Bates County News



 

The Adrian Journal
Adrian, Bates County, Missouri

Jan. 8, 1914 - Dec. 31, 1914
 

Davidson, baby girl
A 9 ½ pound girl was born at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Perry Davidson last week. -- The Adrian Journal, September 24, 1914, Page 1 column 6, Birth
 

Gilham, Stephen
Stephen Gilham died in this city, Friday, September 18, 1914 aged 67 years, 8 months and 7 days.
The death of Mr. Gilham came as a great surprise to his many friends in this community, as he never became ill until Thursday.  His death was caused from kidney trouble.
Stephen Gilham was born in Morristown, Belmont Co., Ohio, June  11, 1874, died at his home in Adrian, Mo., September 18, 1914  Mr. Gilham came to Missouri in 1868 and settled in Altona.  It was here he formed the acquaintance of Miss Victoria Coberly whom in 1847 he married. To this union were born eight children, as follows, Mrs. Frank Greer, Miss Bertha Gilham, Warner Gilham, Miss Jessie Gilham, Warner Gilham, Mrs. Roy Ray, Misses Mable and Ima Gilham.
Mr. Gilham is also survived by three brothers and two sisters, two brothers in and near Adrian and Sylvestion Gilham living in Ohio, Mrs. Rhetta Fisher and Mrs. Mary Graham also live in Ohio.
A number of years ago Mr. Gilham bought the old Huston farm extending from the corner at the southeast edge of Adrian to the corner of Tabler’s residence in the northeast part of the city.  He started a dairy farm and for years supplied Adrian with milk. He sold a part of the farm to others who laid it off into town lots and Mr. Gilham laid off and sold the rest.  He lived to see his entire eighty acres built into a beautiful residence district.
Yet he was possessed of many Christian graces, he lived a clean conscientious life always ready to help the sick and suffering at any sacrifice, would discommode himself anytime to accommodate his neighbor. Thus ends the life on one of our honored citizens.
Funeral services were held from the home in this city Sunday afternoon, conducted by Rev. W. S. Courtney.  Interment at Mt. Olivet cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, September 24, 1914, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

France,  Mrs. F.C.
Mrs. Maggie McCombs went to Shell City last Saturday to attend the funeral of Mrs. F.  C. France, formerly of the Altona neighborhood, who died Thursday, October 22nd, at her home in Schell City. -- The Adrian Journal, October 29, 1914, Page 1 column 1, Death
 

Webb, Thomas
Thomas B. Webb was found dead in bed at the home of Mr. and Mrs. John Stone Sunday morning.  Mr. Webb had been in bad health for sometime and Saturday night Mr. and Mrs. Stone were in his room arranging things for the night and when they were leaving they ask if they was anything they could do for him before retiring.  He requested that a glass of water be set on a chair by the side of the bed and that a heavy comfort be thrown across the bed so that he could pull it up over him should he become cold during the night. When Mr. Stone entered the room Sunday morning to build a fire he found Mr. Webb cold in death.  He had doubtless been dead several hours.  He had pulled the extra cover up and had his Bible in his hand.
The deceased was born in Oak Grove, Mo., and was 79 years of age when the death summons came. At an early age in life he united with the Primitive Baptist Church and always took an active interest in matters pertaining to the church.  He is survived by eight children, five boys and three girls, the boys residing in Oklahoma. The daughters are Mrs. J.H. Stone of Butler; Mrs. Hogan, of Adrian, and Mrs. Mills, of Kansas City.
Short funeral services were conducted at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Stone Sunday afternoon at four o’clock by Rev. Talbert, and the body shipped to Vinita, Okla., for interment.-Butler Daily Democrat -- The Adrian Journal, November 12, 1914, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Penn-Kniffin
Rev. J. W. Penn, pastor of the Adrian U. B. Church and Mrs. Anna Kniffin, of Brookfield, Mo.  Were married at the home of the bride Thursday, November 5, 1914.  They are living in the U. B.  parsonage in this city. -- The Adrian Journal, November 12, 1914, Page 4 Column 5, Marriage
 

Tuttle, Wm. H.
William Harrison Tuttle was born in Columbus, Ohio November 28, 1827, and died at his home in Adrian, Mo. November 10, 1914; aged 86 years, 11 months and 12 days.
In early manhood Mr. Tuttle left his native state and located at Vandalia, Illinois, where he was married to Miss Caroline Wittenmeyer, August 28, 1853.  To this union two children were born, viz: Dr. H. W. of this city and a daughter who died in infancy.  In the 50’s Mr. Tuttle was an engineer on the Illinois Central Railway when the engines were fired with wood.  During the Civil War he served in the 10th Illinois Cavalry.  His term of service being four years and six months.  October 1868 Mr. Tuttle and family moved to Missouri, locating near Dayton, Cass county, where he resided until 1888, when he moved to Adrian, where he has since resided.  Mr. Tuttle was converted and united with the Baptist church more than thirty years ago and lived a consistent Christian life.
Mr. Tuttle had been in failing health for a number of years and for several months past had been practically helpless, requiring constant attention.
The passing of these hardy pioneers is rapid and their departure causes a feeling of deep regret.
Funeral services for Grandpa Tuttle was held from the home Wednesday afternoon, conducted by his pastor, Rev. R. L. Wood, and the body laid to rest in Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, November 12, 1914, Page 4 column 4, Death
 

Thompson, Putnam F.
Putnam F. Thompson was born in Lee county Virginia, April 14, 1847, and died in Chicago, Ill., October 14, 1914 aged 67 years and 6 months.
Mr. Thompson came to Missouri when a boy and lived in Bates and  Cass counties until 1905 when he moved to Topeka, Kansas, where he resided until July 1st of this year when he went to Chicago to reside with his son in law and daughter Mr. and Mrs. Harry Hanna.  Mr. Thompson was united in marriage with Miss Sarah Cox October, 26, 1875.  To this union one child was born, Mrs. Maud Hanna.  Mr. and Mrs. Thompson resided in Adrian most of their married life and were well and favorable known to the older settlers.  Mr. Thompson was a genial gentleman and always had a word of cheer for his fellowman and was always ready to extend a helping hand to those in need of help or sympathy. Several years ago Mr. Thompson was converted and united with the United Brethren church and died in that faith.
The body was brought to Adrian for burial Saturday, the funeral services were held from the United Brethren church conducted by Elder W. S. Hood. Mr. Thompson died of paralysis. -- The Adrian Journal, October 22, 1914, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Mills, Mrs. C. L.
A message was received here Wednesday stating that Mrs. C. L. Mills died Tuesday at her home in Seattle Washington.
Mrs. Mills resided in Adrian for more than twenty years and was active in social circles.  The news of her death will come as a shock to her many friends here.
The husband and daughter have the sympathy of Adrian friends in this bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, October 22, 1914, Page 4 Column 2, Death
 

Derver, J. C.
J. C. Dever, editor of the Rich Hill Enterprise, died last Saturday.  Mr. Deaver was a worthy gentleman and was held in high esteem by his brothers editors. -- The Adrian Journal, October 22, 1914, Page 4 Column 2, Death
 

Moses, Mr.
Mr. Moses died at his home in Ottawa, Kansas, Friday, October 2nd, after a lingering illness.  Mr. Moses was engaged in business in Adrian for several years and will be remembered by many citizens as an excellent gentleman. -- The Adrian Journal, October 15, 1914, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Burnham-Rexroad
The home of the brides parents, Mr. and Mrs. P. N. Rexroad, was the scene of a very pretty wedding Wednesday evening, September 30, when Miss Lela M. Rexroad, of Adrian, and Mr. Mark R. Burnham of Kansas City were united in marriage by the Rev. W. S . Courtney.
A delightful simplicity and sweet sincerity characterized every feature of the occasion.  At 8:30 Mrs. Middleton sang, accompanied on the piano by Mrs. Chapman.  The wedding march which followed ushered the bride and groom into the presence of the waiting guests who had gathered in the parlor.
The bride who is a pretty and accomplished  was beautiful gowned in white satin and carried a large and charming bouquet of white American Beauty roses. The groom who in appearance compares very favorably with the bride wore the conventional black.
Mr. Burnham comes from one of the best of families and is himself well and favorably known among his acquaintances.
A very tasteful two course luncheon was served, after which the bride and groom and others entertained the guests with excellent music.  Among the out of town guest were Mrs. And Mr. Willie Burnham of Kansas City, mother and brother of the groom. -- The Adrian Journal, October 8, 1914, Page 1 Column 3, Marriage
 

Mouse, baby boy
Dr. Pope reports the birth of a boy baby to Mr. and Mrs. Aus Mouse Sept. 26th. -- The Adrian Journal, October 8, 1914, Page 4 column 2, Birth
 

Nebold-Ward
David Newbold and Miss Josephine Ward, both well known young people of Aurora, made a trip to Mt. Vernon Sunday where a license was secured and they were married by a minister of that place, returning to Aurora in the evening.
The groom, who is connected with the freight department at the Frisco station, is one of our best known and reliable young men, while the bride is a well known and most estimable young lady, residing north of town, and the happy couple are to continue to make their home in Aurora.  Together with many other friends the World extends congratulations and best wishes.  The Aurora World. -- The Adrian Journal, October 1, 1914, Page 1 Column 4, Marriage
 

Shubert-Tucker
Len Shubert, of near Adrian, and Miss Orna Tucker, of Montana, were married in Kansas City Tuesday. The contracting parties are excellent young people.  The groom is deputy county treasurer and a young man of excellent character. The bride has visited relatives here many times and is a cultured and refined lady. -- The Adrian Journal, October 1, 1914, Page 5 Column 4, Marriage
 

Shoor, Karl Edward
Karl Edward Shoor, only son of Dr. E. Shoor of this city, who on the morning of July 26th, departed this life to enter into that higher life that higher place, that bourne from which none returneth to this world of trials.
Karl Edward Shoor was born at Garden City, Mo., May 14, 1894, he was taken ill Nov. 15, 1913 and took to his last earthly bed Dec. 4, 1913, where he has been a patient sufferer, until the great good God in pity bade him to journey over the river and to enter that fuller work and life that is waiting always and eternally to the faithful.  Hubbard, enterprise -- The Adrian Journal, August 27, 1914, Page 1 Column 1, Death
 

Garrison, Mrs. T. S.
Mrs. T. S. Garrison, of Rich Hill, was burned to death Monday, when her clothing caught fire while burning paper in a stove.  She ran out doors with her clothing ablaze.  Her children threw water on her to put out the flames. -- The Adrian Journal, August 27, 1914, Page 4 Column 2, Death
 

Owen-Roberts
Miss Nora Roberts and M. B. Owen, of Texas, were married in Butler Tuesday afternoon.  The bride is the daughter of Geo. W. Roberts, Grand River township, the groom is not known in this vicinity. -- The Adrian Journal, September 17, 1914, Page1 Column 3, Marriage
 

Armstrong-Jensen
Mr. Armstrong, of El Dorado Sprigs, and Mrs. Belle Jensen, of Westline, were united in marriage at Butler Saturday.  Mrs. Jensen was the wife of the late Judge Wimstatt. She resided in this city a number of years and is an excellent lady. Her friends join in wishing her a happy wedded life. -- The Adrian Journal, September 10, 1914, Page 1 column 2, Marriage
 

Harris, Deane
Word was received by friends here that Deane Harris died at his home in Rolla, Mo., a few days ago of  heart failure.  It is said he dropped dead on the street. This will be a shock to his many friends here.
Deane was a bright young man and was making good.  He was a graduate of the Adrian High School and of the state school at Rolla.
His parents have the sympathy of their many friends here. -- The Adrian Journal,  September 10, 1914, Page 4 Column 4, Death
 

Snow, baby girl
A girl baby was born into the hone of John Snow last Saturday.  Papa Snow seems all puffed up over the new arrival.
-- The Adrian Journal,  September 10, 1914, Page 5 Column 5, Birth
 

Corbin, baby boy
Born to Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Corbin Saturday, a son. -- The Adrian Journal, September 10, 1914, Page 5 Column 4, Birth
 

Jackson, Samuel
Samuel Jackson was born near Nashville, Tennessee, June 15, 1833, and died at his home in Crescent Hill, Mo., Monday, August 24, 1914, aged 81 years, 2 months and 9 days.
Mr. Jackson was the youngest of eighteen children. In 1845 he came to Missouri and located in this Deer Creek township and from that time was identified with the growth and development of the township until death claimed him.  When he came here this was a vast undeveloped country with but few settlers and fewer advantages. But these early settlers were of sturdy kind who could endure hardships bravely and  to them we owe much of our modern civilization. The first school in the township was organized in 1844, the year before Mr. Jackson came her.  He lived to see the township supplied with excellent educational advantages. The first church was organized in the township in 1857. The subject of this sketch witnessed all of these developments and lived to see their marvelous growth.
Mr. Jackson was united in marriage with Nancy E. Williams August 13, 1851, to this union seven children were born, three of whom died in infancy, four survive the father, viz: Mrs. Wilcox and Mrs. Wilson, of Kansas City, and James and G. M. of near this city, the aged wife also survives.  Mr. Jackson served the Civil War and was honorably discharged July 267, 1865.
In death of Uncle Sam this community lost one of its best citizens, a man who was loved and respected by all who knew him.  He was kind of heart and always spoke well of his neighbors.  It is to be regretted that there are not more such people in the world to scatter the sunshine of good will.
Funeral services were held Tuesday, August 25th, and a large crowd of sorrowing friends attended to pay a tribute of respect to the memory of the departed.
All honor to the memory of these pioneers who paved the way for our modern advantages.
Besides the relatives above named Uncle Sam is survived by sixteen grand children and twenty one great grand children.
-- The Adrian Journal, September 3, 1914, Page 8 Column, Death
 

Lewis, baby girl
A girl baby was born to Mrs. Wm.  Lewis Friday morning.  Mother babe doing well, but papa Lewis is in a serious condition. -- The Adrian Journal, November 19, 1914, Page 4 column 4, Birth
 

Strain, Harvey
Harvey Strain died August 2, 1914, at Charleston,, Ohio, of heart trouble. Aged 78 years, 10 months and 3 days.
Uncle Harvey lived in Adrian for many years and visited friends here a year ago.
The body was buried on Soldiers Mound, Fern Cliff cemetery, Springfield, Ohio. -- The Adrian Journal, November 26, 1914, Page 5 Column 2, Death
 

Newman-Askew
Mr. H. E. Newman, of Pleasanton, Kansas and Miss Leota Askew were married Christmas.
The bride is the daughter of Mr. Robert Askew.  The groom is a stranger here but is said to be a worthy young man.
Their friends join in congratulations and best wishes. -- The Adrian Journal, December 31, 1914, Page 1 column 3, Marriage
 

Nichols-Hill
Mr. F. M. Nichols and Miss Rena Hill were married at Butler Christmas day.
The groom is a prominent young farmer of East Boone township. The bride resided in Butler. They will reside on a farm in East Boone township. -- The Adrian Journal, December 31, 1914, Page 1 column 4, Marriage
 

Duke-Kendrick
Mr. J. C. Duke and Miss Ora Kendrick were married Christmas day.
The groom is a younger farmer of Grand River township.  The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Kendrick of Shawnee township. -- The Adrian Journal, December 31, 1914, Page 1 Column 3, Marriage
 

Cottom, Sarah F.
Mrs. David J. Cottom died at her home in Adrian Monday December 28, 1914; after a long illness of tuberculosis; aged 60 years, 1 month and 13 days.
Sarah F. Burton was born in Kentucky, November 13, 1854.  Miss Burton was united in marriage with David J. Cottom in Au7gust 1872.  Mr. and Mrs. Cottom moved to Cass county, Missouri, in 1874, and to Adrian in 1902, and have resided here since that time. About twenty four years ago Mrs. Cottom united with the Christian church and died in that faith.  She was a good woman in every sense of the word and was held in high esteem by all who knew her.
For several years Mrs. Cottom had been in failing health and for almost two years her condition had been such as to require constant attention.  Mr.  Cottom gave her tender care during this long illness.
Funeral services for Mrs. Cottom were held from the Adrian Christian church Wednesday afternoon, conducted by the pastor, Elder W. S. Hood.  Burial was made in Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, December 31, 1914, Page 1 Column 4, Death
 

Simpson, baby girl
Dr. Tuttle reports the birth of a girl baby to Mr. and Mrs.  J.R. Simpson, Christmas night. -- The Adrian Journal, December 31, 1914, Page 4 Column 3, Birth
 

Kemper-Largent
Lawrence Kemper of Rockville, and Miss Lena Largent, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. P. Largent, of Shawnee township, were married at the Adrian Methodist parsonage last Thursday noon, Rev W. S. Courtney officiating.
The bride is a talented and popular young lady and has a wide circle of friends in the community where she grew to womanhood.  The groom comes highly recommended for the community where he resides as a worthy gentleman.
The happy couple went to the Largent home, where they remained until Monday, when the went to their home in Rockville. -- The Adrian Journal, December 31, 1914, Page 4 Column 5, Marriage
 

Porter-Mouse
Clifford H. Porter and Miss Lena Bell Mouse were married at the beautiful Mouse home in Altona, Wednesday afternoon, Dr. Coggens, of Warrensburg, officiating. The wedding was an elaborate function and a big crowd was present. The happy couple left last night. The will make their home on the groom’s farm west of Adrian. -- The Adrian Journal, December 31, 1914, Page 5 Column 5, Marriage
 

Wallace, A. M.
A. M. Wallace, formerly deputy sheriff, was found dead early this morning by Thos Lincoln at the A. J. Walter farm southeast of this city  He was sitting in a chair with a paper in his hand and had evidently died without a struggle.
Mr. Wallace was alone and had been taking care of his son in laws farm during the winter.  He and Mrs. Lincoln, a close neighbor, had been in the habit of talking over the phone every morning and when Mr. Lincoln called this morning  could get no response.  He saw a light and went to see what was wrong.
The coroner was notified at once but he decided that an inquest was not necessary.  The remains will be brought to the home of his daughter, Mrs. Walter, today.  Funeral arrangements have not been made.
Mr. Wallace formerly lived in Hume and was deputy sheriff in the term of W. J. Bullock.  He is survived by three children, Clay Wallace, of Altamont, Mo., Mrs. Chas. Horton of Hume, and Mrs. A. J. Walter of this city.
Deceased was about 65 years of age and had a wide circle of friends to mourn his loss. -- The Adrian Journal, December 31, 1914, Page 5 Column 5, Death
 

Pipes, Mrs. A. L.
Funeral services for Mrs. A. L. Pipes were held from the Altona Christian church Sunday morning at 11 o’clock, conducted by Elder R. A. Blalock, of Richards.  The Butler Rebekah Lodge had charge of the funeral. A large congregation of friends assembled to pay their respects to the memory of the dead.
The husband and children have the sympathy of a wide circle of friends in their sorrow. -- The Adrian Journal, December 31, 1914, Page 1 Column 4, Death
 

Keeton, John Lyle
John Lyle, son of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Keeton, died of pneumonia at the home of his parents in Elkhart township, Saturday morning, December 16, 1914; aged 3 years, 10 months and 29 days.
The death of this bright little boy was a severe  blow to the young parents.  In their great grief incident to the loss of this dear one they have the deep sympathy of their many friends.
Funeral was held at Mt Vernon church Sunday, conducted by Rev. J.W. Penn.  Burial was made in the Scott cemetery.
-- The Adrian Journal, December 31, 1914, Page 1 column 5, Death
 

Deardorff, Emma
Emma, the eight year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Deardorff, died at the family home, 6 miles northwest of Adrian, last Thursday of typhoid fever. Burial was made in Crescent Hill cemetery Friday afternoon.  A brief service was conducted at the grave by Rev. A. Showalter.
Two other children in the Deardorff home are very seriously ill with the same ailment. -- The Adrian Journal, December 1, 1914, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Elgin, J. A.
J. A. Elgin died at his home in Butler Sunday afternoon Nov. 29, 1914.
This announce was sad news to many people in and near Adrian.  Mr. Elgin lived on his farm, four miles south of this city, for many years and proved himself a citizen worthy the respect and esteem of all who knew him. Some years ago he rented his farm and moved to Butler.
Mrs. Elgin is left to mourn the death of her husband. They had no children. -- The Adrian Journal, December 1, 1914, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

Neel, Florence N.
Mrs. Florence N. Neel died at her home in this city Saturday evening, November 28,, 1914; aged 3 years, 5 months and 14 days.
Ms. Neel had been an invalid for several years and for several weeks immediately preceding her death her condition had been critical.  One son, W. E. Stillson who lived with his mother, is left to mourn her death.
Mrs. Neel moved to Adrian a year ago and was not widely known here.
The son left Sunday noon with the body of his mother for Burr Oak, Kansas, where burial was made. -- The Adrian Journal, December 1, 1914, Page 4 column 2, Death
 

Wright-Asher
Mr. Frank Wright and Miss Bertha Asher were married at the home of the bride’s parents in Topeka, Kansas, Nov. 22nd.  Frank is the son of Mrs. Johathan Adams of this city and has a good position with the Santa Fe Railway at Topeka. -- The Adrian Journal, Loose page found not sure which week it goes with
 

Blocher, baby boy
A boy baby was born to Mrs. Charles Blocher Wednesday night December 10. -- The Adrian Journal, December 10, 1914, Page 4 column 3, Birth
 

Stone, baby
The infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Raney Stone died at their home in East Boone township, Friday night, December 18, 1914; aged six days.
The death of the little one was a great disappointment to the young parents and they have the sincere sympathy of their many friends in this bereavement.
The body was buried in Crescent Hill cemetery Saturday. -- The Adrian Journal, December 24, 1914, Page 1 column 1, Death
 

Mosier, E. F.
E. P. Mosier, one of Bates county’s oldest citizens died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Malinda Zwahlen at Passaic, last Friday, aged 86 years.  He had lived in Bates county for thirty eight years. -- The Adrian Journal, December 24, 1914, Page 4 Column 2, Death
 

Pipes, Alice Beatrice
Mrs. A. L. Pipes died at the family home in Shawnee township, Wednesday, December 23, 1914, aged 60 years, 6 months and 14 days.
Alice Beatrice Shepherd was born in Hardin county, Ky., June 9, 1854, and grew to womanhood in the state of her nativity.  On February 22, 1882, she was united in marriage with Alonzo L. Pipes who with six children survives.  In 1884 Mrs. Pipes united with the Christian church and remained a consistent member of same until death claimed her.
In 1884 they Pipes family moved to Missouri, locating in Clay county, later they moved to Bates county.
Mrs. Pipes was an excellent Christian lady, always courteous to those she met, and an accommodating neighbor and friend..  She was held in high esteem by all who knew her.
The husband and children have the sincere sympathy of a large circle of friends in their irreparable loss.
Funeral services will be held sometime Saturday, the hour and place has not yet been set.  Burial will be made in the Altona cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, December 24, 1914, Page 4 Column 3, Death
 

Beckham, John
Uncle John Beckham died at his home in Shawnee township Tuesday night, December 22, 1914; aged 72 years.  Mr. Beckham was a bachelor and has lived in Bates county for many years. Funeral services will be held at Mt. Olivet today, Thursday. -- The Adrian Journal, December 24, 1914, Page 5 Column 3, Death
 

Tuttle-Moore
Mr. Alva Tuttle of St. Joe, ad Miss Hazel Clara Moore of Adrian, will be married at the Independence Ave. Methodist church, Kansas City, Missouri at 3 o’clock this afternoon.
The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs.  George Moore of this city, ad is a worthy young lady.  The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Tuttle of this city and holds a good position in St. Joe, where they will reside. -- The Adrian Journal, December 24, 1914, Page 4 Column 3, Marriage
 

Buchanan-Shelton
Arthur Buchanan, of Burdett, and Rosy Shelton, of this city were  married in Butler, Friday, August 1st.  Justice B. F. Jeter performed the ceremony. The contracting parties are well and favorably known in this community and their many friends join in wishing them a happy wedded life.  They will make their home on a farm near Burdett. -- The Adrian Journal, August 6, 1914, Page 1 column 3, Marriage
 

Eastley, Andy
Miller, James
Biggs, Mort
One man was killed outright, two were fatally injured and a fourth seriously hurt when a Ford automobile turned turtle three miles west of Rich Hill Tuesday afternoon about  4:30. Andy Eastley, sixty years old, was killed instantly, his neck being broken, James Miller and Mort Biggs were fatally injured and Big Watson, the driver and owner of the car was badly hurt. The men were all married and had families and worked in the mines at New Home.
They were gong fast when they hit a big culvert the steering gear is supposed to have broken.  The driver lost control of the machine and it turned upside down.
The mines had closed down for the primary election and the men had been in Rich Hill for the afternoon.  They were on their way home when the accident happened. They were at once taken to Rich Hill where they have bee receiving medical treatment. -- The Adrian Journal, August 6, 1914, Page 1 Column 4, Death

Only one of the men injured in the automobile accident at rich Hill is dead, but another has a broken back and is paralyzed from the hips down.  He is not expected to live.  The other two men who were in the car are getting along alright. -- The Adrian Journal, August 13, 1914, Page 1 column 1, Notice
 

Nelson, daughter
The little 14 month old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Nelson died July 27. -- The Adrian Journal, August 6, 1914, Page 5 column 2, Death
 

Nelson, Evelyn Rose
Evelyn Rose, only daughter of Willie and Rhoda Nelson was born May 17, 1913, departed this life, July 28, 1914, at the home of her parents, two miles northeast of Burdett.  Sad indeed was that home when parents and friends saw they must give little Evelyn up, everything was done to keep her here, but God knows best.
Funeral services at the Burdett church by Rev. Prevo Tuesday eve. 4 p.m.  Interment Burdett cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, August 6, 1914, Page 8 Column 4, Death
 

Moles, Minnie
Mrs. George Moles, living in the Mt. Olivet neighborhood, died a t her home Saturday night after a lingering illness, aged 32 years 6 months and 12 days.
Minnie C. Addleman was born Feb. 3, 1882, near Stewartsville, Clinton Co., Mo.  She came to Bates county with her parents in 1867 and located near Adrian. She was converted and united with the Christian church when she was only twelve years old, and has lived a good Christian life ever since.
She was united in marriage to George Moles, March 4, 1900.  To this union were born four children, three boys and one girl, all are living.  She leaves a husband, three children, a father, three brothers and three sisters to mourn the loss of a loved one.
Funeral services were held at the Christian church in Adrian Monday morning, conducted by Elder W.  S. Hood.  Interment was made in the Crescent Hill cemetery.
The husband and family have the sympathy of the entire community in their great bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, August 20, 1914, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Tabor, Sarah
Mrs. R. C. Tabor died at her home at Crescent Hill Thursday, August 13, 1914, aged 56 years and 2 months.  Mrs. Tabor had been confined to her bed for five weeks and had been in failing health for two years so that her death did not come unexpected to the family and community.
Sarah Eveline, daughter of J. S. and Judah A. McCraw, was born in Bates county, Missouri, June 13, 1858 and died August 13, 1914. She was united in marriage with R. C. Tabor January 4, 1884.  To this union were born four children, two dying in infancy, two sons, W. L. and R. E. of Eltopia, Washington, were with their mother in her last days.  Besides husband and sons she leaves to mourn her loss, a brother, S. J. McCraw; three sisters, Mesdames S. E. McRoberts, R. S. Hiser and A. J. McRoberts, all of Adrian, Mo.
In early life she was converted and joined the Baptist church later affiliating with the United Brethren church.  She lived and exemplary Christian life and was beloved by all who knew her.  Her friends loved to hear her hearty God Bless You, personally or over the phone.
Mrs. Tabor was one of the pioneer citizens in this community.  Her parents came here in the early days and were among the first settlers in this county.  Mrs. Tabor was born here and lived here almost all of her life.  She had a wide acquaintance and a host of friends who join the family in their grief.
Funeral services were held from the Crescent Hill church Saturday afternoon, conducted by Rev. Mrs. Bowman.  Interment was made in the Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, August 20, 1914, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

Lankford, Donald Barnett
In the midst of rejoicing there is sorrow.  It was a sad message to our neighborhood when we heard of the fatal accident to the little four year old son of Mr. and Mrs. D. L. Lankford last Friday evening between seven and eight.
Mr. Lankford was engaged with a team about the chores and without his knowledge little Donald got into the wagon.  The team started and in some way fell under the wheels, one passing over the little body.
Drs. Floyd Bates and Robinson spent hours trying to save the little fellow but could only alleviate his suffering.  He died at 12:30 a.m..
Altho there are thousands of similar cases we do not realize how sad they are until brought close to home.  By reading the obituary of this little fellow you will be convinced that it took tears to express sympathy for these bereaved parents.
Donald Barnett, son of David and Leah Lankford, was born at the home of his maternal grandparents July 30, 1910 and died at the home of his parents in Elkhart township, Saturday, August 15, 1914, at 12:35 a.m. from injuries above stated, aged 4 years and 16 days.
Donald was a bright and thoughtful child and gave promise of developing into a strong man mentally and physically.  In him were wrapped up the possibilities of noble manhood and excellent citizenship, but fate had decreed that this bud of promise should be taken to the better and brighter beyond just when the hopes of fond parents had become entwined about his growth and development.
Death never comes into a home with the soft pedal, it always comes with the storm’s fury and leaves sorrow and desolation in its wake but in this case the grim messenger seems to have chosen to come in the most crushing manner and has left the parents prostrate with grief.  We wish that we might say some word that would assuage the grief of the stricken ones but this we cannot do.  We know how to sympathize with them, the terrible hurt that has come to their hearts, the blighted hopes, the anguish of spirit.
But there is a silver lining to this disastrous storm cloud, one that is bright with promise when the gloom is penetrate4d.  We believe in a higher and better existence in the great beyond and there can be no doubt that Donald has gone to that place of perpetual bliss.  His condition is better than any that fond parents could possibly have provided in this world.  The loss is purely to the parents and not to the one taken. Viewed from this standpoint mourning is in a measure selfish. The calm judgment of the mourning ones will in time lead them to view the matter in this light and the burden will be measurably lightened.
Funeral services over the remains were held from the Adrian Baptist church Sunday afternoon conducted by Rev. W.  S. Weir, of Warsaw.  The pall bearers were Frank and Cecil Lankford and Eveland and Gordon Hudelson, uncles of the deceased.  A large congregation was present to extend sympathy and render such assistance as they could.  The body was laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery.
Besides the parents Donald is survived by his paternal grandparents Mr. and Mrs. Frank Lankford, his maternal grandparents Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Hudelson and great grand father L. W. Putnam. -- The Adrian Journal, August 20, 1914, Page 1 Column 4, Death
 

Stevenson, Viola Frances
Mrs. Arthur Stevenson died at her home, eight miles southwest of Adrian, Sunday, August 9, 1914.
Vila Frances Burris was born April 12, 1882, and was married to Arthur J. Stevenson. October 30, 1907.  Besides the husband and one child she leaves her mother, two sisters and five brothers to mourn their loss.
Funeral services were conducted from the home Monday afternoon. -- The Adrian Journal, August 13, 1914, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

Switzer, wedding
W. B. Switzer was married in Hutchinson, Kansas, this week to Mrs. E. M. Miller, who formerly lived in the Mt. Olivet neighborhood.  They will arrive in Adrian Friday evening.  Such was the information received by the Journal in a letter from the happy bridegroom. The news came as a complete surprise t Adrian people.
Mr. Switzer and bride have known each other for thirty years, living in the same community for years.  Mrs. Switzer is an estimable lady and popular in her home town.  A large number of people here know her and will welcome her to this city.  Mrs. Switzer has lived here for years and is a genial Christian gentleman.  He is now proprietor of Adrian’s music store. -- The Adrian Journal, August 13, 1914, Page 4 column 3, Marriage
 

Lyle, Dr.
Dr. Lyle, one of this county’s pioneer citizens and physicians died at his home in Butler Sunday and was buried in Rich Hill Tuesday by the Masonic lodge.  Dr. Lyle had a wide acquaintance in this section. -- The Adrian Journal, August 13, 1914, Page 8 Column 4, Death
 

Colbert, Alice Baker
Mrs. Alice Baker Colbert died at the family residence in this city, Saturday, July 4, 1914, age 53 years, 5 months and 24 days.
Mrs. Baker had been in a critical condition for some time with a cancer and death has seemed to be only a question of time for several weeks.  Funeral services were held over the remains at the family home Sunday afternoon and the body was shipped to Lone Jack for burial Monday, her former home.  She leaves a husband and six children to mourn her loss as well as a host of friends and neighbors. -- The Adrian Journal, July 9, 1914, Page 1 column 5, Death
 

Walters, Col. Bob
The announcement of the death of Col. C. R. Walters, editor of the Rich Hill Review, came as a severe shock to the editor of the Journal.  Col. Walters was one of the ablest editors in this part of the state and a man of sterling qualities of mind and heart. He had a fine command of the English language and exposed himself clearly and forcefully.  Mr. Walters possessed a degree of refinement and culture that was deeply appreciated by the better element of people.  It would be impossible to estimate the good that this kind hearted gentleman has done in the community where he has labored for more than thirty years.  The newspaper fraternity has lost one of its ablest and best members. -- The Adrian Journal, July 9, 1914, Page 1 Column 2, Death
 

Weeks, Caleb G.
Caleb G. Weeks, clerk of the county court of Bates county, died suddenly at his home in Butler Tuesday evening at 9:30 o’clock after a two week illness of a complication of diseases.
Mr. Weeks became ill two weeks ago while out in Walnut township calling upon the voters in the interest of his candidacy for re election to the office of county clerk.  He came home and placed himself under a physician’s care and it was thought that he was gradually improving, but it was realized by his family and close friends that he was in a dangerous condition and only his nerve and clean life made it possible for him to withstand the suffering and ravages of the disease.
The deceased was born in Louisiana, Ga., February 18, 1850, and was united in marriage to Miss Leulla Tarv.. On January 2, 1878. To this union five children, two sons and three daughters were born, one son and two daughters with the good wife survive.  In 1883 he moved with his family to Bates county, locating in Rich Hill, where he held for years a responsible position with one of the large mining companies operating there at the time.  Later he entered the employ of one of the banks in Rich Hill and held that position until he was nominated and elected clerk of the Bates County Court and had he lived until January 1st would have held that office for two terms of four years each. At the time of his death he was a candidate for the Democratic nomination for a third term and had a host of friends in all sections of the county who were his warm and enthuastic supporters.
Mr. Weeks was of a quiet, gentle disposition, warm hearted kind and a high minded gentleman in the fullest sense of the term.  As a father he was kind affectionate and indulgent, as a citizen he stood for morality, honesty and better things in life, and as a county official he was competent, capable and obliging and his greatest pleasure seemed to be in extending the many courtesies of his office to people in all parts of the county. A good man-better one never lived-has gone from among us, and we, his friends, are sad today because we know his place can never be filled.  To the sorrowing relatives whose cup of sorrow was filled to overflowing before, the writer extends condolence in this their hour of sad bereavement.
Funeral services conducted by Rev. C. H. Ticknor, pastor of the Presbyterian church, held at the family reside Friday morning at 11:40 o’clock and interment in the cemetery at Rich Hill. Butler Daily Democrat -- The Adrian Journal, July 9, 1914, Page 5 Column 4, Death
 

Wilds, Myrtle
Mrs. Wm. E. Wilds died at her home in Nevada, Mo., July 12, 1914, of tuberculosis; aged, 30 years 7 months and 26 days.
Myrtle, daughter of Thomas and Victoria Jones, was born at Crescent Hill, Mo., September 16, 1883, and grew to womanhood in her native county.  September 16, 1902 she was united in marriage with Wm. E. Wilds.  To this union three children were born two of whom survive the mother.
Myrtle Jones was well known in this community and enjoyed the confidence of a wide circle of friends, who will be pained to learn of her death.
Funeral services were held at the family home in Nevada Tuesday and the body buried in the Newton cemetery.
The husband and children have the sympathy of a wide circle of friends in this bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, July 16, 1914, Page 1 column 4, Death
 

Griffin-Crawford
Miss Beatrice Griffin and Herbert Crawford, of Kansas City, were quietly married at the home of Mr. Crawford’s sister in Kansas City last Wednesday, July 8. Beatrice was formerly an Adrian girl and has a large circle of friends here who wish her a happy married life.  She graduated from the Adrian High School in the class of 1912. The groom is not known in this city, he has a position as railroad mail clerk between Kansas City and Memphis, Tenn.  They will make their home in Kansas City. -- The Adrian Journal, July 16, 1914, Page 1 Column 4, Marriage
 

VanEaton, baby girl
Born to Mr. and Mrs. Will Van Eaton last Saturday, a girl. -- The Adrian Journal, July 16, 1914, Page 5 Column 1, Birth
 

Moudy, baby boy
A boy baby arrived at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Moudy, Jr., yesterday, mother and child doing well and Henry stepping lively. -- The Adrian Journal, July 16, 1914, Page 4 column 4, Birth
 

Woolery, Fannie L.
Fannie Louella Woolery passed into the last peaceful sleep at the home of her sister, Mrs. Minnie Shannon in Seattle Washington, on the ninth day of July, 1914; aged 58 years five months and twenty nine days.
Fanny Louella was eldest daughter of Wm. J. and Elizabeth Woolery, having been born in Boonville, Cooper county, Mo., January 11, 1856.
Early in life she was united with the Baptist church and has been a faithful and devoted member to the day of her death.  She was educated in the Boonville Seminary, having as instructors such gifted men as the late S. W. Marston and R. R. Ricer, she taught in the seminary during her last year there.  And at eighteen years of age she commenced teaching and has taught continuously ever since, until five years ago, her health, failed, since that time she has been a sweet and patient sufferer.
She taught in Cooper, Saline, Cass and Bates county.
Miss Fannie did her last teaching in the Adrian school, where  for several years she taught in the grades and high school. She was thorough in her work and insisted on the pupil dong the work well.  Many young people in this community can be found who speak in the highest terms of praise of the excellent instructions they received from this earnest worker.
It would be impossible to even approximate the good that this  good woman has accomplished in leading the young to a higher plans of living.
In this age of too much superficial work in our schools one can the better appreciate the services of one who insisted and  on the highest ideal in educational work.
Miss Fannie lived an active and useful life and her works will continue to live and to make the world better.
Funeral services were conducted by her former pastor, Rev. W. S. Weir, of Warsaw, from the Adrian Baptist church, Wednesday, July 15, at 10:00 a.m.
Besides the usual pall bearers there were ten young ladies acted as honorary bearers, all of whom were her former pupils in the Adrian school.
Interment in Crescent Hill cemetery.
Besides a large circle of friends she leaves to mourn their loss, one brother, W. T. Woolery, of Kansas City, three sisters, Mrs. Minnie Shannon and Bettie Satterlee of Seattle, Wash. And Mrs. Roxy Cooper of this city, besides a number of nieces and nephews between whom, there was a tender and devoted attachment. --  The Adrian Journal,, July 16, 1914, Page 4 Column 6, Death
 

Hyatt, Elmer
While working in the hay field last Thursday afternoon, Elmer Hyatt was stricken with heart prostration which caused his death Friday morning.  He was working for Mr. Gash, three miles south of Adrian.  According to Mr. Gash he had eaten a large meal at noon and went direct to the hay field, after working awhile he drank very freely of water and was stricken about 3:30.
Elmer Pinkerton Hyatt was born at Garden City,  Missouri, March 26, 1874, died July 17, 1914; aged, 40 years 3 months and 22 days.   Until this spring when he went to work for Mr.  Gash, he made his home with his parents two miles east of Adrian, having never been married.  Besides his parents he leaves fives sisters and two brothers to mourn his death.
Funeral services were held from the home of his parents Saturday, July 18, conducted by Rev. Lucus, of Lee’s Summit, Missouri.  Interment at Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, July 23, 1914, Page 1 column 4, Death
 

Phipps-Miller
Miss Fern Olive Phipps and Mr. Curtis L. Miller, of Hutchinson Kansas, were married Thursday evening at the home of the bride’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. F. Phipps.  The Rev. Courtney performed the ceremony in the presence of about 75 guests.
Mrs. Harve Chapman played the wedding march.  Just before the ceremony Gladys Long and Hazel Phipps sang, “I Will Love You When the Silver Threads are Shining Among the Gold”.
The ceremony was performed on the lawn.  The bride and groom standing under a beautifully decorated arch. The bride wore a gown of white charmense with an over drape of shadow lace. The maid of honor, Miss Amelia Gebhardt, was gowned in blue voile trimmed in shadow lace. The flower girls, Esther Thornhill, Gladys Long and Edith May Bosley, were dressed in white with pink sashes and hair bows. The bearer, Little Hazel Phipps was dressed in white and carried the ring on a white satin pillow.  Mr. Wm. Walls acted as best man.
A reception followed the service, during which a four course lunch was served.  On Friday Mr. and Mrs. Miller left for Hutchinson, Kansas, where they will make their home. -- The Adrian Journal,, July 23, 1914, Page 1 Column 3, Marriage
 

McVey, Leo
Leo. McVey, a young farmer, living in the neighborhood of Sprague, was drowned while swimming with a number of friends Friday evening. The young man dived into a coal pit and struck his head on a sharp rock and drowned before help could reach him.  He was 22 years of age, single and was employed as a farm hand in that neighborhood.-Butler Daily Democrat -- The Adrian Journal, July 23, 1914, Page 1 Column 4, Death
 

Mahan, baby boy
A baby boy was born at the hoe of Mr. and Mrs. Claude Mahan last Sunday. -- The Adrian Journal, July 23, 1914, Page 4 Column 3, Birth
 

Wysong, George
Uncle George Wysong died at the home of Fred Thornhill last Friday afternoon about 1:30.  He had laid down to take a nap and died while asleep without a struggle.  He had been in Ohio all summer and had been back here for only a week.  The funeral was held Saturday at ten o’clock at the Thornhill home conducted by Elder Aaron Showalter.  Interment was made at Everett.
George Wysong was born in Preble county, Ohio and was seventy six years old last February.  He had lived in Missouri and Bates county most f the time for the last thirty years and has a wide circle of friends who mourn his loss.  He was in apparently good health up to the hour of his death. -- The Adrian Journal, July 30, 1914, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Gutshall, twins
Dr. Robinson reports the birth of twins at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Carl Gutshall, a boy and a girl, Henry and Henrietta. -- The Adrian Journal, July 30, 1914, Page 4 column 4, Birth
 

Davis, Eveline
Mrs. Eveline Davis, of Everett, went to Milo, Iowa, the first of last week at attend a reunion of her brothers and sisters. After arriving there she became ill on the following Wednesday and died Thursday.  The body was shipped back to Everett for burial, funeral services being held Saturday afternoon conducted by Elder Hood.
Mrs. Davis was seventy four years old and had resided in Everett for forty years or more. -- The Adrian Journal, July 30, 1914, Page 5 column 4, Death
 

Wineland, Dessie Violet
Dessie Violet Wineland died at the home of her mother in Parker, Kansas, Saturday night, July 25, of pneumonia, aged 18 years 9 months and 20 days.  Miss Wineland was born in Bates county and lived here with her parents until six years ago when the family moved to Kansas.  She had been visiting her brother, Urless Wineland and aunt, Mrs. Chas. Timmons and went home just two weeks before her death.
She is survived by three brothers and mother, Mrs. Rena Wineland. Burial was made at Mt. Olivet, funeral services being conducted by Rev. Corutney.
Miss Wineland was loved by all who knew her and her brothers and mother have the sympathy of all in their deep bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, July 30, 1914, Page 5 Column 4, Death
 

Catron, infant
The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Catron died at their home in Ballard Sunday morning, aged 10 days.  The young parents have the sympathy of many friends in this bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, June 4, 1914, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

Wackerman, Clara Susan
Miss Clara Susan Irick was born January 14, 1861, and died May 25th, 1914 at 4:30 p.m. at her home, six miles east of Adrian, Mo.
She was united in marriage to W. W. Wackerman October 18, 1899 at Louisiana, Mo.
This union was blessed with fourteen children. She is survived by her husband and ten children four having passed on to glory, viz: Mr. W. W. Wackerman, husband, Harry, Bert, Jesse, Jim and Mrs. Gertie Simpson, of Adrian, Mo., Mrs. Beulah Dunham, of Nevada, Mo., Mrs. Tanna Shelton, of Yale, Okla., Mrs. Tina Doll, of Montrose, Mo., Mr. John and Will Wackerman of Clinton, and nine grandchildren, her mother, four sisters and three brothers. Mrs. Wackerman was united with the Baptist church at Marpburg, Mo., 1894.  She removed her membership to the Altona Baptist church later.  She has remained a faithful Christian, a loving wife and mother and a kind neighbor.  All the children were at her bedside during her illness and death.
The father and children have the sincere sympathy of the entire community in this great affliction which has come to their home. -- The Adrian Journal, June 4, 1914, Page 1 Column 4, Death
 

Phillips, baby girl
A girl baby arrived at the E. J. Phillips home last week. -- The Adrian Journal, June 4, 1914, Page 8 Column , Birth
 

Cummings-Yeats
Miss Cummings and Dow Yeatts both of Shawnee township were married at Butler last Saturday. Their friends extend congratulations and best wishes.  We understand that they will make their home in Kansas City. -- The Adrian Journal,, June 4, 1914, Page 4 column 3, Marriage
 

Clawson, Albert
Albert Clawson was born September 3, 1853, at Saberg Agesstorp Soken, Sweden and died near Adrian, Mo., June 3, 1914.
He was the oldest of a family of nine children, having four brothers and four sisters.
He came to the United States of America, July 28, 1872.  He was married in St. Joseph, Mo., July 4, 1877 to Martha M. Johnson to which union two children were born Edward Albert Clawson and Mrs. Claude B. Cross.  He moved from St. Joseph to Blue Springs, Nebr. Where he resided the greater part of the time until 1903 when he moved to Bates county, Missouri where he has since resided.
He came to America almost penniless and by industry, economy and self denial left ample provision for his family.
He was kind, considerate husband and father; was shrewd, honest and upright in all his dealings.
Funeral services were held from the home Thursday morning after which the family accompanied the body to Blue Springs, Nebr., where it was laid to rest by the Woodmen, as he was a member. -- The Adrian Journal, June 4, 1914, Page 4 column 3, Death
 

Shelton, Mark A.
Mark A. Shelton died at his home in this city Wednesday morning, June 3, 1914, of ailments incident to old age; aged 87 years, 10 months and 29 days.
The subject of this sketch was born in Tennessee July 4, 1826.  When he was an infant his parents moved to Indiana where he grew to manhood.  When the war with Mexico broke out he enlisted and served until its close.  At the close of that war he came to Missouri, locating near Pleasant Hill in Cass county.  He  was first married in 1852 to this marriage five children were born, three of whom survive, viz: Mrs. Lizzie Hill, A. J. and Henry Shelton, all of whom reside in Nebraska.  His first wife died in 1862.  He was again married November 23, 1863, to Mrs. Jane Sigler.  To this union three children were born, all of whom are dead. During the Civil War Mr. Shelton served in the Federal army, and at its close again located in Cass county.  He had been a continuous resident of Missouri for almost sixty five years, and for more than twenty years had resided in Adrian.. During the past few years he had been in feeble health, but was able to get up town almost every day until the past few months, since which time he has been out but little. Theses old veterans are fast answering the last roll call. So far as we know Uncle mark was the last of the Mexican veterans in this county.  He lingered a little longer on this side than the rest  of his comrades, but he has gone to join the innumerable caravan.  Peace to his ashes.
Funeral services will be held from the Shelton home Friday afternoon at 2 o’clock and will be conducted by R. L. Wood.  Interment in Crescent Hill cemetery.
The widow, three children and step son, Frank Sigler, have the sympathy of friends.
They desire to express their gratitude to the neighbors for their kindness. -- The Adrian Journal,  June 4 1914, Page 4 Column 5, Death
 

Coits, Elmer
C. M. Coit, of the Reeder Hotel, received word Tuesday morning that his son, Elmer, 23 years old, ha been killed by an automobile in Kansas City Monday night.  Mr. Coit worked in the mail department at the Union Depot and was on the night shift, Monday night he started home after work hours, as he left the street car an auto ran over him and he died in about fifteen minutes.
The young man had been married only about three months.
The parents have the sympathy of friends. -- The Adrian Journal, June 25, 1914, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

Hess, baby girl
Dr. Robinson reports the birth of a girl baby to Mrs. Ed. Hess Monday night.  Ed says he now has four boys and each boy has two sisters.  Here’s wishing them well.  -- The Adrian Journal, June 25, 1914, Page 4 column 3, Birth
 

Dillon-Heater
Mr. Melville Heater and Miss Mary Dillon, prominent young people of Archie, were united in marriage at Butler last Saturday, Rev. Claude Hanby, pastor of the Ohio street M. E. church officiating. The contracting parties are well and favorably known. The groom and his father own the Mawson farm in this township and are progressive farmers.
The bride has for several years been the popular central girl at the Archie telephone exchange and is held in high esteem.
These happy young people will reside on the Heater farm and start out on their wedded life with the good wishes of a host of friends. -- The Adrian Journal, June 11, 1914, Page 1 column  3, Marriage
 

Todd, Mary Ellen
Mary Ellen, wife of Dr. T. B. Todd, died at the Todd residence in Pilot Grove, Mo., Tuesday morning, June 10, 1914; aged 32 years, 6 months and 10 days.
Mary Ellen, daughter  of Rev. and Mrs. Welborne was born in Vernon county, Missouri, September 24, 1881, at the age of eleven years she was converted and united with the M. E. church South, and lived a consistent Christian life until called to the higher existence.  March 15,, 1906 she was united in marriage with Dr. Thomas Britt Todd. To this union three children were born, one daughter and two sons, the daughter, Ruby survives, the sons died in infancy, one having preceded her in death but a few weeks.  Dr. Todd and wife moved to Adrian about six years ago and lived here until last winter when they moved to Pilot Grove.
Mrs. Todd was a cultured and refined Christian lady.  A talented musician and active in social, religious and civic circles.  Those who knew Mrs. Todd held her in the highest regard and her death cast a gloom over the entire community.
The body was brought to Adrian Wednesday for burial in the family lot in Crescent Hill cemetery.  Brief funeral services were held from the Methodist church conducted by Rev. Wood, who was a neighbor to and a friend of the Todd family.
The aged parents, husband little daughter have the sympathy of their friends in this bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, June 11, 1914, Page 4 column 1, Death
 

Rush-Moore
A beautiful home wedding was solemnized at the beautiful county home of Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Rush Wednesday evening, June 10, 1914, when their daughter, Miss Dora, became the bride of Mr. James Moore.  Preceding the ceremony Miss Lela Rexroad sang “Love’s Old Sweet Song”, and “When I Dream of Erin”.  Promptly at 8 o’clock Mrs. Dowell began to play Mendelssohn’s wedding march to the strain of which the bride and groom marched to the east porch of the residence, where in a beautiful and impressive ceremony Rev. R. L. Wood united them in wedlock, after the ceremony and congratulation and excellent two course lunch was served. The contracting parties are numbered among the best people ion the county. The groom was raised in Shawnee township and is an industrious and prosperous young farmer, a man of good habits.
The bride is an excellent young lady, cultured and refined.  For a number of years she has been a successful teacher in the schools of Bates county, the last year she taught in the Adrian school.  She is popular in social circles.  More than two hundred friends were present to witness the beautiful ceremony and to wish the young people the choicest blessing of life.
They will reside on a farm in Shawnee township.  The received many beautiful and useful presents. -- The Adrian Journal, June 11, 1914, Page 4 column 4, Marriage
 

Mills, William A.  (Babe)
Wm. A. (Babe), son of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Mills, of this city died in Kansas City Monday night, aged 39 years, 6 months and 18 days.
Wm. Mills was born at Crescent Hill and later moved to  Adrian, where he grew to manhood.  Some fifteen years ago he went to Kansas City, where he resided until his death.  He worked in the Journal office for three years under the present editor, this was more than twenty years ago.  “Babe,” as he was called was a trustworthy boy and was always on the square with the editor.
Mr. Mills was found dead Tuesday morning.  He had been suffering from the ulcer of the teeth he had lanced Monday and it is thought that death was due to septic poisoning.
The body was brought to Adrian Wednesday and a brief funeral service was held from the home of his parents at 3:30 o’clock Wednesday afternoon, conducted by Elder Hood. Burial in Crescent Hill cemetery.
The aged parents have the sympathy of the community in this bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, June 11,1914, Page 5 Column 4, Death
 

Clawson-Cross
Prof. Claude B. Cross and Miss Effie M. Clawson the only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Clawson were united in marriage at the First Methodist Episcopal church, Topeka, Kansas on Sunday May 17 1914, the Rev. Dr. Benjamin Young, the pastor, officiating.
The bride is an accomplished young lady, being a graduate of the high school at blue Springs, Nebraska, and the State Normal School at Warrensburg, Mo.  During the past year she has held the position of Principal of the high school at Circleville, Kansas.
The groom is a graduate of the State Normal school at Emporia, Kansas, and is a young man of sound moral character and sterling worth.
They will reside at Garrison, Kansas, where Prof Cross has been elected superintendent of schools for the coming year.
-- The Adrian Journal, May 21, 1914, Page 4 column 1, Marriage
 

Burton, baby girl
A girl baby was born to Mr. and Mrs. Jim Burton Wednesday. -- The Adrian Journal, May 21, 1914, Page 5 column 4, Birth
 

Pendleton, baby girl
A daughter was born into the home of A. J.  Pendleton Tuesday. -- The Adrian Journal, May 21, 1914, Page 5 column 4, Birth
 

Knight, baby boy
A boy baby was born into the home of Mr. and Mrs. J.  V.  Knight Monday night. --  The Adrian Journal, May 21, 1914, Page 8 column 1, Birth
 

Manning, Edward
Mrs. Wm. Crow and Miss Dora Manning arrived here Saturday from Wenatchee, Wash. With the body of their father Edward Manning for burial.  Funeral services over the remains were held from the Mt. Olivet church Sunday afternoon, conducted by Rev. W. S. Courtney. The Manning family resided here for many years and are worthy and highly respected people. -- The Adrian Journal, May 28, 1914, Page 5 Column 6, Death
 

Nafus, Lettie
Mrs. Lettie Nafus died at her home in Elkhart township, Monday night, May 25, of ailments incident to old age; aged 85 years and 8 days.
Grandma Nafus was a pioneer in this county and had an active part in the development of the county.  She was a devout Christian and had for many years been a faithful member of the Baptist church. As a neighbor Mrs. Nafus was always kind and courteous; as a citizen she always stood for the things that were elevating and ennobling.
Four children are left to mourn the death of a kind and loving mother.
Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon from the Mt. Vernon church by Rev. R. L. Wood, of this city.
The children have the sympathy of friends in this bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, May 28, 1914, Page 5 Column 6, Death
 

McReynolds, baby boy
William Wilson McReynolds the second, that is his name. 11 ½ pounds, that the size.  Mama and boy doing fine, that’s all of it except don’t fool with dad. -- The Adrian Journal, May 28, 1914, Page 5 column 3, Birth
 

Johnson-Webb
Silence was broken last Wednesday when news of the wedding of Miss Ettie J. Johnson and Jas. Webb of  Oklahoma was announced. They had their plans so skillfully arranged and carried out that one would have to wonder how it was done. They were married at butler last Wednesday evening and returned to his sister’s home, Mrs. Jas. Hogan. Thursday, then on Friday evening they returned to her mother’s home at Fairview and from there to their home at Vinta, Oklahoma. -- The Adrian Journal, May 28, 1914, Page 5 Column 3, Marriage
 

Rush-Hawkins
Miss Ruth Rush and Mr. Cecil Mack Hawkins were united in  marriage at the home of the brides parents one mile south of Adrian Christmas day at 6 o’clock p.m.  It was one of the big social events of the year in this section, there being  135 guests.
When the guests arrived they were received by the Misses Anna Tillson, Ethel Lincoln and Lizzie Rexroad. When the appointed hour arrived Miss Lila Rexroad beautifully sang “Love’s Old Sweet Song”, which was immediately followed by Mendelssohn’s Wedding march played by Mrs. J. E. Dowell. Elder W. S. Hood, of the Christian church, spoke the words that made the happy couple one, and he did it in a most impressive and pleasing manner.
After the usual congratulations the bridal party led the way to the dining room and a sumptuous dinner was served by the Misses Mabel Blair, Marie Lincoln, Jessie Mawson and Ruby Baie, music being furnished by the dinner by the Misses Dobson and Hazel Chapman.
The bride wore a beautiful gown of white Charmeuse trimmed in Puritan lace and white chiffon and carried a bouquet of  lilies and roses.  The bride’s sisters wore pale pink crepe de chine and the mother was dressed in black silk messaline.
The commodious Rush home was beautifully decorated for the occasion.  The large double parlor was decorated in white with wedding bells and mistletoe. The dining room was a profusion of green and red, with holly.
The bride is one of the beautiful girls of this section and has for several years been one of the successful teachers. She has lived here ever since she was a little tot and is an accomplished lady. The groom is one of the most popular and prosperous farmers in the northern part of Bates county. The young  people have the congratulations and best wishes of their host of friends.
They were showered with a large number of valuable presents there coming for seven different states.
Out of town guests: Mrs. Ray McRoberts, of Kansas City, Mr. Burnham, of Kansas City, and Miss Ruth Dobson, of Oklahoma.
On Friday Mr. and Mrs. Hawkins entertained about forty people at dinner in honor of the son and bride. -- The Adrian Journal, January 1, 1914, Page 1 Column 3, Marriage
 

Hanley, Miss
A young lady by the name of Miss Hanley, who lives 4 miles northwest of Archie committed suicide by taking Carbolic Acid.  No reason is known. She was a bright, energetic young lady. -- The Adrian Journal, May 7, 1914, Page 5 column 1, Death
 

Simpson-Crockett
J. A. Simpson, of Deer Creek township, and Miss Vertie Crockett, of mound township, were united in marriage at 9:30 p.m. Sunday, May 3rd, by Rev. R. L. Wood, pastor of the Baptist church at his home in this city.  The young people are at home on the Simpson farm northeast of this city. -- The Adrian Journal, May 7, 1914,  Page 5 Column 5, Marriage
 

Legg, T. W.
T. W. Legg, a prominent citizen of Butler, died last week.  Mr. Legg had resided in that city for nearly forty years and was a good citizen in every sense of the word. -- The Adrian Journal, April 30, 1914, Page 1 Column 7, Death
 

Garvey, infant
The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Garvey died Friday night at the family residence 1 ½ miles southwest of Adrian.  The little one did not long remain long in the good home into which it was born and the parents are deeply grieved at the death of the child.
In their sorrow they have the sympathy of their wide circle of friends. -- The Adrian Journal, April 30, 1914, Page 1 column 6, Death
 

Neff-Allen
Dr. R. W. Neff, of this city and Miss Myrtle Allen, of LaCygne, Kansas, were united in marriage in Kansas City, Sunday April 26, 1914, Rev. Dr. Gray pastor of the Grand Avenue Methodist church officiating.
The happy couple came to Adrian Monday and will reside here where the groom is engaged in the practice of Osteopathy. The bride is a stranger here but will be given a cordial welcome to the city. The marriage was a surprise to friends here. -- The Adrian Journal, April 30, 1914,  Page 4 Column 4, Marriage
 

Calhoun, J.
Mr. J. Calhoun died Wednesday 22nd and buried Thursday. -- The Adrian Journal, April 30, 1914, Page 4 Column 6, Death
 

Temmie, Cora Baie
Word was received here last Friday announcing the death of Mrs. Cora Baie Temmie at her home near Hinckley, Illinois. Death was caused by her being thrown from a buggy in a runaway April 23 and injured to that she died the following morning.  We are not in possession of the particulars of this accident.
Cora, was the daughter of Mr. Wm. Baie and was born and reared on the farm near Adrian. She was a charming young lady and enjoyed the confidence of a wide circle of friends in and near this city all of whom will mourn her untimely death.
The father and other relatives has the sincere sympathy of friends her in this great trial. -- The Adrian Journal, April 30, 1914, Page 4 Column 7, Death
 

Switzer, Mrs. Jesse
Mrs. Jesse Switzer died at her home, this city, Wednesday morning, April 8th of a complication of diseases.
Mrs. Switzer took the whooping cough some weeks ago, two weeks ago she took measles and later pneumonia. The complication was too much for her power of resistance and she died a above stated.
Mrs. Switzer was a young woman, was married to Mr. Switzer last October.  The young husband has the sympathy of friends in this bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, April 9, 1914, Page 4 Column 3, Death
 

Taylor-Thompson
George T. Taylor, of Jacksonville, Ill. and Clara E. Thompson of Adrian, were married in Butler, Wednesday March 25th, Rev. L. R . Elliott, pastor of the Butler Baptist church officiating.  The ceremony was witnessed by only a few friends of the contracting parties.
After a brief wedding trip they will be at home April 15th at Bentonville, Arkansas. -- The Adrian Journal, April 2, 1914, Page 1 column 3, Marriage
 

Lemer, Emma
Mrs. Emma Lerner, living west of Everett, committed suicide Sunday morning by jumping in to the cistern and drowning herself.  Mrs. Lemer was sick and asked her husband to go to a neighbors and get some camphor.  She took advantage of her husbands absence from the home to commit the rash act.
She leaves a husband and three children. We have been unable to get all the facts. -- The Adrian Journal, April 2, 1914, Page 1 Column 7, Death
 

Baum, J. C.
J. C. Baum died at his home 3 ½ miles southwest of Adrian, Monday night, March 30,1914, of pneumonia;  aged 67 years 11 months and 2 days.
Mr. Baum was born in Ross county, Ohio, April 28, 1846.  February 2, 1869 he was united in marriage with Minnesota McCracken by Rev. Hathaway, of Bourneville, Ohio. To this union three children were born, viz: Mrs. J. C. Clark, of St. Joseph, Mo.; J. B. Baum, of Barnard, Mo., and Miss Ollie J. who lives at home. The family moved to Butler in 1881 and to Adrian in 1888, thence to their farm, where Mr. Baum died.
Mr. Baum was a good citizen, a kind neighbor and a loyal friend.  Always agreeable and companionable.  Few men enjoy the association and friendship of neighbors more than Mr. Baum. When in town he was jolly and was always given a hearty greeting by his friends.  He dispensed the sunshine of good will wherever he went.  The world needs more such sunny dispositions. For several years Uncle Jack corresponded for The Journal and his items were always read with interest. We shall miss him.
Funeral services were held from the Baum home Wednesday morning at 10 o’clock, by Rev. C. A. Erdman, after which the body was laid to rest in Crescent Hill cemetery. Peace be to his ashes. -- The Adrian Journal, April 2, 1914, Page 5 column 3, Death
 

Hoots, Sandy
Wednesday morning, April 1, the spirit of Uncle Sandy Hoots took its flight and the good old man entered upon that lasting sleep; aged 93 years, 10 months and 21 days.
S. W. A. Hoots was born in North Carolina, May 10, 1820. In 1830 he moved to Illinois, and thence to Missouri in 1875, locating in Cass county, thence to  Adrian 12 years ago.  Uncle Sandy was married four times, his wives and six children preceded him in death.  There children survive him, viz: Wm. Hoots, of Butler; Mrs.  Emma Lawson of Kansas City, and Mrs. Mary Yale, of Ogala, Nebraska.  In early life Mr. Hoots united with the Christian church and was a devout member of that church at the time of his death.  Mr. Hoots served in the Federal army during the civil war.  He was a man of iron constitution and worked hard until h e was past 80 and attributed his long life to the fact that he had always been active.  Mr. Hoots was possessed of a sunny disposition , always cheerful and the weight of years did not lessen the warmth of his had shake or dim the pleasant smile. Every one had a kind word for Uncle Sandy.
To have lived almost a century is certainly is a rear privilege. Much might be said of the things accomplished during the span of his life but we have space on for the suggestion. A long and useful life has gone out.
Funeral services for Mr. Hoots were held from the Adrian Christian church this, Thursday morning at 10 o’clock, conducted by Elder hood, assisted by the G. A. R. The body was buried in the Everett cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, April 2, 1914, Page 5 Column 4, Death
 

Tillison, Wm. B.
Wm. B. Tillison died at his home, one mile south of Archie Friday, April 10, 1914; aged 89 years, 2 months and 13 days.
Wm. B. Tillison was born in Hamilton county, Ohio, January 28, 1825, where he grew to young manhood.  He then moved to Indiana, where he was united in marriage with Miss Elizabeth Walters February 20, 1850, the wife preceded him in death one year ago.  To this union nine children were born, two precede the parents in death.  Seven survive viz: Wm. Tillison, of Archie; Mrs. Mary Mawson, Archie; Mrs. Nora Dobson, Wayside, Kansas; Mrs. Jessie Warnken, of Adrian; Sherman Tillison, of Archie; Warren Tillison, of Pasadena, California, Dr. C. K. Tillison of Ramona, Oklahoma.
Mr. Tillison joined the Methodist church when a young man and remained a member until his death.  He was a charter member of the Archie church and the oldest member of that society.  Uncle “Billy” as he was familiarly and affectionately called, was a devout Christian gentleman.’
In 1848 Mr. Tillison caught the gold fever and went to California, making the trip by water.  He retained the incidents of this to memory until the  closing years of life.  Mr. Tillison served in the Federal army during the civil war.
The Tillison family moved from Indiana to Bates county, Missouri, in 18668, and settled on the farm where he died.  For forty six years Mr. Tillison was an active factor in the business and social development of this community.  During an acquaintance of nearly a quarter of a century we have never heard  anyone speak a word or reproach of him.  His life was exemplary and his heart beat in sympathy with his fellow man.  Always pleasant in manners and kind of heart he had won the affection of those with whom he associated. During the past few years he had not been able to enjoy the pleasures of life on account of the infirmities of old age.
Funeral services for Mr. Tillison were held from the Crescent Hill church Sunday afternoon, conducted by his pastor, Rev. Blaine, who paid a nice tribute to the memory of the departed.  Burial was in the Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, April 16, 1914, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

Price, Mrs. A. E.
Mrs. A. E. Price died at her home in Kansas City, Kansas, Sunday.  Mrs. Price formerly resided in Adrian and has many friends here who will be pained to learn of her demise. -- The Adrian Journal, April 16, 1914, Page 1 Column 4, Death
 

Walters-Paxton
Mr. George W. Paxton son of Mrs. Etta Paxton of Duncan Falls, Ohio, and Miss Viola M. Walters of Adrian, were married at 4:30 o’clock Sunday afternoon at the home of Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Hobson on South Mechanic street.
Rev. Claude S. Hanby,  minister of the  Ohio street Methodist Episcopal church, performed the ceremony, which was attended only by near relatives.
Mrs. Paxton is a sister of Mrs. Hobson, and a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Walters of Adrian.  Mr. Paxton is a lineman for the Bell Telephone Company engaged on long distance lines.
The young people will make their home at Grandview, Mo., for the present. Butler Daily Democrat -- The Adrian Journal, April 16, 1914, Page 1 column 5, Marriage
 

Huffman, baby girl
Born into the home of James Huffman a baby girl, April, 8th. -- The Adrian Journal,, April 16, 1914, Page 4 Column 3, Birth
 

Murell, George
Mr. George Murell, who has been sick, for the past nine weeks died Thursday, and buried Saturday.  His wife has the sympathy of the entire community. -- The Adrian Journal, April 16, 1914, Page 4 Column 3, Death
 

Bullock, Mrs. North
Mrs. North Bullock died at her home in Archie this morning from troubles incident to old age.  Mrs. Bullock is the mother of ex sheriff Bullock and of Mrs. Dr. Acair.  The family has resided near Archie many years. -- The Adrian Journal, April 16, 1914, Page 5 column 2, Death
 

O’Dea, Rosanna
Mrs. Rosanna O’Dea died at her home, five miles southwest of Adrian, last Saturday night; aged 76 years.  Mrs. O’Dea was born in Ireland and came to this country when a girl.  Her husband, John O’Dea died several years ago.  The family came to Bates county many years ago and located in Mound township.  Mrs. O’Dea was an excellent lady and was held in high esteem by her neighbors.  Her sons, Thomas and Ned O’Dea reside in Mound township and are highly respected citizens. Funeral services were held from the home Monday morning, by Rev. Father Mallon, of the St. Joseph Diocese. The body was laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, April 23, 1914, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Frazier, infant
The little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Frazier died at the family home in East Boone township, Friday, April 17, aged three months.  Brief funeral services were held at the Crescent Hill cemetery, conducted by Elder Hood.
The parents have the sympathy of the entire community in this bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, April 23, 1914, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Manning, E. N.
Edward Newton Manning, aged 82 years died at his home south of this city, April 9, 1914.  Mr. Manning has resided here 7 years and for the past five years has been almost helpless.  He was born in Illinois in 1831. He served three years and one month in the Civil War in Company A. of the 25th Illinois Infantry which was the same company of which I. W. Reeves of this city was a member.
Mr. Manning is survived by five children, all of whom are residents of this valley.  They are: Mrs. Dora Crow, Miss Lou Manning, George Manning, Mrs. Janie Landreth and Levi Manning.
The funeral will occur Sunday at 2:30 p.m. at the parlors of the Wenatchee Undertaking company, Rev. S. O. Pool of the Church of Christ having charge of the service.  Daily World, Wenatchee Wash.
Mrs. Dora Crow and Miss Lou Manning will bring their father’s body here for burial in Mt. Olivet cemetery, where the wife and mother was buried in 1904. -- The Adrian Journal, April 23, 1914, Page 4 Column 3, Death
 

Long-Hartley
Virgil Long and Miss Cleo Hartley went to Butler Wednesday and were married. After the ceremony they returned to the Hartley home by automobile where they will remain until Sunday when they will go to Kansas City, where they will reside. The contracting parties are numbered among the best young people of the community. The groom is a carpenter and contractor and is numbered among the best in his line.
The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Hartley, and has for several years past taught school in Bates and Cass counties, the last three or four years in her home school.
Their friends join in wishing the young people a prosperous and pleasant wedded life. -- The Adrian Journal, April 23, 1914, Page 4 column 4, Marriage
 

Ferris, baby boy
A son was born to Mr. and Mrs. Les Ferris last Sunday morning ½ mile east of Elkhart. Dr. F. S. Bates attended. -- The Adrian Journal, April 23, 1914, Page 5 column 3, Birth
 

Blocher-Meck
Mr. Clifton Blocher, of Adrian and Miss Mattye Euella Meck of Belton, were married at the home of the bride, Sunday, March 1, 1914.
We are not in possession of the facts beyond the announcement of the wedding. The will be at home after March 10th in Adrian.  The groom was raised in this vicinity and his many friends join in wishing him and his bride a happy wedded life.
-- The Adrian Journal,, March 5, 1914, Page 1 column 4, Marriage
 

Wilson, baby boy
Born to Mr. and Mrs. Sam Wilson last Wednesday a son.

 A fine boy was born to Mr. and Mrs. Samuel O. Wilson, of Burdett, February 25th  The proud parents gave the youngster a hearty welcome to their home. -- The Adrian Journal, March 5, 1914, Page 5,1 column 3,7, Birth
 

McDaniel, Cruce
Mr. Cruce McDaniel died in Visalia, California, March 1, 1914; age 70 years and 7 days.
Mr. McDaniel was born in Barber county, West Virginia, Feb. 14, 1844.  He left his native state  in 1863 and came to Bates county in 1865, where he resided until about thirty years ago when he moved to California, where he spent the remaining years of his life.
His brother Dewitt McDaniel left here February 27th and was with him at the time of his death and arranged to have the body shipped here for burial.
The body is expected to arrive here today and will be laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery beside his father and mother.
O. McDaniel of this city, is a brother of the deceased. -- The Adrian Journal, March 5, 1914, Page 5 column 1, Death
 

Mahan-Cook
Mr. Glenn Mahan, of near Adrian, and Miss Ina Cook, of East Lynn, were married at the home of the bride’s parents in that city, Wednesday March 4, 1914.
The groom is one of the most prosperous and energetic young men in this neighborhood, and a young man of good morals. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. F. Cook and is an excellent young lady.  She grew to beautiful womanhood in and near Adrian.
The happy couple will reside  on the Mahan farm near this city.
The Journal joins their many friends in extending heartiest congratulations and best wishes for the continued happiness of the worthy couple. -- The Adrian Journal, March 5, 1914, Page 5 Column 3, Marriage
 

Shantz, baby boy
A son was born to Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Shantz Tuesday morning, March 17th. They will probably call him St. Patrick.
-- The Adrian Journal, March 19, 1914, Page 5 Column 7, Birth
 

Wooley, baby
Dr. Bates reports the birth of a child to Mr. and Mrs. Les. Wooley, Monday. -- The Adrian Journal, March 26, 1914, Page 1 column 6, Birth
 

Workman, Josephine
Mrs. Orville Workman died at her home, 4 miles northeast of Adrian, Monday, March 23, aged 31 years, 5 months and 25 days.
Josephine, daughter of James and Ardie Simpson, was born September 28, 1882, and on the farm where she died October 24, 1900, she was united in marriage to Orville Workman, to this union one son was born, with his father survives.  Mrs. Workman’s parents are dead. Besides the husband and son she is survived by the following brothers and sisters: Mrs. Riley Ohler and Jeptha Simpson of Alberta, Canada; J. J. Simpson, of Arrington, Kansas and Mrs. G. W. Arrick, of Adrian.
Funeral services were held Tuesday morning and burial was made in the Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, March 26, 1914, Page 1 Column 4, Death
 

Howard, John F.
John F. Howard died at his home in Nevada, Mo.; Thursday, March 1914, age 53 years.
Mr. Howard had been in bad health for some time and his death was not unexpected.  He lived in Adrian a number of years and was engaged in the barber business.  Fate seemed to be against him for several years past and he was wrecked financially.
Mr. Howard was a kind hearted man and we believe he was strictly honest in his dealings.
He leaves a wife and several children to mourn the loss of a kind husband and father. -- The Adrian Journal, March 26, 1914, Page 1 column 4, Death
 

Oiler, Eunice Stella
Eunice Stella, only daughter of Clarence E. and Stella Oiler, was born April 21, 1913, and departed this life January 30, 1914, at the home of her parents six miles south west of Adrian; aged 9 months and 6 days.  Sad indeed was that home when parents and friends saw that they must give their darling up.  She was sick but a few hours. Although Dr. Robinson and friends did all they could. She fell asleep in death at one o’clock a.m. Friday morning. The funeral services at the Adrian Baptist church by Rev. Wood Saturday at 11 a.m., interment in the Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, February 5, 1914, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Lacy-Chapman
Mr. Ray Lacy and Miss Verne Chapman, prominent young people of the Burdett neighborhood, were married last Saturday.
They are worthy people and the Journal joins their many friends in wishing them a happy and prosperous wedded life.
Later: Since writing the above we learn that the contracting parties were married by Rev. R. L.  Wood at his residence in this city. -- The Adrian Journal, February 12, 1914, Page 1 Column 3, Marriage
 

Chrisman,Ewin
Mr. Ewin Chrisman age about 85 years, died at his home north of Burdett Saturday evening.  After short services conducted by Mr. Nelson the body was laid to rest in the Burdett cemetery Monday afternoon. -- The Adrian Journal, February 12, 1914, Page 5 column 3, Death
 

Robards-Blachmon
Mr. DeWitt Robards and Miss Lulu Blackmon, two prominent young people of East Boone township, were married Wednesday evening February 11th at 4 o’clock at the home of Ed Groves.
The groom is the son of Mr. L. Q. Robards and is an industrious and prosperous young farmer. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. B. Blackmon and is handsome and accomplished young lady. -- The Adrian Journal, February 12, 1914, Page 4 Column 4, Marriage
 

Prine, William D.
William D. Prine died at his home in this city at 10 o’clock Wednesday night, aged forty four years. Funeral services for Mr. Prine will be held from the home Friday morning at 11 o’clock  Burial in Crescent Hill cemetery.
William Prine was a good citizen, energetic and honest. Few men afflicted as he was, would done as well. He was a hustler, never giving up, but always at something to make an honest living.  He was ingenious and skillful in many lines and his services were always in demand.  He served two terms as Constable and Collector of Deer Creek township and was a competent officer, in fact what he did was well done.
Billy Prine will be missed.
His wife, children, father, brothers and sisters have the deep sympathy of the public in this affliction. -- The Adrian Journal, February 12, 1914, Page 4 Column 2, Death
 

Rush-Mawson
Mr. Charles H. Rush and Miss Jessie Mawson were united in marriage at the Mawson home in the north part of this township Wednesday evening February, 18, 1914, at 6 o’clock.  The Methodist minister of Archie officiating.  The heavy rain that was falling kept many of the guests away but there were many present to witness the ceremony.
The groom is one of the best young men and most prosperous farmers in this county. The bride is a charming young lady and has been a very successful teacher in the public schools of the county. -- The Adrian Journal, February 19, 1914, Page 4 Column 2, Marriage

The home of Mrs. Mary B. Mawson was the scene of a very pretty wedding, when her daughter Jessie, was united in marriage to Mrs. Chas. H. Rush on Wednesday evening Feb 18th at 6 o’clock.  The guests were received by the Misses Annie Tillison, Dora and Cora Rush.
Promptly at 6 o’clock the bridal couple entered the double parlor  to the strains of  Lohengrin’s Wedding March played by Mrs. Harve Chapman.  In a very pleasing and impressive manner Rev. Blaine, of the Archie Methodist church spoke the words which united the happy couple. After congratulations a delicious two course dinner was served by Maude Hodge, Katie Westhoff, Mable Blair, Flossie Rexroad and Grace Melton. The bride wore a beautiful gown of shadow lade over white Charmeuse, trimmed with rhinestones and carried a bouquet of bride’s roses.  She is an accomplished young lady of this community and has been a successful teacher for years. The groom is a prosperous and successful young farmer. They received many valuable and useful presents. About 100 guests were present.  Mr. and Mrs. Rush will be at home to their friends after March 1st, on their farm one half mile south of Passaic. -- The Adrian Journal, February 26, 1914, Page 4 Column 4, Marriage
 

Rogers-Holloway
Mr.  D. S. Rogers and Mrs. Lou Holloway went to Independence, Mo., Saturday and were married.  The came home on the evening train. -- The Adrian Journal, February 19, 1914, Page 8 Column 3, Marriage
 

Prine, Daniel
Daniel Prine died at his home in this city Sunday morning, February 22, 1914, after a brief illness of pneumonia fever; aged 73 years 5 months and 5 days.
Daniel Prine was born inn Cole county, Missouri, September 17, 1840, when he was a small boy his parents located near Dayton, in Cass county, here he grew to manhood.  In 1861 Mr. Prine joined the Missouri Home Guard at Harrisonville and served six months, at the close of this service he enlisted in the 14th Kansas Calvary for three years, at the end of this term he re enlisted and served until the close of the war. He was said to be a fearless soldier.  On August 5, 1863, Mr. Prine was united in marriage with Miss Sarah E. Morris and they moved to Paola, Kansas. To this union nine children were born, four sons and five daughters, six of these are still living, viz: Edward Prine, Mrs. Reed, Mrs. Huston and Mrs. Mathis, of Kansas City’ I. W. Prine, Ketchen, Oklahoma, and John R. Prine, of Los Angeles, California.  Mrs. Prine died January 11, 1893.  Mr. Prine was again married February 27, 1900, to Mrs. Mary Thompson, who survives him.  In 1976 Mr. Prine was converted and united with the Austin Baptist Church and later transferred his membership to the Adrian Baptist church of which he remained a member until he died.  In 1967 the Prine family moved from Paola, Kan., to Austin, Missouri, and from thence to Adrian in 1888, where he spent the remaining years of his life.
Daniel Prine was a good man. Always a clean, honorable and industrious citizen and a kind and obliging neighbor, a loyal friend.  His life long residence in this vicinity only served to widen the circle of his friends.
Funeral services for Mr. Prine were held from the Adrian Baptist church Tuesday afternoon, conducted by his pastor,, Rev. R. L. Wood.  Burial in Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, February 26, 1914, Page 1 Column 3, Death
 

Deffenbaugh, babe
The two week old babe of Mr. and Mrs. Homer Deffenbaugh died at the home of its parents, this city, Thursday night
of last week. Burial was made in Crescent Hill cemetery Friday afternoon.
The young parents have the sympathy of friends in this bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, February 26, 1914, Page 8 Column 3, Death
 

Limpus-Blackmon
Mr. C. E. Limpus and Miss Elizabeth Blackmon were united in marriage at the home of the bride’s brother, Mrs. C. G. Blackmon, 717 Monroe Ave, Kansas City, Mo., at 6:00 p.m., Feb. 22, 1914.  The ceremony was performed by the Rev. Dr. J. . Moore, Pastor of Oakley M.  E. church, Kansas City.
The bride was handsomely gowned in electric blue crepe, the groom wore the conventional black.  After the ceremony the bridal couple and those present, consisting only of relatives a close friends, were invited to a splendid four course dinner by Mrs. C. G. Blackmon, formerly Miss Ruby Ricketts, of Adrian. The house was beautifully decorated with flowers, also decorated in honor of Washington’s birthday.
The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. B. Blackmon, one of the most prominent families of Bates county. She is an accomplished young lady and a successful teacher, having just finished her 4th year in the rural schools.
The groom is the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. George Limpus, a prominent family of Cass county. He holds a prominent position with Montgomery Ward & Co., Kansas City, Mo.
The will be at home, 5622 Scarret Ave, Kansas City, after February 25, 1914.
Their many friends wish them a long and happy wedded life. -- The Adrian Journal, February 26, 1914, Page 4 Column 4, Marriage
 

Broughton, E. M.
Edward M. Broughton died at his home near Ballard, last Friday night of pneumonia fever; aged 55 years.  The body was brought to Adrian Saturday evening and shipped to Ray county for burial. Mr. Broughton was born and raised in that county and spent most of his life there. Several years ago he moved to Bates county and located near Altona. He was a high class gentleman and a citizen who commanded the respect and esteem of his neighbors.  Such citizens are always missed and mourned.
A wife, two sons and two daughters are left to mourn the loss of the companionship and counsel of a loving husband and father.  In this sorrow they have the tender and loving sympathy of a wide circle of admiring friends. -- The Adrian Journal, February 26, 1914, Page 8 Column 3, Death
 

Bloom-Bloom
In the presence of relatives and friends, Miss Emma Bloom, of Adrian, Mo., and Mr. Bert Bloom, of Springfield, Illinois, were married at 8:00 o’clock Wednesday evening, January 21, at the home of the bride’s brother P.D. Bloom who resides at 309 State Ave, Kansas City, Kansas. The wedding march was played by Mrs. Epperts.  Immediately after the ceremony a dainty wedding supper was served.
The bride and groom departed Thursday morning for Adrian, where they were entertained at the hoe of A. J. Smith, after which they went to their home, a fine farm four miles west of Adrian, the property of the bride.
The bride is a well known Adrian girl and her friends join in wishing her the greatest joy in new venture. The groom is from Springfield, Illinois, and is well spoken of by all who know him and we congratulate him in securing a wife who will bring him much joy and happiness.
Mr. Bloom will take charge of the farm and its work. We extend to him a cordial welcome to our community. -- The Adrian Journal, January 29, 1914, Page 1 column 4, Marriage
 

Cherry, baby girl
It’s a fine girl! That’s the message that broke in over the Journal phone this morning at 10 o’clock. The man at the other end of the wire was Postmaster Cherry announcing the birth of a daughter. Mother and babe doing well, but dad is nervous. -- The Adrian Journal, January 29, 1914, Page 4 column 1, Birth
 

Drenan, Newton
Newton Drenan died at his home in Butler last week. Mr. Drenan had resided in Bates county for more than forty years and was a highly respected citizen.
Mesdames D. F. Andes and C. VanDerVerre, of Adrian, were his nieces, and attended the funeral services in Butler.
-- The Adrian Journal, January 15, 1914, Page 1 column 7, Death
 

Fox, Willis
Word has been received by friends here announcing the death of Willis D. Fox at his home, Waitsburg, Washington, Saturday night, January 10, 1914, of heart failure.
Mr. Fox resided in Adrian a number of years and twenty years ago was a prominent teacher in the public schools of north Bates county, and a man held in high esteem by all who knew him. Mr. Fox moved to Washington about seventeen years ago and taught school in that state until the time of his death.
Mr. Fox was a good man and his friends here will regret his death. -- The Adrian Journal, January 15, 1914, Page 1 column 4, Death
 

Wright, infant
The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Wright died at the home of the parents two miles southeast of Adrian, Saturday, January 10, 1914; aged 6 days. Burial in Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, January 15, 1914, Page 1 column 1, Death
 

Rexroad-Widner
Mr. Perry Rexroad and Miss Ruth Widner were married at the home of the bride’s parents at Crescent Hill, Wednesday evening, January 14, 1914, at 6 o’clock, Rev. R. L. Wood officiating.  Only the immediate relatives of the contracting parties were present to witness the ceremony.
The bride is the only child of Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Widner and is a handsome and popular young lady. The groom is a native of this county and is a worthy young man. -- The Adrian Journal, January 15, 1914, Page 4 column 2, Marriage
 

Hogood, John
Announcement of the death of uncle John Hagood was received. Died at the home of his daughter Mrs. Chas. Music, of Oklahoma.  He was a pioneer in the  Central West. Born in Ky. He came to Lafayette county after the Civil War and in 1880  he came to Bates county, improving the farm now owned by J.  A. Page, near Fairview. He raised a large family who are scattered here and yonder.  Grandma Hagood died about 20 years ago, since that time he has made his home with his children.  He served in the Confederate army and lived to be 91 years and a few months old. -- The Adrian Journal, January 15, 1914, Page 5 Column 3, Death
 

Ganther-Henderson
Mr. William A. Ganther, of near Adrian, and Miss Alice Henderson, of near Amsterdam, were married in Butler Saturday afternoon, Rev. Elliot, pastor of the Butler Baptist church officiating. After the ceremony the happy couple drove to the home of the bride’s parents, where the wedding supper was served.
The groom is one of the best young men in his part of the county. The bride is not known here but is said to be an  excellent young lady.
Mr. and Mrs. Ganther left Monday for Sheridan, Wyoming, where they will reside. -- The Adrian Journal,, January 22, 1914, Page 1 Column 3, Marriage
 

Crow, Prof. Herman
Prof. Herman Crow died in Colorado Springs, January 14, 1914, after a lingering illness; aged 25 years, 10 months and 16 days.
Herman, son of William J. and Martha J. Crow, was born in Spruce township, Bates county, Missouri, February 28, 1888, and spent his boyhood days on the farm where he was born, and where his father died when he was a small boy. Mrs. Crow moved to Adrian in 1907, ad Herman entered the Adrian High School, graduating in the class of 1909.  He taught in the Adrian school in 1910, and the next year entered the State Normal school at Tahlequah, Oklahoma, graduating from that institution in June 1912.  Herman was employed as principal of the Inola, Oklahoma, school for the years 1912 and 1913 and his labors in that position were crowned with a high degree of success. He had applied himself to study with such energy for so many years that the close of his last school year his constitution was almost wrecked and he became ill of typhoid fever and lingered for several weeks, he gained sufficient strength to come to his home in this city, gut was only a shadow of his former self.  In September 1913 he went to Colorado Springs in the hope that his physical vigor would return, but that invigorating climate and the earnest prayers of admiring friends could not stay the ravages of the disease and he passed peacefully to the great beyond as above stated.
At the age of 14 years Herman was converted and joined the Fairview Baptist church, when the family moved to this city his membership was transferred to the Adrian Baptist church, of which he remained a member until death.  Herman was an active Christian always a capable and efficient worker. A student of the Bible who made its teachings a part of his daily life. To come in contact with Herman Crow was to feel that his life was that of a devout Christian gentleman, free from selfishness and considerate of the feelings of others. His whole nature was for the higher and nobler ideals of life.
The editor will never forget the many pleasant visits with Herman and the discussion of subjects that were of mutual interest and his death causes the writer keen regret. A beautiful life was his, and it will continue to be a blessing to this community.
His mother, six brothers and four sisters survive him, and to them his death comes as a crushing blow.  The brothers are : John H. Crow, Kansas City; Joseph A. Crow, Williston, North Dakota; J. F. Crow, Tulsa, Oklahoma; J. D. Crow, Spruce, Mo.; W. W. Crow and A. B. Crow of Kansas City.
Sisters: Mrs. G. D. Teeter of Apache, Oklahoma; Mrs. J. I. Hendricks, of Tulsa, Oklahoma; Miss Cora Crow, of Okarche, Oklahoma, and Miss Effie, who resides with her other in this city.  All of these were present at the funeral except Joseph A. Crow and Mrs. Teeter.
Funeral services were held fro Prof. Crow were held from the Adrian Baptist church Saturday morning at 9 o’clock conducted by his pastor, Rev. R. L. Wood, who spoke tenderly and feelingly of the beautiful life. The body was laid to rest in the Cloud cemetery.
The aged mother, brothers and sisters have the deep sympathy of all in this great bereavement. The grief is the more poignant because of the possibilities for good wrapped up in this young life. -- The Adrian Journal, January 22, 1914, Page 1 column 4, Death
 

Limpus, Frank
Frank M. Limpus died at his home, near Everett, Friday, January 2, 1914, from the effects of a wound received from the accidental discharge of a revolver inflicted six days prior to his death. An account of this accident was published in the Journal last week.
All that loving hands and skill could do was done to save the life of the patient but all failed and death won the victory.
Frank Limpus was born Feb. 7, 1882; was married to Miss Martha Davis, October 5, 1904; united with the Church of Christ at Everett in 1908 and died with his faith and hope in his god.
Mr. Limpus was a good citizen in every sense of the term. In his home, as a neighbor and a member of society at large he measured up to every requirement of Christian citizenship and his death comes as a distinct loss to the community in which he had spent his life.  A wife, mother, two brothers and tow sisters survive him.  Upon these the loss comes with crushing force.  Only those who have passed through such trials will know the heartaches of those sorrowing relatives.
Funeral services for Mr. Limpus were held from the Everett Christian church Sunday, conducted by Elder W. S. Hood, of Adrian, after which the body was laid to rest in the Everett cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, January 8, 1914, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

Bateman, Lela Isabella
Lela Isabella, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Bateman, died at the family  home, this city, Saturday January 3, 1914: aged 12 years 4 months and 9 days.
Lela was a twin, her twin sister preceded her in death 6 years ago.  She was a frail child and her constitution was no match for a severe attack of pneumonia. -- The Adrian Journal, January 8, 1914, Page 1 Column 1, Death
 

Lacy, baby girl
Born to Mr. and Mrs. Ed Lacy, last Saturday, a daughter. -- The Adrian Journal, January 8, 1914, Page 4 column 4, Birth
 

Mosier, Mrs. Amanda
Mrs. Amanda Mosier died in Kansas City January 6th; aged 72 years. The body was shipped to Adrian Wednesday and taken to Spruce township for burial in Bethel cemetery.
Mrs. Mosier was for many years a resident in the Ballard neighborhood. -- The Adrian Journal, January 8, 1914, Page 4 column 5, Death


Submitted by: Sandee Hubbard

Note: The information provided by Sandee Hubbard has been made available for personal genealogy research.
It may not be copied or reproduced without gaining her written permission to do so.

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