Bates County News



 

The Adrian Journal
Adrian, Bates County, Missouri

Jan. 12, 1900 - Dec. 29, 1900
 

Ensworth, baby
An heir came to the home of Mr. and Mrs.  Ensworth on Wednesday. -- The Adrian Journal, January 12, 1900, Page 4 Column 3, Birth
 

Brown, Charles
Charles Brown, son of Thomas Brown, died at the family residence six miles west of town, Wednesday night.  The young man had been in failing health for a year past, and his death was expected.  Funeral was held yesterday.  Runnenburger was the undertaker.  The family have the sympathy of the many friends in their bereavement. --   The Adrian Journal, January 26, 1900, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Young-Wheeler
Moral-Wheeler
Married at the home of the bride’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Truman Wheeler, in West Adrian on Sunday evening, January 21, 1900, Wm. Young and Miss Elizabeth Wheeler, also Perry Moral and Miss Minnie Wheeler.  Only a few invited guests were present to witness the beautiful ceremony which was performed by  Rev. J. A. W. Brown.
At the conclusion of the ceremony a sumptuous supper was served, to which all did ample justice.
The many friends of the contracting parties united in extending congratulations and best wishes, in with the Journal joins.
-- The Adrian Journal, January 26, 1900, Page 2 Column 3, Marriage
 

Turpin, Mrs.  Jerry
Prof. Will Hoover writes from Oak Grove that Mrs. Jerry Turpin died at her home in that city on the 27th, after a brief illness of pneumonia fever.  Funeral services were held on Sunday last.  Mrs. Turpin will be remembered by many Adrian people as an amiable Christian lady. -- The Adrian Journal, February 2, 1900, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Moudy, Dr. A.
Dr. A. Moudy died at his home  in Westerfield, Ind., January 27, 1900.  He was an uncle of the Moudy brothers of this city, and was a prominent physician and business man.  Many of the older citizens here remember him as a man of culture and of fine business ability. -- The Adrian Journal, February 2, 1900, Page 1 Column 2, Death
 

Mudd, baby boy
A bouncing baby boy arrived at the home of W. S. Mudd today, mother and son doing well. -- The Adrian Journal, February 2, 1900, Page 1 Column 2, Birth
 

Beswick,  infant daughter
The infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Beswick died suddenly Wednesday morning.  It had been ill but a few hours.  The young parents have the sympathy of their many friends in this bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, February 2, 1900, Page 5 Column 2, Death
 

Glazebrook, Durrell Hall
At 7 o’clock Thursday morning February 8, 1900, the spirit of little Durrel Hall, the eight months old son of Mr. and Mrs. J.L. Glazebrook, took its flight from earth to the fairer and brighter realms above.  For three weeks the little one had made a heroic struggle for the life against the stubborn attack of a complication of diseases, and at one time it was thought that he would win the battle, but his strength gave way and the body was lifeless.  Durrel Hall Glazebrook was born May 28, 1899,  being a the time of death, 8 months and 11 days old.  He was a bright little babe and was a favorite of all who met him.  His death has cast a gloom over the entire community, and the deep sympathy of all goes out to the young parents, who are bowed down with grief beneath this great bereavement.  May God comfort them is our earnest prayer.
Funeral services were held from the U.B. church this morning at 9:00 o’clock, conducted by Rev.  Jos. Timmons, and the remains were tenderly laid to rest in Oak Hill cemetery in Butler. -- The Adrian Journal, February 9, 1900, Page 1 column 1, Obituary
 

White-Crawford
Willard E. White and Amanda M. Crawford,  of Crescent Hill were married at Butler, Tuesday February 6, 1900.  Justice Hemstreet officiating. -- The Adrian Journal, February 9, 1900, Page 1 Column 1, Marriage
 

Sims, C. A. T.
C. A. T. Sims, formerly station agent at this place, died at the home of his mother in Indiana on Feb. 1st.  His many friends in this city deeply regret his demise.
At the time of his death he was a member of the Adrian Lodge No.13 I.O.O.F.; also of the M. W. A.  Camp of this city. -- The Adrian Journal, February 9, 1900, Page 1 Column 2, Death
 

Shubert, Mrs.
Mrs. Shubert, an aged lady, died at the home of her son, Charles Shubert in Grand River township, Wednesday night.  The remains were taken to her former home in Kentucky for burial, they were shipped from this city last night. -- The Adrian Journal, February 9, 1900, Page 4 Column 2, Death
 

Gilham-Raymey
Gaston Gilham and Mary L. Raymey were quietly married on Thursday, Feb. 1, 1900.  They moved to their farm in Mingo township.  The Journal joins their friends in extending congratulations and best wishes. -- The Adrian Journal, February 9, 1900, Page 5 Column 3, Marriage
 

MCCray-Claxton
Harry McCray, of Kansas City, and Miss Bessie Claxton, of this city were united in marriage at Butler  on Wednesday.  The bride is well known in this city, and her friends join in wishing her a realization of her fondest hopes.  The happy young couple will make their home in Kansas City. -- The Adrian Journal, February 9, 1900, Page 5 Column 4, Marriage
 

Gebhardt-Kussman
On Tuesday, Feb. 6, 1900, at the home of the bride’s parents, five miles northeast of this city, Leopold Gebhardt and Miss Lyda Kussman were united in the holy bonds of matrimony.  A large number of friends were present to witness the ceremony and to pay their respects to the contracting parties.
Mr. and Mrs. A. Kussman, parents of the bride, had provided a sumptuous dinner for the invited guests, and all present partook of the meal with a hearty relish and appreciated the manner in which they were entertained.
The groom is a worthy young gentleman, and has been successful in business, he recently purchased a good farm in Grand River township, where they will reside.  The bride is a popular and industrious young lady and will do well her part in making happy and prosperous.
The Journal joins the many friends of the contracting parties in wishing them life’s most bountiful blessings. -- The Adrian Journal, February 9, 1900, Page 8 column 3, Marriage
 

Duke-Haggard
Robert Duke and Miss Mattie Haggard were quietly married on Tuesday by Judge John Dunkle at the home of the latter.  The Journal joins the many friends of the worthy young couple in wishing them life’s most bounteous  blessings.
-- The Adrian Journal, February 16, 1900, Page 4 Column 2, Marriage
 

Houston-Prine
F. U. Houston and Miss Bertha Prine, of this city, were quietly united in marriage at the Methodist parsonage, Butler, on Tuesday evening, Feb. 20, 1900, the Rev.  Dr. W.  F. Jones officiating.
The contracting parties are numbered among Adrian’s finest citizens, having spent the greater part of their lives in this city.
The groom has for a long time been engaged in running a meat market in this city.  He is one of the most substantial and popular business men in the city.
The bride is a handsome, popular and worthy young lady, and will do her part in meeting the stern battles of life in a pleasant way.
The Journal joins with a multitude of the friends wishing the contracting parties a pleasant and profitable journey through life, and that success may attend their laudable efforts. -- The Adrian Journal, February 23, 1900, Page 1 Column 1, Marriage
 

Hall, Balinda
Balinda, wife of P. J. Hall, formerly a resident of this city, died at her home in Kansas City, Dec. 28, 1899, aged 66 years.  For more than thirty years she had lived an exemplary Christian life.  She was loved and esteemed by all who knew her.  She had been in declining health for a number  of years, when she was taken down with pneumonia fever.  She suffered for eight weeks with great patience when death relieved her of suffering, and she was ushered into a better land.  She leaves a husband, four children, four brothers and two sisters and many friends to mourn her loss. -- The Adrian Journal, February 23, 1900, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Boswell, Bettie
Bettie, wife of C.  W.  Boswell, died at the family residence six miles northeast of this city on Wednesday, Feb. 20, 1900.  She had been ill about a week, and bore her sufferings with Christian fortitude.
Deceased was an amiable Christian lady, highly esteemed by a wide circle of acquaintances and friends.
She was united in marriage about thirteen years ago to Elmer Timmons, one child was born to this union.  Mr. Timmons answered the least summons about twelve years ago, later the babe joined the father in a brighter clime.  Six years ago last  December she was united in marriage to C.  W. Boswell, to this union three children have been born, all  of whom with the husband survive.
Bettie Duke was born thirty two years ago and grew to womanhood in this county.  She was popular with young and old, because of her noble character.
Funeral services were held yesterday  from Deer Creek Chapel, her pastor, Rev. Brown officiated and the remains laid to rest in the Nichols cemetery beside those of her first husband. -- The Adrian Journal, February 23, 1900, Page 8 column 5, Death

Died, Feb. 21, 1900, at her home six miles northeast of Adrian, Bettie wife of C. W. Boswell, age 32 years, four months and 24 days.  She was born and raised near where she died.  She was a member of the U. B. church having given her heart to God in early life.  She was a true Christian lady, a devoted wife and loving mother, and all who knew her loved  her.  She leaves a husband, three little boys, a mother, one sister and seven brothers to mourn her loss.  She knew that she could not get well and told her husband to bring her dear little children to her that she might kiss them for the last time.  As her relatives passed by her bedside she kissed the good-bye forever; and at ten minutes past three o’clock she fell asleep to awake no more. Rev. Brown, of Adrian, preached quite an able funeral sermon, after which her remains were laid to rest in the Nichols cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, March 9, 1900, Page 8 column 4, Obituary
 

Wright, Brant
Brant, the four year old  son of John T. Wright and wife, died at the home of Joe Thompson, this city, last Sunday of  membranous croup, after a very brief illness.  The parents were visiting in this city when the little one was stricken.  Funeral was held Monday and the body laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, February 23, 1900, Page 8 column 5, Death
 

Woolsey, Napoleon B.
Napoleon B. Woolsey surrendered his life to the angel of death on Feb. 25th, at 3:10 a.m., at his home in Grand River township.  He was the only son of Jerry Woolsey, and besides his father, leaves two sisters to mourn his death.
Deceased was born in Livingston county, Mo., Oct. 9, 1876.  He was a quiet young man and had many warm friends.
The family have the sincere sympathy of the entire community in their hour of sorrow. -- The Adrian Journal, March 2, 1900, Page 1 Column 2, Obituary
 

Prine-Thompson
Daniel Prine, of this city, and Mrs. Thompson, of Montrose were married at the latter place on Tuesday, Feb. 27, 1900. The groom is a highly respected citizen of Adrian, and has a wife circle of friends who unite in wishing him a blissful future.  The bride is a stranger to the people of this city, but she will be given a cordial welcome.  They arrived home last night.  The Journal joins in wishing them well. -- The Adrian Journal, March 2, 1900, Page 5 Column 3, Marriage
 

Hill, Uriah
Uriah Hill, an old  and respected citizen, died at his home, three miles west of Adrian.  Tuesday night.  The body was laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery yesterday. -- The Adrian Journal, March 2, 1900, Page 8 Column 1, Death

Eliub Hill Dead
Died at his home, three miles west of Adrian, Mo., Feb. 28, 1900, Eliub Hill, age 79 years.  Death was caused by dropsy of the heart, from which he had been a long sufferer.  He leaves five children to mourn his loss: viz, Uriah, Chauncey, Isaac and Wallace, Mesdames Chas. Teeter and Susie Wright.  The remains were tenderly laid to rest in Crescent Hill cemetery on March 1st. -- The Adrian Journal, March 9, 1900, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Parish, son
The six weeks old son of Judge and Mrs. W. W. Parish died Saturday evening on March 3, 1900, at their home 6 miles northwest of this city.  Funeral was held from the home at 12 o’clock Sunday, and all that was mortal of the little one was laid to rest in the Everett cemetery.  The parents have the sincere sympathy of the community in their sorrow. --
The Adrian Journal, March 9, 1900, Page 1 Column  4, Death
 

Moles-Addleman
George Moles and Minnie Addleman were married at the home of the bride’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Addleman, at 5 o’clock Sunday evening, March 4, 1900.  A very appropriate and impressive ceremony was performed by Rev. G. B. Haggard.
The bride was dressed in a beautiful blue silk, and the groom in the conventional black.
After all had offered congratulations to the young couple they passed into the dining room where a supper was prepared with the most delicious food ever seen.  After each had eaten they were ushered into the parlor where they heard music and merry laughter.
The bride and groom received several nice presents which will be long remembered by them.
At a later hour each one started for their house expressing themselves as spending a pleasant evening. -- The Adrian Journal, March  9, 1900, Page  4 Column 2, Marriage
 

Ashbaugh, baby
John Ashbaugh is the happiest man in the state since that prospective voter arrived at his home-mother and child are doing well. -- The Adrian Journal, March 9, 1900, Page 8 column 3, Birth
 

Corbin, Richard
Died at his home three miles west of Burdette on February 26th, Richard Corbin.  His remains were laid to rest Thursday, March 1st in the Sharon cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, March 9, 1900, Page 8 Column 3, Death
 

Spaw, Mrs.
Mrs. John Spaw died at the family residence, four miles northeast of this city, last night, after a long and painful illness of cancer.  She was an amiable lady.  Obituary will be published next week. -- The Adrian Journal, March 16, 1900, Page 4 Column 3, Death

Mrs. John Spaw died at the family residence, four miles northeast of this city,  Thursday night, after along and painful illness, of cancer.  She was a popular and amiable lady.  Funeral services were held today and the remains were laid to rest near Virginia.  The family have the sympathy of their many friends in this bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, April 13, 1900, Page 5 column 3, Death
 

Wofford-Proctor
At the residence of the bride in this city, Thursday evening at six o’clock, Mr. O. Wofford, of Bates county and Mrs. Jennie Proctor, Rev. Bibb officiating.  The newly wedded pair left on the Hummer Friday morn. -- The Adrian Journal, March 23, 1900, Page 4 Column 2, Marriage
 

Lentz, baby boy
John Lentz is rejoicing over the advent of a bouncing boy baby into the home last week.  May he live long and well is our wish. -- The Adrian Journal, March 23, 1900, Page 5 Column 3, Birth
 

Whitney, baby boy
Harris, baby girl
Dr. Tuttle reports the advent of a fine boy baby into the home of Mills Whitney on Saturday; also a 12 pound girl into the home of T. C . Harris on Tuesday. -- The Adrian Journal, March 30, 1900, Page 5 Column 2, Birth
 

Sims, Laura
Dr. Bates received word from Frankfort, Ind., today announcing the death of Mrs.  Laura Sims, widow of the late Chas. A. T. Sims, which occurred March 28th.  The husband died just two months ago.  May God bless and guide the parentless children is our prayer. -- The Adrian Journal, April 6,  1900, Page 1 Column 1, Death
 

Steel-Shoup
John W. Steel and Mrs. Martha F. Shoup were quietly united in marriage at the home of Rev. Joseph Timmons, on Saturday evening, March 31, 1900, Rev. Timmons officiating in his usual pleasant manner.  The contracting parties have the kindest regards of all, coupled with the wish that they may enjoy life’s most bounteous blessings. -- The Adrian Journal, April 6, 1900, Page 5 Column 3, Marriage
 

Wyatt, Brigham Young
Died, Brigham Young Wyatt, at the residence of A. H. Wyatt, March 31st, aged considerably.  Deceased was well known to many.  He leaves an aged mate and a sorry master to mourn their loss. -- The Adrian Journal, April 6, 1900, Page 5 Column 3, Death
 

Bates, baby girl
Dr. Bates and wife are rejoicing over the arrival of a new lady boarder at their home on the 10th. -- The Adrian Journal, April  13, 1900, Page 4 Column 1, Birth
 

Ward, infant
Sherman Ward’s infant babe was buried last Sunday at Crescent Hill cemetery.  Rev. Brown conducted short services at the house.  The parents have the sympathy of the community. -- The Adrian Journal, April  13, 1900, Page 4  Column 2, Death
 

Grider, Minnie
Minnie, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.  S. E. Grider, died on Tuesday morning, April 10, 1900.  Deceased who was a young woman of excellent qualities and sweet disposition, has for some months been suffering from that dread disease consumption, and her death was not unexpected, but was none the less a sad blow to her family and many friends who have the sympathy of the entire community.
Funeral services were held in the church at Scott cemetery Wednesday, at 11:00 a.m., conducted by Rev. J. W. Sage and attended by a large concourse of friends and neighbors of the family. -- The Adrian Journal, April 20, 1900, Page 1 Column 1, Death
 

Moles, son
The three months old son of Mr. and Mrs. Will Moles  died Wednesday after a brief illness.  Funeral services were held yesterday from the Mt. Olivet church, Rev. J. A. Silvius officiating.  The young parents have the sympathy of their many friends in this bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, April 27, 1900, Page 1 Column 5, Death
 

Gossard-Bice
On Tuesday evening, April 24, 1900, at 7:00, a pretty home wedding occurred at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. E. M. Bice, five miles southeast of this city.  Rev. Joseph Timmons, in a very beautiful and impressive ceremony, united in marriage their daughter, Miss Cora and Mr. John Gossard.  The ceremony was performed in the presence of relatives and a few intimate friends.
After the usual congratulations the party was invited to partake of a  sumptuous supper, which consisted of the substantials and delicacies in abundance.
The bride is a worthy and popular young lady and will make a faithful wife.
The groom is a stranger here, but is said to be an industrious and worthy young man.  They will make their home in Webb City.
The Journal joins their many friends in wishing them many blessings and few sorrows.
List of Presents:
Mr. and Mrs. Yeats..Set China; Mr. and Mrs. Bice…Set China; Mr. and Mrs. Galzebrook..Salad dish; Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Yeats..Table cloth; Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Jenkins..Table cloth; J. Hall and Mrs. Owen..Cake plate; Roy and Rae Bice…Glass Berry set; Will Alsbach…Pair towels; Paul Jenkins…Jelly Stand; Will Shealey…Glass Fruit dish; Elsie Bice…Bedspread and Cake plate; Will and Dow Yeats…Glass tea set; Frank Bice…Salt and pepper set and preserve dish. -- The Adrian Journal, April 27,1900, Page 1 Column 2, Marriage
 

Hogan Golden Wedding
It does not often occur that people live to celebrate their golden wedding, but occasionally life is lengthened out so  that the companions of youth are dearer companions of old age.  On Tuesday, April 24, 1900, J. M. Hogan and Elizabeth Hogan, of this celebrated the 50th anniversary of their marriage
They had not planned to commemorate the event, but their children and friends had not forgotten to provide for the proper celebration of event.  Uncle john was in Kansas City and had been for some weeks, and was not thinking of coming, but when he arose Tuesday morning his son informed him that he was expected to go to Adrian at once.  He protested, but to no avail, he was persuaded to come.
Grandma, who knew nothing of the arrangement was invited to take dinner with Mrs. R. Bryant of this city, both were unaware of the cyclone of joy and gladness that was gathering, and which was destined to break upon them at noontide.
In the meantime their daughter, Mrs. Susie Webb, of Vinta, I.  T., had arrived in the city on Monday night and was being entertained by Mrs. John Stone.  Mrs. Mollie Roadcap, J. D. and E. D. Hogan, their children who reside in Kansas City, came down on the 10:25 train Tuesday morning, and Mrs. Wm. Haas, and J. D. Hogan, who reside near this city drove in.  They all met at the depot when the train came in and marched to the home of their parents.  After everything was in readiness Grandma was sent for.  It would be impossible to describe the surprise of the worthy lady as she was ushered into the presence of her children,  some of whom she had not seen for several years.  It was joy unspeakable; a moment of supreme happiness and delight.  After affectionate greetings and hearty expressions of good will, they were seated around a table loaded with the good things of life, where they enjoyed themselves in the highest degree.  The children had not failed to provide suitable mementoes of the occasion.  They  bought for their father a handsome gold headed cane, with his name engraved upon it.  For their mother they purchased a gold breast pin which contained the picture of her husband.  These gifts were presented by Dr. E. E. Gilmore in an eloquent address, suitable for the occasion.
These worthy people have resided in this county for many years and it is with pleasure to their friends that their lives have been spared and that they are still in the enjoyment of reasonable health.
The Journal joins with their many friends in wishing them many years of happiness and hope that they may have the pleasure of meeting their children around the family fire side many more times.  We congratulate them upon their safe arrival at the place where they could celebrate their golden wedding and rejoice with them in their pleasant environments of life. -- The Adrian Journal, April 27, 1900, Page 4 Column 1, Anniversary
 

Martz, William
William Martz, an aged and respected citizen, of Shawnee township, died Wednesday, after a lingering illness of pulmonary trouble.
We are not in possession of facts from which to write an obituary.
Funeral services were held from the home yesterday, conducted by Elder Coffey, and the remains laid to rest in the France cemetery.
The family have the sympathy of a large circle of friends in this bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, May 4, 1900, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Eichinging, Frederick
Died at his home in this city, on Tuesday night, May 1, 1900,. Frederick Eichinging, after a brief suffering from a complication of diseases.
Deceased was born in Adams county, Penn., Sept. 22, 1815, and was at the time of his death 84 years, 9 months and 9 days old.
He was married to Mary A. Allaway Feb. 24, 1842, this union lasted until Nov. 26, 1894 when the companion of his youth passed into the beyond.
He moved from Penn., to Illinois, and from thence to this county in 1868, where he has since resided.
He has several living children whose names were are unable to give, two children preceded him to the other shore.  As a citizen, Uncle, Fred, as he was familiarly known, was peaceable, honest and industrious; a kind and generous neighbor.
For several years past he had made his home with his daughter, Mrs. Davis, and for some months past the weight of years had been weighing heavily upon him to those who knew him it was evident that his days were numbered.
At the time of his death, and for several years past he had been a member of the U. B. church.
Funeral services were held from the home at noon Wednesday, Rev. Joseph Timmons, of this city, conducted a brief but impressive funeral service, after with the remains were taken to Butler where they were laid to rest beside those of his wife.
In the death of Uncle Fred an old landmark is removed, and the surviving relatives have the sympathy of a host of friends in this bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, May 4, 1900, Page 8 column 3, Obituary
 

Spaw, Sue
Mrs. Sue Spaw (nee Miss Lindley) was born in Martin county, Indiana, January 19, 1849.  After the death of her parents in 1853, she moved to the home of her aunt, near Paola, Ind.; in 1875 she went to Ill., and came to Mo., in 1883.  She united with the Baptist church in 1835 and was a  consistent Christian lady.  She was married to J. S. Spaw Aug. 5, 1885 and settled on a farm near Adrian, where she died April 11, 1900, aged 51 years, 2 months and 22 days.  She was a devout wife and a loving mother.
For several months she had been prostrated, but at times would rally and the family would take a hew hope; but the dread disease had taken such a firm hold upon her system and she became so emaciated for the long suffering that she was unable to stand the strain, notwithstanding the medical treatment and the tender care of kind friends, who administered to her every want, day and night. The Lord wanted her and  called her home.
Her remains were tenderly laid to rest in the Norris cemetery, southwest of Butler. -- The Adrian Journal, May 4, 1900, Page 8 column 4, Obituary
 

Arnold-Smith
Wm. Arnold and Mrs. Annie E. Smith, of Butler, were married yesterday at high noon at the residence of W.  F.  Hemstreet.
The bride, who formerly resided in this city, is a worthy lady, and has many friends here who join in wishing her a happy journey through life.
Banker Mills and family, of Adrian attended the wedding. -- The Adrian Journal, May 11, 1900, Page 1  Column 3, Marriage
 

Rains, Henry
W. A. Kidwell and wife, of Rich Hill, were called to Archie this week on account of the serious illness of Uncle Henry Rains.  We learn that this aged gentleman and worthy citizen died Wednesday night. -- The Adrian Journal, May 11, 1900, Page 1 Column 4, Death

 Henry Rains died at the home of his daughter in Archie, May 12, 1900; aged 82 years, 3 months and 17 days.  He had been a constant sufferer for many months and his death did not come as a surprise.
Mr. Rains is an honorable citizen and was highly esteemed by all who knew him.
Funeral services were held on  Sunday and the remains laid to rest in Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, May 18, 1900, Page 1 Column 2, Death
 

Arring, J.   H.
Dr. Rains received a phone message from Kansas City yesterday evening stating that a man named J. H. Arrick, living near Adrian, had been killed by a cable car in that city.  Investigation proved that it was not J. H.  Arrick of this vicinity.  Later the name was given as J. H. Arring of near this place.  If such a man resides in this community he is not widely known. -- The Adrian Journal, May 18, 1900, Page 1 column 2, Death
 

Wolfe, Dell
These are incidents in life that sent a thrill of  horror through every heart familiar with the facts.  The sudden and shocking away of little Dell Wolfe on Tuesday was one of those inexplicable horrors that send a pang  to every beast.  Words have no power to express the real feeling that fills the heart.  A promising life ended; a home made desolate; a community engulfed in sorrow in a moment. We shrink from the picture, and turn away with poignant grief for the parents. -- The Adrian Journal, Mary 18, 1900, Page 4 Column 2, Death
 

Wolf, Dell
A TERRIBLE DEATH
Little Dell Wolfe Was Thrown From A Horse Tuesday Morning And Dragged To Death-Details
On Tuesday morning as Dell, the 11 year old son of Grant Wolfe, was returning from the home of h is Uncle, Chas. Fri to his own home he was thrown from his horse, at the bridge west of Perry Black’s house, his foot became fastened in the stirrup strap.  This frightened the horse and it began to run and kick in a frantic manner, the poor boy had no way of losing himself and was completely at the mercy of the frightened animal.
Perry Black and Geo. Wyatt were up the road some three hundred yards from where the boy was thrown, and in the direction of the horse came.  Mr. Black, being mounted, immediately started to meet the animal and if possible stop it in time to rescue the boy alive, but his best efforts failed to save the boy.  Time and time again he rode in front of the horse, but it would dodge him.  As they came u; where Mr. Wyatt was standing he, Wyatt, caught the horse by the bits and stopped it.  The boy lived but a few minutes after he was rescued.
A messenger was sent after Dr. Bates, who promptly responded, only to find that life had gone from the body.
The body was tenderly carried to the home of Mr. Black, and he at once went to inform the parents of the great calamity that had befallen them and the community as well.
How It Happened
Little is known as to the cause of the horse getting frightened.  Mr. Goss, who was plowing in a field nearby says, that Dell waved his hat at him and he thinks this scared the horse.

 Obituary
Dell was the only son of Mr. and Mrs. Grant T. Wolfe, had he lived until next August he would have been eleven years old.  He was an intelligent and obedient boy, a favorite with all who knew him.  The neighbors looked upon him as a manly boy, and held him in  high esteem.  His parents had learned to depend upon him, because they could trust him.
The entire community was shocked beyond the power of words to describe when the death of Dell was announced; grief filled every heart, and every hand was ready to minister to the needs of the grief stricken parents.
Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon, conducted by Rev. Dr. May, of Kansas  City.  A large congregation of sorrowing friends were present to pay their respects to the memory of the dead, and as best they could, comfort and assist the living.  The remains were laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery.
The parents, who are numbered among the most worthy and highly respected people of the community, have the deep sympathy of all in their great affliction. -- The Adrian Journal, May 18, 1900, Page 8  column 3-4, Death

   Dellifus E. Wolfe, son of Grant and Louisa Wolfe, departed this life May 15, 1900, by being thrown from a horse that became frightened from an unknown cause.  His age was 10 years, 9 months and 1 day.
The chilling tides of grim death have once gain darkened the lonely chamber of devoted parents by taking from their midst a promising boy whose heart, while throbbing with the vigor of youth, was stilled forever.  The sudden blast of untimely death adds greatly to the sorrow of the bereaved parents, when,  without thought or warning, they realize the sad departure of the one they love.
Little Dell was born and raised about 5 miles west of Adrian, Bates county, and his early school life was spent in the district known as Fairview.  His respectful obedience to his teacher as well as devotion to his parents foretold the future development of a noble manhood.  He was of a type that would excite the admiration of all who knew him as well as that of his teacher and schoolmates.  He was one of the number that din not make trouble for his teacher and his aptness to take learning as further evidence of a fine development.  But alas, how soon and how sadly did the lamp of life become extinguished that invoked the eternal darkness of death.
His young age as well as his index of character will doubtless insure him a happier destiny in the glorious Eden above.  We cannot, under any consideration, think his condition worse.  Death, sorrow and sickness can never disturb his quiet repose, while his spirit will ever bask in the sunlight of the God who gave it.  Weep not beloved parents.
We should not dear friends, look upon the earthy departure of human kind as a detriment or a curse.  How many, who have died while youth was in it splendor, have escaped the creel pangs of life while others have lingered long past noon and felt the heat and burden of the day.  Think of the many sorrows that are ever crossing the uneven paths of helpless humanity.  Think of the tyranny of man and the arrogance of wealth and position.  Think of the sufferings of the weak and the power of passion.  Think of the cold blasts of scorn and the crass gales of slander.  Think of the follies of sin and the temptations innumerable.  Might well the Bible say, “O death, Where is thy sting? O grave, where is thy victory? Not withstanding our inability to unveil eternity and determine the destiny of all our departed friends we know beyond all doubt that they are released forever from the tumults and scenes of strife.  Amid life’s dreary storms the dead sleep tranquil and serene.  No dins of earth disturb their peaceful slumbers.  It is surely better that we pass away and go down to the dreamless grave, to the tongue less silence of the voiceless dust than to endure life’s pangs forever.  Eternal sleep is better than eternal pain.
The remains were laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery, where they will remain until the glorious morn of the resurrection shall crumble every tomb and deprive them of all their inmates.  The beloved parents are undergoing pangs that no comforter save the Christ Physician can relieve.  Nor words of sympathy, however kind and gentle, can stay the flood of sorrow that wrecks this lonely home.
May peace be unto the dust of little Dell while the flowers of love and tenderness may ever shed their lasting perfume above his silent grave.
Our dear young friend has passed away,
From home and kindred dear;
And left the comrades of his day,
To mourn his absence here.
Like a young oak around whose form,
Like creeping ivy twines;
So was he in his little home,
That now for him repines.
How sad the home he lately blessed,
By his kind presence there;
How sad must be the mother’s heart
Who must such losses bear.
And while we mourn in sorrow here
For him that sleeps alone;
His spirit with his Maker dear,
Doth bask around the throne.
His teacher,  M. M. Straube.
-- The Adrian Journal, April 25, 1900, Page 5 column 3, Obituary
 

Blocher, baby girl
Dr. Bates reports the arrival of a girl baby at the home of Charles Blocher yesterday.  Mother and child doing well. -- The Adrian Journal, June 8, 1900, Page 8 column 3, Birth
 

Bowling, Samantha
Samantha, wife of G. D. Bowling, died at the family home, five miles southwest of Adrian on Monday evening, June 4, 1900, after a lingering illness of dropsy.
Samantha Shaw was born in Cochocton, Ohio, March 14, 1832 (?) moved with her parents to Illinois in 1836.  On October 12, 1851 she was united in marriage with G. D. Bowling.  In 1868 they moved to Kansas,  remaining there until 1894 when they came to Bates county, Mo., where they have since resided.
Five children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Bowling, one daughter preceded hr to the other shore, having died in 1872.  The surviving children are, P. J. of this county, C. G., of Santa  Barbara, Cal., Mrs. S. C. Crummer, of Belleville, Kansas, and L. P. of Salina,  Kansas, with these also remains the aged father who mourns, deeply, the loss of the companion, who shared his joys and sorrows for forty-nine years, and who was ever loyal and true to husband and home.
Deceased was reared under Methodist discipline and her early life  was actively devoted to church and Sunday school work.  She was  ever kind and generous to friends and neighbors; a devoted wife; a tender and affectionate mother.  Only those who were under her gentle influence could full appreciate her generous impulses.
In that undying word “Mother” is wrapped the dearest affections of the human heart.  The storms of life may sweep away our friends, the irony of fate may leaves us impoverished, but through all of these the love of mother remains an unfading and undying treasure.  The bitterest tears are over mothers grave.  Only those who have felt the pangs incident to the loss of mother  can full realize the depth of sorrow that penetrates the heart.
Funeral services over the remains of Mrs. Bowling were held from the home on Tuesday, conducted by Rev. J. E. Hall, of this city, after which the remains were tenderly borne to the Crescent Hill cemetery, where they were tenderly laid to rest.
The journal joins the many friends of the aged husband and children in extending condolence in this their darkest hour of sadness and gloom. -- The Adrian Journal, June 8, 1900, Page 8, Column 4, Obituary
 

Weaver-Sherman
Relatives and friends gather at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Sherman Sunday evening to witness the marriage of their daughter, Miss Ida to F. Elmer Weaver.
The wedding march was played by Mrs. J. E. Dowell of Adrian, Rev. W. F. Jones joined the happy couple in wedlock, after which a bountiful luncheon was served to the guests.  It was the birthday of Mr. Sherman and their son Homer.
Mr. and Mrs. Weaver were the recipients of many beautiful presents.  The bride is a naïve of Butler, her friends are numerous, whose wishes for her future happiness will follow her.  Her superior a ability as a teacher has been proven in the years she has been employed at Adrian.  As an  elocutionist she has been admired by all that have heard her.
The groom is a Bates county boy, having been born and reared near Adrian.  He has a good position with the Kansas City, Kan., Cracker Co. as bookkeeper.
The Journal takes pleasure in joining the many friends of the young couple in extending congratulations.
For four years Miss Ida had charge of the primary department of Adrian Public School and grew in popularity each year.  She is a cultured and refined lady and popular in social circles.
Elmer  Weaver is a model young man, and is popular with all who know him.  He spent most of his life in Adrian and there is no one that will say aught against him.  In business he is accurate, courteous and honest, and is coming too the front in business circles. -- The Adrian Journal,  June 15, 1900, Page 1 Column 2, Marriage
 

Epley, Mrs.  David
H. P. Smith received a message yesterday, announcing the death of his aunt, Mrs. David Epley, who  lived in Cass county.  He and Mrs. Smith will attend the funeral. -- The Adrian Journal, June 15, 1900, Page 5 Column 3, Death
 

Marriage license
Marriage license have been issued to Earl C. Barber and Medora Barber. These people were divorced in this county last winter. -- The Adrian Journal, June 29, 1900, Page 5 column 3, Marriage license
 

Tuttle-Kline
At the beautiful country home of Mr. and Mrs. J. N. Kline, five miles southeast of Adrian, on Wednesday evening, June 27, 1900, at 8:30 o’clock Lewis Tuttle and Miss Maud Kline were united in the holy bonds of matrimony.  A large number of the friends and relatives of the contracting parties had been invited to be present, and 125 persons availed themselves of the pleasant opportunity of visiting this hospitable home.
Monroe Cox, as groomsman, and Miss Jessie Jenkins, a s bridesmaid, led the way.  A beautiful rug of ferns and daisies had been arranged,  upon which the bride and groom stood during the ceremony, here they were met by Rev. J. E.  Hall, who in a very beautiful and impressive ceremony united the happy hearts in the most sacred bonds of life.
The floral decorations were  elaborate and displayed with taste.  Misses Maud Jenkins and Mattie Taylor played the role of flower girls in a graceful manner.
The bride and bride’s maid were gowned in white organdy over pink shadowed silk.  The usual congratulations followed the ceremony, after which the wedding party and invited guests were invited to the spacious dining room, where a sumptuous meal was served in four courses.
To prepare such menu taxed the culinary skill, but Mrs. Kline, the bride’s mother, is equal to such occasions, as was fully demonstrated by the excellent quality and fashionable service presented to the guest on this occasion.  The dinner was delicious in quality abundant and exquisite in service.
Those who had the good fortune to enjoy the hospitality of this happy home on this occasion, will long remember it as one of life’s most pleasurable events, and cherish it in memory as long as life shall last.  The host and hostess endeared themselves to all present by  their easy and graceful hospitality.
Miss Maud Kline, the bride, is a handsome and accomplished young lady, a  society leader, and will doubtless be a worthy and agreeable companion.  The groom was raised in  Adrian and vicinity, he is the son of Dr. H. W. Tuttle of this city, and is an industrious young man.  For several years he has successfully conducted his father’s farm east of town.
The presents received by the happy couple were numerous, costly and useful.  The Journal joins their , of many friends in congratulations, coupled with the wish that their lives may be as pleasant as their fondest fancy has pictured it. --  The Adrian Journal, June 29, 1900, Page 8 Column 3, Marriage
 

Thompson, Mrs. James
Mrs. James Thompson died at the family residence near Elkhart on Tuesday morning, July 3, 1900, of an illness lasting several months.  Deceased was 57 years old. She was a highly esteemed lady, and her loss will be keenly felt by the people of the community. -- The  Adrian Journal, July 6, 1900, Page 1 Column 1, Death
 

Shull, Grandma
Grandma Shull died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Wm. Neiswender, Thursday, after a lingering illness.  Funeral services will be held from the U. B.  church this afternoon. We have been unable to get the necessary facts, hence cannot publish an obituary until next week. -- The Adrian Journal, July 6, 1900, Page 1 Column 1, Death

   Grandma Shull (Barbara) passed to her home at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Neiswender, July 5, 1900.
She was the daughter of John and Catherine Keller, was born in Lebanon county, Tenn. May 19, 1820.  Moved with her parents to Franklin county, Ohio, in 1829.  She was married to Isaac Shull in May, 1840, to which union were born eight children, six of whom with her husband preceded her.
In 1853 she moved to Miama co., Indiana.  After the death of her husband she made her home with her daughter, Mrs. Neiswender.  She was converted in early life and joined the U. B. church, in which she lived a consistent member for twenty five years.  When she went to live in her daughter’s home in Kansas she gave her letter to the M.  E. church, there she lived a devoted Christian life for 25 years.  After coming to Mo., she again united with the U. B. Church.  Failing health prevented her from attending public worship, but she lived a devoted Christian life at home.  Her Bible was her daily companion.  For some time she realized that she could not get well, but it did not trouble her.  She would say, “I am just waiting for my Heavenly Father to call me above.”
The funeral services were conducted by Rev. J.  E.  Hall at the Mt. Olivet church on the 6th. -- The Adrian Journal, July 13, 1900, Page 1 Column 2, Obituary
 

Walker-Paine
George B. Walker, of this county and Mrs. Jemima F. Paine of Sedalia, were united in marriage at the home of David Beaman, Mound township, Sunday, July 1, 1900.  Justice W. D. Anderson performed the ceremony which made them man and wife, after the ceremony the guests were invited to partake of a bountiful supper, which was heartily appreciated by all.
The groom is 74 years old and the bride is 60. -- The Adrian Journal, July 6, 1900, Page 1 column 5, Marriage
 

Shubert, twin
One of the infant twin children of Charles Shubert died suddenly Sunday.  Funeral services were held on Monday and the remains laid to rest in  the France cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, July 6, 1900, Page 5 Column 2, Death
 

Fuller, Charles W.
Chas. Fuller Badly Injured
While engaged in hauling logs Tuesday his team became frightened and started to run throwing Chas. Fuller from the wagon and one of the hind wheels of the loaded wagon passed over his breast, and for a time it was thought that the life had been instantly crushed out of him, but he regained consciousness after a time.  The accident occurred at the Fuller saw mill, eight miles northwest of this city.  On Tuesday night he was  brought as far on the road home as this city, here he was taken to the hotel to rest before pursuing the journey home.
At this time it is not known just how badly he is injured.  It is said that no bones were broken.  The injuries if serious, are internal.
It is hoped that he is not fatally hurt, and that he will be speedily restored to his former healthfulness and vigor.
Later
Mr. Fuller died as a result  of his injuries Wednesday evening at 7:00 o’clock.  He suffered intense pain from the time he was injured until death came.
His injuries were internal.  No bones were broken and not even a flesh wound was made to indicate the serious nature of his injuries.
After his death the body was taken to the residence of W. H. DeArmond, on East Main St. where it remained until the hour of burial.
The sudden and shocking taking away  of Mr. Fuller cast gloom over the entire community, every heart is filled with grief at this unexpected calamity to one of the most prominent families in the county.  Following closely as it does after another frightful and  fatal accident, makes it doubly sad.
Obituary
Charles W. Fuller was born in Illinois Nov. 1846, died in Adrian, Mo., July 11, 1900, age 54 years.  In his young manhood he went west and engaged in mining until July 1885, when he came to this county, he has since made his home with his brother, Judge DeWitt  C. Fuller.
Mr. Fuller never married.  As a man and a citizen he was generous hearted to a fault.  His neighbors say that no one ever appealed to him in vain for public or charitable purposes, he responded liberally and cheerfully to every need in these directions.  Morally his habits were correct.  He was a quiet, unassuming, refined gentleman.  In his dealings with others he was scrupulously hones, asking of them only that which he himself would most willingly grant.  Being a man of but few words, he did not acquire as wide an acquaintance as some, but those who knew him best are most profuse in their praise of his many manly traits of mind and heart.
This brother and family have the deep sympathy of the entire community in this their sudden and shocking bereavement.
The remains were quietly laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery yesterday in the presence of a large number of sympathizing neighbors and friends of the family. -- The Adrian Journal, July 13, 1900, Page 8 Column 3, Death
 

Bloom, Jacob
Jacob Bloom, and old settler of Bates county, died of pulmonary trouble, July 14, 1900.
Deceased was converted and united with the Christian church a few years ago.  Last winter while the writer was holding a meeting in Archie, he united with the U. B. church.
He was a good citizen and an honest upright man, and will be missed both in the church and community in which he lived.
He leaves five children to mourn their loss, two children with their mother have died.
The funeral was held at the home, one miles southwest of Archie, on Sunday, July 15, conducted by he undersigned in the presence of a number of friends and neighbors, and the remains were laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery.
Rev. J.  A. W. Brown -- The Adrian Journal, July 20, 1900, Page 5 column 4, Obituary
 

Freeman, Rachel
Rachel J. Freeman died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. E. M. Bice July 12 1900, after a painful illness lasting11 months.
Rachel J. Schooley was born in Paris, Ky., Sept.11, 1832.  She was united in marriage with Stephen W. Freeman June 15, 1850, to this union ten children were born, four of whom are still living.
She united with the Baptist church at the age of 16, later she joined the M.E. church, in which denomination she remained a faithful and consistent member until death released her spirit and she was taken to enjoy the reward of the just.
Funeral services were held from the home Friday afternoon, conducted by Rev. J. E. Hall, of this city, after which the remains were laid to rest in the Nichols cemetery. The relatives have the sympathy of a large circle of friends in this bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, July 20, 1900, Page 8 column 4, Obituary
 

Cox, James Madison
James Madison Cox was  born in Scott  county, Virginia, June 28, 1848, when he was a lad of eight summers his parents moved to Pulaski county, Ky., where he grew to manhood.  During the civil war he left home and joined the engineer corps of the Federal army and saw active service for more than two years.
On June 13, 1867 he was united in marriage with Miss Elizabeth Catherine Young, who still survives him, to this union four children were born, three daughters and one son, one of the daughters died a number of years ago.  The living children are Mesdames Jas. Allen and John Pulliam, and Monroe Cox.
In 1868 Mr. Cox moved to Mo., locating near Dayton, Cass county, and in 1882 he moved to this city, where he since resided, and during which time he has been active in the business circles of the city.  In 1897 President McKinley appointed him Postmaster, which office he held at the time of his death.
No more generous hearted man ever lived in a community than Mat. Cox.  He was ready to respond with  all his energy to every public enterprise, and in deeds of charity he was always a liberal and enthusiastic leader.  His desire was not to harm anyone.
An energetic, charitable and peaceable citizen has  gone and  we will miss him.
The family have the deep sympathy of the entire community in this sad bereavement.  Funeral services will be held today at 2:00 o’clock p.m. from the M.E. church, the pastor, Rev. J. E. Hall will preach the sermon.  It is expected that the Knights of Pythias will attend in a body.  Burial will be at Crescent Hill.  May he rest in peace. -- The Adrian Journal, July 20, 1900, Page 8 Column 3, Obituary
 

Heath, John C.
John C. Heath died at his residence, four miles west of Adrian, July, 1900, aged 67 years 2 months and 15 days.  He was born in Harrison county, Ohio, cut came to this state in early manhood.  Uncle John Heath built the first house on the land where Adrian now stands, but sold the farm to the Town Co., and bought the home where he died.
He was twice married, his first wife died 7 years ago. Seven children, all gown survive him.
Uncle John Heath was an honest and industrious man, held in high esteem by all  who knew him.  He united with the Presbyterian church at Fairview in Feb. 1895, from which place funeral services were held on Sunday July 29th, conducted by Rev. Watkins, of Appleton City,  who preached a very appropriate sermon.  The remains were laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery to await the dawning of the Great day.
The love and sympathy shown for him by his bereaved companion during his days of suffering, are highly commended by her neighbors.  May she ever be blessed with tender  friends and as willing hands as her’s in her husband’s dying days.
-- The Adrian Journal, August 3, 1900, Page 8 Column 4, Death
 

Purkey-Knaus
Judge J. F. Smith united in marriage on Sept. 1, 1900, W. G. Purkey and Mrs. Mattie Knaus, both of this city.  The contracting parties are well and favorably known in this vicinity, and their friends join in congratulations and best wishes.  They will reside in this city. -- The Adrian Journal, September 7, 1900, Page 1 Column 3, Marriage
 

Simpson-Wright
On Monday, Sept. 3, 1900, James Simpson, Jr. and Miss Edna Wright were united in the holy bonds of matrimony.  The contracting parties are numbered among the best  citizens of this community.  The Journal joins in their many friends in wishing them a happy and prosperous future. -- The Adrian Journal, September 7, 1900, Page 1 Column 3, Marriage
 

Gutshall-Ficklin
Chas. E. Gutshall and Miss Fannie, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Ficklin, were united in marriage at the home of the bride’s parents Wednesday, Sept. 5, 1900, at 6:30 o’clock p.m.  Rev. Theo. Reynolds in a beautiful and impressive ceremony united the fortunes of the happy couple.  The Journal joins their many friends in wishing a realization of their fondest anticipations. -- The Adrian Journal, September 7, 1900, Page 1 Column 5, Marriage
 

Hall-Allen
Harrison H.  Hall and Miss Rachel Allen were united  in marriage at the residence of the bride’s parents, this city, Thursday morning, Sept. 27,1900, at  10:00 o’clock, Justice H. T. Carr performed the ceremony which united the happy hearts.
The contracting parties are worthy young people, and held in high esteem by all who know them. The Journal extends congratulation and best wishes for their happiness and success. -- The Adrian Journal, September 28, 1900, Page 1 Column 3, Marriage
 

Burnett, Joseph
Joseph Burnett, a formerly a respected citizen of this vicinity, died at his home near Howard, Mo., last Friday. The remains were shipped to this place from Galena, Kan., on Saturday at 1:12 p.m.  Owing to the illness of his wife the remains were unaccompanied, being sent by express, and consigned to J. N. Estep.  Friends here took charge of the body and laid it to rest in the Nichols cemetery on Sunday.  Deceased was about 70 years of age, his death was caused by Bright’s disease. -- The Adrian Journal, September 28,1900, Page 3 column 4, Death
 

Simpson-Switzer
James Simpson and Mrs. M. Switzer were united in the holy bonds of matrimony Tuesday.  They are worthy people
and their many friends join in wishing them a pleasant married life. -- The Adrian Journal, October 6, 1900, Page 5 Column 3, Marriage
 

Morgan,Walter
Walter Morgan, a son-in-law to Theo. Morrison, died suddenly at his home in Butler Monday night.  The cause assigned is heart failure. -- The Adrian Journal, October 6, 1900, Page 5 Column 3, Death
 

O’Dea, baby girl
Tom O’Dea is stepping high like a blind horse.  A brand new girl baby is the cause of those lusty strides. -- The Adrian Journal, October 12, 1900, Page 1 Column 3, Birth
 

Shubert-McRoberts
Bert Shubert and Maggie McRoberts surprised their many friends  by quietly getting married some three weeks ago, at which the Journal did not learn until recently.  They are worthy people and those who know them will join in extending best wishes for their success. -- The Adrian Journal, October 12, 1900, Page 1 Column 1, Marriage
 

Harris-Bagby
Will Harris and Miss Annie B. Bagby, prominent young people of the Burdette neighborhood, were married last Sunday, Rev. Lewis officiating.  The contracting parties are well and favorably known, and their many friends unite in wishing them abundant success in their journey through life. -- The Adrian Journal, October 12, 1900, Page 1 Column 1, Marriage
 

Lentz-Mills
Friends of the contracting parties were surprised when it was Tuesday that Emmet Mills and Miss Maud Lentz had been quietly married at Kansas City Monday, Oct. 8, at 2 o’clock p.m.  While such an event was not unexpected the young couple kept their most intimate friends in the dark as to when it would occur.
The groom was raised in this city and always bore a good name, some years ago he went to Kansas City, and has been and is now in the employ of the ice company.  He is a worthy young man.  The  bride is the only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Lentz, of this city, and grew to beautiful womanhood in this city.  She is a popular and worthy young lady.  The Journal joins the many friends of the happy couple in extending congratulations. -- The Adrian Journal, October 12, 1900, Page 1  Column 2, Marriage
 

Hackler-Oiler
Married, at the home of the bride’s parents in Elkhart township, George E. Hackler and Miss Mary Oiler, at 7:00 p.m. on Sunday Oct. 7th, Rev. Watkins officiating in the presence of the relatives an a few intimate friends of the contracting parties, numbering in all twenty people. It was a pretty and well arranged wedding.  Immediately after the ceremony we were ushered into dinging room,  we can’t tell it all just as Father Hackler.  These young people have gained a good reputation in our community and in the church and Sunday school work at Fairview.  The groom is a prosperous young farmer of Mound township, while the bride is a charming young lady in every way and knows how to make a little home look neat and attractive.  The Fairview people join in wishing them a happy future. -- The Adrian Journal, October 12, 1900, Page 8  column 3, Marriage
 

Cherry-Leffler
At 12:00 noon, Sunday,  Oct. 14, 1900, at the residence of the bride’s parents, this city, E.A. Cherry and Miss Pearl Leffler were united in the holy bonds of matrimony, Rev. R. M. Montgomery officiating.
After the ceremony refreshments were served.  The bride and groom took the afternoon train for Kansas City for a brief visit, after which they will make their home in this city.  The contracting parties are well and favorably known to the people of this city, where they have a host of admiring friends.  The Journal joins these in wishing them a blissful and prosperous wedded life. -- The Adrian Journal, October 19, 1900, Page 1 Column 3, Marriage
 

Harper-McDaniel               
At the home of the bride’s parents, five miles northeast of this city, Wednesday evening, Oct. 17, 1900. R. H. Harper and Miss May McDaniel were united in marriage, Rev. J. E. Hall officiating.  Promptly at the appointed hour the bridal party marched to the altar to the strains of Mendleson’s wedding march played by Mrs. Dowell.  John McDaniel, acted as best man and Miss Kate Corbin of Hume was the bridesmaid.  The ceremony over, a choice array of refreshments were served.  There were 35 guests present.  The groom is a wealthy young man and a clever gentleman.  The bride is a bright and popular young lady, born and reared in Bates county.  The Journal joins their many friends in  extending congratulations and best wishes. -- The Adrian Journal, October 19, 1900, Page 1 Column 3, Marriage
 

Tabler, baby girl
Born to Mr. and Mrs. Tabler last Friday, a new girl.  All parties doing well. -- The Adrian Journal, October 19, 1900, Page 4 Column 1, Birth
 

Schunck, baby girl
Born to Mr. and Mrs. Schunck Oct. 9, a girl, regulation size and beauty.  Dave puts up a cake walk of great proportions in honor of heir No. 3. -- The Adrian Journal, October 19, 1900, Page 8 Column 3, Birth
 

Harper, daughter
The seventeen year old  daughter of Mr. Harper, living three miles northeast of Archie died very suddenly last Saturday.  The family deserve the sympathy of the community. -- The Adrian Journal, October 19, 1900, Page 8 Column 2, Death
 

Haler-Smith
Charley Haler and Miss Viola Smith were married Oct. 16th. -- The Adrian Journal, October 19, 1900, Page 8 Column 2, Marriage
 

Martin-Love
Percy  Martin of Osawatomie, Kan., and Miss Maud E. Love, daughter of the Place Hotel Keeper, were married Sunday, Oct. 14th. -- The Adrian Journal, October 19,1900, Page 8 column 2, Marriage
 

Trannum, Martha
Martha, the 10 year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. N.S. Trannum, died at the family residence, this city,  Monday evening at 6:00, after a lingering illness of typhoid fever.
Funeral services were held from the M. E. church Tuesday afternoon, Rev. J.E. Hall, the pastor, conducted the service.  After with the remains were laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery.  The family have the sincere sympathy of the entire community in this bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, October 19,1900, Page 8 column 1, Obituary
 

Moses, Harry S.
The remains of Harry S. Moses were, Saturday, Oct. 20, taken to his old home, Genesco, Ill.,  for interment, after the funeral services in this city, conduced by Rev. J. E. Hall of the Methodist church, where were assembled his large acquisition of friends and neighbors to view for the last time the lifeless remains of the one who so short a times before was among them in the vigor of health.
The body was received at the home of his birth by relatives.  Those who were with him in his last sickness and accompanied his remains were, his father, mother, brother Howard, and his intended wife, Miss  Lizzie Smith.  His sister, Drucilla, being then in Ill. On a visit.
Harry Sherman Moses was  born in Genesco, Illinois, Aug. 17, 1876, died Oct. 19, 1900.  His boyhood was spent in Illinois, until seven years ago when he removed to he west with his parents, and for the past year and a half he has resided in this city, during his stay with us he has shown us that he was a young man of sterling habits, and upright character; his  associations were of the best and his business qualifications were respected by all, and acknowledged to be superior to one of his age.
Services were conducted at Genesco, Ill., by the family minister, Rev. M. J. Miller, assisted by Rev. Millard, the interment occurring Sunday.  Impressive services were held at the grave, where the setting sun, throwing its rays from shower threatening clouds, added to the solemnity of the scheme.
The former school mates and associates, with the many relatives and friends followed the remains to their last resting place.
No one will be so missed by both old and young in the social and business community as our departed friend. -- The  Adrian Journal, October 26, 1900, Page 1 Column 3, Obituary
 

Shier, Ann
Mrs. Ann Shier died at her home four miles west of Adrian, Oct. 29, 1900, of pneumonia fever.
Deceased whose maiden name was Ann Long, was born in England Nov. 3, 1825.  She was a member of the Church of England, and had been since early girlhood. She had no children and her husband had been dead for a number of years.  Seven step-children survive her.  The remains were taken to Lexington, Mo., Tuesday for burial.  Joe Heath accompanied the remains to their last resting place.  The relatives and friends have the sincere sympathy of friends in this their bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, November 2, 1900, Page 1 Column 2, Obituary
 

Holloway, Cora A.
Mrs. Cora A., wife of Gordon Holloway, died at her home near Lone Tree, on Saturday, Oct. 27, 1900, in child birth.
Deceased was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. T. B. Webb, and a sister of Mesdames J. B. Hogan and John Stone of this vicinity. She was born in Jackson county, Mo., March 28 1869.  She was a consistent Christian lady, a faithful member of the Baptist church Pleasant Ridge, where the funeral services were held on Monday.
Besides the father, mother, brothers and sisters, a husband and four little children are left to mourn the loss of a loving wife and mother.  In this their great affliction they have the sympathy of the entire community. -- The Adrian Journal, November 2, 1900, Page 8 column 3, Death
 

Kelley, Thomas
Thos. Kelley, marshal of Butler, died suddenly Saturday evening of apoplexy. -- The Adrian Journal, November 9, 1900, Page 1 Column 1, Death
 

Fisher-Holman
Robert Fisher and Miss Georgia May Holman were married at Los Angeles, California, October 31st. -- The Adrian Journal, November 9, 1900, Page 8 column 4, Marriage
 

Koeger, Mrs. Gusta
Mrs. Gusta Koeger, widow of the late Chris Koeger, died at her home six miles northwest of this city Monday at 1:40 p.m., aged 41 years.
For several months she had been a constant suffer from dropsy, every effort to secure relief proved fruitless.  Deceased leaves five children, on daughter and four sons to mourn the loss of a kind mother.  In this their hour of grief they have the sincere sympathy of the community.
Mrs. Koeger was an amiable and highly esteemed lady and a large circle of friends are grief stricken over the demise of so worthy citizen.
Funeral services were held from the home Wednesday, conducted by Rev. J. E.  Hall, of this city, and the remains laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery beside those of her late husband. -- The  Adrian Journal, November 30, 1900, Page 1 Column 2, Death
 

Johnson, Franklin
Franklin Johnson was born in Morgan county, Illinois, Dec. 11, 1825.  Died Dec. 1, 1900, of dropsy at the home of his son, J .L.  in Kansas city,  Mo.  He was married to Elizabeth Pearson, April 26, 1853. To this union were born three children, Mrs. J. N. Estep, H.B. and J. L.  Johnson, all living in Kansas City.
In the autumn of 1868 Mr. Johns and family moved to Bates co., Mo., locating where  Adrian now stands, where Mrs. Johnson died, Feb. 3, 1879.  In 1881 Mr. Johnson was again married to Mrs. Bell, who died in January 1890.  For the past ten years deceased had made his home with his son J. L. in Kansas City.
The remains were brought to Adrian for burial and laid to rest by those of his first wife in the Nichols cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, December 7,1900, Page 1 Column 5, Death
 

Harper baby
The six week old babe of Mr. and Mrs. H. H.  Harper died yesterday at the home if its grandmother, Mrs. Susan Scudder, of spinal meningitis.  Funeral services were held from the  Baptist church today at 10:00 conducted by Rev. Haggard and Silvius.  The young parents have the sympathy of friends in this bereavement. -- The  Adrian Journal, December 7, 1900, Page 5 Column 3, Death
 

Landes, baby girl
A girl baby came to the home of Mr. and Mrs. John Landes Sunday, and showed a decided inclination to become a permanent boarder at that pleasant home. -- The Adrian Journal, December 7, 1900, Page 5 Column 4, Birth
 

Walker, Nancy
Miss Nancy Walker died at the home of her sister, Mrs. Crow, on Wednesday, of consumption, age sixty. Funeral services were held yesterday. -- The Adrian Journal, December 7, 1900, Page 8 Column 4, Death
 

Simpson, Cassandra
On December 3,1900 at the family home, this city the spirit of Grandma Simpson took its flight to a better world and the relatives and friends gathered around the lifeless body, grief stricken over the thought that life which had been so kind and pure had been taken to enjoy the beauties of a better world.
Cassandra H. Fulton was born in Virginia, March 24, 1824, on January 29 1839 she was united in marriage with Thos. R. Simpson, who still survives.  For nearly sixty two years they had traveled life’s uneven journey together, and shared in its sorrows and joys.
To this union nine children were born, five of whom, four daughters and one son, with the aged husband survive.
In 1840 Mr. and Mrs. Simpson moved from Virginia to Missouri and for sixty years had resided together in this state.
Mrs. Simpson united with the Baptist church in 1846, since which time until her death she had been a consistent Christian lady; faithful in the discharge of every duty/ a kind neighbor and devoted mother and wife. Several years ago she lost her sight, but under this great affliction she was kind and cheerful.
No  person in the community was more universally loved that Grandma Simpson every one was her friend.  As a neighbor she was kind and generous, with a word encouragement for all.  Her gentle and amiable spirit was an inspiration to all with whom she came in contact.  No word of  bitterness, hatred or envy ever fell from her lips.  Her countenance was ever illuminated with a pleasant smile and her lips bore the message of good will to all.
Funeral services were held from the home on Wednesday, conducted by Rev. A. H. Dean, of Harrisonville after which the remains were tenderly laid to rest in the cemetery at Butler.
In this great bereavement the aged husband, the children and grandchildren have the sympathy of the community.  Their neighbors and friends weep with them. -- The Adrian Journal, December 7, 1900, Page 8 Column 1, Obituary
 

Adams, Annie
Annie (Powell) Adams was born in Pettis county, Mo., September 1854, and died a the home in Grand River township, Dec. 11, 1900 of pneumonia fever; aged 46 years.  She was united in marriage with J. H. Adams March 7, 1875.  To this union were born two daughters, who with the husband survive.
Mrs. Adams had been poorly for some time but not seriously ill until the last few days, all that medicine and nursing could do for her was done.  Her last days were days of suffering, but whether in gloom or bereavements in the stern pressure of pain, she knew in whom to trust.  She was not afraid “to walk in the valley of the shadow of death” for He in whom she had so long trusted and devotedly served was with her to the end and comforted, shielded and protected.  
A large concourse of people followed her remains to the Mt. Olivet church. The choir began the services by singing “Gathering Home then Jesus Lover of My Soul”, Rev. Silvius read a scripture lesson full of beauty and comfort, then a hymn the deceased had loved so well, “When the Roll is Called Up Yonder” was sung.  The discoursed was taken from Hebrews 227, “It is appointed unto man once to die,” etc.  She was loved by all who knew her, and her great sympathetic nature went out for all.  The services were closed by singing “We shall know each other there.” -- The Adrian Journal, December 14, 1900, Page 8 column 2, Obituary
 

McRoberts, Sophronia
Sophronia B. (Goodden) McRoberts  was born Feb. 7, 1859 and died of pneumonia fever and heart failure December 11, 1900.  She was married No. 26, 1876 to John W. McRoberts.  The them were born twelve children, seven boys and five girls; five boys have preceded her to eternity.  The husband, five girls and two boys still remain on this side.  Sister McRoberts was converted and united with the Baptist church in early life, she remained a faithful member until 1886, when she united with the United Brethren church, of which she was a faithful member until removed to the church triumphant. She expressed to her husband the wish that the Lord would relieve her sufferings just a short time before the close of life.  God in His great mercy came to her and received her unto Himself.”
Mrs. McRoberts was an amiable lady held in high esteem by a large circle of friends. Her life was that of a consistent Christian lady, and in her death the community has lost one of its best citizens. The bereaved husband and children have the deep sympathy of the community in this their hour of sadness. Funeral services wee held from the home Wednesday conducted by Rev. R. M. Montgomery, her pastor, after which the remains wee laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery beside those of her departed children. -- The Adrian Journal, December 14, 1900, Page 8 column 2, Obituary
 

Jenkins-Herrell
The beautiful home of Mr. and Mrs. Jno. F. Herrell was the scene of a brilliant social event Wednesday evening, Dec. 19,1900.  It was the occasion of the marriage of their amiable and popular daughter, Miss Etta, to Mr. Oren E. Jenkins.
Over one hundred invited guests were present to witness the ceremony and to pay their respects to the worthy couple and their parents.  The home was beautifully decorated with Chrysanthemums and evergreens, and in the parlor, suspended from the ceiling, was a large and beautiful floral wedding bell, trimmed in white chrysanthemums, beneath this they  took their positions while the ceremony was performed.
Promptly at 6:30 o’clock p.m. Mrs.  J. E. Dowell took her place at the organ and began to play Mendelssohn’s Wedding March, to the time which the contracting parties marched to the altar, preceded by Rev. J. A. Smith the officiating clergyman.  In a brief but impressive ceremony he united the fortunes  of the contracting parties, at the close of which he offered a fervent prayer that their lives might be guided by noble impulses and characterized by kindly deeds.
Following the ceremony were the usual congratulations, accompanied with best wishes for their success.
The bride, who is one of Adrian’s most popular young ladies, was gowned in white silk and carried a bouquet of white roses.  The groom, who is a prosperous young farmer, wore the conventional black.
An important factor of the event was the sumptuous spread which followed the ceremony.  Those who know Mr. and Mrs. Herrell, are aware of the fact that they do things by halves, and on this occasion they did credit to their history for hospitality.  The menu was served in courses, and consisted of meats, salads,  fruits and cakes of divers and sundry kinds. These were prepared in the most palatable  way and attest the liberality of the host in providing and the skill of the hostess in preparing for their guests.  The large company was fed and much remained.
Mr. and Mrs. Jenkins start out on the voyage of wedded life under favorable circumstances, followed by the best wishes of a host of friends, in with the Journal joins. -- The Adrian Journal, December 21, 1900, Page 1 column 4, Marriage
 

Smith, Laura M.
Laura M., daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. M. Hunter, was born in Madison county, Ohio, June 26, 1866; moved with her parents to this county in 1872 and resided on the farm until 1882 when the family moved to Adrian.  September 30, 1885, she was united in marriage with Alvin J. Smith.  To this union were born three children;  viz. A. Clayton, aged 14 years; Martha E., age 9 years; Leon H., age 6 years.
In early life she was converted and lived a consistent Christian life until death called her home.  He beauties of Mrs. Smith’s character was shown in her home, where she was a model wife and mother.  Her children were the tender objects of her care, and upon them she bestowed her motherly devotion, and in their lives is reflected the noble traits of the mother’s character.  They are mannerly, obedient and considerate of the rights of others, respected and loved by all because of their correct deportment.  The highest compliment a parent can receive is to say that their children are properly trained, and in this Mrs. Smith did her part nobly, and leaves a rich heritage.
Funeral services over the remains were held from the Mt. Olivet church Wednesday, conducted by Rev. T. Pingry, the minister who received her into the church and who officiated when she and Mr. Smith were married.  His sermon was a review of the beautiful life of deceased.  A large congregation was present to pay their respects to the memory of the dead and to comfort the living.
The  faithful husband and motherless children have the deep sympathy of the entire community in this deep affliction, and this extends to the aged parents.  A beautiful life has gone out, but its lingering rays remain to make the world brighter and better. -- The Adrian Journal, December 21, 1900, Page 1 Column 3, Obituary
 

Walls-Hawk
Geo. H. Walls and Miss Penelope Ballentyne Hawk, two of Mound township’s most prominent and popular young people, were joined in the bonds of double blessedness at Butler on Tuesday, Dec. 18, 1900, Rev. Cobb officiating.
The contracting parties are both well and favorably known, the groom being a prominent and prosperous young farmer, and the bride a popular young lady in the community. They immediately went to housekeeping in the comfortable home fitted up by the groom.
 The Journal joins the many acquaintances and friends of the happy couple in wishing them a life of unsullied bliss. -- The Adrian Journal, December 21, 1900, Page 4 Column  1, Marriage
 

Prowell, baby girl
A young lady arrived at the home of Presiding Elder Prowell’s this morning and desires to board with them.  Mother and child doing well.  Elder up and around. -- The Adrian Journal, December 21, 1900, Page 5 Column 2, Birth
 

Clark, infant
The six week old babe of Charley Clark’s was buried Wednesday. -- The Adrian Journal, December 21, 1900, Page 5 column 3,, Death
 

Barnard, baby boy
Born to the wife of Jas. A. Barnard a boy on the 18th. Mother and child doing well.  Arthur still lives. -- The Adrian Journal, December 21, 1900, Page 5 Column 3, Birth
 

Tout, baby girl
Born to the wife of Abraham Tout a girl on the 19th. -- The Adrian Journal, December 21, 1900, Page 5 column 3, Birth
 

Daniels-Hoots
Crouch-Daniels
The home of T. C. Hoots of this city, was the scene of a pretty social event Tuesday eve.  The occasion was the marriage of A.W. Daniels and Miss Fannie Hoots and Elmer Crouch and Miss Nona Daniels.  Rev. J.E. Hall pronounced the ceremony that united the fortunes of the contracting parties.
After the ceremony the guests were invited to the dining room where a sumptuous supper was spread, and upon which they feasted until they were satisfied.
The Journal joins with the many friends of the contracting parties in wishing them a pleasant and prosperous journey through life. -- The Adrian Journal, December 29, 1900, Page 1 Column 1, Marriage
 

Wilkinson-Hill
Arch Wilkinson, of Merwin, and Belle Hill, of Burdette, were united in marriage last Sunday. The bride is a worthy young lady and has many friends in this city who join in wishing her a happy married life.  The groom is a stranger to the people of this vicinity, but is said to be a worthy gentleman. -- The Adrian Journal, December 29, 1900, Page 4 Column 2, Marriage


Submitted by: Sandee Hubbard

Note: The information provided by Sandee Hubbard has been made available for personal genealogy research.
It may not be copied or reproduced without gaining her written permission to do so.

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