monday.  Their wedding trip will embrace a trip through the southern states to New Orleans. The many friends of the groom in this city united in extending congratulations. -- The Adrian Journal, January 1, 1897, Page 5 column 3, Marriage
 

Johnson, twin baby  boys
Joseph Johnson and wife, of this city, are rejoicing over the advent of twin boys into their home yesterday.  The mother is over 50. -- The Adrian Journal, January 8,1897, Page 4 Column 4, Birth
 

Ingle, baby girl
The home of Walter Ingle was gladdened by the arrival of a girl baby on the 7th, inst. -- The Adrian Journal, January 8, 1897, Page 5 Column 2, Birth
 

Miller, baby boy
Dr. Gilmore reports a fine boy baby at the home of Edward Miller, two miles west of Adrian. -- The Adrian Journal, January 8, 1897, Page 5 Column 2, Birth
 

Cumming-Woolsey
Married: at the residence of the bride’s parents, at Altona, Mo., on Wednesday evening, January 13, 1897, George E. Cumming and Miss Ruth A.  Woolsey, Rev. J. A. Smith officiating.  The young people are well and favorably known in the community in which they live, they start out on their married life with the best wishes of a host of friends, in which the Journal joins in. -- The Adrian Journal, January 15, 1897, Page 4 Column 2, Marriage
 

Wright-Wyatt
Married, at the residence of the bride’s father, Elkhart township, at high noon, Jan. 9th Miss Jessie Wyatt and James Wright. Their many friends extend congratulations. -- The Adrian Journal, January 15, 1897, Page 8  Column 1, Marriage
 

Blair, Elizabeth
Died, at her home in grand River township, on the 18th inst, Elizabeth Blair.
Elizabeth Latta was born Nov. 18,1818, at the time of her death was 79 years 2 months old.  She was united in marriage with Thomas Blair Aug. 24, 1845. To this union were born seven children, six of whom survive.
When quite young she was converted and united with the M.  E. church, of which she remained a member until eight years ago when she united with the U.C. church.
Deceased was a generous hearted lady, a good neighbor and friend.  Funeral services were held on Thursday from the Crescent Hill church, conducted by Rev. J. A. Smith and the remains laid to rest in the cemetery at that place. The family have the sympathy of all in this bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, January 21, 1897, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

McMurray, Everett
Everett McMurray, the 15 year old son of Jos. McMurray, of Benton, Iowa, died at the home of his uncle D. W. McMurray, of this city, Wednesday afternoon.  The father and son left their Iowa home in November for an overland trip to this place, they arrived here in safety and drove as far south as Rich Hill.  Three weeks ago the son was taken seriously ill and remained in that condition until a few days ago when he appeared to be much better and at noon Wednesday he was in a cheerful mood and was thought to be on the road to recovery, but at about 4 o’clock in the afternoon death came very unexpectedly, and with out a moments warning the spirit took its flight to a better world.  The father started for his home in Iowa where the remains will be interred.  It is a sad journey for the grief stricken father, and will be a sorrowful home coming for the heart broken mother.  Their newly formed acquaintances here extend sympathy. -- The Adrian Journal, January 21 1897, Page 1  Column 3, Death
 

Walter, baby boy
Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Walter of Passaic, are rejoicing over the arrival of a fine baby boy at their home. -- The Adrian Journal, January 29, 1897, Page 4 Column 2, Birth
 

Wyatts, baby girl
Dr. Gilmore reports the arrival of a anew girl at the home of A. T. Wyatts Wednesday night. -- The Adrian Journal, February 3, 1897, Page 5 Column 3, Birth
 

Knaus-Crow
Married, at the home of the bride’s parent’s Spruce township, on Tuesday, February 2, 1897, R. H. Knaus and Miss Mattie Crow, Rev. J. A. Smith, of this city, officiating.  The contracting parties are highly respected persons and start out in the journey of life with the congratulations and best wishes of a host of friends. -- The Adrian Journal, February 3, 1897, Page 5 Column 3, Marriage
 

Feeback, J. H.
HEAD END COLLISSION
Two Cars And One Engine Demolished
One Man Instantly Killed
Two freight trains collided at the South end of the switch, in this city last Saturday evening, resulting in the death of one man, and wrecking three box cars, the engines were also badly demolished.  The wreck seems to have been the result of carelessness. The South bound train came in on the switch and as they passed the depot the engineer jumped from the engine to get order, he failed to reverse the engine before he left it.  It rushed madly down the switch and out on the main line just in time to collide with the north bound freight, with the above results, a wrecking train was sent for and by 3:00 o’clock Sunday morning the rack was cleared.  It was not known that anyone was injured until the wrecking train arrived and began to remove the debris.  A man was found crushed between two cars, badly mangled.  The remains were at once brought to the depot and justice Hogan summoned a coroner’s jury to hold and inquest. They at once preceded to perform that duty, and it was soon discovered that the dead man’s name was J. H. Feeback, and that he lived at Latour, Mo.  He also has a brother at Passaic, a messenger was dispatched form him and he identified the remains as those of his brother, who had just left his home.
The story is a sad one. Feeback had a wife and six children living at Latour.  He came  to Passaic to visit his brother, while there he received word that one of his children was seriously ill.  He determined to take the first train home, and sought passage on the freight.  The conductor informed him that they did not carry passengers; so the anxious father got into a box car in order to reach Harrisonville in time to connect with the train on the Bailey road, the rest is soon told.
He was neatly dressed and had sufficient money on his person to meet his need.  Undertake Kidwell dressed the man and forwarded the remains on the 1:20 train Sunday to Latour, where his sorrowing wife and children were waiting to receive him. -- The Adrian Journal, February 12, 1897, Page 1Column 2, Death
 

SHELBY LAID TO REST ADRIAN JOURNAL FEB. 19, 1897
IN A  WARRIOR’S GRAVE
Gen. Jo. Shelby Laid To Rest In The Forest Hill Cemetery
Wednesday Feb. 17 1897
Gen. J. O. Shelby died at his country home near this city last Saturday morning at 4:30.  His demise was not unexpected as the physicians had pronounced his case critical from the first.
The General’s last illness was caused from exposure in performance of official duties.  During the extremely cold week, he went to the Ozark mountains to measure some lumber belonging to the government, this trip necessitated much exposure, and he returned home sick from which he never rallied.
Dr. Gilmore, of this city, the family physician, was constantly at his bedside, but had but little hope from the start.  Gen. Shelby had the reputation of being one of the most gallant soldiers in the confederate army and in the West he more than any other man made a gallant stand for the lost cause.  After the war was over here he went to Mexico and offered his services but was rejected.
Gen. Shelby accepted the results of the war gracefully, and often expressed his gratification of the out come.  He was a generous nature, he spared no pains to help a friend, and no less than twenty young men from this community, who are now holding paying positions, secured them through the direct influence of Gen. Shelby, this fact they are proud to admit.  The remains were brought to this city Monday morning and placed in the M. E. church, where hundreds of people marched by the casket to take a last view of their distinguished fellow citizen.  At 1 o’clock p.m. the remains were tenderly borne to the depot to be taken to Kansas City for burial. The pass bearers here were Oscar  Reeder, W.  C. Mills, and J. B. Highley all of whom served in Shelby’s command during the war; W. S. Mahan, W. M. Hunter and Theo. Morrison members of the G. A. R. post of this city.  The guard of honor was composed of ex confederates and ex union soldier. To the writer this was a touching scene, to see the men, who a third of a century ago were foes, clasp hands over the dead form of one of the most gallant leaders.  The mantle of charity has fallen over the incidents of that period, and today we are brethren.
The funeral obsequies were held at Kansas City on Wednesday, under the U. C. V. association assisted by the G. A. R. -- The Adrian Journal, February 19, 1897, Page 1 column 2, Death
 

Bathurst, Dr. R. A.
Mrs. Geo. W. Scott informs us of the death of her father Dr. R. A. Bathurst, which occurred at his home near Lone Tree, on the 4th inst.  He had been in failing health for several months.  Mrs. S. has the sincere sympathy of her friends in the bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, February 19, 1897, Page 5 Column 1, Death
 

Greer-Gilham
Married at the residence of the bride’s parents, on Tuesday evening Feb. 16, 1897, Frank Greer and Miss Lydia, oldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Gilham, Rev. Farley officiating.  These young people are among the most highly respected in this community.  Both are natives of this county, and are honest and upright people, worthy of respect and esteem of their large circle of friends.
A number of guests were present to witness the ceremony, and to partake of the sumptuous supper served by the parent’s of the bride.  The Journal join the many friends in extending congratulations. -- The Adrian Journal, February 19, 1897, Page 8 column 2, Marriage
 

Lansdown-Brown
The most brilliant nuptial ceremony and social event that ever occurred in this county took place on the evening of the 24th of Feb. 1897, at the palatial residence of J. O. Brown, 5 miles southwest of Adrian.
The nidus of the occasion was the marriage of Dr. Walter Lansdown of this city to the beautiful and accomplished daughter of J.  O. Brown.
The ceremony was performed by Rev. J.A. Smith, of Adrian.  The bride and groom was handsomely attired; the company present very large and courteous.  After the ceremony, binding the two young hearts together for life was over, we repaired to the dining room where the table was groaning beneath every variety of edibles which pains and money could produce.
One or two hours were given to feasting on the many delicious articles elegantly prepared, until all had eaten to complete satiety, then a few hours were spent with music social chat and complementing the fair couple.  Then the large audience dispersed reflecting upon the pleasant time they had enjoyed at the hospitality of Mr. Brown. -- The Adrian Journal, February 26, 1897, Page 1 Column 3, Marriage
 

Argenbright-Claunch
Marriage Bells
The Social Event of the New Year
One of the most brilliant weddings that has ever taken place in north Bates was at the beautiful county home of Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Mills, one mile east of Adrian.  The rooms were exquisitely decorated with draperies, smilax and potted plants.  Mrs. Anna Smith presided at the piano, and at the appointed hour, to the soft strains of the bridal chorus from Mendelssohn the couple slowly wended their way beneath an arch decorated with smilax and flowers.  Under this the bride and groom stood during the ceremony, which impressed everyone with a holy calm, as if the Divine presence was there, while the beautiful gates stood ajar and these two entered in to go out no more until death do us part.  The gates of eternal love closed while Divine blessings and guidance for these, who had taken upon themselves, the obligation of a new life, was touchingly and tenderly invoked by the minister.
After congratulations the bride and groom led the way to the dining room and were seated at the table tastefully decorated with fruits and flowers at which a sumptuous repast was served in several courses.
A special feature of the evening consisted of dainty little cakes being passed, in one of which had been placed a ring, one a dime and another a darning needle; Miss Nettie Brown doomed to old maidship, Miss Ida Whitsitt secured the dime and Miss Mary Walker the ring.
The bride was richly attired in a gown of Cream Poult de faille with trimmings of Mousseline de soire and crepe palm lace.  He hair was becomingly arranged in a high coiffure with cream rose buds and her hand she carried a bouquet of bride roses.  The groom was dressed in the conventional black.
The bride who is a niece of Mrs. C. L. Mills is a young lady of charming personality and has a host of friends and enjoys the respect of both old and young alike, is one that will adorn the home, make life cheerful and pleasant to her household and will make just such a wife as the groom richly deserves.
The groom was reared in  Bates co., and is a young man of excellent character, sterling  business qualities, and has a bright future before him.  In the new domestic relations which he has so recently assumed all wish him unbounded happiness.
The hostess was assisted in welcoming the guests to library, parlors and dining room, by Mrs. J. W. Mathers, of this city and Mrs. Anna Smith and Mary Walker of Butler.
They were the recipients of many elegant and useful present. -- The Adrian Journal, February 26, 1897, Page 1 Column 2, Marriage
 

Butler, Harry
Died: at the home of his parents this city, Feb. 20 1897, James Harry, infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Benj. Butler of that dread disease membranous croup aged one year and eleven months. Little Harry was a bright little flower, and that the frosts of winter should carry him from the family fireside seems a hard affliction but it is a pleasure to know that he now lives with the angels.  It is hard to give up the little children and yet the blessed consolation that they die in their purity and rest in a fairer land buoys up the bereaved parents.  Mr. and Mrs. Butler have the sympathy of their friends in this great affliction. The funeral services were held at the U. B. church last Sunday conducted by the pastor, Rev. G.B. Clay, and the remains laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, February 26, 1897, Page 8 Column 2, Death
 

Wright, Alva
Died: Feb. 20, 1897, Alva Wright, at his home Altona, Mo., aged 58 years, of pneumonia.  Funeral services were held from the Baptist church on Sunday, conducted by Rev. J. Smith and the remains were laid to rest in the France cemetery. --The Adrian Journal, February 26, 1897, Page 5 Column 3, Death
 

Thrawl, baby girl
Dr. Gilmore reports the arrival of a new girl at the home of Mr. and Mrs. John Thrawl last Tuesday. -- The Adrian Journal, March 5, 1897, Page 5 column 3, Birth
 

Bateman, baby boy
Taylor, baby boy
Dr. Bates reports the following births this week; On Sunday a boy to Mrs. C.R. Bateman, on Saturday a boy to Mrs. John B. Taylor. -- The Adrian Journal, March 5, 1897, Page 8 Column 2, Birth
 

Bateman, infant
The three weeks old son of C. R. and S. Bateman died on the 18th, inst, and was buried on the same day. The parents have the sympathy of their many friends in their loss. -- The Adrian Journal, March 26, 1897, Page 4 Column 2, Death
 

Shelton, Lester
A memorial mention for Little Lester Shelton. -- The Adrian Journal, March 5, 1897, Page 8 Column 3, Death
 

Martz, Jennie Duncan
Died, at her home in Shawnee township, March 5, 1897, Mrs. E. E. Martz.  Jennie Duncan was born near Troy, Lincoln Co., Missouri, November 11, 1866, nine years ago she married with Mr. Martz.  To this union four children were born, three of whom, with the husband, survive to mourn the loss of a kind mother.  Deceased was a woman of unsullied Christian character, a faithful member of the Baptist church.  She was a kind and obliging neighbor a true friend, and a devoted wife and mother.  The husband and children mourn the loss of their best earthly friend.  The funeral services were held from the home on the 6th, inst, conducted by her pastor Rev. J.A. Smith, and the remains interred in France cemetery.  The Journal joins the many friends of the family  in extending sympathy. -- The Adrian Journal, March 12, 1897, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Simpson, Addie
Died at her home March 10th, Mrs.  James Simpson
A shadow of sadness has been cast over our community by the death of Mrs. Addie Simpson, which occurred at her home on Wednesday morning at 11  o’clock. The remains were tenderly laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery on Thursday at 2 p.m.  The large procession bore evidence of the high esteem in which she was held.  By her  death we lose one of our noblest Christian women, and the family an affectionate wife and loving other.  Were there nothing beyond this life  to look forward to, the parting would be doubly sad; but He who doeth all things well, hath some thing better than this life in store for her, and she is called zion-ward.  Having the assurance that she died as she lived, happy in feeling that she was approved by our great Master, in whom she had trusted.  Her last year on earth was one  of suffering borne cheerfully and patiently.  And though she was told to leave her loved ones, who will miss the kind word, the loving voice and the patient gentle face, yet she bowed in willingness to God’s command.
She leaves a husband, five children, and two brothers to mourn her loss, with whom we all deeply sympathize. -- The Adrian Journal, March 12, 1897, Page 8 Column 1, Death

 At her home in this township on March 10, 1897, Mrs. Addie N. Simpson bid adieu to earth and passed beyond the mysterious curtain that conceals from us the joys of another world.
Deceased was born in Johnson County, Mo., May 12, 1857, her name was Addie N. Bell.  She moved with her parents to this county in the spring of 1870, married James Simpson February 18, 1872.  To this union were born six children, five of whom with the husband and two brothers survive to mourn the loss of a dear one.  She was a woman of unsullied Christian character, a faithful member of the  Christian Church.  The funeral services were held from the Crescent Hill church on Thursday, conducted by Rev. Griffin. -- The Adrian Journal, March 19, 1897, Page 8  Column 1, Death
 

Sims, baby boy
Agent Sims is rejoicing over the advent of a boy baby in his home o the 16th, inst. -- The Adrian Journal, March 19, 1897, Page 4 column 3, Birth
 

Kinney, baby boy
Dr. Gilmore reports the birth of a boy baby in the home of Brack Kinney on the 14th, inst. -- The Adrian Journal, March 19, 1897, Page 5 Column 2, Birth
 

Timmons, baby girl
Dr. Bates reports the arrival of a new girl at the home of W. B. Timmons, all parties doing well. -- The Adrian Journal, March 26, 1897, Page 5 column 2, Birth
 

Wyatt Philander L.
Philander L. Wyatt, on of the most prominent citizens in the county, died at his home on Elkhart township last Sunday night. Deceased was born in Ohio about 50 years ago and grew to manhood in his native state, he came to this county more than 15 years ago, where he his since resided.  Fourteen years ago he was called upon to follow to their last resting place the remains of his amiable wife, the companion of his youth, this was a grief from which he never recovered, he remained a widower to death.  Mr. Wyatt was one of the leading spirits in this community in every public enterprise.  He was one of the most liberal contributors to the fund used in building Fairview Presbyterian church, of which he was a faithful member.  Being blessed with a large share of this worlds goods, he was a liberal giver to every worthy cause. Three children, two sons and one daughter, survive to mourn the loss of an indulgent father.
The funeral services were held from the Fairview church on Wednesday at 10 o’clock p.m., conducted by Rev. Watkins, of Butler, a choir of singers from this city assisted in the music.  After the services were concluded the remains of a good citizen and a faithful Christian were tenderly borne to Butler and laid to rest beside those of his wife.
The community mourns with the children in the loss of so good a citizen.  The Journal joins in extending condolence. -- The Adrian Journal, April 2, 1897, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Wright, John Davis
Died: at his residence in Altona, Mo., on Sunday March 28, 1897, John Davis Wright.
Deceased was born in Owen county Kentucky February 21, 1818, and came to Missouri in the spring of 1846, locating in Lexington, where he resided until 1879, when he came to this county.  In 1839 he was married with Miss Elizabeth Threlkeld.
He mad a profession of religion and joined the Long Ridge Baptist church in 1838 and has ever since been a consistent Christian.  His exemplary life is left as a rich legacy to his surviving children. No man in this community stood higher in the estimation of the people than Mr. Wright.  He was always kindly disposed, and courteous to all who met him. While his last years were full of suffering, his patient Christian spirit shone out through the pain and gloom, and was as a gentle sunbeam to his friends.  Funeral services were held from the Baptist church at Altona on Monday, conducted by his pastor, Rev. J. A. Smith and the remains tenderly laid to rest by loving hands.  The large audience present attested to the friendly feeling for the deceased. -- The Adrian Journal, April 2, 1897, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Jayne, Eleanor
Died, at the home of her sister, Mrs. Swift, in East Boone township on the 14th inst, Miss Eleanor Jayne. Deceased was born in Virginia 82 years ago, where she resided until 1880, at which time she came to this county.  For 63 years she had been  a faithful member of the Baptist Church, in which  faith she died. Funeral services were held from the home yesterday, and the remains laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery. The surviving brother and sister have the sympathy of friends in this bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, April 16, 1897, Page 4 column 2, Death
 

Henderson, Eliza
Mrs. Eliza Henderson, formerly a resident of this township, died at her home in Xenia, Ill., on the 20th, inst. Mrs. Joe Duncan, of Crescent Hill, is a daughter of the deceased, and in this affliction she has the sympathy of friends. -- The Adrian Journal, April 16, 1897, Page 5 column 3, Death
 

Lentz-Thomison
Married at the residence of Elder George Lentz, at 6 o’clock yesterday evening John A. Lentz and Miss Lydia Thomison. Elder George Lentz officiating.  The bride returned from California yesterday where she has resided for the past two years.  She is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Thomison, of this city, and is well and favorably known here. The groom is one of Adrian’s best citizens, and is held in high esteem by all.  He is honest and industrious. The newly married couple began housekeeping at once in the comfortable home recently fitted up by the groom, and, where they will be at home to their friends. The Journal unites with their friends in wishing them a life of usefulness and happiness. -- The Adrian Journal, April 23, 1897, Page 1 Column 3, Marriage
 

Maple-Baie
Married, at the residence of Rev. A. J. Smith, this city, Thursday evening, Clarence Maple with Lilian E. Baie, Rev. Smith officiating.  The bride is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Baie who is well and favorably known.  The groom is a son of Mr. and Mrs. A. Maple who has resided in this vicinity for several years.  These young people start out in life with the best wishes of a host of friends for their future happiness. -- The Adrian Journal, April 23, 1897, Page 8 column 1, Marriage
 

Dickey-Baker
Married, at the residence of Rev. T. S. Mosier, near Passaic, April 28, Wm. O.  Dickey and Miss Rosa Baker both of Cass county.
Visitors present, Wm. Sliffe and wife, R.L. Caldwell and Miss Minnie B. Baker, W. B. Baker and Miss Maud Grundy, all of Cass county, and Nathan Ingle and wife of Adrian.
The contracting parties are highly esteemed young people and start on life’s journey with the best wishes of a large circle of friends. -- The Adrian Journal, April 30, 1897, Page 4 Column 3 Marriage
 

Lewis, C. B.
C. B. Lewis, one of Butler’s most enterprising citizens died at his home in that city Wednesday morning.  He was taken ill on Thursday night of last week and his sickness was serious from the first. The funeral services were held yesterday morning, and the remains taken to Johnstown for burial.  The I. O. O. F. lodge of Butler was in charge of the ceremonies. -- The Adrian Journal, May 7, 1897, Page 4 Column 3, Death
 

McCorkle, Frank
Frank McCorkle, formerly of this city, died at his home near Dayton on the 3rd, inst.  Rev. Smith conducted the funeral services. Undertake Kidwell was in charge. -- The Adrian Journal, May 7, 1897, Page 5 Column 3, Death

The startling announcement of the sudden death of Frank McCorkle, which occurred on the 3rd, inst, cast a gloom over the city.  He was taken sick on Friday morning previous to his death, his case was critical from the first. Deceased was 28 years old.  He united with the Christian church last October and died in the faith. -- The Adrian Journal, May 14, 1897, Page 8 column 1, Death
 

Frost-Hall
Married, at Butler, on Monday, May, 10, 1897, Charles Frost and Miss Emma Hall, both of this city.
This wedding was not a surprise to the many friends of the young couple. For some time passed they have been classed among those whom Cupid’s darts had struck with deadly effect.  The groom is one of the proprietors of the north side barbershop, and is a young man of good habits, numerous friends. The bride is the handsome daughter of Mr. and Mrs. P. J. Hall, and is one of Adrian’s best young ladies.  They start out on the voyage of life with the blessings and good wishes of a host of friends. -- The Adrian Journal, May 14, 1897, Page 1 Column 2, Marriage
 

Blocher, Jacob
Jacob Blocher was born at Gettysburg, Pa., Aug. 6, 1825. Died at Adrian, Mo., May 11, 1897 ; aged 71 years 9 months and 5 days.  Moved to Lee co., Illinois, about 1852, thence to Adrian, Mo., in 1884. He leaves a bosom companion and eleven children to mourn their loss. Two children are dead.
Death and its doings is everywhere. Again the pale messenger has entered our community and called hence one whose life was give in Christian work, and which was a constant benediction to all who came under its benign influence.  Having passed his three score and ten, age with its sure and telling effect showed itself for several years in a gradual but decided giving way of his physical powers.  Possessed with a strong constitution, and more than an ordinary amount of ambition and energy, his gradual failing was not so much noticed, except by those who were with him most.  About last Christmas he was confined to his home, and was away but a few times since. Though his suffering was severe, without a murmur he continued to endure.  In his sickness as well as in h is health his mind was continually occupied with Christian work, and cultivating the Divine principle within. At different times during his sickness he would call his children to him and desire that some time be spent in scripture reading and prayer.
Deceased united with the German Baptist Brethren church over 40 years ago, and lived faithful to the cause he thus espoused to the time of his death.  He served the church as a Deacon with much ability, and his much esteemed counsel will be greatly missed.
And now the closed volume of his finished life is forever sealed. His work is done.  His example will live to beckon others on in the path he has trod. How truthfully it can be said, “Blessed are the death tat die in the Lord from henceforth; yea  saith the spirit they rest from their labors and their works do follow them.:
And now those who are left behind look beyond the grave where there will be a happy reunion that will never be severed. -- The Adrian Journal, May 14, 1897, Page 8 column 1, Death
 

Creath, Samuel
Samuel Creath was born October 15, 1827, in Madison county, Ohio; died May 17, 1897, aged 69 years, 7 months and 2 days. He married Elizabeth Davidson in his native state about 45 years ago, to this union 3 children were born, two, Mrs. Henry Nichols, and J. D. Creath survive, the wife having gone to the brighter beyond seven years ago.  He came with his family to this county thirteen years ago and located in Shawnee township where he resided until death claimed him.  He was converted and united with the U. B. church more than forty years ago, during which time he has lived a faithful and consistent life.
No man in the community stood higher in the estimation of the people  than he.  He possessed a sunny disposition, his face was always radiant with a pleasant smile, an his lips bore a message of good cheer.
From his lips there never escaped a bitter or unpleasant expression about a neighbor or an acquaintance. While his ashes are deposited in the earth, his kind words, his charitable deeds will live on to bless and make the world better. Death can not despoil a notable life, it only makes it the more precious.  His last years were full of suffering patiently borne. Above the intense pain there shone that radiant star of hope, which promised and adequate reward beyond.
The Journal joins their many friends in extending condolence to the bereaved children.  Funeral services were held Tuesday at 3 p.m. from the Chapel, conducted by Rev. Jos. Timmons, assisted by Rev. Wm. Griffin, and the remains laid to rest in the Nichols cemetery.  The large number of people in attendance attested his high standing in the community. -- The Adrian Journal, May 21, 1897, Page 8 Column 1, Death
 

Kline, Barth
Barth F. Kline, of Cochrane & Kline, machinists, dropped dead early Sunday morning on the banks of the Miama, southwest of town, where he was with a fishing party.
The party left town Saturday evening with tent and fishing outfit and those that were married expected to be joined by their wives the next day, when they were to have a fish fry.  Mr. Kline was of a jolly disposition and seemed in an especially good mood Saturday evening.  He laughter and joked with the rest of the boys and seemed to be in perfect health. He slept in a tent with the others that night and was one of the first one up the next morning, and in company with Mr. Willet, he went down  to the river and looked at the seine for a few moments and then returned to the tents and got a bucket and went to a well after some water.  After he returned with the water he sat down on a wagon box that was resting on the ground and complained of a pain in his side.  He had uttered but three or four words when he fell to the ground dead; having expired from neuralgia of the heart.
The deceased was 27 years old and unmarried.  He was of German descent. Butler Democrat -- The  Adrian Journal, May 28 1897, Page 1  column 2, Death
 

McRoberts, baby girl
Dr. Bates reports a fine girl baby at the house of John McRoberts. -- The Adrian Journal, May 28, 1897, Page 5 Column 3, Birth
 

McCombs-Harrison
One of the most brilliant events of the season was that of the marriage  of Jesse Warren McCombs of this city and Miss Zonia Harrison, of Shawnee township.  The ceremony was performed at the beautiful country residence of Mr. and Mrs. E. S . Harrison on Wednesday evening at 8 o’clock June, 9th.  Rev. Coffey officiating  There were present about sixty guests.  The spacious rooms of the pleasant home had been tastefully adorned with flowers for the occasion.  Promptly at the appointed hour the parties marched to the hymeneal altar to the beautiful strains of a wedding march played by Mrs. J. W. Mathers, of this city, where a brief but impressive ceremony by the officiating clergyman made them man and wife.
The contracting parties are among the most highly esteemed young people in the community. For several years the groom has been employed as book keeper for the  Adrian Banking Company, in which position he has been gentlemanly and efficient; he is regarded as a young man of honesty and integrity, with a bright promise for the future.
The bride is the only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. S. Harrison, and is an accomplished and charming young lady possessed of the highest womanly qualities.
They start out on life’s journey under favorable circumstances, with the benedictions of a multitude of friends upon them.  The Journal joins in extending congratulations. They received many costly and useful presents from their friends.
We understand that Mr. and Mrs. McCombs will at once begin house keeping in their handsome residence in Page’s addition.
It would not be fitting tribute to the occasion were we to omit mention of the sumptuous supper of which guests were invited to partake. -- The Adrian Journal, June 11, 1897, Page 1 Column 3, Marriage
 

Moss, Milton
SERIOUS EXPLOSION
One Man Killed and Another One Badly Hurt
Butler Daily Democrat
While engaged in digging a well for W. F. Duvall, near the west school house and while in the act of blasting Milton Moss was killed and John  Dunn seriously injured.
The accident happened about 11 o’clock this morning.  The two men were down in the well and had put some powder in a hole for a blast and were pounding it down when it went off.
After he was hurt Moss lived long enough to climb out of the well by means of a ladder.  As he reached the top he said, “tell mother and send for my sweetheart at Adrian.”  He died immediately afterward, having been hurt internally.  He leaves a widowed mother and several brothers and sisters.
John Dunn was picked up unconscious at the bottom of the well, one arm was mangled and he was badly hurt about the head.  He is not expected to live.  Mr. D. has a wife and several children.  He was a minister of the gospel and preached at times in the Holiness church.
Moss was well known in this city, having worked for Wilson Allen for several months past, until two weeks ago.  He was a quiet and industrious young man and well liked. -- The Adrian Journal, June 11,1897, Page 4 Column 1, Death

 Milton Moss was buried in Nichols cemetery.
 

Claunch, baby girl
Dr. Bates reports a new girl at the home of Andy Claunch’s. -- The Adrian Journal, June 11, 1897, Page 5 column 2, Birth
 

Deter, Mrs.
Mrs. Deter, wife of Rev. Deter, of Spruce township, died Tuesday morning after a brief illness. -- The Adrian Journal, June 11, 1897, Page 5 column 3, Death
 

Keneda, child
The three year old child of Mr.  Keneda, living five miles west of Adrian, died Monday night, and was buried at Sharon church, near Drexel on Tuesday. -- The Adrian Journal, June 11, 1897, Page 5 Column 3, Death
 

Wright, Dick
Dick Wright, formerly Marshal of Butler, was killed in Kansas City Tuesday.  He resisted arrest by the police and was struck a violent blow on the head by one of the “Cops”, which resulted in death.  The remains were taken to Butler for burial. -- The Adrian Journal, June 11, 1897, Page 5 column 2, Death
 

Baie, baby boy
Dr. Bates reports the arrival of a fine boy at the home of H. C. H. Baie, on the 15th inst. -- The  Adrian Journal, June 18, 1897, Page 4 Column 3, Birth
 

McCombs, baby girl
J. H. McCombs and wife are rejoicing over the arrival of a new girl at their home last Monday. -- The Adrian Journal, June 18, 1897, Page 5 Column 2, Birth
 

Wainwright, baby girl
Thos. Wainwright and wife are rejoicing over a new female boarder. -- The Adrian Journal, June 18, 1897, Page 5 column 3, Birth
 

Clark-Lentz
About fifty friends assembled at the beautiful home of Mr. and Mrs. H. P. Lentz on Thursday evening, June 24, 1897, at 5 o’clock, to witness the marriage of their daughter Miss Elizabeth to Eugene S. Clark, of Altona. Daisies were used profusely in decorating the parlor and dining room. The bride wore a beautiful gown of white silk and carried a bouquet of daisies.
Promptly at the appointed hour the bride and groom marched to the altar to the beautiful strains of a wedding march gracefully executed by Miss Olive Lentz. Elder George Lentz, with a beautiful and impressive ceremony pronounced them man and wife. After the usual congratulations the happy couple led the way to the dining room, where a sumptuous supper was served.  The Misses Olive,  Clara and Maud Lentz acted as waitresses.
A number of valuable and useful presents were received.
The bride is one of Adrian’s fairest young ladies, and popular in society circles. The groom is a young man of good habits.  They start out on life’s voyage under most favorable circumstances, with the best wishes of a host of friends for their future happiness and success.  The Journal joins in the congratulations and best wishes.  The happy couple will make their home in Altona. -- The Adrian Journal, June 25, 1897, Page 1 column 3, Marriage
 

Berry, George
George Berry a young farmer living near Metz, was killed by lightening last Saturday evening. -- The Adrian Journal, July 9 1897, Page 5 Column 3, Death
 

Copeland, baby girl
Dr. Tuttle reports the birth of a fine girl baby to Mr. and Mrs. J.A. Copeland this week. -- The Adrian Journal, July 16, 1897, Page 8  column 3, Birth
 

Gregory, son
The 13 year old son of B. F. Gregory, of near Mayesburg was killed last week by falling under the wheels of a separator. The boy was riding on the machine and lost his balance falling to the ground in front of the wheel.  His jaw was broken, his neck dislocated and an arm broken in two places. -- The Adrian Journal, July 23, 1897, Page 4 Column 2, Death
 

Pulliam, baby boy
Mr. and Mrs. John Pulliam are rejoicing over the arrival of a 12 lb. boy at their home yesterday. -- The Adrian Journal, July 23 1897, Page 8 column 1, Birth
 

McReynolds, baby girl
Mr. and Mrs. Ben McReynolds are rejoicing over the arrival of an 8 lb girl baby at their home on Wednesday.  Grandpas McReynolds and black are also wearing a broad  grin. -- The Adrian Journal, July 30, 1897, Page 5 Column 3, Birth
 

Johnson, Chelsea
Wm. Johnson and son Chelsea, of Douglas county, Kansas, started a few weeks ago for an overland trip to El Dorado Springs, where they were going for the benefit of the son’s health, he being in the lat stage of consumption.  They went into camp at the Millsap bridge last Thursday night, and the condition of the young man became so alarming that it was impossible to ;pursue their journey.  On Sunday morning they were moved to town and given quarters at the creamery building, and the good people of Adrian nursed the sick one and administered to his temporal wants until death came to his relief. The parties were in destitute circumstances, and money was raised to meet the present need and to bury the remains decently. Funeral services were held from the U. B. church, Tuesday evening, Rev. Clay conducted the service.  Deceased was 30 years old and a member of the M. E. church.  Adrian people can be depended upon to do the proper thing in cases requiring charity. -- The Adrian Journal, July 30 1897, Page 8 column 3, Death
 

Dunham, H.
H. Dunham, a brother of Mrs. Taylor Timmons, was killed in Texas last week in a threshing machine wreck. Deceased formerly resided in this township. -- The Adrian Journal, August 6, 1897, Page 1 column 5, Death
 

Timmons, George A.
A dark shadow was cast over this community Monday morning when it was announced that George A., oldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Taylor Timmons had died on Sunday night.  He had been ill less than a week, and while his condition was considered serious from the first, yet death came unexpectedly even to his parents, who had been constantly at his side.   George’s career was a brief one he having just passed the tenth mile stone in his earthly life. He was an unusually bright and industrious boy.  Hi quiet manners and manly habits made him popular among his acquaintances.  He was a good boy and an obedient son.
The sorrowing parents mourn not as those who have no hope, the child has been taken to a purer and better home, where they may go to him.
Funeral services were held Monday evening from Deer Creek Chapel, Rev. Griffin conducting the service; the remains were tenderly laid to rest in the Nichols cemetery.  A large congregation of sympathizing friends assembled to pay their respects to the memory of the dead, and to console the living.  The parents have the sincere sympathy of a large circle of friends in this their hour of deepest sorrow and grief. -- The Adrian Journal, August 6 1897, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Haas, baby boy
Born, to Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Haas, on Monday morning, Aug 9th, a 10 lb boy.  Mother and child doing well, Charley’s condition is not exactly normal, but he will probably recover. -- The Adrian Journal, August 13, 1897, Page 5 Column 3, Birth
 

Blair, Alfred
Alfred, the fifteen months old son of Mr. and Mrs. David Blair, died last Sunday night, after a lingering and painful illness. The little one was laid to rest in Crescent Hill cemetery on Monday. -- The Adrian Journal, August 13, 1897, Page 5 column 3, Death
 

Fenton, baby girl
Dr. Gilmore reports the birth of a girl baby to Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Fenton on Monday last. -- The Adrian Journal, August 13, 1897, Page 8 Column 3, Birth
 

McNeil, James
James McNeil died at his home in El Dorado Springs, on Monday Aug. 16, 1897.
Deceased was born in New Hampshire in September 1827, where he grew to manhood.  At an early age he taught school, but soon launched out in the world’s activities on a broader scale.  His first business venture was as a rail road contractor on the Lackawana road.  He came to Missouri in the fifties and engaged in contracting on the Mo. P. system, here he remained until the war broke out, when he again cast his fortunes to the east, this time locating in Penn.  From thence he moved to Indiana.  He returned to Mo., in 1870, locating on a farm in East Boone township, this county, where he resided for 17 years when he moved to El Dorado.
Mr. McNeil was married to Miss Jane Wilson, of Factoryville, Penn., more than 40 years ago, to this union 12 children were born, eight of whom with the wife, live to mourn the loss of a kind father.  Below we give the names of the living children in the order of their ages; Mrs. Lawrence Rosier, John and Tom McNeil, Mrs. W. S. Mudd, George, Fred, Anna, and Merritt.
Funeral services were held at El Dorado Springs on Tuesday at 2 o’clock p.m. and was conducted by the Masonic lodge of that city.
In the death of Mr. McNeil the community loses one of its best citizens.  His life was crowded with business activities, yet his honor and manhood were never tarnished.  He left a good name and a worthy example. -- The Adrian Journal, August 20, 1897, Page 1  Column 3, Death
 

Russell-Kline
Al Russell and  Cora Cline were united in marriage at Passaic on Monday evening.  The Journal joins the friends of the contracting parties in extending congratulations and best wishes. -- The Adrian Journal, August 20, 1897, Page 4 column 3, Marriage
 

Blair, Alpha V.
Died: August 8, 1897, Alpha V., infant son of David and Emma Blair, aged 1 year, 2 months and 10 days.  The remains were interred in the Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, August 20 1897, Page 4 Column 2, Death
 

Tipton, baby girl
An eleven pound girl baby came to the home of Mr. and Mrs.  A. B. Tipton last Sunday. -- The Adrian Journal, August 20, 1897, Page 5 column 3, Birth
 

Hedelson, J. M.
Died, at his home in Elkhart township, on Thursday evening, J. M. Hedelson, aged 75 years.
Deceased had been a resident of this county for a number of years, and was a highly esteemed citizen.  Funeral services will be held from the Fairview  church tomorrow, and the remains will be interred in the Butler cemetery.  The sympathy of many is extended to the mourning family. -- The Adrian Journal, August 27, 1897, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Ketron, Theodore
There came to the home of another of our best citizens the hand of death and called away a dear one.
Theodore Ketron was born in St. Clair Co., Ill., Feb. 11, 1870.  Died at his home in Mound township, Aug. 24, 1897.  Was united in marriage with Sarah E.  Downing Jan. 7,1891.  Professed faith in Christ at the age of fifteen years, and united with the Baptist church at Competine, Iowa.
In Christ he lived and died.  He had been a great sufferer for the past three years, but bore his affliction with great fortitude, always trusting in God.  In his last hours he called his friends around him and told them to meet him in heaven.  He left this world with a smiling  countenance and a prayer to God on his lips.
A faithful wife, father, mother, two sisters and a brother are left to mourn the loss of one so kind and good.
Funeral services were held Tuesday evening, conducted by Rev. Smith, and the remains laid to rest in the Mt. Olivet cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, August 27, 1897, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Thomison, John
Died, at his home in this city, Sept. 2, 1897, John Thomison, age 55 years, 11 months and 26 days.
Deceased was born in Tenn., Oct. 6, 1841 and came to this state 27 years ago, where he has since resided.
He married an Illinois lady,  who with five children survive to mourn the loss of a kind husband and father.  Deceased served in the federal army during the war of the rebellion. He was a faithful member of the German Baptist church for a number of years and died in the faith. For several years he has been in failing health and suffered severely, yet patiently.
Funeral services were held today from the German Baptist church of this city, conducted by Elders Geo. Lentz and Ira Witmore and the remains were laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery.  The family have the tender sympathy of a host of friends in this their hour of deepest grief. -- The Adrian Journal, September 3, 1897, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

Whitlem-Mullens
Married, on Sunday evening at the residence of H. P. Edwards, in this city, Wm. C. Whitlem and Mary E. Mullens, Rev. T. Mosher of Passaic, officiating.  After the ceremony the guests were invited to partake of a sumptuous supper which had been prepared by Mrs. Edwards. -- The Adrian Journal, September 10, 1897, Page 5 column 4, Marriage
 

Satterlee, Aaron J.
Aaron J. Satterlee was born in Cattaraugus county, New York, April 5, 1840, settled in Bates county in 1857.  He enlisted in the federal army June 27, 1861 and served until June 27, 1865, being discharged as 1st sergeant.  After the clouds of war had cleared away he returned to his Bates county farm, and was appointed deputy sheriff by Gov. Fletcher in October 1865, serving as the first deputy after the war.
In 1868 he was elected coroner, serving two years, after which he followed stock raising until 1880.  He located in Archie in 1880 and bought grain, coming the next year to Adrian.  He built the grain house now owned by the Bates County Elevator Company.  In 1882 he built a store house and embarked in the grocery, drug and grain business, this was the third store building erected in this city.  In 1883 he built the brick block on the north side of Main street.  He served two terms as postmaster, six terms as Justice of the Peace, issued the proclamation declaring Adrian a city of the Fourth class, and at the time of his death was serving his second term as mayor of the city.  Deceased belonged to several societies; was a Knight Templar, a Past Master, Past High Priest, and a Royal and Select Master, and Grand Lecturer; was an Odd Fellow,  Knight of Pythias, and a member of the  Adrian G. A. R .   He was a member of the M. E . church.
He was twice married, his first wife being a Miss Cook.  There were four children by the first marriage, living, Mrs. J. H.  Eyman, of Selma, Kansas, Mrs. R. A. Davidson, Of Mexico, Henry Satterlee, of Selma, Kansas, and Mrs. C.  T. Pratt of Sedalia, all of whom were present at the time of his death.
In 1888 he was married to Mrs. S.  E . Mitchel, who survives to mourn the loss of a kind husband.  Mr. Satterlee was a generous citizen, a kind husband and father. To the poor and needy, his purse was ever open, and in every enterprise, that had for its object the promotion of the city’s interest, he was a prominent figure.  He will be a missed man.
Funeral services were held on Sunday at 2:30 p.m., from the Baptist church, Rev. Farley, of the M. E. church, preached the sermon.  The Knights Templar had charge of the funeral ceremony.  The Masonic and Odd  Fellow Lodges acting as escorts.
The funeral cortege was one  of the most imposing ever witnessed in Adrian.  Knights from Butler and Harrisonville were present in large numbers. The remains were tenderly and tearfully laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, September 10, 1897, Page 1 Column 2, Death
 

Mefford, baby girl
Chas. Mefford is rejoicing over the arrival of a girl baby at his home. -- The Adrian Journal, September 17, 1897, Page 5 column 2, Birth
 

Whitley, baby boy
Dr. Gilmore reports the arrival of a new boy at the home of Archie Whitley. -- The Adrian Journal, September 17, 1897, Page 5 Column 3, Birth
 

Timmons-Weaver
At the beautiful residence of the bride’s parents, this city, on Wednesday evening at 8 o’clock Foster B. Timmons and Miss Anna Weaver were united in marriage, Rev. T. A. Farley officiating.
The wedding was a quiet affair, only the near relatives and a few of the intimate friends of the contracting parties being present.  The bride wore a dress  of white tiffany silk, trimmed in chiffon and satin. The groom wore the conventional black.
After the ceremony a  sumptuous supper was served.  The happy couple left on the night train for Kansas City, where they will make their home.
The groom is an agreeable young man and holds a good position as salesman at the stock yards.   The bride is the only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. F. R. Weaver, and was reared in this county. She is an intelligent, energetic and industrious young lady and has numerous friends here who wish her a life of happiness. -- The Adrian Journal, September 24, 1897, Page 1 column 2, Marriage
 

Stark-Mudd
At high noon yesterday, at the residence of the bride’s parents, this city, Francis M. Stark, of La Junta, Colo., and Miss Kate B. Mudd, were married, Rev. J. A. Smith officiating.
Only the immediate relatives of the parties were present to witness the ceremony. A bounteous dinner was served at the conclusion of the ceremony.
The happy couple took the 1:20 train for their future home in La Junta.
The groom is a prosperous business man, and although a stranger to the people of this community, is highly spoken of as an honorable citizen.
The bride is widely known in this county, having taught school here for several years past, and is held  in high esteem by many friends. --  The Adrian Journal, September 24, 1897, Page 1 column 2, Marriage
 

Williams-Bowman
On Tuesday morning William E. Williams and Miss Dell L. Bowman drove to Butler and were quietly married.  Their friends have long suspected that they were matrimonially inclined, and were not surprised when the news of their marriage gained currency.
The groom is an hones and industrious young man of good habits. The bride is the eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Bowman, and is an estimable young lady with a host of friends.  They start out on life’s journey with the benediction of a host of friends upon them. -- The Adrian Journal, September 24, 1897, Page 1 column 2, Marriage
 

Fox-Bloom
Walter Fox and Miss Julia Bloom were united in marriage at the home of the bride’s parents on Sept. 8th, Rev. J. A. Smith officiating. The wedding march was played by Mrs. Carr.  After the ceremony the guests were invited to partake of a carefully prepared supper. The young couple will make their home in El Dorado. -- The Adrian Journal, September 24, 1897, Page 1 Column 2, Marriage
 

Walter, Henry
The subject of this sketch first saw the light in Fairfield Co., Ohio, June 17, 1840.  He lived the usual life of a farm boy, received a meager education, grew to manhood and Aug. 20, 1861, responded to his country’s call and joined the 17th Ohio Reg.  Served three years and one month, being honorably discharged Nov. 1, 1864, having served one month longer than the time required by his enlistment.  During these three years he engaged in 26 pitched battles. He was a Chickamauga, Stone River, Missionary Ridge and Lookout Mt.  never shirking a duty and ever ready to relieve a less sturdy soldier upon whom some task fell, he endeared himself to many of his comrades in whose memory he yet lives, and when time with its many changes shall have crumbled the marble slabs raised in memory of the veterans the principles for which they fought will yet live in the minds of a grateful people.
On February 21, 1865 he  was united in marriage with Mary E. Smith, the only daughter of J.J. Smith. To this union were born six children three boys and three girls, five of which are now living, Clara the eldest having been called away in 1894.
In 1867 the deceased, in company with his father-in-law, came to Missouri and traveled on foot over several counties finally locating in Bates co., where he last resided.  Bates co. was then a sparsely settled district and many were the trials and hardships undergone by the early settlers, comfortable dwellings now mark the place of rude cabins. Waving fields of grain now thrive and flourish were one the blue stem grew.  But these things did not come by chance, an immense amount of honest toil was necessary to convert those wild prairies into fertile farms.
In the year 1866 he was soundly converted and united with the M. E. church in which organization he remained during all these years, and when the end drew near his faith never wavered, he did not dead death, but rather welcomed it, believing firmly in Christ’s saving power and rusting only in Him.  He was a man of few pretensions, he advocated no reforms, but his example could well be followed.  He never talked of charity, yet his hand was among the first to render assistance to the needy.  No sacrifice too great that he would not make it for his family, and his greatest ambition was to see his children grown  to manhood and womanhood without any stain on their characters, honest upright men and women.
A man’s aspirations, in a measure determine his worth.  His were pure and noble, and his life was in accordance with them. To him, life was a stern reality and let us hope that his life of unswerving duty is rewarded with a crown immortal.  -- The Adrian Journal, September 24, 1897, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Griffin, baby girl
Dr. Bates reports the arrival of a new girl at the home of Rev. Wm. Griffin last Saturday night. -- The Adrian Journal, September 24, 1897, Page 5 column 3, Birth
 

Keep, Mrs. James
Died, at her home in this city on Wednesday night, Mrs. J. H. Keep aged 50 years.
While death came suddenly it was not entirely unexpected.  For almost a year she had suffered intensely  from dropsy, but was a patient sufferer.
Deceased was one of the most amiable ladies in the city. She was devoted to her family and it was there that the beauty of her character shone in its true light.
A husband and three children survive to mourn their loss, and in this their hour of unfathomable gloom they have the sympathy of a host of friends.  A brief funeral service was held at the home this morning conducted by Rev. Farley, and the remains taken to Butler for burial. -- The Adrian Journal, September 24, 1897, Page 8 column 5, Death
 

Berry-Miller
E. T. Berry, of St. Clair county, and Addie Miller, of Appleton City, were united in marriage at the home of Geo. Miller, this city, last Saturday night, Rev. Clay officiating. The young people have the best wishes of a host of friends for their happiness and success. -- The Adrian Journal, October 1, 1897, Page 1 Column 3, Marriage
 

Buxton, Mrs. Geo.
Henry Haas received a message last Saturday announcing the death of Mrs. Geo. Buxton at her home in Kansas City.  The remains were taken to Butler Sunday for burial.  Deceased was well and favorably known in this city, and a host of friends here extend sympathy to the family. -- The Adrian Journal, October 1, 1897, Page 5 Column 3, Death
 

Jersig-Shelby
Mr.  Fredric W. Jersig, a prominent young business man, of Kansas City, and Miss Anna Boswell Shelby, only daughter of the late Gen. Jo. C. Shelby, were married at the Shelby home, at 7 o’clock Tuesday evening, Oct. 5th.  Rev. Dr. T.J. May, of Kansas City officiated. The wedding was a quiet affair, only the family and a few friends of the family being present.  The wedding ceremony was a most beautiful and impressive one.  Immediately following the ceremony the bride and groom led the way to the spacious dining room, where a delicious supper was served in five courses.
The bride was attired in white mousseline de soie made over white silk, trimmed in pleated chiffon and passementerie, with moire ribbon and carried a bouquet of pure white roses. She was indeed a charmingly beautiful bride.  Mr. and Mrs. Jersig will be at home to their friends after two weeks at Wabash Ave., Kansas City.  A host of admiring friends unite in extending congratulations and best wishes for the happiness and success of the contracting parties. -- The Adrian Journal, October 8, 1897, Page 1 column 2, Marriage
 

Story, Cyrus
Died, at his residence in this city Monday at noon Cyrus Story, aged 62 years 3 months and 22 days.
Deceased was born and reared in Ill., and came to this county twenty years ago, where he has since resided. He served two terms as alderman from the second ward of this city.  He was honest and just in his dealings, and leaves a good record for his sterling integrity.  To his family he was kind and considerate, and as a neighbor he was courteous and obliging.
A brief funeral service was held from the home on  Tuesday, conducted by Rev. Farley, and the remains tenderly laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, October 8, 1897,  Page 1 Column 2, Death
 

Greer, J. T.
J. T. Greer, who had suffered long and patiently, died at his home in Shawnee township, on the 1st inst. Aged 48 years, 5 months and 26 days.  He was born in Kentucky, but came to this state in young manhood.  In 1871 he was united in marriage with Grace Webb, to them were born six children, all of whom with the wife survive to mourn their loss.  He was a kind husband and father and a good citizen.  Funeral services were held from the Mt. Olivet M. E. church, of which he was a member, on Saturday, conducted by his pastor Rev. T. A. Farley, and the remains laid to rest in the cemetery there. -- The Adrian Journal, October 8, 1897, Page 1 column 2, Death
 

Scudder, Jotham
The tolling of the church bell yesterday morning announced the death of Jotham Scudder, president of the Adrian Banking Company.  His demise did not come unexpectedly, as for months he had been in failing health.
Jotham Scudder was born in Miama county, Ohio, December 12, 1837, when he was but a year old his parents moved to Green county, Wisconsin, where he grew to manhood.  His early life was spent on a farm, attending school in the winter season and doing farm work in the summer. The learning acquired in the country schools was supplemented by a two year course in the Beaver Dam Academy, and this by a two years course in the Wisconsin State University.  While he was a student in the last named institution of war of the rebellion broke out, and the ever patriotic heart of young Scudder responded to his country’s call and entered the service, enlisting in Co. K. 22 Wisconsin Vol. Inft., and served until the close of the war.  After the smoke of battle cleared away he reentered the Wisconsin
State University and graduated with the highest honor, of his class in 1866.  After leaving school he taught one year at Monotowac, Wisconsin.  In the fall of 1867 he came to Bates county, where he has since resided.  The first years of his residence were devoted to teaching school, he having taught at Pappinsville, Crescent Hill and Butler.  In the early seventies he formed a partnership with N. A. Wade as editors and publishers of the Bates County Democrat, in which business he continued until 1882, when he sold out to accept the position of President of the Adrian Banking co., which position he held at the time of his death.  In 1875 he was elected to the office of County School Commissioner and served two years.  As a thorough scholar Mr. Scudder had but few equals and no superiors in the county.  He was successful in all  of his business ventures; his career as an editor was brilliant.  As a financier he demonstrated his ability in a large measure.  His life was free from deceit in every form, what he was he was and that was the end of the matter.  In deeds of charity his life abounded, no man’s hand opened more freely to the wants of his less fortunate brethren than his.  He was never married.  In all of the enterprises that aided in building up the town and community in which he lived, he was a leader. The city has lost one of its most generous hearted and enterprising citizens.  He was a man of eccentricities, yet beneath them were burning the warm fires of a generous heart, and in his breast were the true impulses of noble manhood.  Peace to his ashes.
A sister only, Mrs. Nancy Hulburt, of Albany, Wisconsin, survives.  Mrs. Susan Scudder, sister in law to deceased has been his faithful and constant attendant during his lingering illness.
Funeral services were held today at 2 o’clock from the Baptist church, conducted by Rev. J. A. Smith, and the remains laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, October 8, 1897, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Blackman, infant
The six week old babe of Black Blackman died Sunday night and was buried  Monday in the Burdette cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, October 8, 1897, Page 4 column 2, Death
 

Jackson, baby boy
Sell Jackson wears a broad and significant grin these days, all on account of the advent of an eight pound boy baby into his home.  It is now PaPa Jackson. -- The Adrian Journal, October 8, 1897, Page 4 column 2, Birth
 

Knause, R. H.
While engaged in digging a well in the vicinity of Ballard last Monday evening R H. Knause met with an accident which resulted in his death the following morning. The accident came about in the following manner;  The air at the bottom of the well became so foul that Mr. Knause was almost over come, a box attached to a rope was hurriedly lowered and he took passage to the top, and when he came in contact with the fresh air he fell from the box head first to the bottom of the well.  His skull was fractured, from the effects of which he died.  The affair was a most unfortunate one, and cast a deep gloom over the entire community.  Mr. Knause was a highly esteemed and respectable citizen, and his sudden demise will be  felt.  Funeral services were held from the Fairview Baptist church and were conducted by Rev. Smith, of this city. -- The Adrian Journal, October 8, 1897, Page 8 column 1, Death
 

Timmons-Ketron
Charles Timmons and Miss Rebecca Ketron were united in marriage Wednesday evening at the home of the bride’s parents.  Rev. Wright was the officiating clergyman. This was no an unexpected event, as for sometime their friends had suspected that they were matrimonially inclined.  The bride is the beautiful and amiable daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Ketron.  The groom is an industrious and prosperous young man, worthy of the heart he hath won.  The wedding was a quiet affair, only the near relatives of the contracting parties being present.  The happy couple will begin house keeping at once at the Timmons homestead.
They start out in life with the best wishes of a host of friends in which the Journal joins. -- The Adrian Journal, October 15, 1897, Page 1 Column 3, Marriage
 

Argenbright-McCullough
A very pretty home wedding which occurred this week was that of Miss Lena A. McCullough to Mr. Chas. H. Argenbright, it took place at the bride’s beautiful country home near Dayton, Mo,, on Tuesday evening, Rev. Y. W. Whitsett of Warrensburg, performing the marriage rites.  Only relatives and a few intimate friends of the contracting parties were present to witness the ceremony which bound the lives of these two young people together.  The bride is a charming and vivacious young lady with many graces of character, and is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. H. McCullough, who are one of Cass county’s families of high rank.
The groom is a highly spoken of and is a prosperous farmer and stockman of Altona.
Mr. and Mrs. Argenbright will go immediately to their elegant home in north Bates. A number of handsome presents were received. -- The Adrian Journal,  October 15, 1897, Page 1 Column 3, Marriage
 

Murphy, M. E.
M. E. Murphy died suddenly at the home of Henry Harrison last Friday.  For several days he had been complaining of a severe pain in his left arm and on Friday went to Altona to consult the Dr.  As he was returning home he became suddenly worse, and being unable to pursue his journey he stopped at Mr. Harrison’s and died before medical aid could be had.  Mr. Murphy was 55 years old, and had long been a resident of this county.  He leaves a large family.  Funeral services were held from Mt. Olivet church Saturday at 2 o’clock, conducted by Rev. J. A. Smith. -- The Adrian Journal, October 15, 1897, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Moudy, Mary
Died, at the home of her son Chas. This city, on the 12th inst, Mary Moudy.
Mary Huff was born in Shelby county, Kentucky, June 13, 1825; her parents moved to Hendricks co., Indiana, with her parents when she was young, at the age of 21 she married Northcut Alexander, to them was born one child, Wm. R. Alexander, who survives her.  Her first husband died in 1850, and she was united in marriage with John Moudy August 7, 1853, to them were born six children; viz, Elma, Sarah Eveline, Ida, Alfred, Austin and Charles.  She has also been a kind and affectionate mother to Nancy J. Wager, Henry and Nelson Moudy and Aneliza Weaver.  The following children survive her: Nancy J. Wager, Henry and Nelson Moudy, W. R. Alexander, Elma Ewing, Alfred, Austin and Charles Moudy. She moved to Missouri with her family in the year 1856, settling in Deer Creek township where she lived until death called her.
She embraced the Christian religion 55 years ago, and has since lived a consistent Christian.
Grandma Moudy was one of those kind hearted and amiable ladies whom every one loves. The large attendance at her funeral was an evidence of the high esteem in which she was held.  Services were held from the Baptist church Wednesday at 2 o’clock, and were conducted by her pastor, Rev. J.  A. Smith.  The remains were buried in the Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, October 15, 1897, Page 1 Column 2, Death
 

Purkey, baby girl
Dr. Tuttle reports the arrival of a girl baby at the home of Will Purkey. -- The Adrian Journal, October 29, 1897, Page 5 column 3, Birth
 

Noble-Miller
Married, at Butler, Nov. 3, 1897, A. P. Noble, of Blue Mound, Kan., and Mrs. Fannie Miller, of Adrian.  His frequent visits to Adrian had led Mr. Noble’s friends to suspect that there was more than an ordinary  attraction here, but he kept his secret so well that no one knew of his intention until after he was married.
The groom formerly resided in this county, but is now a prosperous farmer near Blue Mound.  The bride is a worthy lady.  The many friends of the contracting parties unite in wishing them success in life. -- The Adrian Journal, November 5, 1897, Page 4  Column 1, Marriage
 

Highley-Webb
As we go to press we learn of the marriage of Geo. Highley and Miss  Ella Webb, which event occurred on Wednesday. -- The Adrian Journal, November 5, 1897, Page 8 Column 3, Marriage
 

McReynolds, Nina
Nina, wife of Ben McReynolds died at her home 4 ½ miles west of Adrian, Tuesday, Nov. 2, 1897, aged 20 years, 6 months and 27 days.
Nina Black was born April 5, 1877, in this county, and was the second daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Perry Black, she grew to beautiful womanhood, loved by her parents and admired by a large circle of friends.
On August 28, 1895 she was united in marriage with Ben McReynolds a worthy and highly respected young gentleman.  The union was a happy one.  A little daughter came into the home about three months ago, and the mother never recovered from the accouchement.  For all these months she had been an intense sufferer, yet patient in affliction.  All that an affectionate husband and kind friends could do was done to restore her to health, but in vain.  It is sad to think of the bereft young husband and motherless little babe, but kind hands there are ready to meet their every temporal need.
Funeral services were held yesterday from Fairview church, of which deceased was a faithful member, conducted by Rev. Dr. T. J. May, of Kansas City.  There was a large attendance of friends and neighbors to pay their respects to both the living and the dead. The remains were buried at Crescent Hill.  The entire community joins in extending sympathy to the husband and near relatives. -- The Adrian Journal, November 5,1897, Page 8 column 1, Death
 

Highley, Joseph
Died, at the home of his son, W. A., in this city, Monday morning Nov. 8, 1897, Joseph B. Highley.
Deceased was born in Virginia March 5, 1833, and came to this county in 1854; was married to Hanna Crawford December 23, 1855, to them were born two sons, twins, William A. and T. B. Highley, who with the mother survive.
Uncle Joe Highley, as he was familiarly known, was on of the most agreeable men in the community, he was always in a happy mood and during his long residence here was never known to do harm to anyone.  Hiss life was free from every thing that would tend to injure those with whom he associated.
Funeral services were held on Tuesday from the M.  E. church, conducted by Rev. T. Farley, and the large number of friends present attested the esteem in which he was held.
All that was mortal of Uncle Joe was laid to rest in the France cemetery. Peace be to his ashes. -- The Adrian Journal, November 12, 1897, Page 1 Column 3,Death
 

Wirt-Mills
Miss Julia, daughter of H.C. Mills, of Foster, was united in marriage with J. D. Wirt on Wednesday.  The young lady has numerous friends in this city who join in extending congratulations and best wishes. -- The Adrian Journal, November 19, 1897, Page 4 Column 3, Marriage
 

Brown, Lizzie M.
Sacred to the memory of Lizzie M. Brown, wife of Oscar Brown and daughter of K.H. and S. A. Penley, who departed this life Sept. 4, 1897, aged 18 years and 4 months. -- The Adrian Journal, November 19, 1897, Page 9 Column 4, Death
 

Whitley, James K.
Died, at his home in Crescent Hill on Sunday night, Nov. 21, 1897, James K. Whitley.
Deceased was born in Kentucky January 21, 1853, and came to this state when he was 13 years old, where he resided until death called him hence.  He leaves a wife and six children to mourn their loss, and in this sad affliction they have the sympathy of a large circle of friends.
Funeral services were held on Tuesday from the Crescent Hill church, conducted by Rev. G. B. Clay of this city. The remains were interred in the Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, November 26, 1897, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Brashear, Minnie
Miss Minnie Brashear died at her home two miles west of Pond Creek, O T. Sep. 30, 1897, at four o’clock in the morning with that dread disease consumption.  She had been a constant sufferer for four years, but never complained or murmured.
She was born in Larue county, Ky., Dec. 30, 1879, moved to Mo. With her parents when a small child.  Joined the church at Burdett and was baptized by Rev. Cuthbertson at the age of 16, since which time she has lived a devoted Christian life.  She had a keen sense of right, justice, honor and duty, always kind and considerate of others. To her parents, brothers and sisters I would say weep not, for her home is in Heaven. Though absent she will never be forgotten by those favored with her acquaintance or blessed with her friendship, though dead her memory will cease not to be treasured by them  That the grave hides from us all that is mortal for the time, of our dear friend, yet that we will see her again are all divine and glorious expectations. -- The Adrian Journal, December 3, 1897, Page 1 Column 2, Death
 

Page, Jay
Jay page died at his home near Elkhart on the 8th, inst. Deceased was born in Yankeetown, Ohio, on March 8, 1811.  He leaves one son and two daughters.  The remains were laid to rest in the Virginia cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, December 10, 1897, Page 8 column 4, Death
 

Deffenbaugh, Flora
Died: Dec. 14, 1897, Flora, aged 3 months 8 days, infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Deffenbaugh. Funeral services at the house, 10:30 a.m., today, conducted by Rev. Hohanshelt.-The Viliaca Review -- The Adrian Journal, December 17, 1897, Page 1 Column 2, Death
 

Huston, Clara Ellen
Died at her home in this city, Saturday morning, Dec. 11, at 2:15 o’clock, Clara Ellen, wife of Frank U. Huston.
Clara Ellen Lentz was born in Elkhart county, Indiana, August 31, 1864, and moved with her parents to Illinois in 1868 and from thence to this county in August 1881, where she resided until death called her home.  On December 18, 1884, she was united in marriage with  F. U. Huston.
Her life was one of physical suffering. From girlhood she had been afflicted.  Three times she had submitted to critical surgical operations that would have made even the person of iron nerve shudder, yet in all these extreme tests she remained cheerful and hopeful, and in every instance she rallied form the effects of the surgeon’s knife.  Death was directly due to tuberculosis of the entire system, a disease that the patient sufferer never suspected that she had.
A frail body, with all of its pains and aches, could not hid the sweet spirit of this noble woman.  Through the clouds of physical suffering and discomfort, there shone a beautiful Christian spirit, resplendent with the noble sentiments of the human mind and heart.  Her life was a striking example of the power of the spiritual to triumph over the ailments of the physical being.
Perhaps no other person in the community was more highly esteemed that Mrs. Huston. People were drawn to her through her affliction, but they were bound to her by her sweet womanly spirit, that never suffered the trials of this life to rise above or eclipse her real cheerful self.
During all these years of patient affliction her faithful husband has been a companion in the truest sense, and in this sad affliction he has the sympathy of a large circle of friends.
An aged father, a husband and seven brothers survive her.
Funeral services were held on Sunday at 2 o’clock p.m. from the German Baptist church, of which deceased was a member. Elder George Bernhardt, of Carthage, conducted the service. The house would not accommodate half the people who came to pay their respects to the memory of the dead.  After a touching funeral sermon and several well rendered selections of vocal music all that was mortal of Ellen Huston was tenderly borne to their silent resting place in the Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, December 17, 1897, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

Park, Wesley
Wesley Park, an aged citizen living eight miles southwest of town, died last Sunday. -- The Adrian Journal, December 17, 1897, Page 5 column 3, Death
 

Florence-Hope
Fred Florence and Miss Nellie Hope were united in marriage at the home of the bride’s parents on Sunday Dec. 12th. Rev. Coffey was the officiating clergyman. The contracting parties are numbered among the best young people of the community, and they start out on life’s journey with the good wishes of a host of friends in which the Journal heartily joins. -- The Adrian Journal, December 17, 1897, Page 5 Column 4, Marriage
 

Baie-Zootman
Wm. Baie and Mrs. Ida Zootman were married at Hinkley, Illinois, on the 8th inst. The groom owns a large farm just west of this city and is one of the substantial farmers of this community.  Their friends wish them happiness and success.
-- The Adrian Journal, December 24, 1897, Page 1 Column 3, Marriage


Submitted by: Sandee Hubbard

Note: The information provided by Sandee Hubbard has been made available for personal genealogy research.
It may not be copied or reproduced without gaining her written permission to do so.

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