Bates County News



 

The Adrian Journal
Adrian, Bates County, Missouri

Jan. 18, 1901 - Nov. 29, 1901
 

Owen, Jane Haggard
  
Death, that silent, yet resistless messenger crossed the threshold of one of Adrian’s happy homes on the night of Jan. 8, 1901, and bore away the spirit of an aged and loved mother to a sweeter and happier existence.
On the above date Mrs. Jane Haggard Owen, mother of M. V. Owen, passed into that invisible “Bourne.”
Mrs. Owen died at the home of her brother, Lewis Haggard, where she was stopping temporarily while her son M. V. was repairing and adding to his residence.  She made her home with hr son.  Death was the result of a severe attack of La  Grippe after a brief illness.
  Jane Haggard was born in Clark county, Kentucky, Oct. 4, 1812.  On May 26th, 1831 she was united in marriage with Martin B. Owen in the county of her  birth.  To this union were born five children, viz: John, who was killed in the battle of Lone Jack, Crayton, father of Treasurer Andy Owen, who died in the fall of 1886; Mary Owen, now Mrs.  Ragland, of Montrose; Lewis Owen, who died in infancy, and M. V. Owen, of this city, with whom she had lived since the death of her husband in 1888.  Immediately after her marriage she moved with her husband to Henry county, Ky., where they resided until 1853 when they moved to Missouri, locating on Elk Fork, in what is now Bates county, here she resided until last September, when she moved with her son to the city.
 In early life Mrs. Owen was converted and united with the Old Baptist church, but later she united with the Missionary Baptist at Altona, where she held her membership at the time of her death, and where she was known as a worthy Christian lady.
Mrs.  Owen was one of those sweet gentle women who win the admiration of all with whom they come in contact.  Loving and lovable, kind and courteous; a true example of the Christian character given by the Master.  To her was given many years, but they were fruitful of good.
The heart has ceased to bead, the lips are silent, the hands will no more minister to the wants of the needy, but still she lives in the hearts and lives of those who knew her.  Her gentle words, her kindly deeds, her pure Christian character still remain to guide and influence her acquaintances in the right paths.  Men and women died and return to dust, but a beautiful life lingers to lead others into the light of truth.  Such was the life and character of Grandma Owen.
The surviving children have the sympathy of the entire community in this bereavement.
The remains rest in the Owen’s cemetery. Peace to her ashes. -- The Adrian Journal, January 18, 1901, Page 1 Column 5, Obituary
 

Arrick, John H.
John Hiram Arrick, a prominent farmer of this vicinity,, died at Mace, Indiana, Sunday,  January 20, 1901, of pneumonia.  He had been in failing health for  the past year.  Last fall he rented his farm and with his family droved overland to Indiana and Ohio with the hope that the trip would prove beneficial to his health, and for a time he seemed to gain in strength, but an attack of pneumonia shatter the last hope and brought the grim monster.
John Hiram Arrick was born in Noble county, Ohio, January 5, 1845, and grew to manhood in the state of  his nativity.  When the civil war broke out he enlisted in an Ohio regiment and served for over three years.  After the war closed he moved to Missouri, and has resided here almost continuously since.  In 1885 he was united in marriage to Mrs. Annie L. Edwards.  To this union were born two children, a  son and daughter.  On December 23, 1888, his wife died.  July 30, 1889 he was united in marriage with Miss Mollie M. Moody, who with his daughter survives to mourn the loss of a faithful husband and father.
In early life he was converted and united with the Presbyterian church and was an active worker in the cause of the Master.  Later he joined the M. E. church.  After he moved to his farm near Coalville he joined the Friends, and was an acceptable member of that denomination at the time of his death.
He was a good citizen, a kind neighbor, and a respected Christina gentleman, and the community now mourns the loss of one of its best men.
The body was brought to this city and on Tuesday was taken to the Mt. Olivet church, where funeral services were held, his pastor, Rev. Theodore Reynolds conducted the services.  The remains were tenderly laid to rest in the cemetery at that place.
The wife and daughter have the sympathy of their large circle of friends in this great bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, January 25, 1901, Page 1 Column 3, Obituary
 

Lansdown, Dr. W. J.
At the home of his daughter, Mrs. Sam Walls, of this city, on Tuesday night, January 22,1901, the spirit of Dr. W. J. Lansdown took its flight from the body and passed into that invisible existence beyond.  For several weeks he had been gradually sinking and hope of recovery had been abandoned.  He received every attention that could be give, but to no avail.
Dr. W. J. Lansdown was born in Cole county, Mo., May 22, 1841.  After arriving at manhood he attended and graduated from the Missouri Medical College, of St. Louis, and immediately thereafter engaged in the practice of his profession.  In 1874 he located in Butler and was soon recognized as one of the leading physicians of the county.  In 1892 he moved to this city where he resided until his death.
Dr. Lansdown was united in marriage with Miss Wines in 1862.  To this union eight children were born, two sons and six daughters, survive the father.  Dr. Walter A. Lansdown, of Butler, and Mrs. Sam Walls, of this city, being the two of the surviving children, the names of the other two we did not learn.  The wife died a number of years ago.
Funeral services were held from the home of his daughter Thursday at 1:00 p.m.  The Methodist choir sang several appropriate selections and Rev. J. E. Hall preached a brief sermon.  The remains were taken to Butler and laid to rest in Oak Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, January 25, 1901, Page 1 Column 3, Obituary
 

Devany, Mrs.
Mrs. Devany, who lived on the H. Gilbert farm, died suddenly Sunday evening at 5 o’clock from paralysis.  She was buried in the Austin cemetery on Monday.  She leaves a husband and several children to mourn her loss. -- The Adrian Journal, January 25, 1901, Page 4 Column 2, Death
 

Baker, Isaac
Isaac Baker, who resided near Austin for several years died at El Dorado and was buried in  the Austin cemetery
on the 21st. -- The Adrian Journal, January 21, 1901, Page 4 Column 2, Death
 

Mudd, Austin
Our old friend Austin Mudd departed this life Saturday morning of last week.  His remains were laid to rest in the Burdett cemetery at 12:30 o’clock Sunday. -- The Adrian Journal, January 25, 1901, Page 1 column 5, Death
 

Bates, Isachar
Isachar Bates died at the home of his son, E. R. Bates,  5 miles east of this city on Wednesday, January 30, 1901,
of la grippe.  Mr. Bates was born in Jefferson county, New York, Dec. 18, 1814.  Funeral services were held from the home yesterday and the body buried in the France cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, February 1, 1901, Page 1 Column 3, Death

Isachar Bates was born in Jefferson county, N. Y. Dec. 28, 1814, and died at the home of his son, E. R. Bates, five miles east of this city January 30, 1901, aged 86 years, 1 month and 2 days.  He was united in marriage with Eliza Dewey in 1836.  Of this union four children were born, three sons and one daughter, viz: Philander, Chester, Edgar R. and Georgianah.  The son E. R., with whom he had lived since 1888, and Chester of Portland, Oregon, survive.  His companion died Feb. 25, 1886.  He was the last member of a family of five children.
In 1885 he moved from N. Y.  to Aurora, Ill., and from thence to Cass county, Mo., in 1869 and to Bates in 1880.
Funeral services were held from the Bates home on January 31, 1901.  -- The Adrian Journal, February 8, 1901, Page 1 Column 2, Obituary
 

Eyman, Ruby
In memory of little Ruby Eyman the only daughter of Chas. Eyman, whose spirit took its flight Dec. 29,1900, age 5 years, 3 months.  She was  only sick 5 days.  The remains were tenderly laid  to rest in the Burdette cemetery to await the Resurrection. -- The Adrian Journal, February 1, 1901, Page 1 Column 5, Death
 

Martin, Mary
Mary Martin was born May 31, 1801,in Madison county, Ohio.  She was converted and united with the Methodist Episcopal church when she was fifteen years of age.  In the year 1835 she was united in marriage to Patten Martin, who died in 1843.  To this union was born three children,  two sons and one daughter. The daughter, Mrs. J. W. Estep, with whom she has lived since 1868, and one son survive her.  She had five sisters and two brothers, only one of this large family survives her, a sister, Mrs. Adaline Nichols.
But few persons have the opportunity of passing as many milestones as Grandma Martin.  During all these years she has taken Jesus Christ as her guide and council and always found him a present  help in time of need.  Although nearly 91 years of age she made the Bible her daily companion and during the past year she has read the New Testament through.  I visited her many times during the past summer an d autumn.  I always found her sitting by the window, calm and  sweet.  I never left without having a special talk with grandma.  She always spoke of soon going to Heaven.  She would say “I am ready.” “I am just waiting for Jesus to call me.
  I always left her feeling that it was a blessing to hear her talk she seemed so near Heaven.
On the morning of Jan. 30, when her daughter went to call her she found her asleep in Jesus.
Funeral services were held from the Estep home Thursday at 2:00 p.m. conducted by Rev. J. E . Hall, and the remains laid to rest in the Mt. Olivet cemetery.-Mrs. J. E. H. -- The Adrian Journal, February 1, 1901, Page 1 Column 4, Obituary
 

Hartsall, Sidney
Sidney Hartsall, brother of our worthy townsman Esau Hartsall, died at his home in Blackburn, Oklahoma, January 30, 1901, age 50 years, 4 months and 14 days.  Deceased was  born in Pettis county, Mo., and spent his boyhood on the farm near Archie.  He was never married. Esau has the sympathy of friends in this bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, February 8,  1901, Page 1  Column 1, Death
 

Nelson-Spencer
A quiet wedding took place in town Sunday noon. The contracting parties were Chas. Nelson and Miss Dora Spencer, both of this vicinity.  S.C. Marshall officiated.  They have the best wishes of their friends. -- The Adrian Journal, February 8, 1901, Page 4 Column 1, Marriage
 

Wright, baby boy
Born to the wife of R. L.  Wright, this city, on the 5th a boy, mother and child doing well and Bob is able to get along without the aid of a physician. -- The Adrian Journal, February 8, 1901, Page 8 column 4, Birth
 

Morris, Charley
Died, Sunday morning, Feb. 5, little Charley, the seven month old babe of Charley Morris, the Archie barber.  B. L. Goodbar and wife have been taking care of the baby, but death called him to his long and happy home.  Born on earth to bloom in heaven. -- The Adrian Journal, February 8, 1901, Page 8 Column 4, Death
 

Porter-Vansant
Henry Porter and Miss Kate Vansant were married Wednesday eve, Jan. 30th.  Both parties lived in Bates county, one and a half miles southwest of Archie. -- The Adrian Journal, February 8, 1901, Page 8 column 4, Marriage
 

Lanham, Dick
Will Forbes received word last Friday announcing the death of Dick Lanham on that date, at Grainfield, Kansas.  The cause is given as pneumonia. Deceased lived  in this county for a number of years, until a year ago, when he moved to his new home.  He was an honorable gentleman and good citizen and a host of friends here regret to learn of his demise. For a number of years he had been a great sufferer from rheumatism but the change of climate proved beneficial to him. We have not the dates from which to write an obituary. -- The Adrian Journal,  February 15, 1901, Page 1 Column 2, Death

D. Lanham was born in Kentucky, Nov. 20, 1852, died in Grainfield township, Gove county, Kansas, Feb. 7, 1901, 
of pneumonia, age 48 years, 2 months and 18 days.  He married Mary F. Story May 2, 1877, in Macoupin Co., Ill. Came to Mo. Oct. 1877, where he resided until March 3, 1900.  A wife and six children are left to mourn the loss of a kind and faithful husband and father. -- The Adrian Journal, February 22, 1901, Page 1 Column 3, Obituary
 

Licklider, Samuel E.
We chronicle the death of Samuel E. Licklider, who was buried in the Everett cemetery on Wednesday Feb. 6th.  The writer of this items had known the deceased since 1868, while Sam had his faults, as we all have, he was a good neighbor, and would do a neighbor a favor at any times, day or night, as those who live in and around Everett can attest. -- The Adrian Journal, February 15, 1901, Page 8 Column 3, Death
 

Wysong-Ewing
  
On Wednesday evening, February 20, 1901, at the home of the bride, 2 ½ miles west of this city, George Wysong and miss Myrtle Ewing were united in the holy bonds of matrimony, Rev. A. H. Dean, of Harrisonville,  was the officiating clergyman.
  The ceremony was performed in the presence of a large number of relatives and friends of the contracting parties.  After the usual congratulations the bride and groom led the way to the dining room, where a bounteous spread, prepared in a tempting manner, awaited them.  The supper attested fully of the skill of Mrs. Ewing and daughter in the culinary art.
The contracting parties are numbered among the best young people in the community, and stand high in the esteem of their acquaintances.
George Wysong, the groom, is a young man of excellent habits, honest and industrious, and will be loyal to the obligations he has assumed.
Miss Myrtle is the only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Ewing, and is every way worthy the high esteem in which she is held.  She is in every was a lady of sunny temperament, a real jewel  in social life.
The Journal heartily joins the host of friends of the contracting parties in extending congratulations and best wishes for the happiness and success of the worthy couple.  May they realize their fondest expectations is our earnest wish.  They received a large number of costly and useful presents. -- The Adrian Journal, February 22, 1901, Page 1 Column 3, Marriage
 

Mudd, Amanda
  
At the family home, one mile south of Burdett, on Monday February 18, 1901, Mrs. Amanda, wife of Ex-Sheriff E. C . Mudd, passed into that invisible beyond.  For several weeks she had been a great sufferer from a complication of diseases, and medical skill could not stay its progress.
  Amanda Stillwell was born January 1, 1852; on September 26, 1874, she was united in marriage with E.  C. Mudd.  Of this union five children were born, two of them, a son and daughter survive, three preceded the mother.
  Mrs. Mudd was a woman of noble Christian character. Her life was filled with deeds of kindness, and words of love and affection.  Those who knew her best esteemed her most highly.  In her home she was like a gentle sunbeam, ever reflecting a kingly spirit, and a persuasive influence over those with whom she came in contact.  For 22 years she had been a faithful member of the Baptist church, and her life corresponded with the profession she made.
  Funeral services were Helford the Baptist church at Burdette on Tuesday, and were  conducted by Rev. Silvius, of this city, and the remains laid to rest in the cemetery at that place.
The husband and surviving children have the sympathy of their friends in this great bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, February 22, 1901, Page 1 column 3, Obituary
 

Moore, Mrs.
 
Mrs. Moore died Sunday night last, here remains were laid to rest in the Englewood cemetery Tuesday. The family have the sympathy of their friends. -- he Adrian Journal,  March 15, 1901, Page 8 column 3, Death
 

Bowling-Hawk
Our brilliant correspondent, Mr. P. Jay Bowling and Miss Roberta Hawk, both of Mound township, were united in marriage at Butler Tuesday, Rev. Cobb officiating.
   The contracting parties are numbered among the best in the county.  The groom is a progressive and industrious farmer, and a cultured gentleman.  The bride is highly educated and refined lady, a brilliant artist, and will make a charming companion.
They will make their home at the Hawk farm, three miles southwest of this city.  The Journal congratulates the happy parties and predicts for them a happy future.
We always too P. Jay for a man of excellent judgment, and this step only serves to confirm our opinion of him.  The Journal confidently expects to be complimented with some interesting items from the esteemed gentleman. -- The Adrian Journal, March 15, 1901, Page 8 Column 4, Marriage
 

Davis, triplet babies
Dr. McFarland, of Ballard, reports the birth of triplets to the wife of Homer Davis on the 13th. Two boys and one girl. All interested parties doing well. -- The Adrian Journal, March 22, 1901, Page 8  Column 2, Birth
 

Todd boy
Wm. Warden and Harvey Wilson, west of Everett, were in town Saturday morning after a coffin for one of Reuben Todd’s boys who died the night before as a result of a wound from a target rifle. The particulars as told to your correspondent by Mr. Ward are as follows:  Todd told the boys not to load the gun until they left the house, but they did, and it was discharged with deadly effect.  The boy lived until Friday night.  The Barkley boy went home and shot his own brother, but not seriously. -- The Adrian Journal, March 22,1901, Page 8 column 3, Death
 

Sartain, Charles J.
 
On Friday morning, March 30, 1901, the dark messenger crossed the threshold of the Sartain home, four miles north of this city, and carried away the spirit of the dear husband and father.  His light went out on earth to shine with a brighter luster in a fairer land.
  Charles J. Sartain was born in Releford county, Tennessee, April 27, 1838, where he resided until he was 10 years old, when the family moved to Texas, where he resided until the sixties, after serving for a time in the Confederate army, he went to Illinois.  In 1863 he was united in marriage with Miss Mary Ham.  Of this union nine children, four sons and five daughters wee born, all of whom with the companion survive.  Mr.  Sartain and family moved to this county in the spring of 1875 and located near Butler, in 1879 they moved to the farm north of this city, where they have since resided.
   About 30 years ago Mr. Sartain was converted and united with the Methodist church, of which he remained a member until 12 years ago, when he united with the U. B. society at Crescent Hill, and of which he was a member at the time of his demise.
As a citizen Charles Sartain’s character was above reproach.  He was punctual in meeting his obligations.  A man of kindly nature and generous impulses.  He enjoyed the companionship of his neighbors and acquaintances.  The purpose of his life was to be honest with his fellowman.
Six years ago he was stricken with disease, since which time to his death he was a constant sufferer.  No pains were spared to nurse him back to life.  He was treated by the local physicians, consulted specialists in Kansas City and New York; spent a year or more at the health resorts in Arkansas, but all was in vain, he  grew steadily worse.  During these years of suffering his faithful wife gave him every attention that could be given.  For the past three years he had been a helpless invalid, yet the tender object of care of his faithful companion, and devoted children.  In his home life he was a devoted husband and father, adored by his family.
The community joins with the bereaved ones in mourning the loss of this esteemed citizen and worthy gentleman.
Funeral services were held Sunday at 2:00 p.m. from the Crescent Hill church, conducted by his pastor Rev. R. M. Montgomery.  The large concourse of people in attendance attested the high esteem in which deceased was held by his neighbors.  After the services at the church were concluded the remains were tenderly borne to the Crescent Hill cemetery and laid to rest. -- The Adrian Journal, April 5, 1901, Page 1 column 3, Obituary
 

Hodges, baby boy
 
Born to the wife of Ed. Hodges, on Thursday night, March 28, an average baby boy.  Mother and child doing well.  Ed is able to be about, he ordered a new walking plow next morning for his baby boy. -- The Adrian Journal, April 5, 1901, Page 8 Column 4, Birth
 

Lightfoot, Mrs. P. G.
Mrs. P. G. Lightfoot died at her home two miles north of Burdett on last Saturday morning after an illness of only a few days.  Funeral services were conducted at the Baptist church by Rev. Lewis Sunday.  Her remains were laid to rest in the village cemetery.  The bereaved family have the sympathy of the entire community. -- The Adrian Journal, April 5, 1901, Page 8 Column 4, Death
 

Brown, Bert
 
A letter from Dan Brown announces the death of his brother Bert at Salem, Oregon, March 31, 1901.  He was working in the timer March 29th and was struck in the stomach by a falling limb.  Death resulted from the injury as stated above.
   Bert formerly resided in this vicinity, and was a highly respected gentleman.  At the time of his death he was 26 years, 2 months and 12 days old. -- The Adrian Journal, April 12, 1901, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Van Alstein, Laura Nevada
Mrs. Laura Nevada Van Alstein died at her home in Kansas City last Monday, aged 32 years.  A husband and four children are left.  Deceased was a daughter of Mrs. Dan Prine, of this city.  The remains were brought to this city Tuesday and on Wednesday taken to the Cloud cemetery for burial.  She was a faithful member of the Bales Chapel Baptist church of Kansas City.  Rev. Silvius conducted a brief funeral service from the Prine home Wednesday morning, which was attended by friends. -- The Adrian Journal, April 19, 1901, Page 1 Column, Death
 

Rodman, W. W.
 
W. W. Rodman, a farmer living on the Wilhite farm, two miles west of town, dropped dead this morning.  His body was found in the hay shed.  He ate a hearty breakfast and appeared in his usual health.  Heart disease is supposed to   be the cause. -- The Adrian Journal, April 26, 1901, Page 1 Column 1, Death

   William Wesley Rodman, who died suddenly at his home near this city last Friday morning,  was born in Olena, Illinois, August 13, 1851 and died April 26, 1901 of heart failure.  He was united in marriage with Miss Isabella Neally Feb. 1874, to this union were born 12 children, eight of whom with the wife survive him.  He has three sisters and two brothers.
Deceased had lived in this vicinity for the past six years, and was held high esteem by all who knew him.  He was honorable in all his dealings. He was a loving father and husband; home was a sacred place to him, there a vacancy exists that can never be filled.
Funeral services were held from the home Sunday morning at 10:00 o’clock, conducted by Rev. J.E. Hall, and the remains were buried in Crescent Hill. -- The Adrian Journal, May 3, 1901, Page 8 column 4, Obituary
 

Taggart, John
John Taggart died at his home at Nashville, Barton, county, Mo., Friday, April 19, 1901. The remains were taken to Rose Hill, Johnson county, on Sunday for burial.
For several years Mr. Taggart had been a great sufferer from cancer, and every remedy had been exhausted to relieve him of his malady, but to no avail.
We have not the facts necessary to write an obituary, but will try to get them later.  The family have the sympathy of their many friends in this their hour of gloom. -- The Adrian Journal, April 26, 1901, Page 1 Column 2, Death
 

Gutshall-Forgey
Ira B. Gutshall and Miss Forgey were united in marriage at Birds Point, Mo., April 17,1901.  The arrived in this city Friday for a few days visit with the groom’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Gutshall.  On Sunday morning they left for Bostwick, Neb., where the groom is engaged in the mercantile business.  The groom is a Bates county boy and his friends here join in wishing him and his bride a happy journey through life. -- The Adrian Journal, April 26, 1901, Page 1 Column 3, Marriage
 

Sears, Troy
  
At the home of Gibb Holloway 1 ½ miles southeast of Lone Tree, May 1st, occurred a frightful accident which resulted in the death of Troy Sears, a 13 year old boy.
   The facts was we got them are as follows: Young Sears was running a stalk cutter for Holloway, and it is thought that he had the lines fastened together and thrown around his neck.  While the lines were in position they were caught in the revolving knives and the result was that the boy was choked to death.
   Mr. Holloway, who was working nearby, heard the boy say, whoa! And looking around saw the boy bending forward, but supposed that he was cleaning the knives.  He soon discovered however that the boy was held fast by the lines, and when he reached the boy it was to late.  Troy Sears was a nephew of Mrs. John Stone of this city. -- The Adrian Journal, May 3, 1901, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Rardin, Margarie
 
Undertaker Leonard informs us of the death of Miss Margarie, the 19 year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. N. Rardin of Archie.  She had been a long sufferer from that dread disease consumption. Funeral services were held on Wednesday. -- The Adrian  Journal, May 3 1901, Page 8 column 1, Death
 

Williams, Robert V.
Last Monday morning the death messenger entered the Williams home of East Boone township, and wafted away the spirit of the husband and father to that invisible bourne.
For two weeks Mr. Williams had been making a heroic fight against the ravages of disease, but at last he was compelled to yield to the inevitable.
Robert V.  Williams was born in Champagne county, Ohio, August 7, 1843, and died at his home near Burdett, Mo., April 29, 1901; aged 57 years, 8 months and 22 days.
When the clouds of war gathered Mr. Williams enlisted in the Federal army and served three years.  In 1870 he came to Bates county and has since made this his home.  On September 23, 1872 he was united in marriage to Ellen J. Perkins. To this union was born five children, viz: Oliver, deceased, Effie, Alta, Carl and Guey, who with the wife and mother survive.
Robert Williams was one of the most widely known farmers in Bates county, having for a number of years been extensively engaged in raising Poland China hogs.  In this he had gained a state reputation owning some of the best bred hogs in the state.
As a citizen Mr. Williams had no superior.  He was a man of progressive thought and put his thought into action.  The Journal men had extensive business relations with him, and always found him to be thoroughly reliable in  his dealings.  He was interested  and delighted to see his neighbors succeed in life and always spoke kindly of them.
In his home he was a model husband and father.  It was there that his beautiful traits of character were displayed.  He was justly proud of the achievements of his family.  To the wife and children this is almost an unbearable bereavement, and in this their hour of deep distress they have the deep sympathy of a wide circle of friends. The community mourns with them over the loss of so good a citizen.
About eight years ago Mr. Williams united with the Presbyterian church,  in which faith he died.
Funeral services were held from the home on Tuesday at 2:00 o’clock p.m., Rev. Silviius of this city conducted the service, after which the remains were buried in Crescent Hill cemetery.
In the death of Robert V. Williams the community lost one of its best citizens. -- The Adrian Journal, May 7, 1901, Page 8 Column 3, Obituary
 

Hobbs, John
John Hobbs, an aged gentleman residing in Archie, died suddenly at his home Monday.  He had been palsied for a number of years. Rev. Cratsinger conducted funeral services and the body buried at Crescent Hill Tuesday. -- The Adrian Journal, May 10, 1901, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Bratcher, Jennie
Mrs. Jennie Bratcher, 67 years old, dropped death at the home of her daughter in Archie on Tuesday morning.  She had been complaining for sometime, but her condition had not been considered serious.  Funeral services were held from the home Wednesday, conducted by Rev. Silvius, burial in Crescent Hill. -- The Adrian Journal, May 10, 1901, Page 1  Column 3, Death
 

Carpenter, Annie May
At 5 o’clock on the morning of May 7,1901, death entered the home of Mr. and Mrs. I. Carpenter and carried away the spirit of their daughter, Annie May.  For three months she had been a constant sufferer of acute pain, yet during all those weary days she had patiently borne the affliction with the hope that she would regain her health, but fate had decreed otherwise.
Anne May  Carpenter was born in Big Rock, Illinois, August 20, 1880, where she resided with her parents until the family moved to this city about a year ago.  She was an amiable young lady, admired by all who knew her.
Brief funeral services were from the parlors of Hotel Carpenter Wednesday at noon, conducted by Rev. John E. Hall.  The Methodist choir sang several selections.  The body was taken by the 1:17 p.m. train to Plano, Illinois, where it was buried Thursday afternoon.  The sorrowing parents accompanied the remains to their last resting place.
The bereaved family has the sincere sympathy of friends in this hour of sadness. -- The Adrian Journal, May 10, 1901, Page 1 Column 3, Obituary
 

Smith-Nichols
At Butler, Mo. On Tuesday evening, May 7, 1901, Attorney A. J. Smith of this city, and Miss Mary Nichols, of Shawnee township, were quietly united in marriage.
Mr. Smith is a successful attorney of this city and enjoys a large clientage.
Miss Mary is one of the best women in the county, and will no doubt make a model wife.
Mr. and Mrs. Smith at once began housekeeping in their beautiful home on West third street, this city where hey are at home to their friends.
The Journal joins their large circle of friends in wishing them a pleasant and prosperous journey through life. We bespeak for them the happiness which accompanies upright living.  -- The Adrian Journal, May 10, 1901, Page 8 Column 4, Marriage
 

Leffler, William
 
William Leffler, an aged gentleman living seven miles northeast of this city, died at his home last night of pneumonia fever after an illness of ten days.  Mr. Leffler has resided in this community for many years.  He leaves a wife and several grown children.
 Funeral services will be held today at 2:00, the  G. A. R. Post of this city, of which the deceased was a member, will have charge of the service and render the ritualistic program at the grave.  The body will be buried in the Crescent Hill cemetery.
The family has the sympathy of a large circle of friend in this bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, May 10, 1901, Page 8 Column 4, Death
 

McCraw, Judy A.
 
Mrs. J. S. McCraw departed this life on Wednesday morning May 15, 1901, after a ten day illness, the immediate cause of death being heart failure.
  Judy A. Jackson was born in Davidson county, Tenn., near Nashville, July 26, 1831, and died at her home near Adrian, Mo., May 15, 1901, aged 69 years, 9 months and 19 days.
  She came with her parents to Missouri in 18847, was united in marriage with John S. McCraw Nov. 16, 1848.  To this union were born ten children, five of whom have preceded the mother to the beyond, one son and four daughters with the husband remain.
 She was converted in August 1848 and united with the Baptist church of which she was a faithful member until 1889, when she joined the United Brethren in Christ, it having taken the place of the Baptist church at Crescent Hill, she remained a faithful member until death claimed her.  She died rejoicing in the triumphs of a living faith.
  Aunt Judy McCraw and her husband were pioneers in this county, the 53 years of their married life having been spent in this township and at the place where she died, with the exception of a brief period during the civil war, when by a general order the county was depopulated.
 During the formative period of social conditions here Aunt Judy was a prominent figure. She was a woman of amiable disposition and this served to make her popular with the hardy pioneers.  Her life abounded in deeds of kindness and words of sympathy, and her home was ever open to those who were in need of aid and comfort.
  The citizens of those early times have only words of praise for Aunt Judy and now that the sympathetic heart has ceased to pulsate and the hand is no longer able to minister to the needy, these friends of bye-gone days weep in sadness at the loss of so good a friend.  Not alone do these weep for the more recent settler here had learned to love Aunt Judy, and to admire her beautiful traits of character.  These to are sad to loose a kind friend.
  Funeral services were held from the home Thursday afternoon, conducted by her pastor, Rev. R. M. Montgomery, and the remains buried in the Crescent Hill cemetery.
  The aged husband and surviving children have the deep sympathy of a large circle of friends in this bereavement.  May they look fervently to Him who alone can comfort. -- The Adrian Journal, May 17, 1901, Page 1 Column 3, Obituary
 

Kellum, Laura
Mrs. Laura N. Kellum, nee Hardy, died in Kansas City Wednesday, of this week, and the remains were laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery yesterday.  She leaves one son, and two daughters with the husband to mourn her loss. -- The Adrian Journal, May 17, 1901, Page 5 Column 4, Death
 

Harrison-Reeder
James Harrison, a prominent young farmer of Shawnee township, and Miss Stella, the handsome daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert  Reeder, were united in marriage at Urich last Sunday.  The young people are prominent in the social circles of the community ad the Journal joins their large circle of friends in extending congratulations and best wishes for their happiness and success. -- The Adrian Journal, May 17, 1901, Page 8 column 3, Marriage
 

Hoover-Owings
 
Prof. W. T. Hoover, of this city, and Miss Lula Owings, of Oak Grove, were married at the home of the bride’s parents on Monday, May 20, 1901, at 8:00 o’clock p.m.  The wedding was a quiet affair.
The groom is prominent educator, having been principal of the Oak Grove school for the past two years, and is employed for another year at an advanced salary.
The bride, is a stranger to the people of Adrian, but is said to be a charming young lady.
The happy couple arrived in this city last night for a brief visit with relatives, after which they will go to housekeeping in Oak Grove.
The Journal joins their many friends in extending congratulations and best wishes.
Will surprised his most intimate friends and nearest relatives in this matter.  None of them had the slightest intimation of his intention, and none of them suspected that he was matrimonially inclined, but their congratulations are none the less hearty and sincere. -- The Adrian Journal, May 24, 1901, Page 1 Column 3, Marriage
 

Shannon, Roy
Roy, son of Anderson Shannon, of near Merwin, fell sixty feet into a mine at Joplin Tuesday and was instantly killed. The body was taken to Merwin where it will be buried today.  Rev. Reynolds of this city conducted the funeral services. -- The Adrian Journal, May 31, 1901, Page 1 Column 1, Death
 

Wright, Claude
On Friday, June 14, 1901,  Claude, the 15 year old son of Mrs. Mattie Wright, of Altona,  was dragged to death by a span of frightened mules.  Claude was working for his brother-in-law, Ira Deardorff, two miles north of Altona. AT 1:30 o’clock he left the home field, driving the mules and carrying a bucket of water and an umbrella.  On the way he had to pass through a strip of timber.  After passing through this he raised his umbrella.  This frightened the mules, and the lines being either around his neck or body, he was thrown to the ground and dragged to death.  It is thought the mules ran at least a mile before the lines broke, releasing the mangles remains of the boy.  As soon as the mules reached the house Mr. Deardorff started for the field in search of the boy, but when he reached him Claude was dead.
This is all that is known of this sickening calamity, as there was no eye witness.  The above statement is made form the circumstances.  The bucket and umbrella were found together, the latter being opened.  From this it is thought that the mules became frightened when the boy opened the umbrella.
Claude Wright was an exemplary young man, and bore a good name in the community where he was raised. He was a faithful Sunday school pupil, and always deported himself in a becoming manner.  He was industrious, and did much toward the support of his widowed mother.
Impenetrable gloom washes over the entire community when his untimely death was announced, and every hand was extended to help the bereaved mother, brother and sister.  No pen can paint the picture of despair and distress that followed this sad occurrence.  Strong  hearts shrunk from the terrible scene.  On Saturday morning a large concourse of people assembled at the church, where Claude was seen each Sunday, to listen to a touching funeral sermon by Rev. Silvius.  It was a fitting tribute of respect to the memory of the manly boy, and the tears that trickled down the cheeks of these friends bore testimony of the heart pangs which they felt.  It was a sad occasion indeed.
After the funeral service the body was borne to the  France cemetery and tenderly laid to rest.
The mother, brother and three sisters have the deep sympathy  of the entire community in this, their hour of deepest grief. -- The Adrian Journal, June 12, 1901, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Blocher, Margaret
Margaret (Buck) Blocher was born in Somerset county, Pa., Feb. 17, 1834; died of Hepatic Calculi, with Intestinal Hepatitis, at Adrian, Mo.  June 17,1901, aged 67 years and 4 months.  Moved to Lee county, Illinois, about 1850, thence to Adrian, Mo., Oct. 1884.  She was married to Jacob Blocher in 1855. Eleven children remain to mourn their great loss.  Two children died in their infancy.
Thus one time more the pale messenger has come into our midst and claimed one whose life everyone recognized as being filled with Christian love, thought, and  deed.  At about 20 years of age she united with the German Baptist Brethren church, and ever lived a faithful life, dying in the full hope of the glorious resurrection of the just.
  She had been in poor health almost constantly for several years, and was confined to her bed for three months previous to her death.  Her suffering was very great, but she bore the same with Christian patience and resignation that is every where admired.
Her mind was constantly filled with Christian thought and work, and those about her were made to realize that the Christian religion is not only the hope of the living, but also the stay of the dying. 
  All that loving hands and medical skill could possibly do was done to alleviate her great suffering, and different times she expressed heartfelt appreciation for the tender care that was given her.  While her body was racked with pain, her spirit was reaching to realms above, and at different times she called her children to her for divine services, which she always much enjoyed.  And thus her work is done, and may we add, well done, the book is closed.  Her example will live to beckon others on in the good way he has trod.  Funeral services were held by Eld. D. M. Mohler, of Warrensburg, at the Brethren church Wednesday morning at 9:30, a large and sympathizing congregation being present, after which the remains were tenderly laid to rest in Crescent Hill cemetery, by the side of her husband, who had preceded her to the beyond four years.
And those who are left behind should now look beyond the grave to a happy meeting in the celestial City where parting is known no more.  Dry thy eyes and reverently say, “Not my will, but Thine, be done.” -- The Adrian Journal, June 12, 1901, Page 1 column 3, Obituary
 

Rink, Alma
 
Alma I, the only child of Mr. and Mrs. George Rink, died of Tubercular meningitis June 7,1901.  She was two years, six months and eighteen days old.  Little Alma was a bright and lovely child. She was the idol of her parents, and dearly beloved by all of her relatives.  Her parents and relatives did all in their power for the little sufferer, and the physician used all of his skill and brought every known remedy to bear to stay the hand of death, that the little angel might remain in the presence of her parents to light up and beautify, and make happy their home, but in spite of all their efforts, the disease conquered, and she yielded to death.  Her sweet, lovely little face is hidden from them. The veil of eternity dropped between them and her and her bright little soul passed into eternity, where it awaits their coming.  Oh! How happy they will be when they pass through the myst of death and meet little Alma on the other bright shore and gaze again upon her sweet little face, brightened and glorified by the light of an eternal existence to part no more. -- The Adrian Journal, June 14, 1901, Page 8 Column 2, Death
 

Watson, James
  
Two young men were standing in  a stable at Main City, during a thunder shower last week, lightening struck the stable, killing James Watson and shocked the other young man so severely that he was rendered unconscious for several hours. -- The Adrian Journal, June 14, 1901, Page 8 Column 4, Death
 

Davis, W. J.
W. J. Davis, familiarly known as Uncle Jack, started Wednesday with his wife from their home south of Everett, to visit their son in Drexel; when they reached the Armstrong property, near Main City, Uncle Jack took suddenly ill and was taken to a nearby house where he was tenderly cared for by friends, but to no avail, he died in a few minutes.  W. E. Leonard embalmed the body.  Uncle Jack had lived near Everett for 32 years and was near 70 years old when he died.  He leaves a wife and several children. -- The Adrian Journal, June 14, 1901, Page 8 column 4, Death
 

Brown, baby boy
Born to the wife of Jacob Brown on the 23rd, a  boy.  Mother and child doing well, Jacob still survives. -- The Adrian Journal, June 28, 1901, Page 8 column 4, Birth
 

Runnenburger-Hall
A number of Adrianites received handsome announcement cards on Tuesday tell of the marriage on Monday evening, June 24th of Frank Runnenburger and Miss Sabra, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. D. K. Hall.  The contracting parties are numbered among the most prominent young people of Harrisonville.  The groom is interested in business here, and has many friends who wish him and his bride the best. -- The Adrian Journal, June 28, 1901, Page 8  column 5, Marriage
 

Woolsey, Abigale
Died at the home of her son Jerry Woolsey, 3 miles west of Altona.  Mrs. Abigale Woolsey, the subject of this sketch was born June 24, 1822, in Carrol co., Mo.  Departed this life July 1, 1901, aged 79 years 7 days.  She was married to Stephen Woolsey January 28, 1838.  To this union was born 7 children.  At the age of 16 years she gave her heart to God and united with the Christian church and ever after lived a faithful Christian life.
She had been an invalid for several years, but at last death came to her relief and gently as the morning breeze she fell asleep to wake no more on earth but in heaven.  Her remains were taken to Mt. Olivet church where Rev. Silvius, of Adrian, preached an able and sympathic sermon, after which the remains were laid to rest in Mt. Olivet cemetery.-Mrs. E. M. Duke -- The Adrian Journal, July 19, 1901, Page 1 column 2, Obituary
 

Gregory, W. H.
W. H. Gregory of Amsterdam, was killed in a runaway Wed. night, by being thrown from a wagon. -- The Adrian Journal, July 19, 1901, Page 1 Column 4, Death
 

Goodrick, baby boy
What causes the broad smile on Chas. Goodrick’s face? Oh! Its only a boy come to live with him. -- The Adrian Journal, July 19,1901, Page 8 column 1, Birth
 

Hoots, Mrs. S .  W. A.
Mrs. S . W . A. Hoots, who has been an occupant of the asylum at Nevada for the past two years died of the heat last Saturday and was buried in Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal,July 19, 1901, Page 8 Column 3, Death
 

Lemaster, John
John Lemaster, and aged citizen, died at his home in Elkhart township, Wednesday evening.  He had been afflicted for some time with some ailment in his foot, recently it became necessary to amputate one of is toes but this did not bring relief.  He leaves a wife and several grown children. -- The Adrian Journal,, July 26, 1901, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Winkle, baby girl
Born to the wife of Bert Winkle on the 22nd, a girl. Mother and child doing well.  Bert is recovering his usual health and his mind is improving. -- The Adrian Journal, July 26, 1901, Page 8 Column 4, Birth
 

Garland, baby boy
A baby boy came to the home of Charley Garland a few days ago.  He give promise of making a good blacksmith. -- The Adrian Journal, July 26, 1901, Page 8 Column 4, Birth
 

Feebank, Wm.
Wm. Feebank, a prominent farmer of Passaic, dropped dead at his home Wednesday evening, heart disease  is assigned the cause.  He had been complaining for some time. -- The Adrian Journal, August 2, 1901, Page 1 Column 4, Death
 

Ensworth, Lucy
Saturday morning, July 27, 1901, at 11:00 Lucy F., wife of C. L. Ensworth passed into that invisible bourne.
Mrs. Ensworth had been ill but a short time, her illness was due to heat prostration, which came upon her Tuesday night.  She had been in her usual health previous to that time.
Lucy F. Remley was born in Bracken county, Ky., Oct. 14, 1840, and came to Missouri in 1859.  April 12, 1870 she was united in marriage with C. L. Ensworth.  To this union four children were born, viz, Eugene, Mrs. Marcelia Hodges, Mrs. Josie Lanz and Irvin, all of whom are living.
Mrs.   Ensworth was for many years a faithful member of the Baptist church, and her life was such as to reflect credit on the cause she espoused.
  She was a model wife, mother and neighbor.  Those who lived near her say that her hand was every ready to administer to the wants of her neighbors.  In sickness and health she was always the same kind hearted Christian lady.  The large number of persons who attended her funeral evidenced the esteem in which she was held by them.
The funeral services were held from the home Sunday afternoon, Rev. Joseph Timmons conducted the services.  He remarks were very appropriate, and having resided near them for a number of years, he knew of the excellent character of the deceased, and spoke feelingly of her beautiful life.  At the conclusion of the services the remains were laid to rest in Crescent Hill cemetery.
The aged husband, and children have the deep sympathy of the entire community. -- The Adrian Journal, August 2, 1901, Page 1 Column 2, Obituary
 

Warwick, infant
Mr. and Mrs. Warwick’s infant child died Wednesday and was buried Thursday morning. -- The Adrian Journal, August 2, 1901, Page 8 column 1, Death
 

Arnett, Elizabeth A.
Died: Elizabeth A. Arnett.  Born March 8, 1825 died July 28, 1901 age 76 years 4 months and 20 days. -- The Adrian Journal, August 2, 1901, Page 8 column 1, Death
 

Frazier, Mary
Mrs. Mary Frazier, a widow lady living near Austin, committed suicide Wednesday in a horrible manner.  She saturated her clothing with oil and set them on fire.  The body was found in the field near her home, the clothing was burned and the body badly charred.  It is thought that she was prompted to the deed on account of poor health. -- The Adrian Journal, August 9, 1901, Page 1 Column 2, Death
 

Whitlem, Robert
 
Friday evening, August 2nd, the spirit of Robert Whitlem took its flight to the other world. For several days his condition was such that no hope of his recovery had been entertained by relatives and friends, and the result did not come as a surprise.
Robert Whitlem was born near Epworth, Lincolnshire, England, May 13, 1822, and came to America in May 1850.  He was united in marriage with Sarah Cobb Oct. 29, 1857, to this union were born six children, two of whom, Mrs. H. P. Edwards and Wm. Whitlem, both of this city, survive him.
After coming to this country he resided in Ohio 4 years, he then moved to Iowa where he resided until 1865, when he moved to Cass Co. until six years ago when he moved to this city.
He was converted and united with the M. E. church in 1864, of which he remained a faithful member until called from his earthly duties.
Robert Whitlem was a generous and kind hearted man, and made fast friends of those who met him.
During his residence here he was able to be around but little, and was constantly at home, but those who crossed his threshold were heartily welcomed.
Funeral services were held from the home of Mrs. Edwards, Saturday at noon, conducted by Rev. J. E. Hall and the remains were taken to Freeman by the 1:17 train, where they were laid to rest.
The aged companion and surviving children have the sympathy of their many friends in their bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, August 9, 1901, Page 1 Column 2, Death
 

Moles, baby boy
Born to Geo. Moles and wife last week, a boy.  Mother and child doing well. -- The Adrian Journal, August 9, 1901, Page 8 Column 4, Birth
 

Cowley, infant
 
The 18 month old child of George Cowley, of Grand River township, died yesterday morning of  dysentery, after a brief illness. -- The Adrian Journal, August 16, 1901, Page 5 Column 3, Death
 

Gundy, child
 
The 12 year old son of Jake Gundy, of near Austin, died Monday after an illness of 24 hours, of flux.  Funeral Tuesday. -- The Adrian Journal, August 16,1901, Page 5 Column 3, Death
 

Tabor,  Mrs. Lace
Mrs. Lace Tabor died at the family home in Kansas City Monday. The remains were brought to this city
Tuesday and laid to rest in the  Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, August 23,1901, Page 1 Column 1, Death
 

Terry-Rodman
Frank M. Terry, of Coffeyville, Kansas and Mrs. Mealissa B. Rodman, of this city, were united in marriage at Coffeyville, on the 19th., Rev. Cline, of that city officiating.
The bride returned to Adrian, packed her household effects and moved to her new home.  Mr. Terry is a machinist and owns property in Houston, Texas.  The bride resided in this city for many years. -- The Adrian Journal, August 23 1901, Page 1 Column 2, Marriage
 

Wheldon, Elizabeth
Elizabeth Weldon died at her home in Burdett  Tuesday night, Aug. 20, 1901, after an illness of several weeks.
Elizabeth Davis was born in Washington, Homestead co., Ark.  June 30 1830, and came to Mo. In 1832.  In 1853 she was united in marriage with Harvey Weldon in Clay county, the same year she was converted and united with the Baptist church, and at the time of her death she was a faithful member of the Baptist church at Burdett.
A husband and three children survive her.
Funeral services were held from the Baptist church at Burdett, Wednesday afternoon, conducted by Rev. Silvius, her pastor, and the remains were buried in the cemetery there.
The family have the heartfelt sympathy of their many friends in their bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, August 23, 1901, Page 1 Column 2, Obituary
 

Bloom, May
May, the three year old daughter of P. D. and Dona Bloom, died of flux, at the family home in Archie, Aug. 27, 1901.  Funeral services were held in the Baptist church, Archie on Wednesday at 1:30 o’clock, conducted by Rev. Montgomery, after which the remains were laid to rest in the Everett cemetery.  The bereaved have the sympathy of friends in their great loss. -- The Adrian Journal, August 30, 1901, Page 1 Column 2, Death
 

Burns, James
James  Burns, for many years a resident and large property owner of Elkhart, died at Nevada last Sunday.  He was 64 years old and had for many years been a member of the U. B. church. The remains were brought to Adrian Monday and taken to Mt. Olivet, where funeral services were conducted by Rev. Montgomery and the remains buried in the cemetery at that place.  Deceased was a brother of Mrs. S. E. Jones and Mrs. Capt. Dillon. -- The Adrian Journal, August 30, 1901, Page 1 Column 2, Death
 

Sliffe, Margaret Emeline
Margaret Emeline Sliffe, wife of Benjamin F. Sliffe, and daughter of John and Mary Timmons, was born in Madison county, Ohio May 2, 1858.  Died at her home 5 ½ miles southeast of Adrian, August 26, 1901. Aged 43 years, 3 months and 24 days.
She moved with her parents to this county in 1869.  Was converted and united with the U. B. church, under the labors of Rev. Jos. Timmons, November 1874.  Was married to her present sorrow stricken husband on October 11, 1881.  She was faithful to every duty; to visit the sick and to do acts of kindness to all.  She leaves a husband, a loving father and step-mother, two brothers, four sisters and a host of  relatives and friends to mourn, but not without hope.  Her mother, two brothers and one sister preceded her to the other shore.
 How we will miss her, for she was always with us in Sunday school and church work.  Her home was a home for God’s people.
Funeral services were held from the Deer Creek Chapel on Tuesday, a large and sympathizing audience being present. After the services the remains were laid away in the Nichols cemetery to await the summons from on High.  God bless the bereaved. -- The Adrian Journal, August 30, 1901, Page 1 Column 2, Obituary
 

Wilcox, Sarah
 
On Wednesday night at 12:00 o’clock the death messenger came and carried away the spirit of Grandma Wilcox, who was stopping with her daughter, Mrs. Sarah Scott at Foster.
Sarah Duncan was  born in Bath county, Kentucky, June 6, 1811, and died August 20, 1901; aged 90 years, 2 months and 23 days. When quite young she moved with he parents to Mooresville, Indiana. There she was married to Isaac Wilcox December 16, 1828, to this union fifteen children were born, twelve of whom are living.  James Wilcox, of Everett, Richard Wilcox of Passaic, Mrs. Chas. Garrison, of near Adrian, and Mrs. Scott, of Foster, are among the living.  In 1866 the family moved from Indiana to this state, locating near Crescent Hill and resided there until the eighties, when they moved to Butler, there the husband died January 29,1886, since which time the aged wife has resided in and near Butler, during the last three of which she lived her children.
Mrs. Wilcox was converted and united with the Baptist church at Stilesville, Indiana, in 1842, and remained a faithful member of that denomination until her death.
Grandma Wilcox was more vigorous than persons of her age usually are.  She retained her mental faculties to the end.  In her primes Mrs. Wilcox was an active figure in the community. All of the earlier settlers in this locality remember her as an amiable and kind hearted woman, ready at all time to relieve suffering and comfort the sorrowing.
Her ninety years of life were made up of kindly deeds and comforting words. Truly Grandma Wilcox has passed to a rich reward, after a long life which has been and will continue to be a benediction to her children and associates.  Peace be to her ashes. -- The Adrian Journal, August 30, 1901, Page 1 Column 4, Obituary
 

Bateman,  twin girls
Chas. Bateman reports the arrival of twin girls at his home Saturday night. All parties doing well. -- The Adrian Journal, August 30,1901, Page 5 column 4, Birth
 

Cook, Dr. J. D.
Dr. J. D. Cook, and old physician of Warrensburg,  died at that place Aug. 25, of lockjaw and was buried in the Crescent Hill cemetery.  He was an old G. A. R. man. -- The Adrian Journal, August 30, 1901, Page 8 column 3, Death
 

Nichols-Bowman
William Nichols and Miss Ida Bowman were quietly united in marriage at the U. B. parsonage, this city, last Sunday morning, Rev. R. M. Montgomery officiating.
While it was not generally known that they were to be married at that time yet it was not a surprise to their many friends, as they had been expecting the event at any time.
The groom is an industrious and prosperous young farmer of Shawnee township, and a worthy and popular gentleman.  No one is more highly esteemed in the community that Will Nichols.
The bride is the amiable daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Bowman of this city, and is in every sense a worthy and popular young lady.  The Journal unites with their host of friends in wishing them a pleasant journey through life and that their lives be abundantly blessed. -- The Adrian Journal, September 13,  1901, Page 1  Column 2, Marriage
 

Moses-Smith
At the beautiful home of the bride’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Smith, of this city, on Tuesday, Sept. 10, 1901, at 11:00 o’clock a.m., Miss Lizzie D. Smith and Howard N. Moses, M.D., of Salina, Kansas were united in the bonds of matrimony Rev. J. E. Hall, pastor of the M. E. church officiating.
  The bride was gowned in Ashes of Roses silk, and carried a beautiful bouquet of white roses and maiden leaf ferns.  The groom wore the conventional black.
 Only the immediate relatives of the contracting parties were present to witness the beautiful ceremony, the bridal party and guests were ushered into the spacious dining room where a sumptuous collation of refreshments were served, which fully attested the skill of the bride’s mother in the culinary art.
  Lizzie Smith is one of Adrian’s best and most beautiful young ladies, a cultured musician.  No matter when or where she was met, she was always courteous and agreeable.  A sweet disposition makes her a real queen.  She has no enemies but has a multitude of friends.  Lizzie, is a consecrated Christian girl, prominent  in church work and here she will be sadly missed by those with whom she has labored.
   The groom is a prominent young physician of Salina, Kansas, being the resident physician at the Sanitarium at the place and enjoys a large practice.  He is the son of H. W. Moses, formerly a prominent and highly respected business man  of this city.  Dr. Moses is said to be in every way worthy of the real prize he has won, and gives promise of being a leader in the medical profession.  While he is not widely known here a brief acquaintance has resulted in winning him many lasting friendships.
  The happy couple took the 1:17  train for a tour of the west, which will include a visit to Denver and Colorado Springs.  They will be at home, Salina, Kansas, after Sept. 20.
The bride received a number of beautiful and costly presents, a list of which we failed to get.
  The Journal joins heartily in the chorus of congratulations that are extended to these worthy young people, and united in the hope that their lives may be as happy as their  fondest anticipations have pictured it.  May they live long and well is the wish of their friends. -- The Adrian Journal, September 13, 1901, Page 1 Column 2, Marriage
 

Cox, Martha
On Sunday, Sept. 8, 1901, the death messenger entered the home of J. P. Cox, of Shawnee township, and carried away the spirit of the devoted wife and mother, who for many months had been suffering from cancer of the stomach, and whose death had been expected for several weeks.
Martha L. Deems was born in McDonough county, Illinois, May 21, 1856, on February 10, 1887 she was united in marriage to John P. Cox.  Of this union four children, two boys and two girls, were born who with the husband survive. She was converted and united with the M. E. church in 1875, since which time to her death she lived a consistent and devoted  Christian life.
 For months before the end came she was aware that her recovery was impossible, yet during this trying period she was resigned and tranquil of spirit.  The same generous impulses which she possessed in health remained with her in affliction to the closing moments of life.
 The family moved from Illinois to this county about five years ago, yet during this brief residence she had formed many acquaintances and these were ready during her affliction to minister to her wants in every possible way. Those who knew her best admired her beautiful life most.  She closed her eyes on the scene of this life without an enemy.
The high esteem in which she was held was full attested to by the large concourse of people that came out through the inclement weather to attend the funeral and to pay a tribute to the dead, and as best they could to comfort the stricken family.
 A husband, four children, a father and mother, three brothers, two sisters and a host of friends survive to the death of this noble woman, whose life was a veritable benediction to the community.  The writer had known her all his life and never in a single instance was she aught but a queenly lady, amiable and courteous to all.
Funeral services were held from the Mt. Olivet M. E. church Monday Sept. 9th, at 3:00 p.m. conducted by her pastor, Rev. J. E Hall, who spoke feelingly of her beautiful character, after which the remains were tenderly laid to rest in the cemetery there.
  The bereaved family and relatives have the deep sympathy of the community in this bereavement.  May the God of the fatherless deal graciously with them in this hour of impenetrable gloom. -- The Adrian Journal, September 13, 1901, Page 1  Column 3, Obituary
 

Hill, Clyde
Clyde, the six month old son of Mr. and Mrs. Wallace Hill, died at the family home Saturday night of cholera infantum.  He had been ill but a few days, but medical skill could not stay the ravages of the disease.  Burial at Crescent Hill on Sunday.  The parents have the sympathy of friends in their bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, September 13, 1901, Page 5 Column 3, Death
 

Moles, baby boy
Dr. Gilmore reports the birth of a boy at the home of Jesse Moles on Monday night. -- The Adrian Journal, September 13, 1901, Page 5 column 2, Birth
 

Miller-Haggard
 
Sunday morning, September 8, 1901, at 9:00, at the home of the bride’s parents. Mr. and Mrs. George Haggard of this city, Miss Fern Haggard and Fred Miller of Pittsfield, Mo., were united in marriage.  Rev. Wier of the Baptist church officiating.
 The wedding was a surprise to the most intimate friends of the bride, who is one of Adrian’s most popular young ladies.  She was prominent in social circles and church work and enjoyed the respect and esteem of our citizens generally, all of whom wish her life’s choicest blessings.
  The groom is a stranger here, but is said  to be a worthy young man and a prominent and prosperous farmer of Johnson county.
They leave today for Pittsfield, where they will make their future home.
The Journal joins their friends in extending congratulations and best wishes for their happiness. -- The Adrian Journal, September 13, 1901, Page 8 column 2, Marriage
 

Forbes-Bateman
A quiet wedding ceremony was performed at the home of Grandma Bateman, on Wednesday, Sept. 13, 1901, at 1:30 o’clock p.m.  It was the occasion of the marriage of Bert Forbes and Miss Louie Bateman.  Rev. J. E. Hall officiated.  The young people are well known in Adrian and vicinity.
The groom is an industrious young farmer of good habits.
The bride is a worthy Christian lady and an active church member.
The Journal joins their friends in  extending congratulations and best wishes  for their happiness and success. -- The Adrian Journal, September 20, 1901, Page 1 Column 1, Marriage
 

Marsh-Baskins
 
At the home of the bride’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Berry at Pleasanton, Kansas, at 8:00 o’clock Thursday evening, Sept. 12, 1901, Miss Ella Baskins was united in marriage to Mr. Chas. Marsh.  Rev. Rice officiating.
Only the family and immediate friends were present, the wedding being a very quiet one, but beautiful in every detail.
After the usual congratulations the bridal party and guests were led to the dining room where an elegant supper was served.
The bride wore a beautiful gown of castor cloth and carried a bouquet of bride’s roses and ferns.  She is the only daughter of Mrs. J.J. Berry, well known and respected by all.
Mr. Marsh is a successful farmer and stock raiser of near Drexel, Mo. And is a pleasant and genial gentleman.  They went to Drexel Sunday, where they will be at home to their friends for a few months before leaving for Okla. Their future home, the groom being one of the fortunate in securing a good claim near Hobart, on of the flourishing cities of the new country.
Mr. and Mrs. Marsh enjoy the acquaintance of a large circle of friends who wish them all happiness and success through life. -- The Adrian Journal, September 20, 1901, Page 4 column 3, Marriage
 

Weldon, W. H.
W. H. Weldon dropped dead at his home in Burdett last Tuesday morning.  He had eaten a good breakfast and left the house in his usual health, but in a few minutes his daughter found him dead. Heart disease is given as the cause.
Deceased was 86 years old, and was not rugged.  His aged companion passed into the beyond only a few months ago, and he has joined her.
He was a faithful member of the Baptist church and the funeral services were held from the Burdett church on  Wednesday.  The surviving relatives have the sympathy of friends in this bereavement.  Rev. Silvius conducted the service. -- The Adrian Journal, September 27,1901, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Hess-Feraris
At high noon on Sept. 25, 1901, at the beautiful country home of the bride’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Peter Feraris, in Mound township, Ed Hess and Anna Feraris were united in marriage.  Miss Mary Feraris acted as bride’s maid and Theodore Feraris was best man.
Promptly at noon the bridal party marched to the alter to the strains of the wedding march played by Mrs. J. E. Dowell. Rev. Weymeir performed the marriage ceremony in a very impressive manner, which was attentively listened to by the large number of persons present.
After the usual congratulations the guests were ushered into the spacious dining room where a sumptuous dinner was served.  Its excellent qualities can not be aptly described. Everything that was necessary to make an excellent service was at hand in abundance.  After all had eaten to satiety there was enough left to feed many more.
 Ed Hess, the groom, is one of the most industrious and well to do farmers in this vicinity, and is popular in the social and business circles of the community.  His friends have advised him for years to join fortunes with some fair maiden, and they were about to give up in despair when the wedding announcement was made public.
 The bride is a handsome and popular young lady, and will make him a worthy wife.
  The Journal joins their many friends in extending congratulations and best wishes for their future happiness and success. -- The Adrian Journal, September 27,1901, Page 1 Column 1, Marriage
 

Woods, Grandma
Grandma Woods died Wednesday and was buried in Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, September 27, 1901, Page 8 Column 3, Death
 

Walls, baby boy
 
Born, Sept. 21 to Mr. and Mrs. G. H. Walls, a son, regulation size and beauty.  All doing well except George who was immediately taken with a bad case of stringhalt. -- The Adrian Journal, September 27, 1901, Page 8 column 3, Birth
 

Lafrance-Stearns
   At the beautiful country home of the bride’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. H.  F. Stearns, Charles E. Lafrance and Edna H. Stearns were united in marriage in the presence of a goodly number of their friends.  Promptly at 7:30 o’clock, Mrs. J. E  . Powell began to play the wedding march and the contracting parties marched to the marriage alter, where Rev. R. M. Montgomery in a very beautiful and impressive ceremony united the fortunes of the young people.  This was followed by congratulations by the invited guests.  At the conclusions of this ceremony the party and guests were inducted into the dining room, where a sumptuous meal was served in the most approved manner.  Never has it been our good fortune to partake of a more sumptuous repast, abundant in quantity and excellent in quality.  No pains had been spared the menu. Everything attested the high standing of Mrs. Stearns’ skill in the culinary art.
  Whenever Dr. Gilmore and the Editor fail to make a visible impression on a good dinner the quantity must be great and on this occasion they made on impression whatsoever.
   The groom is a prominent young farmer and mechanic and a man of excellent habits, popular with all who know him.
   Miss Edna is an accomplished young lady, bright and vivacious, and will make an amiable and worthy companion.
   The will make their home in Kansas City, for a time, where Mr. Lafrance has a good position.
  The journal joins their many friends in extending congratulations and best wishes for the happiness and success of the worthy couple. -- The Adrian Journal, October 4, 1901, Page 1  Column 2, Marriage
 

Chapman, baby boy
Born to Mr. and Mrs. F. Chapman a boy, Sept. 25.  Mother and child doing well. -- The Adrian Journal, October 4, 1901, Page 5 Column 3, Birth
 

Rains, baby girl
Born to the wife of Chas. Rains, a girl.  Mother and child doing well. -- The Adrian Journal, October 4, 1901, Page 8 column 4, Birth
 

Browning, Eli
Word was received here Tuesday that Eli Browning had dropped death at his home in El Dorado Springs on Monday morning.  He formerly resided on a farm five miles east of Adrian, but moved to El Dorado several years ago. He was a brother of Wm. Browning and 72 years of age.  He leaves a wife and several children. -- The Adrian Journal, October 11, 1901, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Taber, Lace
Lace Tabor died in K. C. yesterday.  The remains were brought to Adrian today and buried in the Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, October 11, 1901, Page 1 Column 1, Death
 

West, baby boy
Born to Mr. and Mrs. Doyle West, Oct. 8th, a son.  Doyle says the son if a follower of his illustrious sire and Abraham Lincoln. -- The Adrian Journal, October 11, 1901, Page 8 column 3, Birth
 

Cripe-Whitehead
   On Wednesday evening October 16, 1901, at the country home of J. F. Whitehead, S. J. Cripe, of Holmesville, Neb., and Miss Claudie Whitehead were united in marriage Elder Geo. Lentz of the German Baptist Church officiating.  About 40 invited guests were present to witness the ceremony.
   After the usual congratulations the bridal party and guests were led to the dining room, where a sumptuous meal was served.  The choicest edibles were in abundance and served in a most tempting manner.
  The groom is a stranger here, but come well recommended as a man, in every way worthy of the heart he hath won.
   Miss Claudie is a beautiful young lady, of amiable disposition, and a popular and worthy woman, who has a host of friends.
  They will leave next Monday for Holmesville, Neb., where they will make their future home.
 The Journal joins the host of the bride’s friends in congratulations and best wishes for their continued happiness and prosperity in life. -- The Adrian Journal, October 18, 1901, Page 1 Column 2, Marriage
 

Teeter, Mrs. Durias
Mrs. Durias Teeter died in Los Angeles, Cal., October 17, of pneumonia fever, aged 52 years.  The remains were brought to Adrian and laid to rest in the Cloud cemetery on Tuesday.
Mrs. Teeter and her husband went west some time ago for the benefit of the latter’s health.
A husband and three grown children survive to mourn the loss of an affectionate wife and mother. -- The Adrian Journal, October 25, 1901, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Briggs, Mrs.
Mrs. Briggs, wife of the late Col. A. J. Briggs of Austin, died Wednesday. -- The Adrian Journal, November 1, 1901, Page 8 Column 4, Death
 

Hartley, baby  boy
Jake Hartley is rejoicing over the arrival of a fine boy baby into his home. -- The Adrian Journal, November  15, 1901, Page 5 column 2, Birth
 

Hill, Hannah
At the family home, three miles west of Adrian, on Tuesday night, Nov. 26, 1901, Hannah, wife of Wallace Hill, passed across the river of death, aged 25 years, 1 months and 1 day.
She was united in marriage with Wallace Hill, Dec. 6,  1893.  On August 18, 1901 she was united with the  Presbyterian church.
For several  yeas Mrs. Hill has been a sufferer of that dread disease, consumption, which was the immediate cause of her death.
She was an amiable lady and enjoyed the respect of her neighbors and acquaintances.
Funeral services were held from the home Thursday afternoon conducted by Rev. J. E. Hall, of the M. E. church, after which the remains were laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery.
The husband and family have the sincere sympathy of the entire community in their great bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, November 29, 1901, Page 1 Column 1, Death
 

Musgrove-Lane
Joseph Musgrove, of this city and Mrs. Jane Lane, of near Butler, were quietly married Tuesday night, Rev. J. N. Estep officiating.
This was a genuine surprise to the groom’s friends in this city, as many of them had not the least intimation that he contemplated matrimony.
 The Journal joins their friends in congratulations and good wishes for their happiness and success. -- The Adrian Journal, November 29, 1901, Page 1 column 2, Marriage
 

Bryant, baby boy
A boy baby came to gladden the home of Mr. and Mrs. R. Bryant on Tuesday. -- The Adrian Journal, November 29, 1901, Page 4 Column 2, Birth


Submitted by: Sandee Hubbard

Note: The information provided by Sandee Hubbard has been made available for personal genealogy research.
It may not be copied or reproduced without gaining her written permission to do so.

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