Bates County News



 

The Adrian Journal
Adrian, Bates County, Missouri

Jan. 6, 1899 - Dec. 29, 1899

(Missing: April 28; May 26; Sept. 15)

 

Peters, Emma
Emma Peters, daughter of W.  C. and M.E . Mills, was married to Wm. Peters, August 29, 1892. They lived in Kansas City, where Mr.  Peters had employment.
Some months ago Mrs. Peters became afflicted with dropsy.  A few weeks ago she came to the home of her parents in Adrian to take treatment at the hands of Dr. Gilmore, but too late to have anything done.  She passed away January 7, 1899 aged 31 years 5 months and 14 days.
She leaves in this world to mourn her death a kind father and mother, two sisters and four brothers, an a tender hearted husband, while she goes to join two sisters and one brother on the shores of eternity.
Emma was liked by all who knew her, and had many friends in and around Adrian.  She will be missed because she was loved. -- The Adrian Journal, January 13, 1899, Page 1 Column 2, Death
 

Davidson-Adams
Ed. Davidson and Miss Alice, youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Johnathan Adams were married at Butler Wednesday January 11, 99.  The bride is a worthy and popular young lady, with a host of admiring friends.
The groom is an industrious and energetic young man.
The happy couple start out on life’s voyage with the hearty benediction of a host of friends. -- The Adrian Journal, January 13, 1899, Page 1 Column 2, Marriage
 

Shoup, D. A.
D. A .Shoup, for many years a citizen of this city died at 10:30 o’clock last night.  He had been ill for two weeks with pneumonia fever. -- The Adrian Journal, January 13, 1899, Page 8 Column 5, Death
 

Moore, Bartley
Bartley Moore, for many years a resident of this county, died at his home one mile northwest of this city last night. -- The Adrian Journal, January 13, 1899, Page 8 column 5, Death
 

Wright, Lizzie
Died at the family residence, 3 miles southwest of this city, at 5 o’clock a.m. Jany. 19, 1899, Miss Lizzie Wright, age 41 years.
Lizzie had been critically ill for several days with pneumonia fever,  but seemed to have taken a turn for the better early in the week.
She was a kind hearted and popular lady, admired for her many sterling qualities of mind and heart.
The funeral services will be held from the later home of the deceased today and the body laid to rest in the family burying ground on the farm.
The surviving brother and sisters have the deep sympathy of their many friends in this sad bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, January 20, 1899, Page 1 Column 4, Death
 

Reist-Stilwell
A pretty home wedding occurred at the country home of Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Stilwell Wednesday evening at 7 o’clock, when their daughter, Miss Minnie, was united in marriage with Dora B. Reist, the adopted son of Mr. and Mrs. W.  B. Switzer.
Rev. A. M. Scovill tied the knot.
The beautiful and impressive ceremony was preformed in the presence of about 20 intimate friends of the contracting parties.
After the usual congratulations the bridal party led the way to the spacious dining room, where a bounteous supper was awaiting them.
The contracting parties are well known and popular young people. The groom has grown to manhood in this vicinity and is a young man of strict integrity, honest, industrious, exemplary in his habits.
The bride is a handsome and popular young lady, and will make a model wife.
Mr. and Mrs. Switzer entertained the young people and a number of friends at a sumptuous dinner yesterday. -- The Adrian Journal, January 20, 1899, Page 8 column 3, Marriage
 

Edwards, Cynthia
Cynthia A. Swearengin was born in North Carolina, April 10, 1818, moved to Indiana in 1835; on April 16, 1840 she was united in marriage with Nathan Edwards. To this union were born seven children, four of whom survive.  In 1842 she united with the Christian church, and for 57 years had been a faithful worker in the master’s cause.
On September 8, 1881 she was called to mourn the loss of the companion of her youth.  In 1882 she came tot his state, where she has since resided. At 3 o’clock p.m. January 24, 1899, at the home of her son Horace P. Edwards in this city, the light of this long and busy life went out to this world and she was dead.
Mrs. Edwards was a kind hearted Christian lady.  Although she had for years been an invalid her gentle Christian spirit and sunny disposition enabled her to bear her sufferings with fortitude.
Uncomplaingly she bore the sufferings of these weary years, full of hope for the reward that awaits those who are faithful to the end of life. To her children she was ever kind ad affectionate, always manifesting a deep interest in their welfare.
She has earned the sweet rest that has been prepared for those who know to do good and do it.
A brief funeral service was held at the home of her son at 1:30 p.m. on Wednesday, conducted by Rev. Scovill, after which the remains were tenderly laid to rest in Crescent Hill cemetery.
The surviving children have the sympathy of many friends in this sad bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, January 27, 1899, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Norman, infant child
The infant child of Jesse Norman died Tuesday night and was buried on Wednesday. -- The Adrian Journal, February 3, 1899, Page 4 Column 2, Death
 

Woolery, Wm. J.
At his home in this city at 10 o’clock a.m. on the 7, inst William J. Woolery past into the last peaceful sleep, aged 74 years, 8 months and 2 days.
William J. Woolery was born in Cooper county, Mo., June 5, 1824 for 62 years he had been an acceptable member of the Baptist church and died in the faith.
He leaves a wife, five children, two sisters and one brother to mourn their loss.  Deceased was a kind hearted Christian gentleman, loved by all who knew him.
Funeral services were held from the home Wednesday afternoon, his pastor Rev. J. A. Smith conducted the service.
The remains were tenderly laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery.
The surviving relatives have the sympathy of friends in this bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, February 10, 1899, Page 1 Column 2, Death
 

Mead, Susan
Died, at her home 3 miles northwest of this city, last Friday night, Feb. 3rd, Susan, wife of J. R. Mead, of a complication of measles and pneumonia.
Mrs. Mead had been seriously ill for several days and death did not come unexpectedly.
She was formerly the wife of Mr. Sullens and of this union there are several living children. Some fifteen years ago she was united in marriage with J. R. Mead who still survives her.
Mrs. Mead was a most amiable lady, beloved by all who knew her for her many beautiful traits of character.
Funeral services were held from the home on Sunday and the remains were tenderly laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery.
The husband and children have the deep sympathy of a host of friends in this sad bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, February 10, 1899, Page 1 Column 2, Death
 

Alsbauch-Jenkins
The home of Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Jenkins was the scene of a beautiful wedding on last Tuesday evening. George Alsbaugh and Miss Nettie, the charming daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jenkins were contracting parties.  Promptly at 6 o’clock the ceremony was performed by Rev. Father E. M. Scanlan of Rich Hill, immediately there after the guests repaired to the dining room where a bountiful supper had been prepared by Mrs. Jenkins, to which all did ample justice. At a late hour all departed wishing the young couple a long and happy life. -- The Adrian Journal, February 17, 1899, Page 1 Column 1, Marriage
 

Chitty, infant
Mr. and Mrs. Ben Chitty were called upon to mourn the loss of their little babe last week. -- The Adrian Journal, February 24 1899, Page 4 Column 3, Death
 

Enos, baby boy
Dr. Bates reports the arrival of a fine boy baby at the home of Frank Enos. -- The Adrian Journal, February 24, 1899, Page 5 Column 2, Birth
 

Prettyman, baby boy
Dr. Bates reports the arrival of a boy baby at the home of James Prettyman. -- The Adrian Journal, February 24, 1899, Page 5 Column 2, Birth
 

Burton, baby
Wm. Burton is rejoicing over the advent of a new  heir at his home. -- The Adrian Journal, February 24, 1899, Page 5 Column 3, Birth
 

Wilson-Philips
Married, at the residence of Jonas Wilson on Saturday evening Feb. 29, 1899, James Wilson and Miss Annie Philips, Elder Aaron Showalter officiating.
The contracting parties are highly respected young people and start out on the journey of life with the best wishes of a host of friends. -- The Adrian Journal, February 24, 1899, Page 5 Column 5, Marriage
 

Haggard-Neff
A pretty home wedding occurred at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Neff, this city, on Wednesday evening at 7:30 o’clock.
The ceremony which united the hears and fortunes of J. W. Haggard and Miss Mable Neff was performed by Rev. Geo. B. Haggard.  At the appointed hour the happy young couple marched to the hymeneal altar to the beautiful strains of the wedding march, which was skillfully played by Miss Eva Blevins.  The ceremony which was most impressive, was preformed in the presence of about 60 invited guests.
After the usual congratulations, the bridal party led the way to the spacious dining room, where supper was served.  Mrs. Neff is noted for her skill in the culinary art and on this occasion she was at her very best.  It was repast beyond the power of pen to describe.  Those who had the good pleasure of testing the excellent qualities of the supper are lavish in the compliments.
The bride was handsomely gowned in Gloria silk, cream colored. The groom wore the conventional black.  The bride is one of Adrian’s best young women, lady like in every respect, and will make a model wife.
The groom is an honorable, industrious and upright young man, worthy the heart and hand he hath won.
They will make their home near Mound City, Kansas. -- The Adrian Journal, March 3, 1899, Page 1 Column 3, Marriage
 

Addleman, baby boy
Dr. E. E. Gilmore reports the advent of a boy baby into the home of Mr. Addleman this week. -- The Adrian Journal, March 3, 1899, Page 4 column 2, Birth
 

Lanham, baby boy
Dr. W. R. Gilmore reports the arrival of a boy baby at the home of Dick Lanham. -- The Adrian Journal, March 3, 1899, Page 5 Column 2, Birth
 

Dalton, W. M.
W.M. Dalton, Probate Judge of this county, died at his home in Butler last night.  He had been in failing health for more than a year and on several occasions, during this period  of time, it was thought he would not recover.  He was just entering on his second term of office, and was a popular official. -- The Adrian Journal, March 10, 1899, Page 1 Column 2, Death
 

Harris-Trobridge
Albert Harris and Miss  Edith Trobridge, two worthy young people of the Burdett neighborhood, were quietly married in Kansas City on the 23rd ult.
The contracting parties stand high in the social circles of the community in which they reside, and their many friends join in extending congratulations and best wishes for their success in life, in which the Journal heartily joins. -- The Adrian Journal, March 10, 1899, Page 8 column 4, Marriage
 

Clark, Reuben
J. C. Smith received a message this morning, which stated that Reuben Clark was killed by a train in Merwin last night.  No particulars were given; he is a son of John Clark, of Altona. -- The Adrian Journal, March 17, 1899, Page 1 Column 2, Death
 

Moles-Greer
Jesse Moles and Miss Alice Greer were united in marriage at the home of the bride’s mother in Shawnee township on Wednesday evening, March 15, 1899.  The ceremony which united the lives and fortunes of these worthy young people, was conducted by Rev. A. M. Scovill, of this city.  About 75 neighbors and friends were present to witness the ceremony.  After the usual congratulations, the guests were invited to partake of a sumptuous supper, which was complete in every respect.
The contracting parties are numbered among Bates county’s best young people, and in their new relations they have the best wishes of a large circle of friends. -- The Adrian Journal, March 17, 1899, Page 1 Column 3, Marriage
 

Mittan-Purkey
A pretty home wedding occurred at the beautiful country home of Mr. and Mrs.  J. F. Purkey Wednesday, March 15th at high noon.  Their daughter, Miss Ota, was united in marriage with Nelson O. Mittan, of Virginia, Neb.  Rev. Scovill said the ceremony that united these happy hearts. The groom is an honest, industrious and worthy young man, and that will succeed in life.
The bride was born and raised in this county, and is a popular worthy young lady.  The happy couple left Wednesday night for Neb., where they will make their home. -- The Adrian Journal, March 17, 1899, Paged 1 Column 3, Marriage
 

Green, Polly
Died, at the home of her daughter, at Virginia, Ill., of La Grippe, Mrs. Polly Green, wife of John Green, deceased.  Mr. Green and family moved from Kentucky to Bates county in 1854 and settled about 5 miles east of Altona, where they resided until April 1880, when the husband passed away.  Since then Mrs. Green has made her home most of the time with her daughter at Virginia, Ill.
Deceased was born Oct. 20, 1812; died, March 15, 1899.  The remains were brought here and laid to rest by the side of her husband, in the Owens cemetery. Deceased joined the Baptist church early in life and lived a devoted Christian until death called her away.  She leaves eight children, one son and seven daughters, and a host of friends to mourn her loss. -- The Adrian Journal, March 24, 1899, Page 4 column 4, Death
 

Boswell, Florence
Florence the 18 year old daughter of C. W. Boswell,  died at the home of her father,  7 miles Northeast of this city, Tuesday morning at 10 o’clock.
She was a popular and amiable young lady in the social circles of her neighborhood.
The remains were laid to rest in the Austin cemetery yesterday.
The relatives have the sympathy of friends in their bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, March 17, 1899, Page 8 column 2, Death
 

Schooley-Jenkins
Married, March 29, 1899 at the home of the bride, near Passaic Clarence J. Schooley and Miss Edith Jenkins, ElderT. J. VanHorn officiating.  A large number of friends assembled to witness the ceremony.  As the clock struck the hour of noon the wedding march sounded through the house and the young couple appeared at the door of the room and took their station at the north side of the room, where they were made man and wife.  After congratulations the wedding party partook of a sumptuous dinner.  The young people will make their home for the present 2 miles south of Passaic.  The good wishes of a host of friends will go with them. The bride is especially well known  in that section and is spoken  of by all in words of commendation and praise.  We learn that Mr. Schooley has lately been mustered out of the U. S. service.  May the blessing of The Great Father rest upon them. -- The Adrian Journal, March 31, 1899, Page 1 Column 3, Marriage
 

Mitchell-Owen
Wednesday at 7:30 p.m., Miss D. L. Owen and E. M. Mitchell were united in marriage at the home of the bride’s mother, this city; Elder T. J. VanHorn performing the ceremony.  It has seldom been our good fortune to attend  a more pleasant wedding.  There were no guests except relatives.  The bride is one of Adrian’s best known and most respected young ladies.  The groom is a worthy and industrious young man, and will succeed in life.
May their new relationship be most happy to both and their life be one of sunshine is our prayer.  After the ceremony the party was invited to the dining room where an elegant supper had been spread. We understand that Adrian is not to lose the young couple, but that they will reside here. -- The Adrian Journal, March 31, 1899, Page 1 Column 3, Marriage
 

Marshall, baby boy
Born to the wife of Bruce Marshall, a 12lb boy, all parties doing well. -- The Adrian Journal, April 7, 1899, Page 1 Column 3, Birth
 

Allen, Major R. N.
Major R. N. Allen, father of J. C. Allen, editor of the Butler Time died suddenly, Tuesday morning at the home of this son in Butler. -- The Adrian Journal, April 7, 1899, Page 4 column 5, Death
 

Brown-Zick
Wilbur Brown, formerly of this vicinity, and Miss Catherine Zick, of Pleasant Hill, were united in marriage last week.  They will reside in Chicago where the groom has a good position. -- The Adrian Journal, April 7, 1899, Page 5 column 2, Marriage
 

Parish, Harry Hersey
Died, at the home of his parents, little Harry heresy, the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Parish.  His short life had been full of suffering, he was taken sick March 11th, and from that time death seemed to have marked him for its own.  He died at 10 p.m. April 28th.  The funeral was held from the Christian church at Everett.  Quite a large number of sympathizing friends were there to comfort the sorrowing parents. -- The Adrian Journal, May 5, 1899, Page 1
Column 3, Death
 

Ensworth-Blocher
Adrian people were surprised yesterday when it was learned that Eugene Ensworth and Miss Grace Blocher had been quietly married on Wednesday evening.  The wedding was a quiet affair, and was witnessed by a few intimate friends.  Rev. Jos. Timmons performed the ceremony.
The contracting parties are worthy  young people and enter upon their new relations with the best wishes of a host of friends. -- The Adrian Journal, May 5, 1899, Page 4 Column 2, Marriage
 

Switzer, infant
The five weeks old son of Mr. and Mrs. Abe Switzer died Tuesday morning, after a brief illness. The parents have the sympathy of friends in this bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, May 5, 1899, Page 5 Column 3, Death

 In memory  of little Roy, youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Abe Switzer, whose little spirit took its flight May 2, 1899, aged 5 weeks.  He was sick only three days. (June 30,1899) -- The Adrian Journal, June 30, 1899, Page 5 Column 3, Death
 

Taney, Mrs.
Mrs. Taney, of the Burdette neighborhood, died Sun. and was buried in the Burdett cemetery Monday. -- The Adrian Journal, June 2, 1899, Page 4 column 2, Death
 

Glazebrook, baby boy
Dr. W. R. Gilmore reports the arrival of a fine boy at the home of J. L. Glazebrook last Sunday evening.  This accounts for the smile seen on Jo’s face this week. -- The Adrian Journal, June 2, 1899, Page 5 column 3, Birth
 

White, Stella
We were sorry to learn of the death of little Stella White, the nine year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Clay White.  Our Gracious Father has taken from us and the family one of our most beautiful flowers, which adorned the garden of humanity. There will  be a vacant place in the family which no one can fill. She now slumbers in her lonely and peaceful bed. -- The Adrian  Journal, June 2, 1899, Page 8 column 4, Death
 

Drury, Mrs. Julia
A shadow has been cast over the entire community by the death of Mrs. John Drury, which occurred at her home 8 miles northeast of Adrian, June 4, 1899.  She had been afflicted for several months and her death came not unexpected.
Julia Curry was born February 8, 1855, in the northern part of Bates co., Mo., where she has since resided.  She was married to John S. Drury Jan. 8, 1875.  To this union were born four children, three of which, with the husband, four brothers and two sisters are left to mourn.
She was a living wife and mother and her kind and patient disposition won for her many friends.  In earl life she united with the Baptist church, in which faith she lived and died.  She bore her sufferings patiently and with Christian fortitude until God called her home.
Her remains were tenderly laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery to await the morning of the resurrection. -- The Adrian Journal, June 9, 1899, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Newlon, Albert
Albert Newlon, and respected citizen of Grand River township, died Tuesday night at 9:00 o’clock, of dropsy. The remains were laid to rest in Bethel cemetery on Wednesday. -- The Adrian Journal, June 23, 1899, Page 4 Column 3, Death
 

Murray, Mrs. William
Mrs. Wm. Murray, of East Boone, died last night of consumption. The funeral will be held tomorrow and the remains will be laid to rest in the Everett cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, June 23, 1899, Page 4 Column 4, Death
 

Mudd-Salsman
On Wednesday, July 5th, at high noon, Elder T. J.VanHorn united in marriage Charles Mudd, son and deputy of Sheriff Mudd, and Miss Florence Salsman, of this city.  The wedding was a quiet affair only a few of the friends of the contracting parties being present. The happy young couple start out on the journey of life with the best wishes of a host of friends. --  The Adrian Journal, July 7, 1899, Page 1 Column 1, Marriage
 

Lair-Deardorff
Elder Geo. W. Lentz united in the holy bonds of matrimony Howard H. Lair, of Olathe, Kansas and Luetta Deardorff on the evening of July 4, 1899, at the home of the bride’s parent near this city.  The young couple will make their home at Olathe. They will be followed by the best wishes of their friends. -- The Adrian Journal, July 7, 1899, Page 1 Column 1, Marriage
 

Trobridge-Ferguson
It is reported that Willard O. Trobridge and Miss R. E. Ferguson, of the Burdett neighborhood were married this week.  --  The Adrian Journal, July 7, 1899, Page 1 column 3, Marriage
 

Newlon, A.
A shadow has been cast over this community by he death of Mr. A. Newlon, which occurred at his home, four miles east of Adrian, on Tuesday, June 20, 1899.  Mr. Newlon was born in Richland county, Ohio, April 30, 1846.  He moved to this state in 1867 and had resided here for the past 32 years.
He died after an illness of a few months duration.
He was married to Miss  M. E. Kerr in February 1869, to this union were born five children, 3 girls and 2 boys.  A wife, 4 children and two brothers are left to mourn his sudden taking away.  The family circle has been broken.  That place which added comfort and happiness to the family is gone-gone to the land of heavenly bliss, where the storms of life are ever absent, and where pleasure and happiness adorn every thing with a  beautiful luster.
He was a kind husband and father, always ready to provide for his family and give assistance to those that needed it.  He was one of the most successful stock raisers and farmers in this community.
His remains were quietly laid to rest in the Bethel cemetery, where he now sleeps.  The sorrow stricken family have the heart felt sympathy of all in this their hour of sadness.  May the blessing of God be bestowed upon them while they travel the path of life and finally may they meet that beloved face on the eternal shore. -- The Adrian Journal, July 7, 1899, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Fenton, Philip
As we go to press we learn that Philip Fenton, of Burdett, died last night. -- The Adrian Journal, July 7, 1899, Page 5 Column 3, Death
 

Shafer, Martin
Martin I. Shafer, who was shot on May 17th last, by D. C. Edwards, Jr., died in Kansas City, July 10th.
The ball entered Shafer’s body about 3 inches below and a little to the left of the left nipple, lodging in the spinal column.  Some two weeks ago he was taken to Kansas city for treatment.  The x rays were used in locating the ball.  Last Saturday evening an operation was performed and the ball removed.  Death followed close in the wake of the operation, but recovery was impossible without the removal of the ball.
The body was taken to Garden City and laid to rest at Dayton.  On Tuesday morning deputy Sheriff McCann and Gen. H. C. Clark drove to the Edwards home and arrested young Edwards, he having been released on bond pending the results of Shafer’s wound.  It is serious affair and is greatly regretted by all.  The shooting was the result of a family row, the parties being brother in law. -- The Adrian Journal, July 14, 1899, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Pierce, Thomas
On Friday, July 14, 1899, T. J. Pierce died at his home near Veve, Vernon county, of apoplexy, aged 52 years.  Mr. Pierce formerly resided in the vicinity of Altona, where he was widely known and universally respected.  He was a half brother to Mrs. J. C. Harrison of this city.
The remains wee brought to this city on Saturday and taken to Altona, where the funeral service were held from the M. E. church, of which deceased had been a member for nearly 30 years.  After the service the body was laid to rest in the France cemetery.  The family have the deepest sympathy of many friends in this their hour of deepest sorrow. -- The Adrian Journal, July 21, 1899, Page 1 Column 2, Death
 

Patton, child
The 18 months old child of Harry Patton died Wednesday night, and the remains were laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery yesterday. -- The Adrian Journal, July 21, 1899, Page 4 Column 3, Death
 

Argenbright, baby girl
Born, to Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Argenbright July 17th, a girl.  Grandpa Warren Lentz is wearing a smile that looks like the new moon, he says that it is due to the recent rains, which assure a corn crop, but his friends do not believe it. They think it is all on account of that granddaughter. -- The Adrian Journal, July 21, 1899, Page 5 Column  3, Birth
 

Ashbaugh-Ciggel
Geo. Ashbaugh and Miss Minnie Ciggel were quietly married in Butler last Monday. The marriage was a surprise to their intimate friends.  The Journal joins in wishing them a pleasant and prosperous journey through life. -- The Adrian Journal, July 28, 1899, Page 1 Column 3, Marriage
 

Showalter, baby boy
Dr. Tuttle reports the advent of a fine boy into the home of John Showalter on the 25th, 1inst. -- The Adrian Journal, July 28, 1899, Page 5 column 2, Birth
 

Walters, Hugh
Last Sunday evening Frank Walters received a message from Ft. Leavenworth announcing the death of his brother Hugh E., which occurred at that place Sunday morning.
Death came suddenly.  He took sick Saturday evening of inflammation of the larynx and died as above stated. Frank and undertaker Kidwell left on the first train for that place. They returned Monday night bringing the body with them.  Funeral services were held from the U. B. church on Tuesday afternoon Rev. Scovil officiating. The remains were laid to rest in Crescent Hill cemetery.  Hugh E. Walters was born in Crescent Hill June 28, 1871 being at the time of his death 28 years, 1 month and 2 days of age.  A mother and one brother are left to mourn his loss, and in this affliction they have the sympathy of many friends. -- The Adrian Journal, August 4, 1899, Page 1 Column 1, Death
 

Pulliam, Herman
Died of Meningitis or dysentery on July 29, 1899, at 10 a.m. Little Herman y. Pulliam was born on July 23, 1897, and was a bright, brilliant little boy who attracted the admiration and kind feelings of all who became acquainted with the little fellow.  He was the gem of his home and also a bright little star in the home of his grandparents, worshipped and lived by all of them.  He was taken sick on July 8th with dysentery accompanied with high fever; on being taken sick he was removed to the home of Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Cox, his maternal grandparents, where he received unceasing attention and kindness.  In a few days prominent meningeal symptoms developed and persisted until finally on the 20th the little fellow succumbed to the complications.  His physicians, E. E. and W. R. Gilmore gave constant and prompt attention to him but were unable to cope with the disease and he died, as all human beings must do sometime in the future, but there is some consolation in our worst bereavements; while he was a dear little angel and worshipped by his parents and relatives it was hard indeed to give him up, yet when he passed from under their care he is hovered over by the care of our blessed Redeemer who will guard him well till the reunion in the future, which will bring all lives together again.  Parents, keep little Herman in sight and live so as to be sure to meet him in the great final day.  You know where he is, prepare to meet him. -- The Adrian Journal, August 4, 1899, Page 8 Column 4, Death
 

Jones, Victoria
The death angel crossed the threshold of Thomas Jones home Tuesday morning, August 9, 1899, and bore to the beyond the spirit of his amiable wife, Victoria B.
For a long time she had been a constant sufferer from that dread disease, consumption and her death was not unexpected.
Victoria Bunch was born in Kentucky, Feb. 5, 1852, being at death 47 years, 6 months and 4 days old.  In early womanhood she was united in marriage with Thomas Jones, to this union were born 10 children, six of whom are living.  Deceased had been a faithful member of the Christian church for 32 years, and in her dying moments expressed a firm faith in the Master. She bade her family an affectionate good bye and closed her eyes in that last long sleep.
Funeral services were held on Wednesday from the U. B. church at Crescent Hill, Elder T.J. VanHorn officiating, and the remains were laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, August 11, 1899, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

Jones, infant
The three months old son of Mr. and Mrs. L.  S. Jones died at the home of the parents near Passaic yesterday morning after a brief illness of cholera infant.  The little one was ill less than 24 hours, and his death came as a great shock to the fond parents.  The little body was tenderly laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery.  The parents have the sincere sympathy of all in this their hour of deepest grief. -- The Adrian Journal, August 11, 1899, Page 4 Column 4, Death
 

Jones, infant
Died, at the family home 1 miles west of Passaic, Sept. 23rd, the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Jones.  This is the second time this home has been stricken within a short time. The funeral took place from the church at Passaic Sunday morning at 10:00 o’clock, and was conducted by Elder VanHorn. The remains were laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, September 29, 1899, Page 4 Column 2, Death
 

Parker-Cuzick
At high noon Wednesday, August 9, 1899, at the home of the bride’s parents, near Virginia, Benj. E. Parker and Miss Mattie Cuzick were united in marriage, Elder Jones of Garden City officiating.
The contracting parties are widely known and highly respected young people, both being popular young teachers. They start out on life’s journey with the best wishes from a host of friends. -- The Adrian Journal, August 18, 1899, Page 1 column 1, Marriage
 

Settle, George
Geo. Settle, a prominent young man of the Aaron neighborhood, died Tuesday evening of typhoid fever. -- The Adrian Journal, August 18, 1899, Page 4 Column 2, Death
 

Warford, daughter
The seven month old daughter of J. A. Warford died at the home of the parents, Spruce township, Wednesday afternoon, of cholera infantum. --    The Adrian Journal, August 18 1899, Page 8 Column 4, Death
 

Copeland-St. Clair
Miss Lettie M. Copeland, formerly of this city, was united in marriage with Daniel St. Clair, near Arcadia, Mo., on Sunday Aug. 13th.  Lettie has many friends here who join in wishing her well.  The groom is a prominent young business man of Fredriecktown,  Mo. -- The Adrian Journal, August 25, 1899, Page 5 Column 3, Marriage
 

Arrick, infant
The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Arrick, of Grand River, died Tuesday night and was buried Wednesday. -- The Adrian Journal, September 1, 1899, Page 8 Column 2, Death
 

Arrick, Mrs. Theodore
As we go to press we learn of the death of Mrs. Theodore Arrick, which occurred at the family home in Grand River township last night. -- The Adrian Journal, September 1, 1899, Page 5 Column 1, Death

 Mrs. Nannie E. Arrick, wife of T. A. Arrick, and daughter of A. J. And Elizabeth Henkle, died at her home near Altona, Mo., on Thursday, August 31, of typhoid fever.  Funeral services were conducted by Rev. Risley, of the M. E. church, and the remains interred in Mt. Olivet cemetery.
Mrs. Arrick was born in Fayette county, Ohio, April 28, 1862. When but a child her parents moved to Madison county, Ohio, settling near Big Plain.  In the winter of 1880 during a revival meeting conducted by Rev. John W. Waite, at Big Plain, she united with the M.  E. church, and has ever since remained a steadfast member of that church.  On June 22, 1884, she was united in marriage to T. A.  Arrick, and for a few years resided in Madison county.  In the fall of 1890 they moved to Bates, Co., Mo., where they have since resided.
Two children, Walter, aged 14 years and Mary, aged 11 years, are left to mourn the loss of a kind and indulgent mother, and the sorrowing husband a loving, faithful wife.  Her death was a shock to her relatives, as a telegram announcing her sickness was followed in a couple of hours by a second announcing her death.
Of a family of five children she was the first to be called home.  Her aged parents and sorrowing sisters feel keenly the sorrow that has fallen on them, and their grief is the more poignant as for nine years they had not seen or spoken with her.  They would like to thank the kind neighbors and friends who ministered to her wants and so kindly cared for her little one in their hour of darkest sorrow. -- The Adrian Journal, September 29, 1899, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Bladen, Mrs.
Mrs. Bladen died at her home in Grand River township Wednesday night. Funeral services were held yesterday. -- The Adrian Journal, September 8, 1899, Page 1 Column 2, Death
 

Scott-Fairchild
On Wednesday evening at 8:00 o’clock, at the U. B. church, Merwin, Mo., Mr. Ed Scott and Miss Helen Fairchild, two of Merwin’s most popular young people were united in marriage. Rev. Sage was the officiating clergyman.  The house was beautifully decorated with flowers and potted plants. A large number of friends were present to witness the beautiful ceremony which united two happy hearts.
The bride’s maids were Misses Hattie Fairchild and Grace Coyle.  Groomsmen were Ed. Sage and Walter Rankin.  Ushers, Clarence Catron and Dudley Chambers.  After the ceremony luncheon was served at the home of the bride’s parents.  The Merwin band furnished music for the occasion. -- The Adrian Journal, September 8, 1899, Page 1 column 1, Marriage
 

Williams, Dorcia
Miss Dorcia Williams, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. D. D. Williams, was born in Mason county, Ky., April 25, 1865.  Baptized into the Christian church about 16 years ago, and lived a consistent Christian until her death, which occurred Sept. 25th, at the home of her father ½ mile west of Lone Tree.  She had been afflicted nearly 15 years and her patient Christian fortitude was commented on by many of those who knew her best.  Her aged parents are nearly prostrate with grief.  But they need not sorrow as those without hope. Funeral was conducted by Elder T.  J. VanHorn. -- The Adrian Journal, September 29, 1899, Page 8 Column 3, Death
 

Six, Alice Anna
Alice Anna Six (nee Hunt) was born June 28, 1876, and died  Sept. 30, 1899.  Aged 23 years, 3 months and 2 days.  She leaves behind a husband and little son, 13 months old, also a mother and three brothers besides a large number of other relatives and friends; as was evidenced by the large concourse of people that assembled at the residence 6 miles northwest of Adrian, on Sunday, Oct. 1st, to attend the funeral services.  After the services the remains were tenderly laid to rest in the family burring ground, four miles north of their residence, on what is known as the Perry farm.  Services were conducted by the writer (Aaron Showalter)
In the death of Mrs. Six, a husband loses a loving companion, a little waif loses a loving mother, a mother and brothers are bereft of an amiable daughter and sister.  All have the sympathy of the entire community.
Deceased was born and reared in north Bates county.  She had been married about three years. She was not identified with any church, yet expressed faith in her Redeemer, and longed for the end of her journey that she might bask in the sunlight of bliss at God’s right hand. -- The Adrian Journal, October 6, 1899, Page 4 column 2, Death
 

Simpson, Abbie
From the program of the German Baptist church: Sunday 11:00 a.m., funeral services of Abbie Simpson. -- The Adrian Journal, October 6, 1899, Page 8 column 3, Death
 

Johnson-Robards
Ensol Johnson and Miss Edith, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. L. Q. Robards were quietly married in Kansas City Thursday, Oct. 5, 1899.
The contracting parties are numbered among the county’s most prosperous and popular young people.  The groom is a progressive young farmer of excellent habits.  The bride is a handsome young lady, and will do her part to make life worth living.
They will begin house keeping at once on their farm five miles west of Adrian. -- The Adrian Journal, October 13, 1899, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Blair-Chapman
Frank Blair and Miss Lizzie Chapman, two of Grand Rivers township’s most popular young people, were quietly married in Butler on the 12th inst. -- The Adrian Journal, October 20, 1899, Page 1 column 1, Marriage
 

Trowbridge, Martin H.
Martin H Trowbridge was born in Fulton county, Ohio, July 12, 1841, and died Oct. 17, 1899. He grew to manhood in his native state.  When the civil war broke out, he enlisted in the Federal army and served 4 ½ years.  He was united in marriage to Miss Marcia Nichols, Oct. 8, 1866, and moved to Washington county, Neb., the same year.  In 1867 he came to Bates county, Mo., and located in East Boone township, where he has since resided. In 1887 he united with the Presbyterian church, and has since been a faithful and consistent member.  Seven children were born  to Mr. and Mrs. Trowbridge, five of whom, with the mother survive.  They are Mrs. George Marshall, Mrs. Bert Harris, and Martin, Wilber and Herbert.  Mr. Trowbridge was an honorable and upright man in his dealing, and was looked upon as one of the substantial farmers of the county.  He was once the Republican candidate for County Judge of this district, and made a creditable race.  Before his health failed him, he was a prominent worker in the Sunday School cause.  He was a man of strong intellectuality and wide business experience, and kept abreast of the times.
The large concourse of people that assembled at the funeral was one evidence of the high esteem in which he was held.
Funeral services were held from the M. E. church at Everett yesterday, conducted by Rev. Brown, of this city, and the remains laid to rest in the cemetery at that place. -- The Adrian Journal, October 20, 1899, Page 1 Column 2, Death
 

Risley, infant son
The infant son of Rev. and Mrs. H M. Risley died Tuesday morning. The remains were laid to rest in the Mt. Olivet cemetery Tuesday morning. -- The Adrian Journal, November 3, 1899, Page 4 Column 2, Death
 

Duke-Simpson
John H. Duke and Mrs. Mattie S. Simpson were quietly married Wednesday night, Nov. 1, 1899, at the residence of Elder T.  J. VanHorn, in this city, that gentleman performing the ceremony. -- The Adrian Journal, November 3, 1899, Page 5 Column 5, Marriage
 

Ramey, child
The three year old child of Thos. Ramey, of Burdett, died Wednesday night of membranous croup. The little one was laid to rest in the Burdett cemetery yesterday afternoon.  Lee & Kidwell, of this city were the undertakers. -- The Adrian Journal, November 10,1899, Page 4 column 1, Death
 

Walters-Sartain
On Wednesday evening, Nov. 15, 1899, at 6 o’clock, at the beautiful country home of the bride’s parents; four miles north of this city, Frank Walters and Miss Cora, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. J. Sartain, were united in the holy bonds of matrimony.
The contracting parties marched to the altar to the strains of the wedding march played by Mrs. J. E. Dowell.  Rev. J.A.  W. Brown, in a beautiful and impressive ceremony uniting the fortunes of the worthy couple.  The ceremony over the bride and groom led the way to the dining room, where a most excellent repast was spread.  To describe its excellence would be impossible. Substantials and delicacies were there in abundance, and they fully attested the skill of Mrs. Sartain and her daughters in the culinary art.
A number of their friends and neighbors wee present to witness the marriage ceremony and to join in wishing the young people a life of happiness and usefulness.
The bride who is a beautiful and accomplished young lady of high social standing, was gowned in pure white and never looked mere beautiful.
The groom is a popular and prosperous young business man of this city, held in high esteem by all who know him.
Many friends regard this as a fortunate union of hearts, and there is no apparent reason why their lives should not be as serene as was the day on which they pledged to stand by each other until death should part them. -- The Adrian Journal, November 17, 1899, Page 1 Column 3, Marriage
 

Patterson, Wm.
Wm. Patterson died at his home near Archie Wednesday night of consumption. Funeral was held on Thursday. -- The Adrian Journal, November 17, 1899, Page 4 column 2, Death
 

Simpson-Brown
Jep Simpson and Viola Brown were quietly married at Harrisonville Nov. 2nd.  Their friends unite in wishing them long life and abundant prosperity. -- The Adrian Journal, November 17, 1899, Page 4 column 1, Marriage
 

Jackson, baby girl
Rink, baby girl
Dr. Gilmore reports the arrival of a girl baby at the home of Sell Jackson; also a daughter at the home of George Rink.
-- The Adrian Journal, November 17, 1899, Page 5 column 2, Birth
 

Moulton-Flynn
Miss Benia A. Flynn, of Mount Sterling, Ky., and J.D. Moulton, formerly of this county but now of Kansas City, were united in marriage at the home of the bride’s cousins, Mr. and Mrs. Jackson Haggard, on Wednesday, Nov. 22, 1899, at six o’clock p.m.  Rev. G. B. Haggard officiating.  The ceremony which united the fortunes of the contracting parties, was beautiful and impressive.
The wedding march was played by Miss Fern Haggard.
The bride wore a gown of Brocade cram silk and carried a bouquet of bride’s roses and ferns.
After the ceremony an elegant dinner was served. The table was beautifully decorated with carnation flowers and fern.
There was a large number of relatives and friends present to witness the ceremony.  They, with a host of other friends, unite in wishing the happy couple a blissful life.
Mr. and Mrs. S. J. Haggard, at whose beautiful country home the wedding was solemnized, had provided abundantly for the accommodations of their guests.  They proved themselves delightful entertainers, and those who enjoyed the hospitality of their home on the above occasion speak in the most complimentary terms of the manner in which they were entertained.  The delicious supper was spread fully attested the skill of Mrs. Haggard in the culinary art. -- The Adrian Journal, November 24, 1899, Page  8 column 3, Marriage
 

Van Horn, Victor B.
Died, at the home of his parents in this city on Sunday Nov. 26, 1899, Victor Brooks, the two year old son of elder and Mrs. T. J. Van Horn.
The little one was taken ill of pneumonia fever on Monday and a few days later measles set in, the complication was too great for the constitution of the little one and the spirit left the tenement of clay and took its flight to a more congenial realm.
Victor was a bright little gem, the idol of his parents and loved by his neighbors, but “Of such is the Kingdom of Heaven.”  His sufferings are o’er and his future state is one of bliss.
The funeral services were held on Tuesday at 2 o’clock p.m. from the Christian church, the sermon, which was eloquent and logical, was preached by Elder C. E. Hill, of Pleasant Hill.  A large congregation of citizens were there to pay their respects to the memory of the dead and to extend condolence and sympathy to the living.  After the funeral the remains were tenderly laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery.   The worthy and highly esteemed parents have the sincere sympathy of a wide circle of friends in their hour of sorrow and gloom. -- The Adrian Journal, December 1, 1899, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Shook, baby girl
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Shook are rejoicing over the arrival of a new girl at their home last night. -- The Adrian Journal, December 1, 1899, Page 5 Column 4, Birth
 

Nyhart, Noah
Noah Nyhart, a prominent citizen of this county, died last Monday. -- The Adrian Journal, December 1, 1899, Page 8 Column 4, Death
 

Dalton-Hulse
Ed Dalton and Miss Hulse, of Butler, were married this week.  Ed’s many friends join in wishing him a life of blissfulness.  -- The Adrian Journal, December 1, 1899, Page 8 Column 4, Marriage
 

Cherry, Lulu
Lulu A. Cherry was born at Crescent Hill, October 22, 1874, died December 2, 1899.  She moved to Adrian, Mo., with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. H L. Fair in January 1881.  She was educated in the Adrian schools, and in the winter of 1891 united with the Baptist church.  On February 25, 1892 she was married to E. A. Cherry, of Carthage, Ill., of this union two children were born: Grover C., born Nov. 27, 1892 died January 6, 1893; and Wesley A., born February 6, 1895, who with the husband survives her.
She had been a constant sufferer from asthma for several years and about one yea Mr. Cherry moved from Illinois to Missouri, believing that the difference in altitude and climate would be beneficial to his wife’s health, but the change in location had no perceptible effect.  Recently he had decided to arrange his business affairs at one and move to Colorado, but unexpectedly his wife took seriously ill, and died suddenly surrounded by her parents, sister, husband and near relatives.  Her live work is finished, and every heart weighed down with a sense of its woe can not but ask, O death, why arm with cruelty thy power To spare the idle weed, yet top the flower.
In the midst of our sorrow let us thank god that he lends to earth such women.  To know her was to love her.  As a companion she was genial, jovial and untiring in her efforts to entertain.  If you would know the beauty and grandeur of her Christian character, go and learn it at the homes of people where she had delighted to turn in the light by her many offices of love.  If you would know the kindness of her generous heart, go to those whom she has given encouragement to look up.  Many bow their heads in grief with her parents, sister, devoted husband and only boy.
Funeral services over the remains of Mrs. Cherry were held from the Baptist church on Monday at 2 o’clock.  -- The Adrian Journal, December 8, 1899, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Martin-Walker
Moses J. Martin, of Carthage, S. D. and Miss Mary Walker were married in Butler Wednesday.  The bride is a niece of Mrs. C. L. Mills, and was at one time engaged in the millinery business in this city.  Her many Adrian friends join in extending congratulations and best wishes. -- The Adrian Journal, December 8, 1899, Page 4 column 1, Marriage
 

Buley, Frank
Frank Buley died at his home near Elkhart, Monday morning, last, at 3 o’clock ,  after a lingering illness of typhoid fever, age 22 years.  The funeral services were held on Tuesday, and the remains laid to rest in the Cloud cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, December 8, 1899, Page 4 column 1, Death
 

Switzer, Abe
The community was shocked yesterday when it was announced that Abe Switzer had died at his home, three miles north of this city.  He had been ill for several days, but his condition had not been considered alarming until a few hours before his death.
He was a quiet, honest and industrious citizen, and his taking away in the prime of life is mourned by a large circle of friends.  He leaves a wife and two children to mourn his loss.
Funeral services were held this morning at 10:00 o’clock, conducted by Elder Geo.  Lentz and the remains laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, December 8, 1899, Page 8 column 2, Death
 

Chapman, baby girl
Chas. Chapman reports the arrival of a girl baby at his home. -- The Adrian Journal, December 15, 1899, Page 4 Column 2, Birth
 

Fenton, child
Geo. Fenton’s child died at Burdett yesterday of diphtheria. -- The Adrian Journal, December 22, 1899, Page 4 column 2, Death
 

Bickell, George
Drs. Gilmore and Bates amputated George Bickell’s left leg Tuesday, which was made necessary because of necroses of the bone, he stood the operation well, and recovered from the effects of the anesthetic, but died Thursday morning of cerebral embolism.  Funeral services were held from the house this morning conducted by Rev. J.A. W. Brown, and the remains were laid to rest in Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, December 22, 1899, Page 4 Column 4, Death
 

Harmison-Harmison
Jerry Harmison and Minta Harmison were quietly married at Butler last Saturday.   Their friends unite in extending congratulations and best wishes. -- The Adrian Journal, December 29, 1899, Page 1 Column 3, Marriage

 
Cummings-Allen
Finney-Allen
A pretty double wedding occurred at the country home of Richard Allen on Christmas day, their beautiful daughters, Daisy and Anna, gave their hearts and hands to the men of their choice.
Newton Cummings and daisy Allen; and George Finney and Anna Allen took the wedding vows.
Rev. J. A. Smith, the officiating clergyman, united the double tie in a very beautiful and impressive ceremony.  A sumptuous dinner was served, of which a large number of invited guests partook with a hearty relish.
The contracting parties received many handsome presents. They will reside in Vernon county. -- The Adrian Journal, December 29,1899, Page 1 Column 3, Marriage
 

Cole-Estep
Married, at Emporia, Kansas, Dec. 19,1899, George Cole of Florence Kansas, and Miss Effie Estep, daughter of J. W. Estep and wife of near this city.  The wedding was a complete surprise to the many friends of the bride here.  She is an amiable and popular young lady and her many Adrian friends join in wishing her many blessings.  The groom is a conductor on the Santa Fe railroad, and is said to be a worthy gentleman. -- The Adrian Journal, December 29, 1899, Page 1 column 3, Marriage
 

Fuller-Obenshain
The home of Mr. and Mrs. Ira Lentz was the scene of a pretty home wedding Monday evening.  The contracting parties were Mr. Claude Fuller and Miss May Obenshain, of Eureka Springs, Arkansas.  The bride is a sister to Mrs. Lentz.
Promptly at 7:00 o’clock the bridal party marched to the altar, Miss Ora Obenshain acting as maid of honor and Mr. Uther Obenshain acting as best man.  In a beautiful and impressive ceremony Elder George Lentz united the two happy hearts in the bonds of matrimony.
  Immediately after the ceremony the bride and groom led the way to the dining room, where a sumptuous dinner awaited the party.
The groom is a promising young attorney of Eureka Springs.  The bride is a handsome young lady, and was formerly engaged in the millinery business in this city with her sister, Mrs. Lentz, and she has many friends her who wish her life’s choicest blessings.
 They received a number of beautiful and useful presents.  The happy couple will leave Sunday for Eureka Springs, where they will reside. -- The Adrian Journal, December 29,1899, Page 1 Column 3, Marriage
 

Ramey, Sophia
 
Miss Sophia Ramey died at her home east of town Thursday night of consumption, aged 17 years. Funeral will be held today. -- The Adrian Journal, December 29, 1899, Page 5 Column 3, Death


Submitted by: Sandee Hubbard

Note: The information provided by Sandee Hubbard has been made available for personal genealogy research.
It may not be copied or reproduced without gaining her written permission to do so.

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