Bates County News



 

The Adrian Journal
Adrian, Bates County, Missouri

Jan. 24, 1902 - Dec. 12, 1902

(Missing: Jan. 3rd, 17th,  May 16th, Aug. 2nd, 29th, Oct. 10th, Dec. 19th, 26th.)
 

Purkey, Mary Jane
Mary Jane Purkey was born in Washington county, Ohio, May 31, 1829.  Died at Tiff City, Mo., December 4, 1902, after a weeks illness of pneumonia fever.
In 1846 she was united in marriage  to John Purkey, who died several years ago.  To this union 12 children were born, seven of whom survive.  The living children are Wesley, Joseph, Windsor, L. R., and Wm. Purkey and Mesdames Robbins and Frank Timons.
At the age of ten years Mrs. Purkey was converted and united with the United Brethren church and lived in that faith until death claimed her.
The family lived here for 32 years, having come here from McDonough county, Ill.
Many friends here remember Grandma Purkey as a kind hearted neighbor and friend.  Peace to her ashes. -- The Adrian Journal, January 24, 1902, Page 1 Column 3, Obituary
 

Claunch, Rachel A.
Rachel A., wife of Jas. Claunch died at the family residence, 3 miles southwest of this city,  Tuesday, January 21, 1902, after a lingering illness caused by consumption.
Deceased was born July 18, 1866, was united in marriage with James Claunch Feb. 23, 1888.  To this union five children were born, all of whom, with the father survive. Funeral services were held from Mt. Olivet church on Wednesday, conducted by her pastor, Rev. J. E. Hall  The husband and children have the deep sympathy of the community in this great bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, January 24, 1902, Page 1 column 3, Obituary
 

Murphy, John A.
We are pained to announce the death of John A. Murphy, who was crushed by a falling rock in a mine at Baker, Oregon.  Mr. Murphy was the oldest son of the widowed Murphy of near Altona.
He was born in Cooper county, Missouri, October 16, 1869, moved to Bates county with his parents in the fall of 1878.  Went to Colorado in 1888.  Later he attended the Commercial College at Portland, Oregon, where he graduated.  He next went to Weston, where he engaged in business for some years.
Leaving Weston he went to Baker Oregon, engaging in mining and in the real estate business where the sad accident occurred which caused his untimely death.  His mother, four  brothers, three sisters and a host of friends mourn his loss.
Mr. Murphy was a young man of industry; energy and integrity.  His savvy and kindness of heart attracted all with whom he came in contact. The bereaved mother, brothers, and sisters have the heartfelt sympathy of a large circle of friends in this their great sorrow. -- The  Adrian Journal, January 24, 1902, Page 5 Column 5, Obituary
 

Goodbar, baby girl
Born to Mrs. Ed. Goodbar, a girl.  Mother and baby doing well, and Ed lives to tell the story. -- The Adrian Journal, January 24, 1902, Page 8 Column 4,Birth
 

Hill-Wright
 
On Wednesday, January 27, 1902, W. E. Hill and Miss Clara B. Wright were united in marriage by Rev. G.J. Donnell, at his residence in Butler.  The contracting parties are numbered among the best young people in this part of the county.  The bride is a worthy young lady, while the groom is an industrious and prosperous young farmer.  Their many friends join in wishing them life’s greatest joys. -- The  Adrian Journal, January 31, 1902, Paged 1 Column 3, Marriage
 

Owen, baby boy
Dr. Hall received a card from M. P. Owen Tuesday in which he stated that a ten pound boy came to their home on the 23rd.  Mother and child both doing well, but Mort was in critical condition (?) -- The Adrian Journal, January 31, 1902, Page 5 Column 3, Birth
 

Nelson, baby girl
Born to Mrs. Chas. Nelson a girl.  Mother and child dong well, Chas. Has a pleasant smile. --  The Adrian Journal, January 31, 1902, Page 8 column 4, Birth
 

Johnson, infant girl
A girl baby was born to Mrs. O. Johnson Monday.  The little one remained but a few hours to brighten the home when its spirit took its flight.  The young parents have the sympathy of friends in this bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, February 7,1902, Page 5 Column 2, Death
 

Huff, Ida Emma
Ida Emma Shelton was born in Harrisonville, Mo., October 26, 1864, and died at her home near Lee’s Summit, Mo., Feb. 10, 1902 of peritonitis; age 37 years, 3months and 14 days.
She was united in marriage with W. P. Huff June 9, 1883, to this union were born 4 children, two sons and two daughters, all of whom with the husband survive.  Her father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. M. A. Shelton, and brother Frank Sigler reside at Adrian, and Mrs. John R. Gary, of Colorado are also surviving relatives. When 16 years old she was converted and united with the U. B. church and has remained a devoted Christian since that time.
She expressed a willingness to answer her last call.
The remains were brought to Adrian Tuesday and taken to the home of her parents, where funeral services were held, conducted by Rev. Silvius, after which the remains were laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery.  The family and relatives have the sympathy of the community in this sad bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, February 14, 1902, Page 1 Column 3, Obituary
 

Parish, baby girl
A baby girl was born to Mrs. W. W. Parish Monday. -- The Adrian Journal, February 14, 1902, Page 4 column 3, Birth
 

Porter, baby
A baby came to the home of Henry Porter this week. -- The Adrian Journal, February 14, 1902, Page 8 Column 4, Birth
 

Cross, Susan
   Mrs. Susan cross (nee Zion) was born in Des Moines county, Iowa, July 19, 1840, and died Jan. 28, 1902 at the age of 61 years, 6 months.  She was married to James A. Cross December 27, 1857, of this union there were three children, one daughter and two sons, viz: Mrs.  Rena Young, of Adrian, Mo., John Z. Cross, of Westborough, Mo., Wm. Cross, of Seneca, Kansas.  All of these were present during her illness and death, which resulted from paralysis after an illness of seven days.
   The funeral was held Jan. 30th at the Center Grove church.  A large concourse of friends extend their sympathy to the family.
   Deceased was a member of the Baptist church for over 35 years and remained faithful to the church.
   In her death the community lost a kind neighbor, the children a loving mother and the husband a dear wife.  How changed a home is without mother?  The only consolation is that in that mysterious future life beyond the grave there is rest.  Mother so filled a home with joy that the silence that is left is heart breaking.  But her life ended, her work finished.  She will be missed from our home forever,  but the good she had done will live t her. She has gone from earth.  Pen is too weak to portray a tribute to one so beloved as mother. -- The Adrian Journal, February 14, 1902, Page 8 column 2, Obituary
 

Voelpel-Hall
A quiet wedding was solemnized at the M.E. parsonage, this city, Monday evening at 7:00 o’clock.  The contracting parties were J.  F. Voelpel, of Chapman, Kansas, and Miss S. A. Hall, of Morrisville, Mo., a daughter of Rev. M.  A. Hall and the only sister of Rev. J. E. Hall, of this city.
The ceremony was performed by Rev. Hall, only a few persons being present. The groom is a wealthy and influential farmer of Dickenson county, Kansas, and an intelligent and progressive gentleman, prominent in  financial and political circles.
The bride is an amiable lady, one of Missouri’s fairest maidens and will  prove a worthy companion to her Kansas partner.  They departed Wednesday for their home followed by the good wishes of their acquaintances here.
The Journal extends congratulations and best wishes. -- The Adrian Journal, February 21 ,1902, Page 1 column 3, Marriage
 

Jenkins, baby girl
Oren Jenkins is sort o puffed up over that girl  baby which came to make its home with them. -- The Adrian Journal, February 21, 1902, Page 5 Column 2, Birth
 

Huffman, Mrs.
Mrs. Huffman died at her home one mile west of Archie on Friday the 14th. Funeral was held at Archie Saturday, burial at Everett. -- The Adrian Journal, February 21, 1902, Page 8 Column 4, Death
 

Duncan, Grandma
Grandma Duncan, mother of Joseph Duncan, whose death we reported last week, died in Kansas City Monday and was shipped to Archie Tuesday.  Funeral services were conducted by Rev. Diggs and the remains were laid to rest in the Perry cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, February 21, 1902, Page 8 column 4, Death
 

Jasper, Mrs.
Mrs. Jasper died Tuesday evening.  The funeral was preached at the Baptist church by Rev. Youngblood.  She leaves a baby one week old.  Her remains were taken to Entry Co. -- The Adrian Journal, February 21, 1902, Page 8 Column 4, Death
 

Ritters, Uncle Sammy
Uncle Sammy Ritters, who lived north of Austin died Monday and was buried in the Austin cemetery Wednesday.  Rev. Youngblood preached the funeral. -- The Adrian Journal, February 21, 1902, Page 8  Column 4, Death
 

Pierce, Mrs.
Mrs. Pierce the wife of our mason died Friday night and was buried in the Austin cemetery on Saturday. -- The Adrian Journal, February 28, 1902, Page 8 Column 4, Death
 

Youngblood-Crum
The Rev. John Youngblood and Miss Ezma Crum of Austin were married in the Baptist church at Austin, Wednesday evening at 4 o’clock.  Rev. Taylor, of Kansas, an old boyhood friends of Mr. Y performed the ceremony.  The young people left on the night train at Archie for Springfield, the home of Rev. Youngblood’s parents. -- The Adrian Journal, February 28, 1902, Page 8 Column 4, Marriage
 

Angle, Mrs. J. R.
Mrs. J. R. Angle died at her home in Butler last Saturday.  She is the daughter of T. R. Simpson of this city, and formerly resided here.  She leaves a husband and several children, an aged father, brother and sisters to mourn.  In this great affliction they have the sincere sympathy of many friends. -- The Adrian Journal, March 7, 1902, Page 1 column 1, Death
 

Wagner, baby girl
A nine pound girl baby came to the home of Wm. Wagner Wednesday morning. -- The Adrian Journal, March 7, 1902, Page 8 Column 1, Birth
 

Cherry, baby girl
A girl baby was born to Mrs. E. A. Cherry Wednesday morning, all parties doing well, except Grandpa Leffler. -- The Adrian Journal, March 7, 1902, Page 8 column 2, Birth
 

Haler, baby boy
Born to James Haler and wife on March 4th, a boy.  Mother an boy doing well and Jim is able to tell the glad tidings. -- The Adrian Journal, March 7, 1902, Page 8 Column 4, Birth
 

Shields, daughter
The 14 year old daughter of Pat Shields died at their home in Austin, Friday, Feb. 28th and was buried Sunday. -- The Adrian Journal, March 7, 1902, Page 8 Column 4, Death
 

Wright-Kizer
Eugene Wright and Miss Melvira Kizer were united in marriage at Butler Tuesday. They are worthy young people and start out on life’s journey with the benediction of a host of friends, in which the Journal joins. -- The Adrian Journal, March 14, 1902, Page 1 Column 3,, Marriage
 

Brown-Baie
John Brown and Miss Laura Baie, two prominent young people of north Bates were united in marriage at Rich Hill yesterday.  They returned on the afternoon train.  The Journal joins their large circle of friends in wishing them life’s richest blessings. -- The Adrian Journal, March 4, 1902, Page 1 Column 3, Marriage

    John  Brown and Miss Laura Baie, prominent young people of this vicinity, were united in marriage at Rich Hill, Thursday, March 13, 1902 at 9:00 a.m. Father Scanlan officiating.
  The happy couple returned the same day to the home of the bride’s parents where they were given a reception.  Their neighbors had assembled at the home by invitation to extend greetings and to partake of a bounteous dinner prepared by the bride’s mother.  Nothing had been neglected.  Mrs. Baie is one of the very best cooks in this community, as those who have been entertained at her beautiful home can attest, and on this occasion she did her best.
 The guests did justice to the meal, but were unable to exhaust the bountiful supply.  All present will remember this as one of the best dinners of their lives.
  At night a large company of young people called to pay their respects in old fashioned charivari.  They to were received with courtesy and royally treated.
 The worthy young couple will go to house keeping on a farm near Adrian.  We join with their many friends in extending  congratulations and best wishes. -- The Adrian Journal, March 21, 1902, Page 1 Column 3, Marriage
 

Brown, Uncle Jerry
Uncle Jerry Brown of Austin died Sunday and was  buried Monday by the G. A. R. -- The Adrian Journal, March 14, 1902, Page 8 column 3, Death
 

Butler, Orville
The body of Orville Butler was found in the road ¼ mile west of Nyhart, Wednesday morning, pierced by a bullet in the region of the heart.  He was known to have enemies, but to date no definite clue to the murder has been discovered. The officers are using all diligence trying to apprehend the guilt party or parties. -- The Adrian Journal, March 28, 1902, Page 1 Column 1, Death
 

McReynolds, Benjamin Kelber
   Benjamin Kelber McReynolds was born March 8, 1835 in Butler co., Ky., departed this life at his home near Adrian, Mo., march 22, 1902, aged 67 years, 12 days.
   Mr. McReynolds was the third child and second son of Sheperd and Elizabeth McReynolds.  His parents died a number of years ago.  Of his brothers Jas. Oliver died in 1891. Robert Eugene lives in Johnson Co., Mo., and Wm. Asguers in Henry Co., Mo.  One sister Mrs. Shields, lives in Greenwood county, Kansas.
  The other sister, Mrs. Lyda Hill, died in 1882 at her home near Austin.
   In 1867 Mr. McReynolds moved from Ky., and settled nears Calhoun, Johnson county, this state.  He removed to Bates co., in 1880 having bought the farm upon which he was at the time of his death.
   Mr. McReynolds and Annie L. Hampton were united in holy matrimony in Ky. May 7, 1868.  To this union were born three sons and four daughters.  One of the daughters, Grace died in infancy.  Mattie passed away in the bloom of young womanhood in 1895.  Enola was united in marriage with Frank Wyatt, and they with their two little daughters, Bernice and Beryle live near Hoxie, Kansas.  Binnie, the youngest of the family is living with her mother at the old home.  Benj. The eldest son was united in marriage with Nina Black, August 20, 1895.  On the death of his young wife, which sad event occurred Nov. 18, 1897, he and his infant daughter, Elsie, went to live with his parents. William the second son and Bruce the youngest  also live at home.  It was a comfort to the aged father and mother thus to have with them all their living children and their grandchildren in the hour of their sorrow.
  For years Mr. McReynolds was a prominent citizen of Bates co., was known and highly respected.  A man of remarkably good judgment, kindly disposition, and rare tact, enjoying the confidence of all who knew him.  He was often appealed to his neighbors in the difficulties of their personal affairs.  If ever differences between neighbors arose it was apt to be left to Uncle Mc to settle, and always with the same results, each party accepted his decisions as manifestly just and equitable.  In his settlement of estates the same rare judgment and unquestioned honesty prevailed.
   He never sought publicity.  Of simple tastes, he enjoyed the most the quietude of his own home and community.  So he always declined to be brought into public office.  Religiously he was very reserve.  It was difficult to get a full expression of his inner feelings.  He was always a thoughtful man, and of most exemplary life, a constant and valued friends of the church.  Those who knew him best have unwavering faith in genuineness of this Christian character. 
  His home life was typical of the man.  Never weak, but always kind and living.  He will be missed in the home; he will be missed in the community of his friends.  His strength of character, his loving nature, his unselfishness, and his readiness always to help his fellowmen won for him the endearing affection of all who knew him.
  The funeral services were held in the Fairview Presbyterian church Monday, March 24, by the pastor, and was attended by a large concourse of friends of the McReynolds family. The interment took place at Crescent Hill cemetery, where rest his mother and daughters who preceded him into the great unknown.
   The God of all grace give divine comfort to the hearts of his loved one who are left behind. -- The Adrian Journal, March 28,1902, Page 1 column 3, Obituary
 

Jones, Mr.
Mr. Jones who lived in Crescent Hill died, and was buried in the Crescent Hill cemetery Sunday, March 23rd. -- The Adrian Journal,  March 28, 1902, Page 8 Column 4, Death
 

Whitman, Fred
Died Friday 12 o’clock, Frederick Whitman at his residence 1 ½ miles southwest of Austin.  Mr. Whitman was 62 years old a member of the G. A. R. and one of the best workers in the Stambaugh Post of Austin and held a $2000 policy in the A. O. U. W.  He was well liked by his neighbors and had one of the largest funeral processions ever seen in Austin.  Rev. Youngblood preached the funeral sermon. -- The Adrian Journal, March 28, 1902, Page 8 column 4, Death
 

McClintock, Ray
Ray, son of John and Mary E. McClintock, was born May 30, 1901, died April 7, 1902 aged 10 months and 9 days.  Funeral was conducted by Elder Aaron Showalter and the remains laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery.  The parents have the sympathy of friends in this their great bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, April, 11, 1902, Page 1 Column 4, Death
 

Whitlem, Sarah Cobb
  Sarah Cobb was born July 24, 1821, at Redford Nottinghamshire, England, died April 4, 1902, aged 80 years, 8 months and 11 days.
   She came to America in May  1850, and settled in Ohio, where she was united in marriage with Robert Whitlem, Oct. 29, 1851.  To this union were born 6 children, two of whom, Mrs. H. P. Edwards and Wm. Whitlem, both of this city survive her.
   She resided in Ohio 4 years from there to Iowa, where she resided until 1865, when she came to Cass county, remaining there until 7 years ago, when she moved to this city, where she has since resided.  She was converted and united with the Methodist church at the age  of 21 and remained a consistent member until death called her home.
  Since the death of her husband 8 months ago, she had made her home with her daughter, Mrs. Edwards.  She had many trials and misfortunes to contend with through life and for the last year had been a constant sufferer, but she bore it all without a murmur, ever able and willing to say, “Thy will be done.”
  Grandma Whitlem retained consciousness until the last moment and expressed her undying faith in God, her last words  being words of praise and rejoicing.  He life was a pure as a sunbeam. -- The Adrian Journal, April 11, 1902, Page 5 Column 4, Obituary
 

Hamilton, baby girl
Born to the wife of Wm. Hamilton, on the 5th, a  girl. -- The Adrian Journal, April 11, 1902, Page 8 column 3, Birth
 

Moudy, Eva Maud
   Last Sunday morning, April 13th, at 6:00 o’clock, the death messenger crossed the threshold of Alfred Moudy’s home and carried  away the spirit of the loving wife and devoted mother.   For days she had been lingering near the border line between life and death, but he indomitable courage aided by the best medical skill was unable to withstand the effects of a fatal  disease and she passed silently into the beyond.
   Eve Maud Quisenberry was born in Pettis county, Missouri, April 15, 1868, the family  moved this this county when she was a small girl, locating at Altona, in the early days of Adrian they moved here, where the subject of this sketch spent the remainder  of her life.  On the 10th day of December 1890 she was united in marriage with Alfred Moudy, to this union three children were born, viz, Eva, Warner, and Hugh all of whom, with the father survive.  In early life she united with the Christian church and lived a faithful Christian until death.
   Mrs. Moudy was a model wife, mother and neighbor.  She was admired by all who knew her, in her heart there was neither envy nor bitterness, on the  contrary she was a woman of culture and refinement.  Her death is a loss to the community, but to  the husband and children the blow is almost unbearable.  May God bless and keep them.
   Funeral services were held from the Christian church  Tuesday afternoon conducted by Elder J. T. Head, a large concourse of friends were present to pay their respects to the memory of the dead.  The local White Ribboners attended in a body.  The remains were laid to rest in Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, April 18, 1902, Page 1 Column 3, Obituary
 

Holloway, Mr.
Mr. Holloway, who lived 5 miles north of Archie, died last week, with cancer of the stomach. -- The Adrian Journal, April 25, 1902, Page 8 Column 3, Death
 

Zimmer, Wm.
Wm. Zimmer, a prominent young school teacher of Passaic, died Tuesday from the effects of injuries received while jumping.  It is thought that a blood vessel was busted.
He was married about two months to a prominent young lady of that vicinity.  In his death the community lost one of its best citizens. -- The Adrian Journal, May 2, 1902, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Chapman-Lawson
Married on Wednesday evening, Mr. Floy Chapman and Miss Ada Lawson, M. Hodges performing the ceremony. -- The Adrian Journal, May 2, 1902, Page 8 column 3, Marriage
 

Houston, baby girl
Dr. Bates informs us that a ten pound girl came to the home of Mr. and Mrs. F. U. Houston yesterday.  Frank has a box of cigars on tap and is the worst swelled up man in town.  He says it’s a twentieth century  woman.  Here’s luck to the baby and its parents. -- The Adrian Journal, May 23, 1902, Page 1 Column 4, Birth
 

Lentz, baby girl
Dr. Bates reports the advent of a girl baby into the home of John A. Lentz Tuesday. -- The Adrian Journal, May 23, 1902, Page 4 column 3, Birth
 

Timmons, Mollie
  Mollie, wife of Lincoln Timmons, died at her home 10 miles northeast of Hoxie, Kansas, on Friday, May sixteenth, 1902.  She had been ill only eight days with neuralgia of the stomach, and  bore her suffering with Christian fortitude.
   Mollie Sease was born at Pleasant Hill, Mo., Jan. 14, 1865.  She was united in marriage with Lincoln Timmons Jan. 24, 1884, to this union five children born all  of whom, with the husband survive her.  She joined the U. B. church at the age of 15 years and lived a Christian life to the end.  She said, “If it is God’s will I am ready to go.”
  Mrs. Timmons had been in Sheridan county, Kansas, only since last October, but those who had met her and formed her acquaintance had learned to love and respect her because of her character, which her Bates Co. friends will remember.
   Funeral services were held at the cemetery, conducted by Rev. Mickey, pastor of the Methodist church, and the remains laid to rest in the Hoxie cemetery.
  Many friends of the family here join in extending sincere sympathy in this their great affliction. -- The Adrian Journal, May 23, 1902, Page 8 column 4, Death
 

Redford, James P.
  At 10:35 o’clock Saturday night, May 24, 1902, the death messenger crossed the threshold of the Redford home, this city, and wafted away the spirit of the aged husband and father.
   For several months Mr. Redford had been in failing health and for some weeks past it was known that his recovery was among the improbabilities, yet his death came as a shock to his friends and every citizen of the city was his friend.
   James Patterson Redford was born in Stokes county, North Carolina, Nov. 8, 1828, he came to Missouri with his parents when 8 years old and spent the remainder of this life in this state.  He lived in Johnson county until 1884 when he moved to Bates county, where he resided until he died, most of these years he lived in Adrian.  March 21, 1850 he was united in marriage with Louvinia M. Swift, who survives him.   Their children are, Mrs. Ella Henshaw, Weiser, Idaho; D. S. Redford, Julesburg, Colo.; A. D. Redford, Burtville, Mo.; and Miss Lou, who resides with her mother in this city.  The three last names were with their father during the last days of his illness.
  J. P. Redford was one of the best citizens of this community and was universally loved and respected.  He spoke evil of none and no one can be found who will cast one word of reproach upon his character as a gentleman and citizen; he died at peace with the world.
  Such men are always missed.
   Funeral services were held from the Baptist church Sunday afternoon at 2:00 o’clock, conducted by Rev. Weir.  A large concourse of friends were present to pay the last tribute of respect to the memory of the dead, and to comfort the sorrowing family.
  The remains were laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery.
  The Journal joins the many friends of the family in extending sincere sympathy in this great bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, May 30, 1902, Page 1 Column 3, Obituary
 

Witmore, baby girl
A girl baby came to gladden the home of Ira Witmore last Saturday evening. -- The Adrian Journal, May 30, 1902, Page 5 column 3, Birth
 

Fisher, Rhoda
   Mrs. Rhoda Fisher died at her home, this city, Sunday June 1, 1902, after an illness lasting several months.
   Rhoda Davidson was born in Virginia, July 24, 1827.  Her parents emigrated to Ohio in 1832. She was married to Joseph H. Fisher, November 18, 1849.  To this union eight children were born five of whom survive the mother.  The father and other children having gone to that bourne of rest, which she now enjoys.  In 1870, with her husband and family, she moved to Platte county, mo.  In 1874 she united with the M. E. church at Davis Chapel, Platte county.  From that time to her death she lived a consistent Christian life.  In 1883 the family moved to Bates county, and in 1893 to this city.
  Grandma Fisher was a noble Christian lady and in her daily walk and conversation exemplified those beautiful traits of mind and heart that are so loveable, and which command the respect and esteem of all. She was a kind and loving mother and it was in her home that her gentle influence was exerted, there mother was adored.
  Funeral services over the remains were held from the M. E. church Monday afternoon, conducted by her pastor, Rev. J. E. Hall, assisted by Rev. Wier, pastor of the Baptist church. The remains were taken to Butler and laid to rest beside those of her husband.
   The children have the sympathy of the community in this bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, June 6, 1902, Page 1 Column 3, Obituary
 

Wilcox-Kerr
   On Wednesday evening, June 4, 1902, at the beautiful county home of the bride’s parents in Elkhart township, Roy M. Wilcox and Miss Maybelle, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Kerr were united in marriage, Rev. Scott of Butler officiating.
   At the appointed hour the contracting parties marched to the marriage alter to the strains of the wedding march, played by Mrs. J. E. Dowell. The groom being accompanied by his brother and the bride by her father.  The bride was gowned in pure white and is a beautiful young lady.  The groom wore the conventional black.
   After the ceremony a  large number of friends present proceeded to shower their congratulations upon the worthy young couple and wish them a pleasant journey down life’s pathway.
   The congratulations over, refreshments were served in courses, and these fully attested the skill of the  bride’s mother in entertaining.
  More than a hundred guests were present to witness the ceremony and to enjoy the hospitality of the home.
   The groom is a prominent young farmer and a capital gentleman. The bride is one of Bates county’s most beautiful young ladies.
    A large number of beautiful and valuable presents were give, a list of which we secured, but owing to the want of time we omit publishing.
  The Journal joins their many friends in wishing them a blissful and prosperous life. -- The Adrian Journal, June 6, 1902, Page 1 Column 2, Marriage
 

Pace, Mrs. Otto
Mrs. Otto Pace died at her home near Elkhart Wednesday, after a lingering illness of consumption.  Funeral services over the remains were held Thursday. -- The Adrian Journal, June 6, 1902, Page 5 column 2, Death
 

White, Grandma
Grandma White died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. J. F. Searight Monday.  Funeral services were held Wednesday.  We have not been able to get facts to write an obituary this week will publish same next week. -- The Adrian Journal, June 13, 1902, Page 1 Column 3, Death

    Mary  J. Quissenberry was born in Kentucky March 7, 1827.  Her parents moved to Pettis county, Missouri when she was a small child.  She came to Bates county about 54 years ago.  She was united in marriage to H.M. White, to this union nine children eight boys and one girl were born.   Her husband died in 1872 leaving her the  care of the large family of children, all of whom survive to revere the memory of a kind and loving mother.  Besides these two sisters, Mesdames M.M. Tucker, of El Dorado, and James Williams, of Butler.  She died, after a protracted illness at the home of her daughter, Mrs. J. F. Searight on Monday, June 9, 1902.
   Being one of the pioneers in this county she possessed all of those sterling characteristics of the first settlers in a community.  Always ready to lend a helping hand in time of need and to extend sympathy to those in distress.  No one enjoyed the confidence and esteem of their neighbors in a higher degree than Grandma White.  Hers was an active life and retained much of her vigor until near the end of the journey.
The immense concourse of friends who attended the last sad rites over her remains fully attested the esteem in which she was held by all who knew her.
 Funeral services were held from the old White homestead on Wednesday, June 11, 1902, and conducted by Rev. Henry Price of Shell City after which the remains were tenderly laid to rest in the Owen’s cemetery.  The family have the sympathy of a large circle of friends in the bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, June 20, 1902, Page 1 Column 2, Obituary
 

Wiseman, son
We are sorry to learn of the death of the seven year old son of bro. Wiseman, of the Rich Hill Enterprise.  The brother has our sincere sympathy. -- The Adrian Journal, June 13, 1902, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Goss, Chas.
Chas., son of James Goss, died in Cass county last week and was buried at Lee’s Summit; he was 28 years old. -- The Adrian Journal, June 13, 1902, Page 5 Column 3, Death
 

Parish, Samuel
Samuel Parish who lives three miles from Archie died Wednesday morning and was buried in Everett cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, June 13, 1902, Page 5 Column 4, Death
 

Pace, Sarah
Mrs. Sarah Pace died of consumption on June 6, 1902.  Funeral services were conducted at the home by Rev. A. H. Lewis, and her remains were taken to the Scott cemetery for interment, attended by a large cortege of sympathizing friends.
  Mrs. Pace was the daughter of I. N. and Rabourn, of Elkhart township.  She was married to A. B. Pace Nov. 26, 1891.  Was baptized and united with the Baptist in August 1899 and lived a devoted Christian.  She leaves a husband and two daughters, her aged parents, 4 brothers and 4 sisters to mourn her loss.  The Mt. Vernon Baptist church of which she was a member will also feel the loss.  May the Lord comfort the bereaved. -- The Adrian Journal, June 13, 1902, Page 5 Column 5, Obituary
 

Hagar, Richard
   Richard Hagar died at his home four miles northwest of this city on Friday, June 13, 1902, of a complication of diseases, aged 46 years.
   He had been in bad health for several months but his condition was not considered dangerous until a few days before his death.  Deceased was born in Germany and came to this country in his young manhood.  He was married to Miss Kussman about 10 years ago.  To this union four children were born, all of whom with the wife survive. Richard was an honorable and industrious gentleman and enjoyed the confidence of all who knew him.
   Funeral services where held Saturday, conducted by Rev. A. Wehmeyer, after which the remains were laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery.
The family have the sympathy of the entire community in the great affliction. -- The Adrian Journal, June 20, 1902, Page 1 Column 3, Obituary
 

Johnson, Mrs. W. T.
Butler Times-Bad Accident
  Yesterday morning about 10 o’clock Mrs. W. T. Johnson, wife of County Treasurer Johnson, was thrown from her buggy by a runaway horse, and seriously hurt, the bone in her right shoulder being broken. The horse took fright on mechanic street, and ran at a furious rate.  In making the turn at the corner of East Dakota and Mechanic streets the wheel of the buggy struck a rock and Mrs. Johnson was  hurled to the ground with great force, falling on her head and shoulders.  Help arrived immediately and she was taken into the house of Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Mallett, where her injuries were attended to by Dr. Lockwood, after which she was taken to her home in a carriage.
   Mr. Johnson who was in Kansas City at the time, was notified by wire of the accident, and returned home on the first train.
Later-As the Times went to press after dinner the report is that Mrs.  Johnson will hardly survive till night.  Her injuries are more serious than first thought.  She is unconscious and the doctors are of the opinion that she is suffering from concussion of the brain and that she cannot recover. -- The Adrian Journal, June 20, 1902, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Harmon, Laird
Laird, the six months old son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Harmon, died at their home in, Las Vegas, New Mexico, Sunday, June 22, 1902, after a few hours illness of cholera infantum.  The parents brought the remains to this city Tuesday night.
  Funeral services were held from the home of the grand parents, Mr. and Mrs. Lew Palmer, Wednesday morning at 9:00 o’clock, conducted by Ref. Weir.  The service was brief, consisting of a few appropriate songs, prayer and a few remarks by the officiating clergyman.
   After the funeral the body was tenderly borne to the Crescent Hill cemetery and laid to rest.  Four young ladies were active pall bearers, the honorary pall bearers being little girls.  The young parents have the sympathy of the community in this bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, June 27, 1902, Page 1 Column 2, Obituary
 

Noble, Cecil
Cecil, the eight year old daughter of A. C. Noble, died at the family residence near Ballard, Tuesday morning, June 24th from lockjaw.  A few days previous to her death she stepped on a nail and lock jaw was the result of this injury.  Her suffering was intense.  Funeral services were held Wednesday. -- The Adrian Journal, June 27, 1902, Page 1 Column 2, Death
 

Mills-Webb
  On Sunday evening, June 29, 1902 at 6:00, at the home of Mr. and Mrs. John Stone, this city, Mr. Elmer Mills and Miss Blanche Webb were united in marriage, Elder C.  B. Lotspeich, of Butler officiating.
   Promptly at the appointed hour the contracting parties marched to the marriage altar to the strains of the wedding march played by Anna Kidwell.  J. T. Elkins was best man and Miss Ida Mills maid of honor. The house was tastefully decorated with flowers, the curtains were lowered and the room brilliantly illuminated with lamps. The bride was attired in spotless which and carried a bouquet of ferns and white roses.  The groom wore the conventional black.  In a very  appropriate and impressive ceremony the officiating clergyman united the fortunes of these happy young people, at the conclusion of the ceremony the usual congratulations were extended.
   Refreshment, consisting of cream and cake were served.
  The groom is a worthy and popular young business man of this city, the landlord of the Hotel Lee.  The bride is the popular and handsome young lady and will be a worthy helpmate.
   The Journal joins their host of admiring friends in wishing these young people a pleasant and prosperous journey through life. -- The Adrian Journal,  July 4, 1902, Page 1 Column 1, Marriage
 

Arrick, son
The two year old  son of Mr. and Mrs. Will Arrick died at the family home in Nevada, Wednesday July 2nd. The remains were brought to this city and tenderly laid to rest in the Mt. Olivet cemetery.
The parents, who formerly resided here, have the sincere sympathy of a large circle of friends in this great bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, July 4, 1902, Page 8 column 4, Death
 

Porter-Remington
  Dr. E.M. Porter, of Cordell Oklahoma, and Miss Ollie Remington, of City of Mexico, Mexico, were united in marriage at the home of the groom’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. R. I. Porter, of Grand River township, on Wednesday, July 2, 1902, Rev. Scott of Butler, officiating.
   Dr. Porter is a Bates county boy and a first class gentleman.  He is a graduate of William Jewell College and of the Kansas City Medical College, and is a bright student.  In his profession he is succeeding.
   The bride is a stranger to the people here, but is a handsome and cultured lady.
 The happy couple took the train Thursday morning for their home at Cordell, Oklahoma, followed by the best wishes of a host of friends. -- The Adrian Journal, July 4, 1902, Page 8 column 4, Marriage
 

Burton, Ray
Ray, the nine year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Burton, died at the home of his parents in this city, on Tuesday, July 15, 1902, after an illness of three weeks of dysentery.
Funeral services were held from the home Wednesday afternoon at 2:00  o’clock, conducted by Rev. Van Eaton, after which the remains were laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery.
The parents have the sincere sympathy of a large circle of friends in this great bereavement.  Only those who have lost children know the real sorrow and anguish that pierces the heart of the parent when the little ones are taken away. -- The Adrian Journal, July 18, 1902, Page 1 Column 2, Death
 

Switzer, baby girl
Dr. Tuttle reports the advent of a girl baby into the home of Dora Switzer Tuesday.  It’s not Dora anymore but PaPa, with a big P.  Mother and child are doing well. -- The Adrian Journal, July 18, 1902, Page 5 Column 2, Birth
 

Smith, John S.
Monday evening John S. Smith who lived with his son D. B., six miles northwest of Adrian, was found lying unconscious in the cow lot.  He had left the house as usual to milk the cows and appeared in his usual health, but when he failed to return in the usual time search was made with the results above.
A messenger was immediately sent for Dr. Tuttle, who found him dying when he arrived.  He pronounced his ailment cerebral hemorrhage. Shortly after 12:00 o’clock the spirit took its flight.
Mr. Smith was about 62 years old, and his life was that of a conscientious Christian gentleman.
Funeral services were held from the home of his son Thursday afternoon, conducted by Eld. Aaron Showalter.  Burial was in Crescent Hill. -- The Adrian Journal, July 25, 1902, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

Morrow, Sarah
   Mrs. Sarah Morrow, wife of John Morrow, was instantly killed and her daughter seriously injured by a south bound engine of the Kansas City Pittsburg and Southern railway at a crossing two miles north of Amoret in the west part of this county Friday afternoon.
   The ladies were in a buggy  with the side curtains drawn, and it is supposed were unaware of the approach of the fast moving passenger train, when they drove onto the track of the railroad.
   The engine struck the buggy between the front and hind wheel smashing the vehicle, killing the horse and throwing the two ladies high in the air.
   Mrs. Morrow was instantly killed, while her daughter received several severe wounds around the face and shoulders.
  The train stopped and Miss Morrow and the mangles remains of her mother were taken aboard and conveyed to Amoret, where medical attention was secured for the young lady and the body of her mother tenderly cared for.
  The reports for Amoret on Tuesday were the young lady was getting along nicely and in a fair way to recovery.
   The family reside in the west part of the county and were returning home from a visit with relatives when the accident happened.
   The deceased was 55 years old and the mother of 8 or 9 children. She was a most esteemed lady and the unfortunate occurrence cast a gloom over the entire community. -- The Adrian Journal, July 25, 1902, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Adcock, Walter
Walter Adcock died on the 20th, near Everett.  He had been in poor health for some time. Consumption was the cause of his death -- The Adrian Journal, July 25, 1902, Page 8 column 4, Death
 

Mudd, baby
Jeff McCombe received a telegram last night announcing the death of three year old child of Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Mudd of Drexel. Funeral will be held at Burdett today.  Their Adrian friends extend sympathy in the great bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, August 9, 1902, Page 1 Column 1, Death
 

Haas, Mathias
   Wednesday morning, July 6, 1902, Mathias Haas passed into that “Invisible bourne” from which  no traveler ere returns., after a lingering illness; aged 76 years, 6 months and 13 days.
   Mathias Haas was born in Baden, Germany, January 23, 1826.  He was united in marriage with Mary Hess, April 7, 1856, the same year they came to America, locating in Illinois. To this union eight children were born, seven of whom are living, they are: Wm. F., Henry, Chas. And Mrs. Peggy Black, of Adrian; Mrs. M. A. Feris, of Austin, Mrs. A. T. Wyatt of Grainfield, and Mrs. George Berry, of Walla Walla, Washington, all of whom except the last named were at their father’s bedside when he died.
   In 1868 with his family, he moved to this county and located on a farm three miles from where Adrian now stands, here they resided until 1892, when, after the death of Mrs. Haas, they moved to Adrian.  On July 4, 1893, he was united in marriage with Mrs. Julia Seeler, who still survives him.
   In his vigorous manhood Mr. Haas was a successful business man, and acquired a considerable property, of late years he had retired from business activity, and enjoyed the comforts of life, but for the last two years he had been so badly afflicted that he was not bale to get about much.
   In early life he became a member of the German Lutheran church.  Funeral services will be held from the Christian church Saturday afternoon, Revs. A. Wehmeyer, of the Lutheran, and Wier, of the Baptist, are expected to be present.  Burial will be in Crescent Hill cemetery.
   The family has the sincere sympathy o of a large circle of friends in this great bereavement.  A pioneer has joined the silent throng. -- The Adrian Journal, August 9, 1902, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Adams, Martha
  On Thursday morning, Aug. 7, 1902, Martha, wife of Jonathan Adams, died at the family home, three miles northwest of this city.  She had been in failing health for several months, and for three weeks past her condition had been critical, so that death was not unexpected.
  Martha Hiser was born 58 years ago, and most of the years of her life were spent in this community.  September 20, 1863 she was united in marriage with Jonathan Adams.  Of this union five children were born, two of whom, Jahu and Mrs. Davidson, survive with the husband to mourn the loss of the dear one.
   Mrs.  Adams was at the time of her death and had for many years  been a faithful member of the Baptist church of this city.
   Among her friends and acquaintances she was loved for her traits of Christian character.  She was a kind and obliging neighbor, a devoted wife and a loving mother.
   Funeral services will be held from the home this morning at 10 o’clock, conducted by hr pastor, Rev. Wier, after which the remains will be buried in Crescent Hill cemetery.
  The family have the deep sympathy of the entire community in this sad hour. -- The Adrian Journal, August 9, 1902, Page 1 Column 2, Obituary
 

Wade, N. A.
Col. N. A. Wade, editor  of the Bates County Democrat, died at his home in  Butler, Wednesday, Aug. 6.  About two months ago he was stricken with paralysis, but had rallied and his friends had hopes of his recovery.
Col. Wade was one of the veteran newspaper men of the county, having been engaged in the business continuously for about thirty years.  He leaves a wife and one son, Lieu. Ben Wade, now with the Army in the Philippines. -- The Adrian Journal, August 9, 1902, Page 1 Column 2, Death
 

Huffman-Robinson
Dr.  W. E. Huffman, a prominent young dentist of Butler, and Miss Minnie Robinson, of Amsterdam, were quietly married in Kansas City Wednesday. -- The Adrian Journal, August 15, 1902, Page 1 Column 1, Marriage
 

Fansler-Norman
E. Fansler and Mrs. Norman were united in marriage last Sunday evening at the home of Mrs. Thomison, Rev. J. E.  Hall officiating. -- The Adrian Journal, August 15,  1902, Page 1 column 2,Marriage
 

Hall, baby girl
Rev. J. E. Hall has been stepping rather high for a few days past, but his many friends are inclined to be charitable.  A nine pound female boarder arrived at the parsonage Monday evening, and the parson is sure she’s as  good if not better than the best, hence his pride.  We are pleased to note that the mother and daughter are both doing well. -- The Adrian Journal, August 15, 1902, Page 1 Column 2, Birth
 

Lansdown, baby boy
Dr. Walter Lansdown, of Butler, was in the city this morning.  He reports the arrival of a baby boy into his home on the 14th. -- The Adrian Journal, August 15, 1902, Page 4 column 2, Birth
 

Latrance, baby girl
A bright baby girl came to brighten the home of Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Latrance this week. We haven’t seen Charlie or Grandpa Stearns but they are reported all right. -- The Adrian Journal, August 15, 1902, Page 5 column 4, Birth
 

Gilbert, Jane
Mrs. Jane Gilbert died at her home in Mingo township Sunday, August 17, 1902, aged 57 years, 10 months and 7 days.  Death was caused by blood poisoning resulting from a gathering in the hand.  A husband and several children survived to mourn the loss of a faithful wife and mother.  Funeral services were held on Monday.  Undertaker Kidwell of this city attended. -- The Adrian Journal, August 22, 1902, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Piles, child
The 12 year old son of John Piles, of near Everett, died this week. -- The Adrian Journal, September 5, 1902, Page 8 column 3, Death
 

Walter-Wallace
   On Wednesday evening, Sept. 10, 1902, at the residence of the bride’s parents, Hume, Mo., Arthur J. Walter, of Adrian, and Miss Mayme Wallace were united in marriage, the pastor of the Methodist church south, officiating.
   The wedding was a quiet affair, only the close friends of the family being present.
   The groom was raised in the vicinity of Adrian and is a worthy and highly respected gentleman.  He is now engaged in the real estate business in this city.
   The bride was a popular teacher in the public schools of this city last year.  She is a worthy and talented young lady.
  After a brief stay at Pertle Springs they will be at home in Adrian.
   A host of friends extend congratulations and best wishes, in which the Journal heartily joins. -- The Adrian Journal, September 12, 1902, Page 1 Column 1, Marriage
 

Smith-Reeder
   Howard I. Smith and Miss Minnie E. Reeder were united in the holy bond of matrimony Wednesday evening at the home of the bride’s parents one mile southwest of Adrian.
   Promptly at  8 o’clock the chords of Mendelssohn’s march were struck by Gertrude Marshall and the happy couple was led into the parlor by Rev. Lotspeich to  receive the words which made them man and wife.
  After the ceremony all were ushered to the dining room to partake of the sumptuous super that was prepared for them.
   The wedding was a quiet affair but attractive in every way.
   The bride was gowned in white, and carried a bouquet of beautiful roses. The groom wore the conventional black.
  At a later hour the guests followed the bridal party to the train, on which they left for their wedding tour.
   The above account was handed to us for publication.  The contracting parties have grown to noble manhood and womanhood in this community.  Their lives have been spotless, and they enjoy the respect and esteem of all who know them. We unite with their many friends in wishing them continued happiness and success.
  They will make their home in this city, where Howard is engaged in the dry goods business with his father. -- The Adrian Journal, September 12, 1902, Page 1. Column 2, Marriage
 

Ritchie, Margaret E.
  Margaret E., wife of James Ritchie, died at the family residence, six miles northeast of Adrian, Monday morning, Sept. 8 1902, of malaria fever.
   She was born in Illinois  Nov. 22, 1856. In early life she united with the Methodist church.
  A husband and two children are left to mourn the loss of a devoted wife and loving mother.
   Funeral services were held from her late residence Wednesday morning, conducted by Rev. J. E. Hall of this city, after which the remains were taken to Butler and laid to rest in the cemetery at that place.
   The father and children have the sympathy of the community in this their great bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, September 12, 1902, Page 8 Column 4, Obituary
 

Moles-Badget
D. Moles and Miss Gay Badget were married last week. They are worthy young people and have the best wishes of friends. -- The Adrian Journal, September 19, 1902, Page 1 Column 1, Marriage
 

Allen-Ficklin
Albert Allen and Miss Lulu Ficklin joined fortunes last week and started on the sea of double blessedness, they have the best wishes from friends. -- The Adrian Journal, September 19, 1902, Page 1 Column 1, Marriage
 

Johnson, Mrs.
On Sunday, Sept. 14, the noon train arrived about one hour late.  Among the passengers was a woman, accompanied by a boy six years.  She went to the merchants hotel, where she asked for a room.  Soon after going to her room she became violently ill.  Dr. Trout was called but medical aid was of no avail, and death ended her suffering, after a brief illness of less than half an hour.
It was later learned that her name was Johnson, a daughter of Wm. Erwin, a farmer living two miles southwest of Burdett. -- The Adrian Journal, September 19, 1902, Page 1 Column 2, Death
 

Maddy, baby  girl
A new girl at Jim Maddy’s.  All parties doing well, except Jim and he is able to walk alone. -- The Adrian Journal, September 19, 1902, Page 8 column  3,Birth
 

Knisley, John
  As peacefully as the dew drop gather’s at eventide, so the spirit of uncle John Kinsley took its flight in the early morning hours of Sept. 27, 1902. For several days he had been critically ill, and all hope of recovery had been abandoned by his friends.
   John Knisley was born in Miama county, Ohio, August 13, 1811, age at the time of death, 91 years, 1 months and 14 days.  
   In early life he moved to Wisconsin, and from there to Ill., coming to Missouri in 1865, where he spent the remainder of his days.  On January 10, 1836, he was united in marriage with Nancy Weaver, to them ten children were born, four of whom are still living, they are, Barbara, Laney, George, Eli and James.  His wife died in August 1892.
  About 55 years ago Uncle John joined the German Baptist church, having served as a Deacon in the church continuously for 50 years, and was one of the first members of that denomination to located in this community, and one of the most active persons in the organization of the local church.
   People lived Uncle John because of his gentle and kindly disposition.  He was always amiable and approachable.
   Funeral services were held from the Dunkard church Sunday afternoon. Elder George Lentz preached the sermon and paid a tender and eloquent tribute to the memory of the departed. After the services the body was laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery.  The children have the sympathy of the entire community in this bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, October 4, 1902, Page 1 column 3, Obituary
 

Argenbright, baby boy
Charles Argenbright reports a fine boy baby at his home, and the proud papa is happy indeed. -- The Adrian Journal, October 4, 1902, Page 5 Column 2, Birth
 

Edgars death
A young man by the name of Edgars died at the family home, a few miles west of Archie a few days ago. Rev. Diggs preached the funeral. -- The Adrian Journal, October 4, 1902, Page 8 Column 3, Death
 

App-Lawson
Charles App and Mary Lawson were married Sunday. They left on the noon train for Knobnoster,, where Charlie has a restaurant. -- The Adrian Journal, October 4, 1902, Page 8 column 4, Marriage
 

Stevens-Bridges
Bert Stevens and Maud Bridges were Wednesday of last week. -- The Adrian Journal, October 4, 1902, Page 8 Column 4, Marriage
 

Crum, Uncle John
Uncle John Crum, died in Austin Oct. 1, 90 years and was an old resident of Austin. --The Adrian Journal, October 4, 1902, Page 8 Column 4, Death
 

Walls, Wm.
William Walls, an aged and respected citizen, died at his home in Passaic Wednesday evening.  He had been in  bad health for several years, and his death did not come as a surprise to his friends.  He was the  father of Isaac, Ben and George Walls and Mrs. John Cowdery all well known person in this vicinity. There are two other children. -- The Adrian Journal, October 24,1902, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Hammontree, baby boy
A bouncing baby boy was born to Mrs. Bert Hammontree Tuesday. -- The Adrian Journal, October 24, 1902, Page 8 Column 2, Birth
 

Simpson, baby girl
Mr. and Mrs. James Simpson are rejoicing over the arrival of a girl at their house. -- The Adrian Journal, October 31, 1902, Page 8 column 3, Birth
 

Manning-Hardman
On Sunday evening, Nov. 2, at the residence of the bride’s parents, this city, George Manning and Miss Ruth Hardman were united in marriage. Elder Head acting as the officiating clergyman.  The groom is an industrious and prosperous young farmer of Shawnee township.  The bride is a  worthy young lady, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. P. Hardman of this city. The worthy young couple start out on their married life with the best wishes of a host of friends. -- The Adrian Journal, November 7, 1902, Page 1 Column 2, Marriage
 

Sears, George
   On Friday morning, Nov. 7,  1902, at the family residence in this city the spirit of Uncle Geo. Sears left the body, aged 72 years and 1 day.
   George Sears was born in Saline county, Mo., Nov. 6, 1830 and came with his parents to what is known as the Ritchie farm, one mile north of Altona, in 1834, and, was a resident of what is now known as Bates co., until death, excepting the four years he served in the confederate army, during with time he was under Gen. Jo Shelby.
  Uncle George was a generous hearted neighbor, and those who have lived near him speak in the highest terms of him as a man who was ever willing to extend neighborly courtesy.
  A wife and two sons, Geo. Jr., of Grainfield, Kansas, and J. O. of this city.  In this bereavement they have the sympathy of friends.
   Funeral services were held from the home conducted by Elder Head.  A large number of friends were present to pay the last tribute of respect to a neighbor.  The body was laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, November 14, 1902, Page 1 Column 2, Death
 

Hudelson, Grandma Lydia
   Died, in Adrian at the home of her son J.E. Hudelson, Nov. 8, 1902, Lydia Hudelson.  The funeral services were held at the M. E. church Sunday afternoon, conducted by Rev. J. E. Hall, her beloved pastor, who paid a touching tribute to her memory.
   Many and beautiful were the floral offerings, as everyone knew of Grandma’s passionate love for flowers.  A large concourse of people followed the remains to their last resting place in Crescent Hill cemetery by the side of her loved ones gone before.
   The honorary pall bearers, selected form the W.  C.T. U., were Mesdames Williams, Palmer, Hoover, Smith, Gilmore and Towner.  Active pall bearers were Henry Moudy, George Brundige, Bert Ewing, Lewis Williams, Marian Bosley and Louis Page.
   Deceased was born in Orange county, Ind., Nov. 23, 1816.  Lydia Elrod was married to Thomas D. Hudelson in 1834, to this union were born ten children, six of whom survive, Nancy Leffler, J. D. and J. E. of Adrian, Robert D., of Decatur, Illinois, Edward M., of Paola, Indiana, William T., of Kansas City.
  In company with her family she came to Bates county, Mo., in 1867, living at Crescent Hill until 1881, when she came to Adrian.  The purity of her domestic life, her devotion as a mother are fully known only to the members of the family circle.  With her, industry and frugality were the greatest virtues.  While she did not proclaim her religion from the house tops she quietly worshiped her Savior. “Her children rise u; and call her blessed.”  She was a warm supporter of temperance in theory and practice and always had a word of encouragement for others to “press on in good works.”
  At last, while grateful for the fullness of her days, realizing that she could do no more good, that her usefulness was gone and that decay and vital exhaustion had commenced their work, she eagerly sought and watched her approach to the border of eternity, so anxious was she that her last days was a constant prayer  “to see Jesus” and “I want Heaven.” -- The Adrian Journal, November 14, 1902, Page 1  Column 3, Obituary
 

Alexander, Elizabeth
   Elizabeth Dodson was born in Macoupin county, Ill., July 1, 1829, came to Cole  county, Missouri in the forties. Was married to William Alexander in 1854, to this union were born seven children, four boys and three girls. Five children are living, viz: Peter, W. D., S. C., Amanda and Mrs. McKinney. All were present at her death, except the last named.
  Sister Alexander departed this life Nov. 12, 1902, aged 73 years, 4 months and 11 days.  She joined the Baptist church in her girlhood, when her husband was converted in 1979 and joined the M.E. church south, she joined with him.
   Those who knew her say she was a devoted Christian.  The testimony of the children is that she lived before them in such a way that there was no doubt as to her religion.
  Her husband, known as Uncle Bill Alexander, put foot on the eternal shore of the land of sunshine beyond the skies, Jan. 4, 1902.
   A character built on the Man of Galilee will stand the test when this old world is on fire.
   The funeral was held at the old home, near Burdett.  Long may the life of this sainted mother shine  before the children and friends of many years. -- The Adrian Journal, November 21, 1902, Page 1 Column  3, Obituary
 

Ruddle-Walls
Fletcher Ruddle and Miss Cordia Walls, two prominent people of Passaic, were united in marriage Wednesday evening at 8 o’clock by Rev. Scott, at the home of the bride.  The bride is a sister of Mrs.  John Cowdery formerly of this city.
-- The Adrian Journal, November 21, 1902, Page 4 Column 1, Marriage
 

Adams-Cope
J. H. Adams and Clara Cope were united in marriage at Kansas City yesterday.  Friends here extend congratulations. -- The Adrian Journal, November 28 1902, Page 1 column 3, Marriage
 

Cummings-Young
  On Wednesday evening, Dec. 3rd, at the residence of the bride’s parents M. and Mrs.  A. M. Young, S.H. Cummings, of Atchison, Kansas, and Miss Effie M. Young were united in marriage, Rev. W. E. Wilson officiating.  Miss Della Sartin acted as bridesmaid and Irvin V. Enos as best man.  Promptly at six o’clock the contracting parties and their attendants marched to the marriage altar to the strains of Mendelssohn’s wedding march, played by Mrs. J. E. Dowell. The bride was gowned in white Armure Mohair, trimmed in Venice Appliqué, and carried a bouquet of white chrysanthemums.  The groom wore the traditional black.  After the impressive ceremony and the usual congratulations the bride and groom led the was to the dining room, where a sumptuous meal awaited the more than fifty guests.  The elegant spread did justice to the culinary skill of the bride and her mother.  Mr. Cummings is a prominent and prosperous farmer and is said to be in every way a worthy young man.  Miss Effie has grown to womanhood in this community and is a beautiful and worthy young lady. The Journal joins their many friends in extending congratulations and best wishes for their future happiness and prosperity.  Mr. and Mrs. Cummings left yesterday for a two weeks visit with relatives at Atchison, Kansas, after which they will return to make their home here.  Those present from abroad were, Jas., Joseph, Chas. and Wm. Cummings brothers of the groom. Sarah Cummings and Mrs. Armstrong and daughter, the two first named sisters of the groom. The received many handsome and useful presents. -- The Adrian Journal, December 5, 1902, Page 1 Column 2, Marriage
 

Ellis, child
The fifteen months old child of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Ellis, died Monday at the family home six miles northeast of Adrian. -- The Adrian Journal, December 5, 1902, Page 5 Column 2, Death"
 

Muiller-Kussman
At the residence of the bride’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. Kussmann, on Tuesday, Dec. 9, 1902 at high noon, William Muiller and Miss Hulda Kussmann were united in marriage.
The contracting parties marched to the altar to the beautiful strains of the wedding march played by Rev. Wehmayer, who also performed the ceremony which made them man and wife.
A large number of friends were present to witness the ceremony.
The contracting parties are prominent young people and are held in high esteem by all who know them. They are in every way worthy citizens and will doubtless succeed in life.
 After the ceremony and congratulations, a sumptuous dinner consisting of dainty and substantial food was served to which all present did ample justice.
It was one of the most enjoyable events of the season and will long be pleasantly remembered by everyone present.
The Journal joins the many friends of the young couple in extending congratulations and best wishes for their continued happiness and success. -- The Adrian Journal, December 12, 1902, Page 1 column 2, Marriage


Submitted by: Sandee Hubbard

Note: The information provided by Sandee Hubbard has been made available for personal genealogy research.
It may not be copied or reproduced without gaining her written permission to do so.

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