Bates County News



 

The Adrian Journal
Adrian, Bates County, Missouri

Jan. 19, 1911 - Nov. 16, 1911

(Badly torn)
 

Greer Hoyland
Hoyland the 3 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Greer died at the family home in Shawnee township, Thursday November 9th of Diphtheria. Burial in Mt. Olivet cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, November 16, 1911, Page 1 column 5, Death
 

Rose, son
The young son of Mr. and Mrs. Rose died at the home of the parents 4 miles southeast of Adrian, Friday November 10th of diphtheria. --  The Adrian Journal, November 16,1911, Page 1 column 5, Death
 

Breese, Augustine
Augustine Breese was born in Cirena, Illinois, December 16, 1837.  In 1868 he was married to Miss Marian Munsell, to this union five children were born three of whom with the wife survive. In 1885 he moved to Iowa and from there to Adrian Mo. In1903 where he resided until his death, November 1, 1911.  He was 73 years 10 months and 15 days old.
In early life Mr. Breese decided to enter the ministry and after graduating at Princeton he took the course of study in Northwest seminary at Chicago and entered the Presbyterian ministry.  His career as an active minister was brief as his health failed, and for many years he had been a great sufferer but was patient through it all.  Mr. Breese was a kind hearted Christian gentleman and was respected as such by all who knew him.
Funeral services were held from the home Friday afternoon conducted by Rev. B. F. Heaton  The remains were laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, November 16,1911, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

Porter, Sarah
Mrs. Sarah Jones died at her home in this city, Wednesday morning, November 8, 1911; aged 70  years 3 months and 27 days.
Sarah Burns was born July 11, 1841, near Salt Lake, Centre county, Penn. She moved with her parents to Warren Co., Illinois, when she was 15 years old.  On December 5, 1911 she was united in marriage to John C. Jones.  To this union one son was born, Wm. G. Jones of Kansas City.  The husband died about 12 years ago.  Mr. and Mrs.  Jones came to Bates county many years ago.  In early life Mrs. Jones was converted and united with the M. E. church, of which she was a faithful member at the time of her death. She was a good Christian woman and was ever zealous in the cause of the Master.  In recent years she was a constant sufferer, and much of the time was barely able to be about, and could not attend church services regularly.
Funeral services were held from the Mt. Olivet Methodist church this Thursday morning at 11 o’clock, conducted by her pastor, Rev. Chatten, and the body laid to rest in the Mt. Olivet cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, November 9, 1911, Page 5 column 4, Death
 

Twyman, Julia A.
Mrs. D. L. Twyman died at her home on East 3rd street, early Tuesday morning, after an illness of only a few minutes. She complained to her husband of feeling ill and he called the neighbors for assistance but by the time they arrived she was dead.
Julia A. Williamson was born in Everett township, Cass co., Missouri, March 15, 1847 and spent her entire life in her native state near the place of her birth.  October 11 1870 she was united in marriage with Mr. D. L. Twyman, to this union ten children were born, two died in infancy eight children and the husband survive. The living children are: L.R.Twyman, Harrisonville; Mrs. G. W. Flook Lewiston, Montana; T. G. Twyman, Tharp, Idaho; B. E. Twyman, Kansas City; E. O. Twyman, Adrian; W. H. Twyman, Independence; J. E. Twyman, Nevada; D. L. Twyman Jr., Leon, Iowa.
In early life Mrs. Twyman was converted and united with the Baptist church, of which she was a member at the time of her death.  She was always a sweet spirited Christian lady, and in her daily walk reflected the spirit of the Master.  In her home she was an exemplary wife and mother, ever loving and kind.  As a neighbor none was more kind and obliging, she was over sympathetic and helpful.  Her death will be mourned by the entire community.
Funeral services over the remains will be held from the Baptist church Thursday at 1 p.m. conducted by her pastor, Rev. Heaton, burial will be in Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, November 9, 1911, Page 4 column 4, Death
 

Duvall, Hallie May
Mrs. Hallie May Duvall, nee McKee was born June 16, 1893, at the old home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. McKee, in which home she lived until she was married to Mr. Joe Duvall, of Amsterdam, Mo., April 12, 1911.  Five years ago she gave her heart to God and became a loved and honored member of Mt. Vernon Baptist church, of which she remained to the end.  Her lovely Christian spirit, her devotion to God, her tender sympathy and consideration for her associates and her fellowmen gave her a place in the church and in the lives of her friends and  acquaintances that never can be filled.
During her entire illness she was as sweet and patient with her friends, the doctor and nurse as she was trusted and obedient to her God.  Her brave and patient endurance of her long and intense suffering showed many signs of being borne up by a super human power and was a great lesson to all who witnessed them.
After an illness of some two months she peacefully and gently resigned herself to the dark winged messenger who had come to bear her soul to “Great Eternal”, where she will join her infant sister, who for many years she has watched for the coming of the boatman, in which act she bade farewell to husband, father, mother seven sisters and five brothers, who deeply deplore her loss and most solemnly mourn her death, which came at the early age of 18 years, 4 months and 19 days. The old church and many friends join the bereaved young husband and the heart broken family in mourning their great loss. Funeral services were conducted from Mt. Vernon Baptist church, Oct. 30, by J.C. Chappell, of Liberty, Mo. -- The Adrian Journal, November 9, 1911, Page 4 column 4, Death
 

Gilpin, baby girl
A girl baby was born to Mrs. Frank Gilpin last Saturday. -- The Adrian Journal, October 26, 1911, Page 4 column 1, Birth
 

Bunch-Hooker
Eucla Bunch, of Halstead, Kansas, and Miss Della Hooker, of Adrian, went to Nevada, Monday and were united in marriage.
The groom holds a position with a milling company at Halstead, where he has been employed for the past ten years and they will make their home in that  city. -- The Adrian Journal, October 19, 1911, Page 1 column 3, Marriage
 

Nelson, baby girl
A girl baby was born to Mrs. Roy Nelson. -- The Adrian Journal, October 19, 1911, Page 4 column 3, Birth
 

Cowdery, Elizabeth
Mrs. George P. Cowdery died at her home, seven miles southwest of Adrian, Friday evening, Oct. 6, 1911, after a lingering illness of consumption. She had been a member of the Baptist church for twenty three years and was a faithful Christian lady.
Her maiden name was Elizabeth Rayburn, and she was untied in marriage to Mr. Cowdery thirty years ago. To them one son was born, who with the husband, survives.
Funeral services were held from the home Sunday evening and the body buried in the Mt. Vernon cemetery. --  The Adrian Journal, October 12, 1911, Page 1 column 4, Death

 Elizabeth, wife of George P. Cowdery and daughter of Isaac N. and Sarah J.Rayborn, was born at Grand City, Worth co, Mo., October 17, 18162, moved with her parents to Elkhart township in 1866, and departed this life October 6, 1911, at her home 7 miles southwest of Adrian.
She was united in marriage with G. P. Cowdery, July 21, 1881, to this union one son was born; she united with the Mt. Vernon Baptist church twenty three years ago, and at the time of her death was a member of the R.N.A. Lodge, No. 3091, of Elkhart.
Funeral services over the remains were held from the residence Sunday afternoon, conducted by Rev. Prevo, of the Burdett church.  Burial was made in Scott cemetery, conducted by H. T. Carr undertaker.
Mrs. Cowdery had been in failing health for several years, dating back to injuries received in a railroad wreck in 1904, this no doubt hastened her death.
She stood her last illness she did not murmur.  In her death the community has lost a worthy neighbor and influential citizen.  A husband, son Edward, father, three sisters and four brothers are left to mourn their loss. -- The Adrian Journal, October 12, 1911, Page 5 column 2, Death
 

Davis, Hiram
Hiram Davis died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. W. H. Banke, three miles southwest of Altona, Wednesday morning at 4 o’clock, aged 73 years.  Funeral services were held from the home of his daughter, Mrs. Banke, this Thursday morning at 11 o’clock.  Burial in the Cloud cemetery.  Mr. Davis was a highly respected citizen and the near relatives have the sympathy of friends in their bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, October 12, 1911, Page 5 column 4, Death
 

Gutshall, Mrs. Chas. C.
Hannaretta Adams was born in Ohio, August 13, 1844, and come with her husband to Missouri in April 1867, and located on the farm where she, having lived there continuously for over 44 years.  In February 1867 she was united in marriage with C. C. Gutshall, to this union ten children were born, eight boys and two girls, two sons died in infancy, the husband and eight children.  In early life she was converted and untied with the church.  At the time of death she was a member of the Friends church.  Mrs. Gutshall was a faithful wife and a devoted mother.  Her life was devoted to the care of her home and family  and she was adored by her husband and children.  In this bereavement they have the sympathy of the entire community.
The Gutshall children who live at a distance and who, it was thought might come to attend the funeral of there mother, wee heard from early in the week, and in as much as they could not get here the funeral services over the remains of Mrs. Gutshall were held Tuesday afternoon the body laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, September 28, 1911, Page 1 column 4, Death
 

Jenkins, baby
Dr. Todd reports the birth of a babe to Mrs. Paul Jenkins Tuesday morning. -- The Adrian Journal, September 28, 1911, Page 4  column 3, Birth
 

Reeder-Mathers
Mr. W. F. Reeder and Mrs. Anna Mathers were united in marriage Sunday evening, Sept 17, at the home of the bride, this city, Rev. W. K. Chatten officiating. The contracting parties are numbered among the best people in this community and the Journal joins their many friends in wishing them continued happiness. -- The Adrian Journal, September 21, 1911, Page 1 column 3, Marriage
 

Smith-Zimmer
Mr. Chas. R. Smith, of Butler, and Mrs. Pearl E. Zimmer, of Adrian, were quietly united in marriage in Harrisonville, Sept. 15, 1911, at the Baptist parsonage, Rev. Simmons officiating.  The contracting parties intend to make their future home in Greenly, Colo. -- The Adrian Journal, September 21, 1911, Page 5 column 4, Marriage
 

Chitwood-Duffy
Hal Chitwood and Miss Jessie Duffey were married at Butler last Wednesday, Rev. Whitsett officiating. The groom is a young farmer, living three miles west of town a new comer, and stand well in his new neighborhood and makes a good appearance in society. The bride is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Duffy and is well known, a lady in every way.  Having been raised in the neighborhood she is well respected and gets the best wishes of her friends who are many. -- The Adrian Journal, September 14, 1911, Page 5 column 2, Marriage
 

Askew, baby girl
Mr. and Mrs.  Mell Askew are the proud parents of a girl baby. -- The Adrian Journal, September 14, 1911, Page 4 column  5, Birth
 

Todd, infant
The infant son of Dr. and Mrs. T. B. Todd died at the hospital in Kansas City Friday night from the effects of an operation to remove an obstruction of the bowels. The babe was but little more than a month old and had been a constant sufferer almost since its birth.
The body was brought to Adrian and laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery. Funeral services were held from the home at 10 o’clock Sunday morning, conducted by Rev. Clyde French, of Passaic. -- The Adrian Journal, September 7, 1911, Page 1 column 4, Death
 

Nelson, Anna
Anna Nelson, nee Skillman, was born in Bates county, Mo., February 28,1883, was married to Mr. R. E. Nelson on the 16th of November, 1902; and died August 14, 1911, at 3 o’clock p.m.  She leaves a father, four brothers, a dear husband, and two sons, Emmett, aged eight years and Fletcher, aged five years, the infant was laid to rest in the same casket with the dear mother to await the resurrection morn.
Funeral services were held in the Burdett Baptist church, conducted by Bro. A. Showalter, where a large crowd of her friends gathered to pay their last respects to the dead, after which the remains were laid to rest in the Sharon cemetery.
-- The Adrian Journal, August 31, 1911, Page 5 column 3, Death
 

McReynolds-McCune
Wednesday evening was the evening of the McReynolds-McCune wedding at the home of the bride’s  parents, Mr. and Mrs. F. J. McCune, five miles southwest of Adrian.  This being the evening that William McReynolds and Ella McCune took the solemn vow as man and wife in presence of about forty guests.  Bro. Whitsatt very gracefully tied the nuptial knot.  Mrs. George Wyatt played the wedding march and after a short ceremony and the usual greetings they marched to the dining room to as fine a supper  as ever was spread.  A more beautiful and palatable table could not be spread.  Fruits of all kinds, everything in abundance.
The young people need no recommendation, they are widely known.  The bride has been first class teacher of the county for a number of years and is in high standing in Sunday school and church work.  The groom is an honest upright, god serving citizen, owning a good farm, well stocked and amply able to enjoy the luxuries of the present day.  They will be at home in a fine new residence after Sept. 1st, ½ mile west and ½ mile north of Fairview. -- The Adrian Journal, August 31, 1911, Page 5 column 3, Marriage
 

Clawson-Corder
The wedding of Miss Dixie Eugene Corder and Mr. Edward A. Clawson was solemnized in the Christian church in Blackburn, Mo., at 3 o‘clock on the afternoon of August 16, Rev. Arthur downs officiating.
The entire party motored with the bride and groom to Higginsville where the happy couple took the train for Adrian, Mo., the home of the groom, via Kansas City.
After visiting with the parents of the groom they will go to Dearborn, Mo., where Prof. Clawson will have charge of the schools the coming year. -- The Adrian Journal, August 31, 1911, Page 5 column 4, Marriage
 

Mohney, Hester
Hester Ingle was born in East Tennessee, May 17, 1836, when she was one year old her parents came to Missouri locating in Henry county, after residing there one they  moved what is now Cass county, near Austin.  Her father built the mill on Grand River, the first grist mill in this part of the state. At the age of fourteen years she was converted and united with the Baptist church, and lived a devoted Christian life until death called her home.  In 1854 she was united in marriage with Jesse Harris Hammontree, to this union one son was born, John Hammontree, who is still living at the old homestead.  Her husband died in 1872; she was twice married after that, first to Robert Smiley, and after his death to Jesse Mohney who also preceded her in death.
Grandma spent all the years of her long and useful life in the neighborhood where she died and helped to bring about the marvelous changes that  marked the development of this country to its present pleasant condition.  It was such stalwart characters as her’s that made these later privileges possible. To much of praise can not be said of these hardy pioneers, who braved hardships and made sacrifices of the most trying kind that they might build comfortable homes for their children. And amid all these trying circumstances they left the imprint of their Christian characters as a heritage for those who should succeed them on the stage of action.  Such was Grandma’s  life and character.  She has put aside the care of this life for the joys of a happier existence.
Her last days were days of great affliction during which her son, John Hammontree and his wife gave her the tenderest attention.  After lingering for months she passed to the beyond Wednesday, August 16, 1911; aged 75 years, 2 months and 29 days.
Funeral services over the remains were held from the home of her son Friday morning at 10 o’clock conducted by Rev. J. A. Smith of Dayton, and the body was laid to rest in the Pleasant Ridge cemetery, near Lone Tree.
Besides her son she leaves one brother, Nathan Ingle, of this city.  They have the sympathy of friends in this bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, August 24,1911, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

Inman-Grant
Prof. J. Henry Inman, of Adrian, and Miss Ethel Grant were united in marriage at the home of the bride’s parents near Schell City, Mo., Wednesday evening, August 23rd, Elder J. W. Walters, pastor of the Adrian Christian church officiating.
The contracting parties are well and favorably known here.  The groom was born and raised here, graduated from the Adrian High School and from Baker University, Baldwin, Kansas.  He has traveled extensively, having made two trips to Europe, and carefully studied conditions in those countries.  Henry is a young man of good character and excellent ability.  The bride taught in the Adrian high School last year and proved herself to be a good teacher and a lady of excellent Christian character.
They will be at home in Hume after September 1st, where the groom has been employed as principal of schools and the bride as assistant principal. -- The Adrian Journal, August 24, 1911, Page 4 column 4, Marriage
 

Nelson, Mrs. R. E.
Mrs. R. E. Nelson died at her home in Burdett Monday night of child birth. Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon and the body laid to rest in the Burdett cemetery.
A husband and several small children are left to mourn the loss of a kind wife and mother.  These have the sympathy of friends in this great bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, August 17, 1911, Page 1 column 4, Death
 

Crawford-Lockwood
Sunday afternoon at 5 o’clock at the home of the bride’s parents, Dr. T. F. Lockwood and wife on Pine street, Talmage DeWitt Crawford and Miss Eda Lockwood were united in marriage.  Rev. A. S. Gwinn, pastor of the Ohio street Baptist church, preformed the ceremony.  The news of  their marriage comes as a surprise to their many friends.  The newly married couple left Sunday night for Nevada where they will visit for a few days then they will go on the road with the Crawford tent theatre of which Mr. Crawford is manager. -- The Adrian Journal, August 17, 1911, Page 1 column 3, Marriage
 

Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Tuttle
58th Anniversary
Not many couples live to enjoy fifty eight years of married life, and at the end of that time be able to celebrate the event with four generations present and all living, not being a death in the four generations, but such was the unusual privilege and pleasure of Mr. and Mrs. W.H. Tuttle, of this city last Friday. 
W.H. Tuttle and Miss Caroline Wittamire were married at Vandalia, Illinois, August 11, 1853, to them one son was born, Dr. H. W. Tuttle, of this city.  There are six grandchildren and five great grandchildren.  These all decided that they would not let this anniversary date pass without making some kind of a demonstration appropriate to the occasion. So they decided to surprise the aged couple by having a complete family reunion with every member of the four generations of the family present.
Grandpa Tuttle was born in Athens county, Ohio, 84 years ago.  Grandma was born in Pennsylvania 79 years ago.  They came to Missouri in 1868 and located near Dayton, where they resided until they moved to Adrian about 18 years ago. -- The Adrian Journal, August 17, 1911, Page 1 column 3, Anniversary
 

Jackson, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel
60th Anniversary
Uncle Sam and Aunt Nancy Jackson were about the happiest couple on the map last Sunday when abut seventy five of their friends went to their home and helped them celebrate the sixtieth anniversary of there marriage. Though well advanced in years these worthy people are young in spirit and the greeting they gave their friends was that cordial kind which characterized the pioneer days, for Uncle Sam and Aunt Nancy were pioneers in this country.
As such they experienced all of the joys and sorrows that go to make up such a life.
Samuel Jackson and Nancy E. Williams were married at Austin, Cass county, Missouri, Aug. 13, 1851, and have resided in this community all these years.  Uncle Sam was born near Nashville, Tenn., June 15, 1833, and came with his parents to this state when a small lad.  Aunt Nancy was born in Boone county, Missouri, July 30, 1834, and has spent all the years of her life in her native state, and most of them in Bates county.  When they were married, sixty years ago, there were but few settlers in this country and none of the convinces known to the present day. The country was in its primitive state and the problem for the then inhabitants was subdue and develop the vast domain.
They have four children living,  they are: James and G. M., of Adrian, Mrs. Wilcox, of Kansas City, and one whose name we do not know.  There are thirteen grandchildren, and 19 great grandchildren.
The gathering Sunday was a fitting tribute to these aged people and was heartily enjoyed by them as it was enjoyed by the guests. -- The Adrian Journal,, August 17, 1911, Page 4 column 4, Anniversary
 

Stoutsenberger, baby girl
A baby girl was born into the Stoutsenberger home last week. -- The Adrian Journal, August 10, 1911, Page 4 column 1, Birth
 

Lacy, Sterril
Sterril Lacy died at the home of his father, in East Boone township, last Friday morning at 7 o’clock, aged 33 years.
He had been in failing health for several years and recently had been unable to leave his room but was much better the day before he died and hoped to soon be out again.
Mr. Lacy was a first class young man and a popular citizen.
He leaves a young wife, father and other near relatives to mourn his death.
Funeral services were held from the home of his father Saturday afternoon and were conducted by Elder Jean and Rev. Self.  Burial was made in Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, July 20, 1911, Page 1 column 4, Death
 

Swartz-Holland
Albert M. Swartz, of this city, and Mrs. Daisy Holland of the Ballard neighborhood, were married last Sunday afternoon, Rev. S.M. Hardy was the officiating clergyman. -- The Adrian Journal, July 20, 1911, Page 1 column 3, Marriage
 

Deardorff, Lu Edna
Mrs. Jason Deardorff was taken to Kansas City last Thursday for medical treatment. Friday morning an operation was performed on her, at the University Hospital, for a complication of troubles but her system was so worn out by the ravages of disease that she was unable to stand the shock of the operation and death relived her of pain Friday evening at 6 o’clock.
Lu Edna, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Whitehead, was born in Christian county, Illinois, October 22, 1880, and came with her parents to Bates co. Missouri in 1883, and spent the remainder of her life in this county. December 14, 1898 she was united in marriage with Mr. Jason Deardorff, to this union three children were born, two daughters and one son, these with the husband, survive, she leaves besides these her parents, two sisters and two brothers, two  brothers and three sisters having preceded her to the spirit world.
Mrs. Deardorff had been a constant sufferer for many months and her death did not come as a great surprise to her many friends. The family and near relatives have the sincere sympathy of a wide circle of friends in this great affliction that has come upon them.
H. T. Carr went to Kansas City Friday night and prepared the body for burial, returning to Adrian with it Saturday noon. The remains were taken to the home in Shawnee township, Friday afternoon.  Funeral services over the remains were held from the Mt. Olivet church Sunday afternoon, conducted by Elder George Lentz, of Kansas City, and the body laid to rest in the cemetery at that place.  A very large concourse of neighbors and friends were present to pay a tribute of respect to the memory of the dead and to comfort the living. --   The Adrian Journal, July 13, 1911, Page 1 column 4, Death
 

Manlove, Grandma
Grandma Manlove, 70 years old, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Ned O’Dea in Mound township, Tuesday of cerebral hemorrhage.  Funeral was held from the O’Dea home Wednesday afternoon, burial in Crescent Hill cemetery.
-- The Adrian Journal, July 13, 1911, Page 4 column 4, Death
 

Hall, Dorothy Agnes
After a brief stay of five days in the home of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Hall, near Archie, on July the 4th at 1 p.m., little Dorothy Agnes, their infant daughter left them for her home in heaven.  On June 29, 1911, she in such an appealing manner, at such an opportune time we at once begun to build air castles and plan for her future welfare. But alas! The fallacy of human hopes, her going away leaves a deep gaping wound which no double will heal in time, leaving only a scar, which will pain and sting at times when we are reminded of her lovely little face and form, but we will try to submit to our fate, meekly looking beyond the garden of Gethsemane, the Sermon on the Mount, Calvary and the resurrection to God and the everlasting union the other loved ones gone on before. -- The Adrian Journal, July 13, 1911, Page 1 column 6, Death
 

Asher, Mrs.
Dick Asher brought the body of his mother from Kansas City today to be buried in the Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, July 6, 1911, Page 4 column 2, Death
 

Fenton-Clements
George Fenton and Miss Ebe Clements both of Burdett, were married at Butler Monday, Judge Henry officiating. They are well known young people and the Journal joins their friends in congratulations. -- The Adrian Journal, July 6, 1911, Page 4 column 4, Marriage
 

Love, F. N.
F. N. Love was buried Tuesday, June 27th in Crescent Hill cemetery. Rev. Joseph Smith of Dayton, conducted the funeral services.  Mr. Love was a member of the Baptist church and of the M. W. A., in which he was insured for $300, and carried $1000 in the Mutual Protective League. -- The Adrian Journal, July 6,1911, Page 5 column 4, Death
 

Saterlee-Hammontree
Mr. Jay Satterlee, of near Adrian, and Miss Maggie Hammontree were united in marriage at the home of the bride’s parents, near Austin, Sunday, June 25, 1911, at 1 o’clock p.m., Rev. d. W. Britton, pastor of the Austin Methodist Church, officiating.  Only the immediate relatives of the contracting parties were  present to witness the ceremony.  After the usual congratulations and excellent wedding dinner was served.
The contracting parties are first class young people.  The groom is an industrious farmer and is a young man of excellent habits.  He was born in Adrian and has grown to manhood in and near this city.  The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Hammontree and is a young lady of culture and refinement.  She graduated form the Adrian high School and for several years has taught school, the last year in this city and is reemployed to teach here next year. -- The Adrian Journal, June 29, 1911, Page 1 column 3, Marriage
 

Vogel, baby boy
Dr. Todd reports the birth of a boy baby  to Mrs. Clarence Vogel Wednesday night. -- The Adrian Journal, June 29, 1911, Page 4 column 1, Birth
 

Moss, Mrs. Houston H.
Word has been received by friends here that Mrs. Houston H. Moss died at her home in St. Louis, Wednesday, June 28th. The body will be taken to Butler for burial and the funeral will be held Friday.
Mrs. Moss was the daughter of the late Thomas Timmons.  The family lived for a number of years on a farm, three miles northeast of this city. -- The Adrian Journal, June 29, 1911, Page 4 column 3, Death
 

Hobson-Walters
E. A. Hobson and Miss Florence Walters, prominent young people of this city, drove to Butler Wednesday afternoon and were married, Probate Judge Henry performed the ceremony. W. H. Twyman and Miss Grace Hobson witnessed the ceremony.
The groom is engaged in the barber business in this city and is a young man of excellent habits. The bride is one of Adrian’s best young ladies.  After graduating from the Adrian High School she accepted a position in the post office, where she remained until a month ago.
They left Wednesday night for King City, Missouri, where they will visit the groom’s parents for a few days, after which they will return to this city and begin housekeeping. -- The Adrian Journal, June 22, 1911, Page 4 column 3, Marriage
 

Vogler, baby
Icea, the five months old babe of Mr. and Mrs. John Vogler, died at the home of her parents, this city, Saturday night, June 10th. The body was taken to Dayton Monday and laid to rest in the cemetery at that place. -- The Adrian Journal, June 15, 1911, Page 1 column 4, Death
 

Conine, J. E.
J. E. Conine, an aged and respected citizen of Elkhart township, died in the university hospital in Kansas City last Friday night.  Mr. Conine was taken to Kansas City two weeks ago and a surgical operation was performed on him.  His advanced age and weakened condition from a  prolonged illness were against his recovery.
The body was brought back for burial and the funeral services was held from the home Sunday afternoon.
Mr. Conine was a good citizen and held the highest esteem by his neighbors and friends. The wife and children have the sincere sympathy of their many friends in this great affliction which has come to their home. -- The Adrian Journal, June 15, 1911, Page 1 column 4, Death
 

Hope, James
Henry Lentz received word Saturday informing him that James Hope died at his home in Nevada Friday night of neuralgia of the heart. The funeral was held in Nevada Sunday.  Mr. and Mrs.  Lentz went to Nevada Sunday morning.
Mr. Hope formerly resided in the Altona neighborhood and was known as a peaceable and industrious citizen.
A wife and four children survive him, these have the sympathy of their many friends. -- The Adrian Journal, June 15, 1911, Page 1 column 4, Death
 

Tabler-Moore
Leland and Lorand Tabler, twin brothers of this city, who were married at San Marcos, Texas, last Thursday to the Moore sisters, also twins, arrived home Saturday noon. -- The Adrian Journal, June 15, 1911, Page 1 column 3, Marriage
 

Wallace-Smith
An attractive home wedding was solemnized at the beautiful home of attorney and Mrs. A.J. Smith Wednesday evening, June 14th, when Miss Martha Elizabeth Smith became the bride of Mr. Clay H. Wallace.  Preceding the wedding ceremony a beautiful musical program was rendered.  Miss Helen Smith sang, “Believe me if all those endearing charms”.  Miss Mamie Blocher sang, “ All I ask of you is Love.”  The Misses Helen and Josephine Smith sang,  “My Hero”.  At the conclusion of this attractive musical program Miss Josephine Smith took her place at the piano and began to play Mendelssohn’s wedding march, to the beautiful strains of which the contracting parties marched to the altar, where Rev. Wm K. Chatten united their fortunes  in a very impressive ceremony,  The usual congratulations followed, after which an excellent dinner was served.
The bride wore a dress of Brazil net over white satin, trimmed in silk braid.  The groom wore the traditional black.
The bride is an Adrian girl by birth and raising, having graduated from High School of this city in 1910, she is well and favorably known by everyone in town as a cheerful, kind hearted young lady and enjoys the respect of all. The groom is also a Bates county boy, having been born and raised in Hume and is a graduate of the High School of that city.  He is a young man of excellent habits, bright and ambitious.  He holds a good positing with the Long-Bell Company.
They start on their new relations in life with the hearty good will and best wishes of a host of friends. -- The Adrian Journal, June 15, 1911, Page 4 column 3, Marriage
 

Hall, baby girl
A letter received from Rev. J. E. Hall last week stated that a girl baby was born into their home May 31st. -- The Adrian Journal, June 15, 1911, Page 5 column 5, Birth
 

Rockhold-Sells
Ira Rockhold, son of Mr. and Mrs. Rockhold of Fairview, and Miss Sells, of Butler, were married Wednesday night.  The groom holds a good position in the Butler post office.  -- The Adrian Journal, June 15,1911, Page 5 column 4, Marriage
 

Larned, baby boy
Did you know there was a new boy at H. M. Larned’s on the Dr. Bates farm? -- The Adrian Journal, June 8, 1911, Page 5 column 3, Birth
 

Oiler-Newlon
Mr. John Oiler, of Elkhart township, and Miss Janie Newlon were united in marriage at the home of the bride’s mother, this city, Wednesday, June 7th.
The are well known and highly respected persons.  They will reside on the groom’s farm near Fairview. -- The Adrian Journal, June 8, 1911, Page 5 column 4, Marriage
 

Tabler-Moore
Leland and Loran Tabler, prominent young business men of this city, left the early part of the week for San Marcus, Texas, where they will be united in marriage this morning, Leland to Miss Alma Moore, and Loran to Miss Alta Moore, at the home of the brides.
The unusual feature of this double wedding is the fact that the grooms are twin brothers and the brides are twin sisters.
The Tabler brothers were born and reared in Grand River township and bear so close a resemblance to each other that their most intimate friends cannot tell them apart.
The brides are twin sisters and are said to bear a striking resemblance to each other.
The happy couples are expected to arrive in Adrian in a few days where they will reside in a new home recently built by the grooms. -- The Adrian Journal, June 8, 1911, Page 5 column 4, Marriage
 

Ewing-Regan
Mr. Floyd Ewing and Miss Laura Ragan were united in marriage at the home of the bride’s parents, in Elkhart township, Wednesday evening, May 31st, Rev. S. H. Hardy officiating.  Immediately following the ceremony an excellent wedding supper was served.
The contracting parties are numbered among the best young people in this community and they start out on their wedded life with the best wishes of a host of friends for their continued happiness and success.
The will make their home on the Ewing farm, 2 ½ miles west of Adrian. -- The Adrian Journal, June 8, 1911, Page 1 column 3, Marriage
 

Blackmon-Ricketts
A pretty wedding was solemnized at the home of Mr. and Mrs. R. R. Ricketts, Thursday evening, June 1st, when their daughter, Miss Ruby, was united in marriage with Mr. C. G. Blackmon, Rev. Clyde French, of Passaic, was the officiating clergyman.  After the ceremony an excellent wedding supper was served.
The contracting parties are numbered among the best young people in North Bates county.  The groom was raised in East Boone township, attended school in Warrensburg, and now holds a good position in the National Bank of Commerce, Kansas City.  The bride was raised in Grand River township and is an accomplished young lady.  For several years she has successfully taught school in this county. -- The Adrian Journal, June 8, 1911, Page 1 column 4, Marriage
 

Willie, baby boy
Dr. Floyd Bates reports the birth of a 9 lb. boy baby to Mrs. Chas. Willie last week. -- The Adrian Journal,, May 25, 1911, Page 2 column 6, Birth
 

Kreidler, Amanda
Miss Amanda Kreidler died at the country home of Wm. Nelson, six miles northeast of Adrian, Thursday, May 18, 1911; aged, 63 years and 27  days.
Miss  Kreidler was a member of the Crescent Hill United Brethren church, and live a consistent Christian life. -- The Adrian Journal, May 25, 1911, Page 5 column 3, Death
 

Simpson, Thomas
Thomas R. Simpson was born in Shelby county, Indiana, August 19, 1820, died at his home in Adrian, Missouri, May 16, 1911; aged 90  years, 8 months and 26 days.
In 1827 when the subject of this sketch was 7 years old, his parents moved to North, Mo., and with the exception of a few years spent in Texas during the civil war, had resided in this state continuously for 83 years.  He came to what is now Bates county in 1840 and had resided in Bates, Cass and Johnson counties since that time.
Mr. Simpson was united in marriage with miss  Cassandra Fulton at Old West Point in 1839.  To this union nine children were born, the wife and seven of the children preceded him in death. The living children are Mrs. E. O. Hodges, of Holden, Mo., and James N. Simpson, of Harrisonville, Mo.
In 1861 Mr. Simpson enlisted in the Confederate army and served through the war, after the war closed he again engaged in business and continued actively in business until fifteen years ago.
His early business at West Point consisted mainly in trading with the Indians.  At that time there were few white settlers in this country and they lived a primitive life.  They had little money and their manner of living was such that they needed but little merchandise.
Often have we heard Uncle Tom relate the experiences of these pioneer days and the manner of dealing with the Indians.  His mind remained clear on these early events to the very end of his eventful life.  His was a remarkable business career in that it covered a long period of time and was enacted under circumstances and conditions entirely different from those which now prevail.
For several years past Uncle tom had lingered in great feebleness. During these years he had been tenderly cared for by his granddaughter, Mrs. Daisy Mahan.  She was devoted to the charge that fell to her lot. So well did she perform her duty that she won the respect and admiration of the entire community for her loyalty.  Such devotion should be richly rewarded.
Funeral services over the remains were held from the home Thursday afternoon conducted by Rev. B. F. Heaton, and the remains laid to rest in the Oak Hill cemetery at Butler. -- The Adrian Journal, May 25, 1911, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

Gilmore, Dr. E. E.
Dr. E.E. Gilmore died at the home of his son, James P., in Kansas City, Mo., Friday, May 19, 1911; aged 74 years and 9 months.
E. E. Gilmore was born in Kentucky, August 19, 1836.
He graduated from the Transylvania University, now the state University, in 1856, and came to Missouri the same year, locating in Barton county.  Here he taught school until the war broke out.  In 1851 he enlisted in the Union army and served until 1865.  In 1860 he was united in marriage with Miss Mary Duckworth.  To this union three children were born, two sons and one daughter, the latter died in childhood.  The sons are, Wm. R., a druggist, and James P., and attorney, both of Kansas City, Mo., one grandson, Eugene Gilmore, also survives.  The wife died in 1907, at the family home in this city.
In 1865 Dr. Gilmore located in Bates county and taught school for a time.  In 1867 he engaged in the practice of medicine at Coleville, 4 miles northeast of where Adrian now stands.  He practiced his profession there until Adrian was established when he moved here and remained in active practice until 1909.  He always enjoyed a large practice , riding day and night, responding to every call, regardless of conditions.  He never stopped to consider whether he would receive any remuneration for his services, but would respond as readily to the call of the poor and indigent as readily as to the rich. This was an admirable trait of his character, and in this way he contributed much to the relief of suffering humanity.  He was always generous hearted to those in distress and we doubt if any man in the community ever contributed more in actual cash to the relief of the poor that did Dr. Gilmore.  No person ever appealed to him in vain for relief.  In this regard Dr. Gilmore was a rare example and a most worthy one.  In his prime he was regarded highly in his profession and contributed largely to medical magazines, being considered one of the able men in his profession with the pen.  But his strong constitution finally gave way to the great strain that was constantly upon it and he has been gathered with those who have gone before.
Dr. Gilmore was a member of the Crescent Hill Masonic Lodge and Gonley Comandry, the latter located at Harrisonville; he was also a member of the Odd Fellows Lodge at Austin.
The body was brought to Adrian for burial Sunday and the services held in the Adrian Baptist church, conducted by Rev. B. F. Heaton, the pastor.  The local Masonic Lodge and Gonley Comandry had charge of the services.  After the services at the church the body was laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, May 25, 1911, Page 1 column 5, Death
 

Owen, Mrs. J. E.
When the pale horse and his rider made his unwelcome visit to the home of Mr. J. E. Owen and took Mrs. Owen from our midst there was a gloom of sorrow spread over the entire community.
By the death of Mrs. Owen the family has lost an affectionate and faithful wife and mother; the community a loyal and loving friends and neighbor; the church one if its foremost, most faithful and diligent Christian; the world one of its noblest and assiduous citizens.
In her home she was a tender mother and wife.  She had her work to have a Christian and an attractive home.  Indeed she filler her parental sphere as only a noble and true Christian woman should.
In the community she was a neighbor whose well wishes and sympathy was worthy of having.  To the sick and the afflicted she was a staff and a comfort, always ready to serve them and bring sunshine unto their home.  She was indeed a jewel in the community and leaves many friends to lament their loss.
As a Christian and church worker, she was loyal to her Master and her faith.  Her faith and love for Christianity was altogether lovely and an example to be admire.  Her church will indeed miss her sorely.  She was largely instrumental both directly and indirectly in the erection of the new Christian church in Altona, which now stands as a monument to her good efforts.
In the world at large we can say, the world is better for her having lived in it.  In it she leaves many bereaved friends and many kind deeds.
She had filled a premature grave although she made a desperate struggle for life unto the last.
The many friends join in extending their heartfelt sympathy to the bereaved ones at home and shall try to comfort and  console them in  this their hour of grief and sorrow. -- The Adrian Journal, May 11, 1911, Page 1 column 4, Death
 

Moon, Ardilla
Mrs. George Moon died at her home 2 miles west of Adrian, Tuesday, May 9th, after an illness lasting several weeks.
Ardilla Cummins was born in Sullivan county, Indiana, Sept. 17, 1857,but spent most of her life in this county. She was a good woman in the fullest meaning of the term. Few persons were burdened with the weight of care that rested on Mrs. Moon yet under the most trying circumstances she was ever cheerful and kind hearted. For years her husband has been a helpless, bed ridden invalid, and she had sole charge of him. She performed this duty with a patience and fidelity that won for her the admiration of every person acquainted with the circumstances under which she labored. Her life here was one of care; her reward in the hereafter should be one of sweet repose.  Mrs. Moon wrought well and died respected.
For the husband who is left in this helpless and hopeless condition the entire community  has a profound sympathy.  His is indeed a pitiable condition one that is indeed pathetic in the extreme.
Funeral services over the remains of Mrs. Moon were held from the home Wednesday and the body tenderly laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, May 11,1911, Page 5 column 2, Death
 

Dowell, Lucy
Miss Lucy Victoria, the only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Dowell, died Sunday evening at 8:20.  Funeral service was held at the M. E. church Tuesday afternoon.  Interment was made in the Crescent Hill cemetery.
A father’s hand was unequal to the sad duty of writing in memory of an only daughter, and it is hard for a brother.
Lucy Victoria Dowell was born in Miller, South Dakota, March 12, 1890. With her parents she moved to Adrian, Missouri, in December 1890, and she had lived here ever since.
In 1905 she graduated from the Adrian High School and for three years taught in the city schools here. She had attended the Warrensburg State Normal for two years and would have graduated with the class receiving their diplomas this week.
In the state normal she had been honored by being elected president of the Campbell Literary Society, one of the leading girls societies.  For several months of the past year she had been Normal accompanist, presiding at the piano for the soloists in the music department and at chapel exercises. She was a member of the Treble Clef Club, the girls musical organization, a past president of the Campbell Literary Society and a member of the Short Story Club, a club devoted to the study and writing of short stories.
In  this city she was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, uniting in 1901; of the Epworth League, and the Sunday School.  She was a member of the Eastern Star in this city, and of the Mystic Workers.
In these organizations, both at home and in Warrensburg, she was an active worker.  She worked hard in her school work, in her music and in the organizations she was in.  At the time  of her death she had been elected to the principal ship of the Lockwood, Mo., high school, to the post of supervisor of music in the California, Mo., high school; and had been  offered a position of teacher of voice and piano in another, Lucy never knew of any of these offers, as she was in no condition to hear them.
The testimonials of respect from the people of this community and from other places speak louder than words of her character and of the position she held in the hearts of those who knew her.
The only daughter and sister, and ever pleasant and loving, her loss in the family circle, forever vacant, is one that will ever be fresh in memory.
A review of her life is one of accomplishment and of good.  In her short life she had accomplished the attainments and experience of one twice her age and had missed the thorns that cover life’s pathway.
No funeral sermon was delivered.  The service was conducted by Rev. W. K. Chatten, assisted by Revs. Heaton, Hardy, Shelton and Benson, and short memorial talks were made by Rev. Chatten, her pastor;  Prof. J. H. Scarborough, of the Warrensburg State Normal; Prof. W. T. Hoover, who taught her in school here and later was her superintendent when she taught; and by Dr. Zeigler, a fellow teacher.  The Eastern Star had charge of the ceremony at the cemetery.
Her parents and her brothers, John E., of this city, and Geo. B., of Warsaw, bear up with the knowledge that they, and not Lucy, are the losers.  She had seen much of the good in life without coming in contact with the heartaches. -- The Adrian Journal, May 18, 1911, Page 1 column 4, Death
 

Hatcher, Mahlon L.
Mahlon L. Hatcher was born in Belmont county, Ohio, in the year 1837 and died on the 11th of May 1911 being at his death past 78 years old.  In 1861 he was united in Holy matrimony to Mary E. Forman.  There was born to this union eight children, three of whom are living: Geo. A. Hatcher and Lura M. Hatcher, of Ohio and Addie Gilham, of Adrian, Mo., at whose home he was tenderly cared for in his declining days.  Mr. Hatcher was a good man, conscientious in all of his life work and expressed himself as being willing to  go and was not afraid of death.
A kind father and neighbor and an exemplary Christian character has gone from among us with poignant grief we deplore his demise.
The funeral services were conducted from the home by Rev. Chatten of the M. E. Church, the Rev. Benson of the U. B. Church and the Rev. Hardy, of the Baptist Church all making very appropriate and impressive talks along the line of life and death, after which the remains were laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, May 18, 1911, Page 1 column 6, Death
 

Reed, Joseph
Joseph W. Reed was born near Boston, Mass., on March 25,1833, and departed this life on May 13, 1911, at his home at Austin, Mo., at the advanced age of 78 years, 1 month and 18 days.
When but a young man he emigrated to central Wisconsin and became one of the pioneers of that part of the state.  Here he was known as one of those sturdy toilers who did so much to develop the great resources of that state.
He was united in marriage to Miss Lucy J. Cline on Feb. 22, 1856, who has faithfully shared the vicissitudes of life ever since.  To this union three children were born: W. W. Reed, of Lathrop, Mo.; Mrs. A.  A. McWilliams, of Austin, Mo., and Mrs. J. L. Bennett of Adrian, all of whom were present at his bedside when he passed away.  He also is survived by three grandsons and two granddaughters.
On August 22, 1864, he responded to his country’s call for troops and enlisted in the Union army.  He served faithfully in the brave ranks of the blue until the close of the war.
He, with his family, removed to Clinton county, Mo., in 1875 and here toiled and improved their country home until the fall of the year 1907, when Mr. and Mrs. Reed purchased a new home at Austin, Mo., and moved to it.  Here they lived in happiness, gathering material comforts about them until a malignant cancer developed upon his face and which suddenly terminated his life.
The funeral services was conducted in his late home, Rev. D. W. Britton officiating.  A large chorus rendered beautiful and appropriate music and the floral tributes were numerous and exquisite.  Among them was a beautiful token for the Baptist Sunday School, brother Reed being a member of the Home Department.  Another was from the G.A.R., of which the deceased was an honored member.  There were also many others fitting and  impressive in both design and sentiment.
After the sad rites at the home the body was tenderly borne to the Austin cemetery and laid to rest.  In his death, Bro. Reed leaves a devoted wife, three dutiful children and five beloved grandchildren to mourn his sad departure, but they mourn not as those without hope.  In his demise the community loses a kind neighbor and the country at large a true and intelligent patriot.  Bro. Reed possessed a strong personality which in its elements was unique and plain spoke, but always philanthropic and kind.  His type of character was that of sterling worth and unequivocal honest. The family has the sincere sympathy of all who know them in this their great bereavement and sorrow. -- The Adrian Journal, ,May 18, 1911, Page 4 column 4, Death
 

Ballard, Hudson
Hudson L. Ballard was born at Smyrna, N. Y., March 28, 1828, and died at his home in Altona, Mo. May 3, 1911, aged 83 years, 1 month and 5 days.  His father was a doctor and after practicing in New York a number of years he started westward in 1841, stopping a few years in  western Ohio.  In 1845 he located in Joliet, Ill., where he followed his profession until 1857, when he moved to Iowa.  In 1856 the subject of this sketch went to Minnesota and took up a homestead near Minneapolis, where he remained until he secured a government patient on his land, where he sold out in 1861 joined his father’s family in Story county, Iowa. They county at that time was just opening up and he secured land close to his father’s farm and began building a home for himself.  He experienced all the advantages and disadvantages of frontier life. The advantages being cheap and fertile lands, splendid and helpful neighbors, and a sociability that has moved westward as the course of empire takes its way.
The disadvantages being a want of transportation, poor demand, and a low price for what the farmer had to sell. But through all the succeeding years he prospered and accumulated a competency for his old ate.
In 1863 he was married to Miss Mary Corbin, of Webster county, Iowa.
Mr. Ballard retired from active labors many years ago, having turned the farm over to the boys to run, but they in time went their several ways.  Also the daughter who had married W. O. Bates, and with their family had moved to their farm near Altona, thus leaving them alone in their old age and they resolved to leave their old home in Iowa with all its sacred associations, old neighbors and old friendships and relatives and move to Missouri, where he could live near and be cared for by his own children. So, on Jan. 1, 1907 he started south to spend his remaining years away for the cold northern states, which were counted as nothing when possessed of the fires of strong manhood.  He purchased a home at Altona and lived a contented and happy life to the end.
His family consists of Mrs. Mary Ballard, Altona; Mrs. W. O. Bates, Altona; A.L. Ballard, St. Charles, Ia.; P. D. Ballard, St. Louis, and B M. Ballard, Sherman, Texas.  He also leaves two brothers and three sisters and several grandchildren. Funeral service was held at the Methodist church, Rev. French officiating and burial was made at the Altona cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, May 18, 1911, Page 5  column 3, Death
 

West, Judge Samuel
Judge Samuel West died at his home in Butler Tuesday night; aged 71 years.  He served in the Union army in an Illinois regiment; located in Bates co, in 1870.  In 1898 he was elected as presiding Judge of the Bates county Court and served four years.  He was a quiet painstaking officer and retired with the respect of the people.
Funeral services will be held from the Butler Christian church Friday afternoon.  The burial rites of the Masonic Order will be given at the grave. -- The Adrian Journal, May 6, 1911, Page 5 column 5, Death
 

Moles, child
One of Mr. and Mrs. John Moles’ children died Sunday at their home, nine miles southeast of Adrian.  The little one had been sick for several weeks and its death did not come as a surprises to the family and friends.  Funeral services were held on Monday. The parents have the sympathy of their neighbors and friends in this sorrow which has come to their home. -- The Adrian Journal, April 20, 1911, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

Clymer, Miss Mary
Miss Mary Clymer, an aged lady, died at the home of her nephew, Mr. Lichliter, near Burdett, Tuesday evening. Funeral services were held from the Adrian Methodist church Tuesday. -- The Adrian Journal, April 20, 1911, Page 4 column 4, Death
 

Bruce, Adam V.
Judge Bruce’s brother, Adam V. Bruce, died at Salida, Colo., April 9th. The body was brought back to Pleasant Hill for burial.  He was the youngest of ten brothers and six of them and one sister attended the funeral, one living brother was unable to attend.  The Bruce family originally consisted of ten boys and five girls, seven boys and one sister are still living. After the funeral vive of his brothers and tow nephews came to Adrian for a brief visit with Judge and Mrs. Bruce.  The body of Adam Bruce was lid to rest in the lot beside his parents. -- The Adrian Journal, April 20, 1911, Page 4 column 4, Death
 

Warnken, George
George Warnken died at his home in Kansas City, Thursday morning, April 6th, aged 62.
Mr. Warnken was born in Missouri.  In 1884 he and his brother Wm., now a prominent business man of this city, engaged in the mercantile business in Archie and successfully conducted the same for eleven years.
The body was buried in Mt. Washington cemetery, Kansas City. -- The Adrian Journal, April 13, 1911, Page 1 column 5, Death
 

Stevens, John Lloyd
William Pledge Stevens was born in Culpeper county, Va., Jan. 1, 1802.  Acenith Burse Tyler was born in Erie, Penn., in the year 1820  They were married in Crawford county, Indiana in 1836, where their first child was born.  They moved across the Ohio river into Meade county, Where John Lloyd Stevens was born, January 1, 1839.  The family moved to Illinois by boat down the Ohio river in the spring of 1846, thence up the Mississippi to the mouth of the Illinois river and landed in Marshall county, where Putman and Marshall counties join and lived there until the fall of 1866, when the parents and part of the children came to Cass county Missouri.
John Lloyd being the oldest and the father not being stout, the main support of a family of eleven children devolved upon him.  John was always a steady boy, a comfort to his parents and looked upon by the rest of the family as a leader.  He was always quiet and modest and followed the life of a farmer.  He built a house on the farm in 1866 and lived there until the time of his death, which occurred March 16, 1911, age the age of 72 years, 2 months and 15 days.  He was never married.
The large funeral procession which followed his remains to their last resting place showed the esteem in which he was held by his neighbors, some of whom had known him for over 44 years.
Those of the immediate family left to mourn his departure are Mrs. Margaret Ann Graves, of near LaSalle, Illinois; Oliver H. Steven, who lives on an adjoining farm; W.  T., of the Merchants Hotel, Archie, Mo.; J. E. and Eliza Stevens, the two youngest of the family who lived with their brother at the time of his death, both unmarried.
Rev. G. C. Loch, pastor of the Archie circuit of the Methodist church, preached the funeral and made an able talk to the living, telling them to prepare for the future life. -- The Adrian Journal, April 13, 1911, Page 5 column 3, Death
 

Miller, Mrs. Charles
Mrs. Charles Miller died at her home near Everett Sunday after a few days illness from premature child birth.  The body was buried in the Crescent Hill cemetery Monday.
The husband and two small children are left in sorrow. They have the sympathy of the entire community. -- The Adrian Journal, April 6, 1911, Page 8 column 3, Death
 

Tygart, Capt. F. J.
Capt. Tygart died in the Masonic Home, in St. Louis, Monday. The body was shipped to Butler and laid in the family vault Wednesday.
Capt. Tygart was well known in Bates county for many years. -- The Adrian Journal, April 6, 1911, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

Bevington, Mrs. S. G.
Mrs. Bevington, wife of S. G. Bevington, died in Los Angeles, California, Sunday, April 2nd.  The Bevington family is well known here having resided for some tome on Mr. Bevington’s ranch, four miles northwest of Adrian.  Those who knew Mrs. Bevington say that she was a very amiable lady and kind to those about her.  The body was buried at Los Angeles. -- The Adrian Journal, April 6, 1911, Page 1 column 5, Death
 

Owens, Elias
Elias Owens, a blind man, died at his home Sunday morning. -- The Adrian Journal, March 23, 1911, Supplement column 3, Death
 

Richardson, baby boy
A new boy is reported at the home of Jas. Richardson. -- The Adrian Journal, March 23, 1911, Supplement column 4, Birth
 

Dillon, Mitchel L.
Capt. Mitchel L. Dillon died at his home, five miles southeast of Adrian, Tuesday night, March 21st, after an illness of several weeks of pneumonia fever, aged about 73 years.
Mr. Dillon was born in Ireland and came to America when a boy locating in Warren county, Ill., near Monmiuth. When the civil war broke out he enlisted in the service and attained the rank of captain, being honorably discharged at the close of the war.
Capt. Dillon located in Bates county forty three years ago and has resided on his farm.  He was a successful farmer and had accumulated a considerable amount of wealth.
He is survived by a wife and one son, Prof. Wm. G. Dillon, and three grandchildren.
Funeral services were held this Thursday morning from the Mt. Olivet church, conducted by Rev. Lamb, of Butler.
The family has the sympathy of the community in this great sorrow that has come to them. -- The Adrian Journal, March 23, 1911, Page 4 column 4, Death
 

Bates, baby girl
A girl baby was born to Dr. and Mrs. Floyd Bates Wednesday.  Mother and babe are doing well. -- The Adrian Journal, March 16, 1911, Page 4 column 3, Birth
 

Warior, Mrs. R. F.
Mrs. R. F. Warior died at her home in Mingo township Wednesday of consumption, aged 69 years.  Mrs. Warior was born in this county.  A husband and six children survive. -- The Adrian Journal, March 16, 1911, Page 4 column 3, Death
 

Morrison-Ramey
Theodore Morrison and Mrs. M. K. Ramey were united in marriage at the home of the bride in this city, Saturday night, March 4th, Justice W. S. Mahan officiating.  The wedding was a quiet affair only a few persons being present. -- The Adrian Journal, March 9, 1911, Page 1 column 4, Marriage
 

Foster-Blount
Gilbert Foster, of Bennett, Nebraska, and Miss Clora Blount, of Passaic, were married at the brides home, Wednesday evening, March 1st, Rev. Clifford H. French performing the ceremony.  Only immediate relatives were present.
These two charming young people will leave in a few days for their future home near Bennett, Neb., with them the best wishes of their many friends. -- The Adrian Journal, March 9, 1911, Page 1 column 3, Marriage
 

Otto, baby boy
There arrived at the home of E. E. Otto a little youngster weighing 9 ½ pounds.  The took him in gladly and having no name call him Clifton Howard. -- The Adrian Journal, March 9, 1911, Page 4 column 1, Birth
 

Nance, Oliver
Oliver Nance, 20 years old, became despondent last Thursday and while in that condition took strychnine, from the effects of which he died in great agony in a short time.
Oliver lived with his father on a farm 6 ½ miles northeast of Adrian, and was at home when he committed the rash act.  He was a quiet and industrious young man, respected by all who knew him.  For some time he had been subject to gloomy moods during which times he would have little or nothing to say to those about him.  It would seem that he had contemplated suicide for sometime at least for the middle of January last.  He bought strychnine at Hall & Son, it is now thought for that purpose.
The father has the sincere sympathy of the entire community in this great affliction which has come upon him.
Funeral services were held Friday and the body laid to rest in the Austin cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, March 2, 1911, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

Ashbaugh, baby girl
A baby girl was born to Mr. and Mrs. John Ashbaugh. All parties doing well with the exception of John. -- The Adrian Journal, March 2, 1911, Page 5 column 4, Birth
 

Estep, Louisa
Mrs. Louisa Martin Estep died at her home in Belvue, Kansas, January 30, 1911 at the age of 73 years and 5 months.
She was born in Madison county, Ohio, August 7,1837 and was married to John Wesley Estep in 1852. They lived in Ohio ten years and from there they moved to Illinois and then to Adrian, Missouri, and came to Kansas in 1897.  First to at Silver lake and later to Rossville where they lived until they came to Belvue, a number of years ago.  Fifteen children were born to them, twelve of whom live to mourn her death.  Ten of thee attended the funeral, eight boys and two girls.  The funeral services were held at the M. E. church Wednesday, the 31st.  The burial took place in the Wamego cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, February 16, 1911, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

Moudy, Lydia
After long, weary, tedious months of suffering, altho making a brave fight for her life at all times, the grim monster, death, was at last conqueror and on Sunday, February 12, 1911 at 4 p.n. at the University Hospital in Kansas city all that was mortal of Lydia Moudy put on the immortality and her soul left is teneruent of clay and winged its flight to the Beautiful Beyond.
Lydia A. Leffler was born in Hamilton county, Indiana, July 11, 1867.  She was the eldest daughter of A. and Nancy M. Leffler, who have gone on before.  She came to Adrian, Mo., with her parents in 1887, was united in marriage to  Austin C. Moudy, December  25, 1889.  In 1892 Mr. and Mrs. Moudy moved to Creede, Colo, where they lived four years, returning to Adrian they made this their permanent home.  In 1897 the mother of Celestine Westlake Bates died in Creede, Colo., and made a request that Mrs. Moudy take and rear her little daughter, aged eight years, as her own. The little stranger was welcomed to their home and their hearts and brought joy, sunshine and happiness to them as long as they lived.  Mr. Moudy passed away September 29, 1909.
Mrs. Moudy leaves this foster daughter, Mrs. Celestine Bates, two brothers, John Leffler of Courtland, Cal., Robert Leffler, of Kansas City and three sisters, Mrs. Peal Cherry of Adrian, Mrs. Irene Foreman of Kansas City,  and Mrs. Ethel Hill, of Decatur, Ill., to mourn her going away.
Funeral services were held at the Baptist church, of which she was a loyal and faithful member, Tuesday, February 14 at 2 p.m. Rev. W. S. Weir, of Warsaw, Mo., her former pastor preached the sermon. -- The Adrian Journal, February 16, 1911, Page 1 column 4, Death
 

Askew, baby girl
Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Askew are the proud parents of a ten pound baby girl -- The Adrian Journal, February 16, 1911, Page 3 column 4, Birth
 

Timmons, Catherine E.
Mrs. Catherine E. Timmons died at her home, 5 miles northeast of Adrian, Saturday, February 4,1911; aged 55 years, 8 months and 25 days.
Catherine E. Rodes was born in Jackson county, Iowa, May 9, 1855. She was united in marriage with O.H. P. Timmons  January 5, 1874, to this union six children were born, two of them died in infancy, four survive, viz: Carrie, Oliver and Edwin, of Adrian, and Mark, of Joliet, Montana.  The husband preceded her in death nearly five years ago.
The family came to Missouri and located on their farm near Adrian, where they have since resided.  Mrs. Timmons was a good woman and a kind and obliging neighbor and friend.
Funeral services were held from the Crescent Hill church Sunday afternoon, conducted by the pastor, Rev. Benson, after which the body was laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, February 9, 1911, Page 1 column 4, Death
 

Pulliam-Shubert
A very pretty home wedding was solemnized at the home of Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Shubert on Wednesday evening, January 25, 1911, when their second daughter, Miss Netta, was united in marriage with Mr. L. A. Pulliam, second son of Mr. and Mrs. Jos. Pulliam.  The were attended by Mr. Leonard and Miss Lulu Shubert, brother and sister of the bride.  Miss Bertha Shubert, of Belton, played the wedding march.  Rev. Shelton, of Butler, was the officiating clergyman and in a very beautiful ceremony united the fortunes of the happy young couple.
After the customary congratulations the bride and groom led the way to the dining room where a sumptuous wedding supper was served.  Mrs. Shubert and family are noted for the skill in the culinary art and on this occasion they surpassed all former efforts in that line.  The contracting parties received many handsome and useful presents.
The principals in the above named event are numbered among the best young people in this community. -- The Adrian Journal, February 2,1911, Page 1 column 3, Marriage
 

Fenton, Mary J.
Mary J. Fenton died at her home in Burdett, Mo., Wednesday, January 25, 1911, aged 81 years 6 months and 23 days.
Mary J. Crume, was born in Nelson county, Kentucky, July 2, 1829.  She was united in marriage with John Fenton Feb. 2, 1858, to this union 5 children were born, the husband and three of the children preceded the wife and mother in death some years ago. The family came to Missouri in the Pioneer days and have resided at Burdett for many years.
Grandma Fenton was a good woman, a kind and obliging neighbor and a true and loyal friends. For a number of years she had been a patient sufferer. During this time her son George gave her tender and constant attention, neglecting nothing that would add to her comfort.
The surviving children are Fred, of Main City and George, of Burdett.
Funeral services were held from the home last Thursday conducted by Elder Taylor Nelson, after which the body was laid to rest in the Burdett cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, February 2,1911, Page 4 column 3, Death
 

Howe, baby girl
Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Howe are the proud parents of a baby girl. -- The Adrian Journal, February 2, 1911, Page 5 column 5, Birth
 

Kirtley, T. J.
In the death of T. J. Kirtley another of the civil war veterans has passed to the beyond and in a few more years the last one will be numbered with the silent majority. -- The Adrian Journal, February 2, 1911, Page 5 column 3, Death
 

Shrader, baby girl
Born to Mr. and Mrs. Shrader, Tuesday, January 17th a ten pound girl. -- The Adrian Journal, January 26, 1911, Page 4 column 5, Birth
 

Hopwood, Ruth
Mrs. Ruth Hoopwood died at her home near Lone Tree Saturday night, January 21, 1911 aged 79 years and 15 days.  She was the mother of five children all of whom were with her in her last illness. -- The Adrian Journal, January 26, 1911, Page 4 column 3, Death
 

Rexroad, Matilda
Grandma Rexroad died at her home in this city, Sunday, Jan. 22, 1911; aged 75 years 7 months and 16 days.
Matilda Butcher was born June 6, 1835 in Louis county, Virginia. At the age of 15 years she was converted and joined the United Brethren church and remained a devout member of the church until death.  May 20, 1854 she was united in marriage with Wm. H. Rexroad, to this union 12 children were born five of whom died in infancy, seven survive, viz: John Rexroad, of Liberty, Mo.; J. A. Rexroad, of Spearville, Kansas; Wm. Rexroad, of Amsterdam, Mo.; C. L., P. ., Robert and Mattie of this vicinity and one brother Mr. B. Badgett.
Grandma Rexroad was a good Christian woman and a kind and obliging neighbor………….
The body was laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, January 26, 1911, Page 4 column 3, Death
 

Arrick, William T.
William Travis Arrick was born in Noble county, Ohio, Sept. 22, 1891, and died at the home of his son Walter, four miles northeast of Adrian, Missouri, January 12, 1911; aged 70 years, 3 months and 20 days.
Mr. Arrick was converted in early life and united with the M. E. church, and lived in the faith until death called him home.  He was united in marriage withy Miss Naomi E. Sidner, October 30, 1856, who departed this life November 17,1885.
To this union six children were born, four boys and two girls, four of them are living, viz: Theodore, of London, Ohio, Wm. Arrick and Mrs. Fannie Marshall, of Berryville, Arkansas, and Walter, with whom he made his home;.  He came to Missouri in the fall of 1884, and resided in this county continuously from that  time to the date of his death.
Uncle William Arrick was a good man in every respect and a kind and obliging neighbor and  a loyal friend.  His life was a daily example of the profession he made, there was no one who doubted his sincerity.
For some years he had been an invalid, during this time his son  Walter and wife gave him the tenderest attention and they  deserve credit for the faithful and patient manner in which they performed their duty.
Funeral services over the remains were held from the Mt. Olivet church, Friday, conducted by Elder Irvin Enos, after which the body was laid to rest in the cemetery in that place. -- The Adrian Journal, January 19, 1911, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

Poindexter, Julia
Julia, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Moles, was born in Kentucky, February 4, 1865, when a little girl she came with her parents to this county and grew to noble womanhood on a farm near Altona.  December 24, 1893 she was united in marriage with William N. Poindexter, to this union two daughters were born, they with the husband survive to mourn the death of a loving and tender wife and mother.  Mrs. Poindexter was converted three years ago and united with the Adrian Baptist church, since which time she lived a devoted Christian life and died with a firm and abiding faith in her Savior.
Mrs. Poindexter was a good woman. Always a kind and accommodating neighbor and friend and a devoted wife and mother.  Such people are mourned when they pass to the great beyond. But in their grief the friends get pleasure in the fact that there is a bright and lasting reward for those who live a Christian life.
For the husband and children the entire community has the deepest sorrow.  Their grief is great and the way looks dark, but in their sadness they may get pleasure from the fact that the dear one is enjoying the bliss of a better world. -- The Adrian Journal, January 19, 1911, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

Chandler-Curry
At the home of A. S. Quinn and wife of this city, Wednesday evening, January 11th, occurred a very pretty wedding, that of their daughter Frances E. Curry and R. E. Chandler of Kansas City.
As Miss Hattie Willie softly played the wedding march the bride and groom, attended by James and Mattie Quinn, brother and sister of the bride, entered the room and took their places before the officiating minister, Rev. Shelton, of Butler.  In the solemn hush that followed the ceremony was rendered, in which the young couple impressively took the vows that unit4ed them for life.  Immediately after congratulations of the few intimate friends, who had been invited, Mr. and Mrs. Chandler led the way to the dining room, where the guests were served to a bountiful full course supper such as Mrs. Quinn alone could plan and prepare. -- The Adrian Journal, January 19, 1911, Page 1 column 4, Marriage

 
Submitted by: Sandee Hubbard

Note: The information provided by Sandee Hubbard has been made available for personal genealogy research.
It may not be copied or reproduced without gaining her written permission to do so.

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