Bates County News



 

The Adrian Journal
Adrian, Bates County, Missouri

Jan. 14, 1915 - Dec. 23, 1915

Fortner-Sullins
Mr. Floyd E. Fortner, of Spruce township, and Miss Elsie..Sullins, of Shawnee township were married at Butler, …December 18,1915, …..officiating.
The groom is a stranger to the area here, but the bride is a resident of Deer Creek township and had lived here until a few years ago when the family moved to Shawnee township.
She is an excellent young lady and has many friends who will wish the newly weds continued happiness and a large share of prosperity. -- The Adrian Journal, December 23, 1915, Page 1 column 1, Marriage
 

Phipps, Mildred
Mildred, the fourteen year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. F. Phipps, died at the family home, four miles northeast of Adrian, Tuesday morning, December 21, 1915, at 4:15 o’clock.
Miss Phipps was born in Iowa but her parents moved to Kansas when she was a small child, thence to their present home two years ago last August.  A year ago she was stricken with valvular heart trouble and had been in very poor health since that time.  Some days ago she suffered an attack of la Grippe, this with other ailments was too much for her strength.
Mildred was a sweet, lovable girl and made many friends warm friends during her short stay here.  The entire community in extending sympathy to the sorrowing parents and sisters in this loss.
Funeral services for Miss Mildred were held from the Adrian Methodist church Wednesday afternoon, conducted by the pastor, Dr. W. S. Courtney.  Burial was in the Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, December 23, 1915, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

Maxey, Thomas
Dr. James Hall received a letter from James W. Maxey the early part of the week stating that his father, Thomas Maxey, died at this home in Fowler, Colorado, Friday, December 17, 1915, of pneumonia fever.  Mr.  Maxey was well known in Bates, co., having been in the blacksmith business in Burdett for several years, from there he moved to Adrian where he was in business until about eight years ago.
Mr. Maxey was probably between 65 and 70 years old and had been a physical giant. -- The Adrian Journal, December 23, 1915, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

Haggard, Mary
Mrs. Mary Haggard, widow of the late L. C. Haggard, died at her home in Kansas City, Wednesday, December 15, 1915.
The Haggard’s were pioneers in Bates county and for many years lived on a farm in Shawnee township, and for some years in Adrian, but for a number of years Mrs. Haggard had made her home with her son Dixie in Kansas City.
Grandma Haggard was an excellent Christian lady, loved by everyone who knew her.  She was always agreeable and was given a hearty welcome into social circles because of her amiable disposition.
The body was buried in the cemetery at Butler Friday. -- The Adrian Journal, December 23, 1915, Page 8 column 5, Death
 

Wyse, Lulu
Mrs. Henry Wyse died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Lou Allfree, three miles south of Adrian, Wednesday evening, December 22, 1915; aged 69 years, 3 months and 10 days.
Lulu, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.  Richard DeJarnatt, in Grand River township, in what is now Bates county, September 12, 1846, and spent her entire life here.  May 17, 1867, she was united in marriage with Mr. Henry H. Wyse. To this union seven children were born, four of them survive, viz; Mrs. Chas. Shurbert, James Wyse, Mrs. Lulu Allfree and William Wyse, all of them live in this vicinity and get their mail from Adrian.  The aged husband also survives.  Miss DeJarnett was converted and joined the Christian church at Dayton before the Civil War, she moved her membership to the Altona church in 1884. And remained a member of that organization until her death.
Mrs. Wyse possessed the genial traits of the pioneer.  She was a good neighbor and loyal friends and the people with whom she associated all her life will feel the  loss most keenly.
For a long time Mrs.  Wyse had been a constant sufferer from cancer. Every means that is known to medical science was employed to restore her to health but it availed nothing.
Funeral services for Mrs. Wyse will be held from the Altona Christian church, Friday afternoon, December 24th at 1:00 o’clock. Burial will be in the France cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, December 23,1915, Page 5 column 4, Death
 

Burton, William
Uncle William Burton died at the home of his daughter at Pleasant Hill, Monday, December 20th.  We have not his age but he was about 79 years of age.
Mr. Burton lived in Adrian for several years until a few weeks ago, when he was taken to Pleasant Hill where he could be cared for during his declining days.  He was a good citizen in every sense of that term. -- The Adrian Journal, December 23, 1915, Page 4 column 4, Death
 

Gibbs, Hollis
Blough, Bert
Couch, Manford
Clark, Clarence
Gibbs, Samuel
Five Killed By Dynamite
Stump Blasters on the Duvall Ranch were the victims. Four Killed Instantly.
Adrian Boy Is Victim
Clarence Clark, 16 years Old Son of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. N. Clark Among The Dead
Three men wee killed almost instantly and a fourth so badly injured that he died several hours later, when two boxes of dynamite caps and a box of dynamite exploded at 6:30 o’clock this morning on the Duvall ranch eight miles south of this city.
Hollis Gibbs, Bert Blough and Clarence Clark were killed almost instantly.  Manford Couch was injured so badly that he died at 1:30 o’clock this afternoon.  Samuel Gibbs was so badly injured that little hope is entertained for his recovery. Both of his legs were blown off and he was injured around the upper part of his body.  Gibbs, his son, was also injured but was taken to Kansas City today for an operation in the hopes of saving his life.
Just how the accident happened will probably never be known.  Edgar Stone, who was helping the men, had just left the group to get some more caps at the house.  When he left, Blough was standing beside a box of dynamite and two boxes of caps and was capping short fuses.  Clark was handling the caps to Blough who would crimp them on the fuse.
The men had gone to the field to clean up stumps which they had been blasting for the past few weeks and had built a fire to warm themselves and to thaw the dynamite.  When stone was about two hundred yards form the fire the explosion took place.  Stone immediately ran back to the fire and with the assistance of W. H. Hackworth, who was working in a field near by, tried in some way to revive the injured men.  When they reached the scene, the fire had been scattered by the force of the explosion and the clothes of the victims were blazing.  Blough’s body was badly mutilated and it is supposed that the dynamite cap, the explosion of which had exploded the two boxes of caps and the box of dynamite, was held by him.
Parts of his body have not been recovered and his head was badly mutilated.
Clark and Gibbs lived only a few minutes after Stone and Hackworth reached the scene of the accident. The latter sent for help immediately and doctors from this city hurried to the place of the explosion.  Blough’s watch which was found with several other pieces of his personal belongings, had stopped at exactly 6:30 o’clock., the time of the explosion.
Of the four men who were killed, only one was married Hollis Gibbs, who was about 35 years old.  Blough was divorced from his wife and leaves a small child.  Clark was about 20 years old and his parents live near Adrian.  Manford Couch, who died this afternoon was 19 years old, and was the son of K.M. Crouch, who lives southwest of Butler.  Clark had come in from Kansas City Saturday night and had started work this morning.  The other victims have worked on the ranch for sometime.
According to John Howard, foreman of the ranch, the men had been sent to clean up the stumps which had already been blasted.  Instead of doing this they built the fire and while warming themselves by it Blough was capping fuses.  Two boxes of dynamite which were only a few feet from the fire did not explode but caught fire and burned.  The ground was strewn with parts of the victims clothing and a hole two feet deep was blown in the ground.
Relatives of the dead men have been notified of the accident.  The father of Hollis Gibbs had left only Saturday night for Illinois.  Funeral arrangements have not been made yet, and will not be announced until relatives of the victims arrive.-Butler Daily Democrat
Clarence Clark, one of the victims of the terrible explosion, is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. N. Clark, who live one half mile south of Burdett, where the young man was raised.
Mr. and Mrs. Clark were immediately notified of the death of their son, which news came to them as a terrible shock.  They came to Adrian and secured the services of  undertaker Henry T. Carr, who accompanied the parents to the scene of the explosion after the body of young Clark which was brought to Adrian Tuesday morning and immediately taken to the Clark home.  Funeral services for Clarence were held at Burdett and the body laid to rest in the Burdett cemetery.
Clarence was sixteen years old last October and was an industrious young man.  The parents have the sympathy of the entire community in this great sorrow that has come to them. Their’s is a great burden and they  need the tenderest sympathy of their many friends.
As we go to press with first run, we learn that Samuel Gibbs, one of the unfortunate victims of the explosion died Tuesday.  His is the fifth death.  Only one of the group of injured survives and his condition is critical. -- The Adrian Journal, December 23, 1915, Page 1 column 5-7, Death
 

Scott, Winfield
Winfield Scott was found dead in the hog lot on his farm, known as the Berry farm northwest of Burdett, Thursday afternoon, 9th.  Death was due to heart disease.  Before the body was discovered the hogs had mutilated it badly.  Mr. Scott had been in his usual health and it is thought that he fell dead. -- The Adrian Journal, December 16, 1915, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

Chitwood, baby girl
A new daughter arrived at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Jess Chitwood last Wednesday night. -- The Adrian Journal, December 16, 1915, Page 5 column 3, Birth
 

Lawton, Sarah E.
Sarah E. Lawton Reynolds was born in Williamsburg, Ind., in 1845, and died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. J. L. Allen, near Adrian, Missouri, December 8, 1915; aged 70 years, 3 months and 2 days.
Mrs. Lawton was a good woman, she had been a member of the Christian church for many years and had lived a consecrated Christian life, and her family and friends will ever remember her beautiful life.
Mrs. Lawton was the mother of five children, four of whom survive her and three of the children attended the funeral services held for their mother. The living children are Mrs. J.L. Allen, of near Adrian; Mrs. Rose Minnis and Howard Reynolds, of Bentonville, Arkansas; Mrs. A. J. Fenwick, of Briton, Colorado.
Funeral services for Mrs. Lawton were held from the home of Mr. J.L. Allen Friday, December 10th conducted by Rev. H. A. Pfost, of Adrian.  The body was laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery.
The children have the sympathy of friends in this bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, December 16, 1915, Page 4 column 4, Death
 

Hill-Wyer
Mr. Earl Hill, of Burdett neighborhood, and Miss Ruby T. Wyer, were married at the residence of the bride’s parents on High street, Butler, Missouri, Sunday, December 5th at six o’clock, p.m., Rev. R.M. Talbert, pastor of the Butler Christian church officiating.  After the ceremony an excellent dinner was served.
The contracting parties are excellent young people.  The groom is the eldest son of Mrs. Mamie Hill and was born on the farm where they now reside.  Earl is a young man of excellent habits and an industrious and prosperous farmer.  He has the respect and esteem of all who know him. The bride is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Wyer, of Butler, and was raised in that city and is an excellent young lady.
After a honeymoon trip to Kansas City they will be at home on the farm December 12th. -- The Adrian Journal, December 9,1915, Page 1 column 3, Marriage
 

Church, George
Hon. George E. Church, living four miles northwest of Butler, died Monday morning, December 6, 1915, after a several weeks illness from heart disease.  Mr. Church would have been 58 years of age on the 30th of this month, having been born inn Covington center, New York, December 30, 1857.  He was married April 4, 1881, to Miss Elizabeth Coleman.  Three children were born to this union, two of whom survive him, Miss Cora Church and Mrs. Joseph Shyder of Joplin, Mo.
Mrs. Church died March 26, 1889 and on January 23, 1891, Mr. Church was married to Miss Mary Waddell.  Three children were born of this union, all of whom survive.  They are: Kathleen, Ruby and Walter.
Besides his wife, his parents, Mr. and Mrs.  Jesse Church, a sister, Miss Elva church, and a brother, Fred Church, survive him.
Funeral services will be held from the Butler Christian church on Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock conducted by the pastor, Rev. R. M. Talbert, and interment will be in Oak Hill cemetery.  Butler Daily Democrat -- The Adrian Journal, December 9,1915, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

Swar, John
John Swar, who lived with his parents one half mile north of Austin, took his life by hanging last Friday.  Swar was about 26 years old and single.
Friday morning about nine o’clock young Swar, who was in the home, heard someone shooting in a nearby timber, he told some member  of the family that he would go and see who it was doing the shooting.  He went but did not return, after waiting for his return the family began to search for him.  Friends kept up the search all day Friday and all of Friday night, getting no trace of the young man until Saturday morning when they found his lifeless body.
It is not known what caused the young man to take his life. -- The Adrian Journal, December 9, 1915, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

Owens-Warford
Mr. Dale Owens and Miss Irene Warford, popular young people of the Ballard neighborhood were married in Butler Monday afternoon, December 6, 1915.
The groom was raised in this vicinity and is a very worthy man.  The bride is  very popular among those who know her.
-- The Adrian Journal, December 9, 1915, Page 5 column 3, Marriage
 

Morris, Suzannah
Centralia, Nov. 28-Mrs. Suzannah Morris, a pioneer of the northwest, died on the homestead she took up in 1851, according to word received by her grandniece, Mrs. Edward Carlson of Vader.  Mrs. Morris was 98 years of age and was the first white woman born in Bates county, Mo.  She is survived by seven children, 34 grandchildren and 27 great grandchildren. Tacoma, Wash., Ledger -- The Adrian Journal, December 9,1915, Page 4 column 6, Death
 

Lee-Moyer
Mr. John Lee and Miss Alice Moyer, of Rich Hill, were married at the home of Elder Irvin V. Enos, Sunday evening, November 21, 1915; Mr. Enos officiating.
The contracting parties will reside in Pleasant Gap township where they have a host of friends who join in wishing them success. -- The Adrian Journal, December 2, 1915, Page 1 column 1, Marriage
 

Freeman-Blount
James L. Freeman and Miss Naomi E. Blount were married Wednesday afternoon, November 17, the ceremony being performed at the M. E. church South parsonage, by Rev. Robin Gould.  The following day they returned to San Simon, both having land interests in the valley, and will make their home on the groom’s homestead.
The bride is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E.M. Blount and has resided in the valley for about two years, being an unusually charming, cultured young lady; and there is not a more worthy young man in the valley than the groom, who is very popular.
The happy couple have the laugh on their friends. They boarded the train at Vanar Wednesday, and thus passed through San Simon on their way to Bowie to have the not tied.  They stepped off the train here the next day as Mr. and Mrs. Freeman and thus broke the news to their astonished friends.
Before starting for the ranch south of town that is to be their home, the happy couple, with the brides brother, Arthur Blount, were dinner guests at the C. J. Williams home.  Artesian Belt
The bride was born and raised near Adrian and graduated from the Adrian High School about 4 years ago.  She is an excellent lady and her many friends here will join in congratulations. -- The Adrian Journal, December 2,1915, Page 1 column 3, Marriage
 

Nowlin/Eads, George
A frightful tragedy occurred at Archie Monday morning, which resulted in the death of George Nowlin or Geo. Eads.
George and Clarence Nowlin started from their home, west of Lone Tree, Monday to deliver eight mules to Charles Argenbright at Adrian.  Each of the young men was riding a mule and leading three others tied together. George Nowlin tied the lead rope around his body and as they came into Archie the mules he was leading became frightened and pulled him off the mule he was riding.  This added to their fright and they ran at full speed dragging the body of the young man to the John McCraw place about a miles and a half north of Archie.  They body of the young man was frightfully mangles, nearly every bone being broken and his head was bruised and pounded to a pulp.
The young man was about 22 years old and was left an orphan at six years of age.  Mr. J. H. Nowlin a prominent farmer living near Lone Tree, took the boy to raise and he took the name of Nowlin.  Clarence , the other young man with the mules is 18 years old and a son of Mr. Nowlin.  The unfortunate affair cast a gloom over the entire community. -- The Adrian Journal, December 2, 1915, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

Allen, George
Mr. Geo. W. Allen died at his home near Elkhart Saturday morning, November 27, 1915; aged 59 years.
Mr. Allen had lived in that neighborhood many years and was a good citizen.  He was never married.
Funeral services for Mr. Allen were held Sunday from the Mt. Vernon church and the body laid to rest in the cemetery at that place. -- The Adrian Journal, December 2, 1915, Page 1 column 4, Death
 

Greenwood, baby boy
Dr. Tuttle reports the birth of a boy baby to Mrs. R. A. Greenwood Friday, November 26th. -- The Adrian Journal, December 2,1915, Page 8 column 2, Birth
 

Stultz, baby girl
Mr. and Mrs. Earl Stultz are the proud parents of a fine baby girl. -- The Adrian Journal, November 25, 1915, Page 5 column 5, Birth
 

Miller, Dr. Sherman
Dr. Sherman Miller, a prominent physician, of Mayesburg, was drowned in a ditch three miles west of Clinton, Thursday afternoon, when the automobile in which he and Harry Hibbs, also of Mayesburg, were riding.
Dr. Miller and Mr. Hibbs were returning home from Clinton in a new Maxwell car, Mr. Hibbs doing the driving, they were running on a grade that approaches the river, the car going about 8 miles an hour.  Mr. Hibbs was attempting to light a cigar while the doctor was attempting to steer the car, the car struck a rut in the road and seemed to almost jump into the ditch at the side of the grade.  The car turned completely over into about 3 feet of water and mud, both were pinned beneath the car, Mr. Hibbs in such a way that his head was free from the water.  A man and woman who happened to be passing inn a buggy succeeded in dragging Mr. Hibbs from beneath the car, after this they raised the car and found that Dr. Miller had drowned instantly. The body of Dr. Miller and the injured man were taken back to Clinton .  Mr. Hibbs injuries were such that he was unable to attend the funeral of his companion which was held Saturday.
Dr. Miller enjoyed a large practice in Bates, Henry and Cass counties.  He was loved by all who knew him.  He was well versed in the medical science and honored by his fellow physicians.
Dr. Miller was born in Henry county 49 years ago, and was raised in the vicinity where he died, he attended medical college in St. Louis and graduated in the profession 24 years ago, since that time he has been practicing the Profession at Mayesburg.  Besides the large host of friends he leaves a wife, daughter and four sons to mourn his departure.
Funeral services for Dr. Miller was held at the Mayesburg Baptist church, Sunday afternoon, November 13, conducted by Rev. J. Smith of Dayton.  He had been a member of the Baptist church for many years. The burial was at Cove Creek cemetery under the auspices of the Masonic Order of which he was a member.
The Journal is under obligations to Mr. R. D. Reeder for the account of this sad accident, secured by him while in Mayesburg attending the funeral.  Mr. Reeder and Dr. Miller had been ardent friends for many years. -- The Adrian Journal, November 18,1915, Page 1 column 5, Death
 

Ewing, William Burkett
The funeral services held at the Baptist church Friday afternoon for the late William Burkett Ewing was well attended, in fact more people were there than could find seats.  Mr. Ewing had lived in this community for nearly half a century and had always shown a neighborly spirit and a willingness to respond to the need of his neighbor.  While he was a man who attended strictly to his own affairs yet ye was ready to be used for the comfort and accommodation of others.  Such men are appreciated while they lived and missed after death.
Rev. Wood preached an excellent funeral and the choir sang several excellent selections.  At the grave the Masonic burial service was given by Mr. Fred Hanley in a very impressive manner. L Mr. Hanley had the service committed and it is much more effective when spoken than it is when read.  Rev. Wood acted as Chaplain at the grave.  The whole service was very impressive and a fitted tribute to the memory of the departed. -- The Adrian Journal, November 11,1915, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

Harper, Thomas
Thos. L. Harper, ex-county clerk of Bates county was stricken with paralysis at his home in Butler, this morning.  He was seated at the breakfast at the time apparently in his usual good health. He died three hours later.
Mr. Harper was about 65 years old and is well known in Bates county. -- The Adrian Journal, November 11, 1915, Page 4 column 4, Death
 

Graves, A.L.
A. L. Graves, of Garden City, was killed at Garden City last Friday.  Mr. Graves was getting into his buggy when the hose became frightened and he was thrown against the concrete walk and his neck broken.  Attorney Graves is well known in Bates county.  Judge Graves, of the Missouri Supreme  Court is his brother. -- The Adrian Journal, November 4, 1915, Page 1 column 1, Death
 

Nighswonger, Roscoe
Last Sunday morning Roscoe Nighswonger, living twelve miles east of Adrian, shot and killed himself   in his home.  He had been busy with the chores and came to the house about nine o’clock apparently in good spirits he immediately went to his room upstairs.  Soon his mother and sister heard a shot, the sister immediately went to her brother’s room and found his lifeless body lying on the floor with a fatal bullet wound in his right temple.
Mr. Nighswonger was thirty years old and unmarried.  He lived with his mother and sister, Mrs. Grace Cunningham.  There was no known reason why he should take his life and the shooting is thought to have been purely accidental.
The body of Mr. Nighswonger was buried in Oak Hill cemetery at Butler. -- The Adrian Journal, November 4, 1915, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

Gibson, Artie John
Artie John Gibson, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Gibson, was born near Altona, Bates county, Mo., January 22, 1899, and departed this life October 29,1915; aged 16 years, 8 months and 28 days.
He died at the Red Cross hospital in Kansas City, where he had been taken two weeks ago to undergo an operation for appendicitis. All that medical skill and loving hearts could do to alleviate his suffering was done, but to no avail.
Just before he passed away he prayed a beautiful prayer and sang, “When The Roll Is Called Up Yonder” and “Nearer My God To Thee”.
He leaves to mourn his death a father, mother, five brothers and a large circle of relatives and friends. -- The Adrian Journal, November 4, 1915, Page 1 column 7, Death
 

Van BenThusen, Capt. James
Capt. James Van BenThusen, aged 83, died at his home in Rich Hill Wednesday of last week.  Capt. Van BenThusen was a pioneer of Bates county and was very well known in Adrian as he made frequent visits here to visit his son, Grant, who lives five miles west of town. -- The Adrian Journal, November 4,1915, Page 8 column 3, Death
 

Ewing, William Burkett
William Burkett Ewing died at his home in this city Wednesday evening, November 3, 1915, after a lingering illness of tuberculosis, aged 67  years, 1 months and 5 days.
Wm. Burkett Ewing was born in Logan county, Kentucky September 28, 1948, come to Bates county, Missouri in 1868,locating in this community, where he resided almost continuously until the time of his death.  In 1872 Mr. Ewing was united in marriage with Miss Elma Moudy, to this union four children were born, one died in infancy, a daughter, Myrtle died a few years ago.  Two sons, Ed of Yreka, California and Floyd, of Shawnee township, with the wife and mother survive to mourn the loss of a dear one.  Mr. Ewing was converted when a young man and had been a member of the Baptist church for nearly forty years and his life was consistent with his faith. Bert Ewing was a good citizen, always a kind and accommodating neighbor and friend.  He enjoyed the respect and esteem of those who knew him best.  He was a kind and indulgent husband and father.  Mr. Ewing had been in failing health for several years and knew that the end was near but was courageous to the last and p-assed away peacefully.
Mr. Ewing the Masonic Order in 1872 and had for forty three years been a faithful member of Crescent Hill Masonic Lodge No. 368 and exemplified the tenets of the Order in his daily life.
Funeral services for Mr. Ewing will be held from the Adrian Baptist church, Friday, November 5,1915, at 1 o’clock p.m., Rev. R.L. Wood will conduct the service assisted by Rev. McAtee.  The Masonic burial service will be given at the grave. The widow and sons have the sympathy of a wide circle of friends in this bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, November 4,1915, Page 5 column 3, Death
 

Miller, David P.
David P. Miller, who has been in poor health for some time committed suicide in this city Monday afternoon by a shot with a twenty two rifle.  He placed the weapon at his right temple and the discharge went directly to the brain.  Dr. Tuttle was immediately called who later called Dr. F. S. Bates, they made every effort to sustain life but with no results.  Mr. Miller died about two hours after.  At the time of the shooting his wife and children were in the yard where she was raking leaves and he was alone in the house.  At hearing the shot she rushed in and found him almost lifeless body lying on the floor.  Mrs. Miller informed a Journal representative that for the past six weeks that Mr. Miller and been making threats to kill himself on account of bad health but she had not taken his threats seriously.
Miller moved with his family here from Belton about three weeks ago and not much was known of him of late but several years ago he lived on a small farm about six miles west of Adrian.  It was found out Monday afternoon after the tragedy had happened that the family was in destitute circumstances with nothing in the house to eat, with four small children in the home. The word was started and in a very short time enough money was collected to buy sufficient food for the widow and children and what clothing was needed. Besides this there was an abundant supply of edibles brought in by the neighbors.
David P. Miller was born in Pennsylvania in 1869 and moved with his parents to this state when a small child, his mother died about a year ago in this community and is buried in Crescent Hill cemetery, his father lives in Butler with a daughter, there are several other brothers and sisters who will mourn his loss.  The widow and children have the sympathy of the entire community and their wants will be well provided for.
Funeral services were held at the home Tuesday afternoon and the body buried by the side of his mother in Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, October 28,1915, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

Clark, baby girl
Mr. and Mrs. Claude Clark are the proud parents of a baby girl.  Mrs. Clark and baby are not getting along as well as friends would like to see. -- The Adrian   Journal, October 28,1915, Page 5 column 4, Birth
 

Keirsey-Owens
Mr. Fred Keirsey and Miss Ellen Grace Owens, were married at the home of the bride’s mother, Mrs. Emma Owens, Sunday, October 24, 1915, at Spruce, Missouri.
These popular young people are numbered among the best in community. -- The Adrian Journal, October 28, 1915, Page 5 column 5, Marriage
 

Baie, Ida
Mrs. Wm. Baie died at her home one half mile west of Adrian, Saturday evening, October 23, 1915; aged 48 years, 6 mo. and 21 days.
Ida George was born in DeKalb county, Illinois, April 2, 1867.  In 1897 she was married to Wm. Baie, to this union three children were born, one dying in infancy, two daughters, 12 and 9 years old are left with the husband.  At the time of her marriage to Mr. Baie she moved to Missouri where they resided until three years ago at which time they moved to Illinois in hopes of benefiting her health, the change not seeming to be of any great benefit they returned to Bates county last spring.  Mrs. Baie has been in failing health for six years and a few weeks ago submitted to an operation after which she gained in health for a short time. She was taken to her bed about two months ago and was in a very critical condition until death. Besides the husband and two daughters there is her father, a brother and four sisters who will mourn her departure.
Mrs. Baie was converted in her early childhood and untied with the Evangelical church, since that time she has been a faithful servant to the Great Creator, and a lady of true Christian character.  She enjoyed a large circle of friends in this community and was always willing to help them when called upon.
Funeral services were held at the Adrian Methodist church, Tuesday afternoon, October 26, conducted by Dr. W.S. Courtney. The body was laid to rest in Crescent Hill cemetery.  A large crowd was present to pay that final tribute of respect.
The out of town relatives present were: her father and brother, Wm. George, Sr. and Jr., and Mrs. Louise Sampson, of Somlonauk, Ill.; Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Troeger, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Rimsnider, Mrs. Henry Morsch, Mrs. Clarence Troeger, Mrs. C. Rimsnider, of Hinckley, Ill; Mr. and  Mrs. Carl Baie, of Waterman, Ill; Mr. and Mrs. Matt black, of Kansas City, Mo. -- The Adrian Journal, October 28, 1915, Page 4 column 4, Death
 

Burris, Iva Fenton
Mrs. Iva Fenton Burris was born in the vicinity of Burdett, August 17,1889. At the age of 21 years she was united in marriage to Charles Burris.  She was converted to her girlhood and united with the Presbyterian church, Sharon; in which faith she did live until the Lord  called her home, October 9, 1915.
She was survived by her husband, two sisters, one brother other relatives and a host of friends.   Her remains were laid to rest in the Burdett cemetery, Rev. Showalter officiating. -- The Adrian Journal, September 21, 1915, Page 5 column 7, Death
 

Kornhaus-Addleman
Moles-Addleman
A  social event of more than usual importance was the double wedding at the home of Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Addleman Wednesday evening, October 6,1915, when their daughters Edith and Lois were married.  Edith to Christian Kornhaus of Adrian and Lois to Mr. Otha Moles of Shawnee township.  Elder W. S. Hood said the single ceremony that united the destinies of these two young couples and it was a beautiful marriage service.  The brides are sisters and are numbered among the best young women in this community.  Mr. Kornhaus is a carpenter and contractor and is well up in his business.  He is a young man of excellent habits.  Mr. Moles is a young farmer of Shawnee township and is an industrious and honorable young gentleman.
The happy couples are well and favorably known in this community and they start out on life’s journey with the benediction of a host of admiring friends for their continued happiness and success.
After the wedding ceremony the usual congratulations an excellent wedding dinner was served by Mrs. Addleman mother of the brides. This was heartily relished by the guests. -- The Adrian Journal, October 14,1915, Page 1 column 3, Marriage
 

Finley-Johnson
Miss Sarah Lena Johnson, daughter of Mrs. Mary E. Johnson of 321 Lockwood Place, and Mrs. Leonard R. Finley, of Adrian, Mo., were married Wednesday evening at the home of the bride in the presence of a small company of relatives and friends. Dr. Joseph R. Harker, president of Illinois Woman’s college where for four years Miss Johnson was a student, said the words which made the young couple one.
Mr. and Mrs. Finley will go to Macomb for a visit for several days with the family of Archie Finley a brother of the groom. The will spend sometime at the home of J.  O. Johnson, of Literberry, brother of Mrs. Finley and then they will go to Adrian to make their home……As a resident of Arcadia and then of Jacksonville and during the student days at the Woman’s college, the bride has built up a wide circle of acquaintance and formed many friends, all of whom will join in good wishes for a wedded live, long and happy.  She is a young woman of talent and charm, known and respected for her industry and cheerfulness of demeanor.
The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. Finley and was born and reared at Adrian, Mo.  After graduation from the Adrian High School he took a two year course in the college of Agriculture at the University of Missouri.  A young man of thrift and integrity, he gives promise of signal success in his chosen profession, farming.  Jacksonville Daily Journal -- The Adrian Journal, October 14, 1915, Page 1 column 5, Marriage
 

Mawson-Christensen
The Journal reporter did not learn last week of the marriage of Mr. Lon Mawson and Miss Mary Christensen.  They put one over on their friends by going to Kansas City and getting married. -- The Adrian Journal, October 14, 1915, Page 5 column 3, Marriage
 

Hall, Dr. and Mrs. W. P.
50th Anniversary
Tuesday was the fiftieth anniversary of the marriage of Dr. and Mrs. W. P. Hall, which event was celebrated quietly at their home in this city.  No demonstration was made in honor of the event but their friends are congratulating them on being permitted to celebrate a half century of wedded life with bright prospects of many more years of happiness. -- The Adrian Journal, October 14, 1915, Page 5 column 3, Anniversary
 

Cox, Nancy Jane
Nancy Jane Reeder was born in Bates county, Missouri, December 28,1844.  She was one of a family of eleven children. There were seven brothers as follows: J. P., H J. N., R. D. and Oscar Reeder, of Adrian, Mo.; Thomas and Oates Reeder, of Phoenix Arizona, all living, and Frank Reeder who died last March.  There are two sisters, Mrs. Edna Owen, Butler, Mo., and Mrs. Rose Jenkins, of Mound township, and a foster sister, Mrs. Polly White, of Montana.
She was married to John W. Cox May 14, 1874.  To this union were born four children, two died in infancy and two now living, Mrs. Mertie B. Moudy, Adrian, Mo., and Mrs. Tessie L. Haggard, Butler, Mo.  There is one grandchild, John Milton Haggard, four step children, Mrs. P. F. Thompson, Chicago; Mrs. J. M. Lothridge, Kansas City; J. M. Cox, Nowata, Oklahoma, and Wm. Cox, of Paola, Kansas.  The husband passed on before her in the year 1888.
Mrs. Cox united with the Christian church about 1860, or 55 years ago.  She was a charter member of the Adrian Christian church and was an honored member of that congregation until death.  On Friday evening October 8, 1915, at 8:30 o’clock at the home of Mrs. Haggard in Butler, surrounded by her daughters and other loved ones she passed peacefully and safely into the other and better life, being aged 70 years, 9 months and 10 days.
During the last few years of her life Sister Cox was an invalid and at times a great sufferer but amid all her trials she never lost her love for her friends, her interest in her church or her faith in her Heavenly Father. Whole she was unable to care for herself as in former years she was ministered to by her loving daughters who gave much love and  life to give comfort and pleasure to that one who had so well cared for them in infancy and childhood.  To these good women will come many heartaches as in their daily lives they miss the best of earthly friends whom they had learned to love not only because of her service to them but also through sacrifices made for her in the days of her feebleness.
Burial was made in the Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, October 14, 1915, Page 5 column 4, Death
 

Enos-Telford
Walter Enos, of Mound township and Miss Clara Telford, of Sedalia, Mo., were married at the home of the bride’s parents in Sedalia, Wednesday, September 29th.
The groom is a son of A. Enos and has been raised in this community.  He is one of our bet farmers and a worthy gentleman.  The bride is a daughter of E. A. Telford, who formerly was in the produce business in Adrian. She is a very worthy young lady. They will reside with thee groom’s parents. -- The Adrian Journal, October 7,1915, Page 1 column 4, Marriage
 

Goodbar, baby boy
Mr. and Mrs. Ed Goodbar are the proud parents of a baby boy lately. -- The Adrian Journal, October 7, 1915, Page 5 column 5, Birth
 

Parrish, John N.
Butler Daily Democrat
John N. Parrish, 66 years old, after seriously wounding his 18 year old daughter, Mary, and firing four shots at his wife, none of which took effect, committed suicide by shooting himself at his home in Amsterdam, Missouri, Sunday afternoon.  No cause can be determined for the attack on his wife and daughter, other than a sudden fit of insanity of which Parrish was sometimes subject.
Sheriff Harve Johnson was notified of the shooting Sunday afternoon and left for Amsterdam in company with Ed Crabtree and Marshal Braden. When they arrived, they found nearly half the population of the little town gathered around the Parrish home.  No investigation of the shooting had been made, however, after surrounding the house to prevent the escape of Parrish, Sheriff Johnson with his two deputies entered.
They found the body of Parrish lying on a bed in one of the rooms.  He had evidently made careful preparations for suicide. He had thrown an overcoat over the bed and had lain down on this with the muzzle of the shotgun beneath his chin.  When found, Parrish’s hand still grasped the ramrod which he had used to press the trigger of the gun he had used in ending his life.  The whole top of his head was blown off and blood was spattered all over the room.  One  piece of his skull, about two inches in diameter, was blown clear across the room.  His skull was split from his chin to the top of his head and his death was instantaneous.
The daughter, Mary was shot with a revolver, the bullet passing through both cheeks.  Her injuries are not serious, according to the attending physician.  Mrs. Parrish was shot at four times by her husband, but all the shots went wild.  She and her daughter ran from the house but Parrish did not follow them.
Several neighbors who had gathered about the house after hearing the first shots made no effort to enter, because of the fact that Parrish was known to be well armed and could have held off a large crowd.  Two revolvers, a shotgun and a quantity of ammunition were found in the house by the officers.
Two shots were heard by the people surrounding the house, and it is presumed that Parrish fired both barrels of the shotgun into his head.
Parrish had often threatened to kill the whole family, but these threats became so common that no attention was paid to them by his wife and daughter. That he had been planning the crime for sometime is the belief of Bertha Parrish, another daughter living in Kansas city.  She said that her father told her when she visited her parents sometime ago that it would be the last time she would see them alive.  She thought nothing of this threat until she received a telegram early Sunday morning from her father, telling her to come home at once. She notified her brother, George, also of Kansas City, and the two arrived just a few minutes after the shooting.
It is said that Parrish would have spells of insanity lasting for as long as two weeks.  During this time he would threaten to kill his wife and daughter, but they paid little heed to what he said.
Parrish and his family had lived in the Amsterdam since February of this year.  They moved there from Richmond, Missouri.  At Amsterdam he worked in the electric light plant.  He carried a $3000 life insurance policy in a fraternal order.
No investigation will be made by officers. -- The Adrian Journal, October 7, 1915, Page 1 column 5, Death
 

Richardson, baby girl
A daughter was born to Mr. and Mrs. Jas. Richardson the 25th.  Mother and baby doing well. -- The Adrian Journal, September 30, 1915, Page 8 column 3, Birth
 

Garrison-Fortner
Mr. George L. Garrison and Miss Nona E. Fortner, prominent young people of Mound township, were married in Butler Tuesday afternoon, September 28th, at the residence of Rev. R. M. Talbert, pastor of the Butler Christian church.  Harry Reeder and Miss Elsie McReynolds stood up with them.
The groom is the only child of Mr. and Mrs. V. L. Garrison and was born in Mound township.  He is an industrious young man of good morals. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and rms. Wm Fortner, who reside in Mound township, and is a worthy and popular young lady.  They will reside on the Harper farm. -- The Adrian Journal, September 30, 1915, Page 5 column 1, Marriage
 

Baum, Mrs.
Mrs. M. Baum died suddenly at her home in this city at three o’clock Wednesday morning September 29th of  heart failure.  Mrs. Baum had been subject to severe heart attacks for some time.  Wednesday morning she suffered a severe attack and her daughter, Mrs. Olive, called Dr. S. L. Bates, but Mrs. Baum expired before treatment could be administered.
The Baum’s have lived in and near Adrian for many years, Mr. Baum died over a year ago.  The came here from Ohio.  Mrs. B. is survived by three children, viz: Mrs. J.C. Clark, of St. Joe, Mo.; Joseph Baum, of Nebraska and Miss Olive, who lived with her mother.
Funeral services for Mrs. Baum will be held Friday morning, burial will b in Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, September 30, 1915, Page 5 column 3, Death
 

Timmons, Ira
Ira E. Timmons was born in Shawnee township, August 3, 1888, and died September 29,1915; aged 27 years, 1 months and 27 days.
Ira was an only child, his mother died when he was a small child.  The father married Miss Georgie Tuttle, who proved to be a true mother to the boy, she passed away three months ago.  Funeral services for Mr. Timmons were held this morning from the Adrian United Brethren church, conducted by Rev. Penn, burial was made in the Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, September 30,1915, Page 5 column 5, Death
 

Cowgill, baby girl
A baby girl was born to Mr. and Mrs. Wallace Cowgill, of the Ballard neighborhood, last week. -- The Adrian Journal, September 30, 1915, Page 4 column 2, Birth
 

Adams, Judge and Mrs. Wilson
60th Anniversary
Judge and Mrs. Wilson Adams celebrated the sixtieth anniversary of their marriage at the home of Mr. and Mrs. George Saum, Monday, September 27, 1915.  Ordinarily the announcement of a wedding anniversary cause little comment, but when it is announced that a couple has lived together in the bonds of happy wedlock for sixty years, one’s attention is immediately attracted to the unusual event and he begins to feel an active  interest in the parties to the contract.  Only a few couple live to achieve this distinction and when they do they immediately become the objects of admiration and we might say a form of veneration.
Having traveled together for three score years they are lingering in the evening twilight of ripe old age, enjoying the companionship of their friends, not tired of living, but glad to be alive and able to drink in the invigorating beauties of life.  The Journal extends congratulations to the worthy couple and wishes them continued health and happiness. -- The Adrian Journal, September 30,1915, Page 4 column 5, Anniversary
 

Clark, Clarence
Charles Clarence, son of Mr. and Mrs. C. N. Clark, was born near Burdett, Missouri, October 10, 1899, was killed Monday, December 20,1915, at 6:30 o’clock a.m., as a result of the explosion of a quantity of dynamite on the Duvall ranch; aged sixteen years, two months and ten days.  During revival held at Valley Chapel Christian church by Rev. Pearce, in 1911, he confessed and was baptized by the church pastor, Rev. Shelton, of Butler,, but did not unite with an church organization.  Clarence was a good young man and was held in high esteem by a wide circle of friends.  He was ambitious to do things in the world and was away from home to make his own way in the world.  His untimely death came as a shock to his wide circle of friends.
Besides his parents he is survived by four brothers and four sisters, Viz; Stanford B. Clark, of Tarkio, Mo.; Roy G. Clark, of Adrian, Mo.; Guy M. Warren, of Adrian Mo,; William H. Warren, of Adrian, Mo.; Mrs. T. A. Collins, of Kansas City, Mo.; Mrs. W. D. Nelson of Hickman Mills,, Mo.; Mrs. Walter F. Boose, of McCune, Kansas; Mrs. Elisha E. Kelley, of Westover, Texas.
Funeral services for Clarence were held from the Burdett Baptist church Wednesday, Dec. 22, conducted by Rev. McAtee, pastor of the Adrian Baptist church. -- The Adrian Journal, December 30, 1915, Page 1 column 6, Death
 

Black-Trowbridge
Mr. Orville Black and Miss Catherine Trowbridge drove to the residence of Rev. R. L. Wood of this city Wednesday afternoon and were united in marriage, Rev. Wood officiating.
The contracting parties are numbered among the best young people in East Boon township, where they were born and raised. The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. George Black and is a young man of excellent habits industrious and progressive.  The bride is the daughter of Mrs. And Mrs. M. E. Trowbridge and is a cultured young lady, popular with all who know her. -- The Adrian Journal, December 30,1915, Page 5 column 6, Marriage
 

Newlon-Owen
Dr. John S. Newlon and Miss Jennie M. Owen, only daughter of Judge and Mrs. A. B. Owen, were married at the home of the bride’s parents in Butler, Wednesday evening, September 15th. The contracting parties are well and favorably known in Adrian and their many friends here join in extending congratulations and best wishes. -- The Adrian Journal, September 23, 1915, Page 1 column 2, Marriage
 

Enos-Wainscott
Miss Frances, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. Enos, of Mound township, and Mr. R. L. Wainscott, of Culver, were married in Butler Tuesday, September 21, 1915, Judge D. R. Ray officiating.
The bride was born in Adrian and has spent her entire life in and near her native city.  She is an excellent young lady and popular among the young people. The groom is a well to do young man of good morals and worthy the confidence of the lady he has won.
The happy couple will reside on a farm near Culver, where they will be followed by the good wishes of a host of admiring  friends. -- The Adrian Journal, September 23, 1915, Page 1 column 3, Marriage
 

Page, baby girl
A girl baby was born into the home of Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Page Wednesday morning, Mother and child are doing well.
-- The Adrian Journal, September 23, 1915, Page 4 column 2, Birth
 

Tabor-Henry
Richard C. Tabor, of Crescent Hill and Mrs. Caroline Henry, of Oklahoma, were married in Butler Monday and are at home in the grooms residence.
Mr. Tabor has been a resident of Bates county many years and for several years past has been sexton of the Crescent Hill cemetery.  The bride’s maiden name was Jackson and she is a native of Bates county. -- The Adrian Journal, September 16, 1915, Page 1 column 2, Marriage
 

Abbott, Anna M.
Anna M. Abbott was born August 11, 1840, in Cuyahoga county, N. Y., and died September 6, 1915; aged 75 years and 25 days.
She went with her parents to Wisconsin in 1843 and there spent her maidenhood days.  In 1867 she was married to Ephraim Abbott and to this union a son was born, who died at the age of 15.
Anna M. Abbott was the fifth child in a family of seven and there remains but one, Darius Teeter, of Spruce township.  Seventeen years ago she moved from Wisconsin to Bates county, where she resided at the time of her death.
Thus another pioneer has gone to join the ranks of the majority, one who knew what it was to endure to toils and privations of frontier life.  Mrs. Abbott was a kind and tender hearted woman, a dutiful sister and very thoughtful of her neighbors.  In her death the community loses a beautiful character.  She passed away at the home of her brother, Darius Teeter in Spruce township where she had been for the past 17 years.  She had been suffering with dropsy the past year and all medical aid seemed to be of no avail.  Interment was made in the Cloud cemetery near Altona. -- The Adrian Journal, September 16, 1915, Page 1 column 7, Death
 

Blocher-Bridges
Mr. Lester T. Bridges, of Ridgeway, Missouri, and Miss Mamie Blocher, of this city, were married at the home of the bride’s parents Sunday evening, September 5, 1915 at 7:30 o’clock, Dr. W. S. Courtney pastor of the Adrian Methodist church officiating.  Only the immediate family of the bride and a few intimate friends were present.

The bride is a native of this vicinity and is a very popular young lady in both church and social circles.  She graduated from the Adrian high School with the class of 1908, and is a singer of rare ability.  For the past year she has held the position of cashier and bookkeeper for the Haas Mercantile company. Mrs. Bridges is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Blocher.  The groom is a stranger here but is said to be a worthy young gentleman.
The happy couple left on the 9:20 train Sunday night and after a two weeks stay in Colorado they will be at home in Ridgeway, Missouri. -- The Adrian Journal, September 9,1915, Page 1 column 3, Marriage
 

Bradley, Virgil
Virgil, son of Mr. and Mrs. Daly Bradley, died at the home of the parents, Monday night, aged 10 years 7 months and 8 days.
Virgil took sick about ten days before is death and his condition was serious from the first.  A specialist was called from Kansas City but the physicians were unable to check the ravages of the disease.
Virgil was an only son and a bright and manly boy.  He had been a neighbor to the writer for six years and was always courteous to all he met. We shall all miss his frequent visits to our home.
Burial was made in Crescent Hill cemetery Monday evening.  On account of the nature of the disease, diphtheria, no funeral services were held. -- The Adrian Journal, September 9,1915, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

Barnett-Crisswell
Robert B. Criswell and Miss Fannie Barnett, both of Adrian, were united in marriage on Wednesday morning, September 1, 1915 by  Judge Carl J. Henry at his office in the court house. -- The Adrian Journal, September 9,1915, Page 1 column 4, Marriage
 

Buckles-Wheeler
Prof. R. G. Buckles and bride came in from Osceola last week to attend the fair and visit relatives.  The were recently married in Osceola, the bride’s name was Wheeler, Prof. Buckles is an Adrian boy who is making good. -- The Adrian Journal, September 9, 1915, Page 5 column 6, Marriage
 

Poindexter-Tabor
William N. Poindexter, of Mound township, and Maggie Tabor, of Butler, were married last Thursday.
Mr.  Poindexter is a prominent farmer of mound township and a good citizen. The bride is a worthy lady. -- The Adrian Journal, September 2,1915, Page 1 column 5, Marriage
 

Cruse, Mary
Mrs. Mary Cruse died at the home of her son Norman in Grand river township, Monday evening, August 23, 1915, after a lingering illness; aged 74 years.
Grandma Cruse had lived in this county many years and was a lovable lady and a good neighbor. Grandma has been in very feeble health for many months.
Funeral services for Mrs. Cruse were held Tuesday at 3 o’clock and the body was laid to rest in the Altona cemetery.
-- The Adrian Journal, August 26, 1915, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

Tuttle-Stilwell
Monday morning, when the report became generally circulated that two of Plattsburg’s young people had made the trip to St. Joseph together, the friends of the parties mentioned soon realized that their judgment was not far wrong in predicting a marriage.
Mr. Homer Tuttle and Miss Ella Delora Stilwell were united in marriage at 3:30 that afternoon at the Hundley Methodist church in St. Joseph, Rev. I. T. Nash, officiating. A relative of the groom was the only companion of the couple.
The bride is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Stilwell, of Adrian, Mo., the father being a retired business man.  The young lady formerly attended school in Plattsburg and for several weeks just past has been visiting her sister, Mrs. R. E. Pulliam, and the family. She is very popular among a large circle of friends at her home town and also with the Plattsburg young people.
Mr. Tuttle is a son of Mr. and Mrs. E. R. Tuttle, also of Adrian and though he has been here only a year, he has made a host of friends among the young folks  He is advertising man for the Pulliam Stores and very capable in that line of work.  He is also a first class salesman and well liked by the stores’ patrons.-Plattsburg Leader -- The Adrian Journal, August 26,1915, Page 1 column 5, Marriage
 

Scheurich, John
John Scheurich was born in Germany, January 20, 1840 and died at Leavenworth, Kansas, August 10, 1915.  He came with his parents to the United States when two years old and settled in Indiana, where he lived until he was 21 years old when he enlisted in the Federal army and served three years. At the close of the war he came to Missouri. He had lived in Bates county many years.  He was united in marriage with Miss Sarah Drysdale in 1883. To this union four children were born, three of whom survive, viz: William and Elmer, of Golden City and Mrs. L. C. Whitney, of Nodaway, Iowa.  His wife preceded him in death three years ago.
Mr. Scheurick was a good citizen in every sense of the term.  His neighbors all speak in the highest terms of him as a man of real merit.
Funeral services for Mr. Scheurich were held from the home of Mr. and Mrs. B. F. Bolling and were conducted by Elder Aaron Showalter. Burial was made in the family lot in Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, August 26,1915, Page 1 column 6, Death
 

Walker, Ellen
Mrs. Ellen Walker died at her home in Ballard, Thursday evening, August 5, 1915; aged about 50 years.
The Walker family came here recently from Iowa or Illinois, husband and son are left to mourn the loss of a wife and mother.
Funeral services were held Saturday morning from the Walnut Grove church and the body was buried in the cemetery at that place. -- The Adrian Journal, August 12, 1915, Page 1 column 7, Death
 

Wright-Carpenter
Walter Wright and Miss Carpenter, of near Austin were quietly married last Thursday. They returned to their home here Monday. -- The Adrian Journal, August 12, 1915, Page 5 column 4, Marriage
 

Reynolds, Thomas
Thomas P. Reynolds, about 20 years old, died at his home near Everett Wednesday, August 11, after a brief illness from locked bowels.
Funeral services were held Friday afternoon from the Everett Christian church, and were conducted by Elder w. S. Hood, of Adrian.  Burial was made in Everett cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, August 19,1915, Page 1 column 1, Death
 

Unknown Baby
Babe found this morning at school building.  Frank Gilpen found body of fully developed baby girl in school house toilet this morning. Prosecuting attorney notified.
While engaged in cleaning out the toilets at the school house this morning Frank Gilpin and Lenard Satterlee found the body of a girl baby.  The body was in such a state of decomposition that the limbs were easily separated from the body. This indicates that it was deposited there sometime ago.
The officers have started a strict investigation and no pains will be spared to apprehend the guilty party or parties. -- The Adrian Journal, August 5,1915, Page 7 column 4, Death
 

Willie, Pearl
Mrs. Pearl Willie died at her home in Macomb, Ill., Friday, July 30, 1915; aged 24 years, 1 months and 1 day of tuberculosis.  She has been a sufferer of this disease for some time but bore it with much  patience. Besides a husband, she leaves one son, a father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Cline, and three sisters and two brothers as follows.  Ira and Walter Cline and Stella McGaughey, all of Macomb, Ill., Mrs.  Alta Gutshall, of Bynum, Montana and Mrs. Della Gutshall, of Adrian, Mo.  What a sad realization to her many friends in this event.  And to her loved ones the poignancy of grief is absolutely inexpressible for not withstanding she has been a constant sufferer for several months, yet but few of her many friends realized that the hour of dissolution was so rapidly approaching when our darling must yield up the scepter of all earthly prestige, close her eyes upon the inspiring scenes of life and bid a last farewell to friends and loved ones.
Her mother watched over her during her long illness with the tenderest care, bestowing every attention and ministering to her every want with deft hands and loving heart.
The mourning family have our sympathy, our tears and our prayers.  Clouds of sorrow and sadness encompass us whom she leaves behind but we have the glorious assurance that our irreparable loss is her infinite gain, for she is done with life’s stern battle, no more sorrow, nor more suffering, no tears, no clouds of sorrow but all is joy and sunshine with her now. This is sad but we have the inspiring assurance that she has only preceded us to the realms of eternal glory, and ere long we shall meet her in paradise of God to sing the sons of sweet deliverance for ever. -- The Adrian Journal, August 5, 1915, Page 5 column 6, Death
 

Allison, Porter
Porter M. Allison died at his home in Butler Monday evening, July 26, 1915, after a brief illness of stomach trouble.  Mr. Allison served two terms as Superintendent of Schools of Bates county, and was at the time of his death, deputy county clerk. -- The Adrian Journal, July 29, 1915, Page 1 column 5, Death
 

Murphy, Elizabeth
Mrs. Elizabeth Murphy died at the home of her son Harry, July 14th; aged 71 years, 10 months and 28 days.
Elizabeth Stratton was born in Virginia, August 16, 1844.  Her parents came to Missouri in 1856 and located in Cooper county.  In 1866 she was united in marriage with M. E. Murphy. The living children of this union are, T. A. and H. E. Murphy, of Altona; C. A. Murphy, of Butte, Montana; d. G. Murphy, of Joplin; Mrs. H. B. Bohn, of Joplin; Mrs. W. G. Mouse and Miss Lulu of Altona.  The husband died in 1897.  The Murphy family moved to Bates county in 1879 and have lived here since.  In early life Mrs. Murphy was converted and united with the Baptist church and was a member of that body at the time of her death.  She was an excellent Christian woman and was held in high esteem by all who knew her.
The children have the sympathy of their many friends in this bereavement.
Funeral services for Grandma Murphy were held from the Altona Baptist church Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock by Rev. Ford.  Burial was in Mt. Olivet cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, July 22, 1915, Page 8 column 5, Death
 

Allen, Mrs. Wilson
Mrs. Wilson Allen died at her home in this city Wednesday, July 7, 1915, aged 78 years.  Mrs. Allen had been in feeble health for some time and her death was not a surprise.  Mrs. Allen had lived in this city for many years and was a good woman. She is survived by her husband and these children,  John Allen, Jas. Allen and Mrs. Hayes Walters, of Adrian; Lee Allen of Kansas City, and Monroe Allen.
Funeral services for Mrs. Allen were held from the home Thursday afternoon, conducted by Rev. Courtney, her pastor.  Burial was maid in Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, July 15,1915, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

Mead-Jenne
John Mead and Bertha Jenne went to Butler Saturday afternoon and were married.  They had been keeping company for a number of years but their friends were not aware of their plans for getting married.  Both parties to this contract are natives of this county and have lived here all their lives. -- The Adrian Journal, July 15, 1915, Page 1 column 5, Marriage
 

Ferrell, Homer
Homer, the 12 year old son of J. F. Ferrell, died at the home of his uncle, Ben Mills, near Ballard, Friday, July 2nd, of tonsillitis.
Homer was born in Adrian, one of twins, the brother died several years ago.  His mother died several years ago and he had not known a mothers love and tender care, but he was a good boy, loved by all who knew him.  Homer was a manly little fellow and will be missed by his friends.  It is harder for the boy without a permanent home and a loving mother to make good than it is where he has these aids.
The father, sister and brother have the sympathy of many friends in this affliction.
Homer’s remains were brought to Adrian Friday and buried in the Crescent Hill cemetery Saturday.  A brief service was held at the grave. -- The Adrian Journal, July 8, 1915, Page 1 column 5, Death
 

Crumley, W. A.
W. A. Crumley died at his home in West Point township Saturday, July 3rd, after a lingering illness of cancer; aged 54 years.
Mr. Crumley was born in Kentucky but came to Missouri in his boyhood and spent most of his life in the township where he died.  Few men enjoyed the esteem of his neighbors and acquaintances in a larger measure than did Mr. Crumley.  He lived his life well and reaped his reward in the esteem of his fellowmen.  He had held several positions of trust and never betrayed the confidence reposed in him by his neighbors.  He was a member of the friends church  and lived and exemplary life for many years.
Funeral services for Mr. Crumley were held from the Mt. Vernon church Sunday afternoon and burial was made in the cemetery at that place. -- The Adrian Journal, July 8,1915, Page 1 column 6, Death
 

Deffenbaugh, Rachael
Rachel Smith Jackson was born September 15, 1837, at Lily Chapel, Ohio, and was married to J. K. Deffenbaugh Sept. 20, 1856. To this union nine children were born, four of whom are living, viz: J. E. Deffenbaugh, Council Bluff, Iowa; W.W. Deffenbaugh, Stafford, Mo.; Mrs. Reed Eachus, Adrian, Mo; Mrs. W. A. Schoolbelen, 2432 Wabesh, Kansas City, Mo.  In 1882 the Deffenbaugh family moved to Bates county and for a time lived in Adrian and later moved to Butler, where the husband died several years ago.  Mrs. Deffenbaugh was for many years a member of the Methodist church and died in that faith.  She was a good Christian woman.  She died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Reed Eachus, Tuesday June 29, 1915.
Funeral services for Mrs. Deffenbaugh were held from the Mt. Olivet church Thursday conducted by the Rev. R. L. Wood and the body was buried in the cemetery at that place. -- The Adrian Journal, July 8,1915, Page 1 column 7, Death
 

Smith, Barsheba Elenor
Barsheba Elenor Shepard was born near Jonesborough, Tennessee, December 18, 1844.  She was united in marriage with John T. Smith in 1856. To this union three children were born, one died in infancy, two are living, viz: Mrs. F. C. McNally and C. T. Smith, of Kansas City.  She united with the Methodist church South at the age of 13 years and lived a faithful Christian life, a mother in all the beautiful name implies, a true friend and was loved by all her friends.
The children have the sympathy in their sorrow that comes when a mother goes to her heavenly home.  The beautiful life and loving care are left as pleasant heritage to those who survive.
Those left to mourn her going away are a son and daughter, and six grandchildren.  The grandchildren are W. W. McNally, of Kansas City; Mrs. S. M. Fronszer, of Fremont, Ohio; Mrs. W.J. Murphy, of Oklahoma City; Mrs. Will Flippin, Ruth and Lucile Smith, of Kansas City.  All were present and did all that loving hands could do.  Mother Smith made her home with her son until the last four years, during which time she had lived with her daughter, at which place she passed away July 3, 1915.
Funeral services were held at the home Sunday, July 4th.  Monday the body was brought to Adrian and taken from the train to the chapel at the cemetery, where many loyal friends had gathered to pay their respects. -- The Adrian Journal, July 8, 1915, Page 8 column 5, Death
 

Watson, Zella
Zella, the 14 year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Watson, who live four miles south of Rich Hill, was killed by lightning at the home of her parents, Wednesday morning.
Miss Watson was getting breakfast about 5:30 o’clock when a bolt of lightning struck and killed her instantly. -- The Adrian Journal, July 8, 1915, Page 5 column 4, Death
 

Wilcox, Richard
Richard M. Wilcox died at his home near Passaic Saturday, July 3, 1915, after a lingering illness, at the age of 73 years, 5 months and 10 days.
Mr. Wilcox was born in Morgan county, Indiana, January 23, 1842 and came to Missouri in 1857, locating near Crescent Hill and spent the remainder of his life in this county.  In July1866 he was united in marriage with Miss Mattie Masters. To this union a son and daughter were born, Arthur and Bessie, the son only surviving.  He now lives at Kendrick Idaho.  His first wife died in 1876 and he was married to Miss Eliza S. Holcomb, Nov. 29, 1877.  To this union five children were born, three sons and two daughters.  The sons died in infancy, the daughters are Mrs. Gladys Todd and Mrs. Helen Coop.
Mr. Wilcox served in the Union army during the civil War.
He was a kind husband and father, a true friends and a good citizen, and those who knew him best respected him most.
Funeral services for Mr. Wilcox were held from the Passaic church Tuesday afternoon, conducted by Rev. Webdell, of Butler.  The members of the Adrian Masonic Lodge and charge of the burial service at the grave.  Burial was made in Butler cemetery.
Mrs. Chas. Garrison, of Adrian, is a sister of Mr. Wilcox. -- The Adrian Journal, July 8,1915, Page 5 column 4, Death
 

Blocher, Ralph
Mrs. Eugene Ensworth received a letter Sunday morning which stated that her brother, Ralph Blocker, died at his home in Los Angeles, California, June 18th and was buried at that place.  Ralph was married after he left here and his family consists of a wife and two children.
Mr. Blocher left Adrian eleven years ago and his relatives did not know where he was until they received a letter some days ago telling of his serious illness.  Three of his sisters and one brother live her, viz: Mesdames Wm. Wagner, Ira Witmore and E. Ensworth; Jos. Blocher is the brother. -- The Adrian Journal, July 1, 1915, Page 1 column 5, Death
 

Timmons, Georgia E.
Mrs. A. F. Timmons died at her home on East Fifth Street in this city Tuesday morning, June 29, 1915, after a lingering illness of cancer of the breast, aged 59 years, 1 months and 11 days.
Georgia E. Tuttle was born in Macon county, Missouri, May 18 1856, came with her parents to Bates county in 1880; and soon afterwards located in Adrian where she resided until her marriage to Mr. Timmons November 27, 1895, when they  moved to his farm and resided until last winter when they moved to Adrian.  Mrs. Timmons was converted in youth and at the time of her death was a member of the U. B. church.  She was an excellent Christian lady and will be missed by a wide circle of friends.
She is survived by her husband, two brothers, E. R. and J. L. Tuttle of Adrian, four sisters, two residing in Macon county, one in Portland, Oregon, and one in Nebraska.
Funeral services for Mrs. Timmons were held yesterday at 1:30 conducted by Rev. J. W. Penn.  Interment was made at Crescent Hill. -- The Adrian Journal, July 1, 1915, Page 1 column 6, Death
 

Mudd, Stephen Theodore
Stephen Theodore Mudd was born in Nelson county, Ky., February 14, 1823, and died in Parlinville, Kansas, June 6, 1915; aged 92 years, 3 months and 22 days.
He was married February 10, 1846 to Mary Elizabeth Middleton, who departed this life November 10, 1905.  To them were born nine children, four of whom preceded him, the eldest dying in infancy, A. T. Mudd, who died September 23, 1893; Mrs. Emma B. Anderson, who died December 6, 1911; Mrs. Elizabeth A. Courtney, who died May 29, 1912.  Those living are: E. C. Mudd, of Jefferson City, W. S. Mudd, Hemet, Cal., S. A. Mudd, Drexel, Mo., Mrs. Kate M. Stark, LaJunta, Colo., and Mrs. Alice l. McNeil, Farlinville, Kan., with whom he had his home.
He was converted and joined the Nolin Baptist Church in Larue county, Kentucky in 1853, came to Bates county in 1873, united with the Everett Baptist church, afterward entering the organization of the Burdett Baptist church.  When he moved to Adrian, Mo., in 1897 he united with the Baptist church and in 1901 removed to Drexel and was a member of the Drexel Baptist church at the time of his death.  His belief in his Savior never wavered and as the end of his earthly journey drew near he often expressed the joy of service for the Master, and although unable to walk, having received a compound fracture of the left hip four years ago, he was always patient, kind and thoughtful thereby exemplifying the trust he had in his Savior.
He joined the B. R. Young Lodge No. 123 A.F.& A.M., of Hodgenville, Ky., in 1852 was a member of the Crescent Hill now located at Adrian for several years and at the time of his death was a member of the Drexel lodge.
Funeral services were conducted at the Burdett Baptist church, June 8th by his pastor, Rev. W. Holt Smith, and then the brother members of the Drexel and Adrian lodges after a short ceremony laid his body to rest in the Burdett cemetery to await the resurrection day. -- The Adrian Journal, June 24, 1915, Page 8 column 5, Death
 

Simpson, child
The little grandchild of John Johnson was buried Tuesday morning.  Mr. and Mrs. Johnson, the parents, as well as the relatives have the sympathy of the community. -- The Adrian Journal, June 24, 1915, Page 5 column 2, Death

The little son of L. Simpson and wife, near Austin, died Monday morning, June 21.  The child drank lye some time ago and had been sick ever since. -- The Adrian Journal, June 24, 1915, Page 5 column 3, Death
 

Huffman, baby boy
A new baby boy arrived at the home of James Huffman and wife Thursday morning June 17. -- The Adrian Journal, June 24, 1915, Page 5 column 3, Birth
 

Pitcher, baby girl
A girl baby arrived at the home of Chas. Pitcher and wife Tuesday morning, June 23. -- The Adrian Journal, June 24, 1915, Page 5 column 3, Birth
 

Woods, William
Mrs. John Hayes attended the funeral of Wm. Woods, near Lone Tree, who was killed by lightning last week.  Mr. Wood had gone to the well to water his team when the lightning struck killing him and one of the horses. -- The Adrian Journal, June 24, 1915, Page 5 column 3, Death
 

McLay-Owen
As announced in The Journal last week Albert McLay and Miss Ina Cecil Owen, daughter of Ed. Gwen, of Altona, were married in Butler Wednesday.  They left at once for Topeka, Kansas  for a brief visit. They will make their home with Mr. Owen in Altona.
These young people are well known and popular in the northeastern part of this county and The Journal joins their many friends in congratulations and best wishes. -- The Adrian Journal, June 17,1915, Page 1 column 3, Marriage
 

Robinson, James
James Robinson was born in Ripley county, Indiana, February 24, 1847, and came to Benton county, Missouri in boyhood, locating near Cole Camp.  He enlisted in the Federal army and served during the war.  In 1866 he was married to Charlotte Johnson; to this union twelve children were born, eleven of whom are living.  Mrs. Robinson died several years ago.
The Robinsons came to Bates county in the early days and Mr. Robinson owned a large farm in Shawnee township.  He was a good citizen.
Funeral services for Mr. Robinson were held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock and the body was buried in the Oak Hill cemetery at Butler. The children have the sympathy of friends in this great bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, June 17, 1915, Page 1 column 5, Death
 

Smith, Judge Estes
Judge Estes Smith fell from his horse dead at his farm, seventeen miles northeast of Adrian, Wednesday morning, June 16, 1915.  Judge Smith left his home on horseback early in the morning apparently in good health, an hour or so later the horse returned rider less.  A search for judge Smith was at once instituted with the result that his lifeless body was found near a creek on his farm.  Indications that Judge Smith was stricken with apoplexy and was dead when he fell from his horse probably two hours before the body was found. Several years ago Judge Smith fell at the depot in Adrian from an attack of heart failure or some kindred trouble.  Judge Smith’s sons at home had gone to town that morning and were reached by phone.
Judge Smith was a native of Missouri and located in Mingo township in1873, where he died.  He was 59 years old.  In 1906 he was elected a member of the county court serving one term, he was again elected in 1914 and at the time of his death was a member of the court.  Judge Smith was a good citizen in every sense of the term and a wide circle of friends will be pained to learn of his sudden demise.
At the time of going to press the time for the funeral had not been set owing to the absence of some of his sons who are in the west.  Burial will be in Cedar Cemetery not far from the Smith home. --  The Adrian Journal, June 17, 1915, Supplement column 3, Death
 

Lucas, Jane
Miss Jane Lucas died at Hotel Reeder Friday morning, may 21st of pneumonia.  She was brought here from Kansas City Wednesday night to be taken to the home of her sister near Altona, but her condition was such that she could not stand the trip and she was taken to the hotel.
Miss Lucas was born in Fulton county, Illinois, April 5, 1874, came with her parents to Missouri in 1882, and located near Butler, later they located near Altona and still later in East Boone township.
Miss Lucas was a member of the Quaker church.
The body was taken to Garden City Sunday and buried in the cemetery at that place. She is survived by her father, three brothers and three sisters. -- The Adrian Journal, May 27, 1915, Page 1 column 4, Death
 

Ramey-Reed
Mr. R. L. Ramey and Miss Nancy Reed, prominent young people of Belton, came to Adrian Monday and were married at the Hotel Reeder at high noon, Rev. R. L. Wood officiating.  Mr. and Mrs. Henry Moudy, Jr., were witnesses. This was not a run away wedding, the young couple came here to get married for the purpose of surprising their friends. They are bright young people and numbered among the best social circles of their home city. -- The Adrian Journal, May 27,1915, Page 1 column 4, Marriage
 

Snelling, Mr.
Mr. Snelling died at his home near Austin Sunday evening, May 24. -- The Adrian Journal, May 27, 1915, Page 5 column 3, Death
 

Price-Louderback
Frank Price, of near Adrian, and Miss Alpha Louderback were married in Brookfield, Mo., Wednesday, June 2, 1915,the Baptist minister at that place officiated. They returned to Adrian Saturday noon and will reside on the Price farm northeast of this city. -- The Adrian Journal, June 10,1915, Page 1 column 5, Marriage
 

Church, Mr. and Mrs. Jesse
60th Anniversary
Over fifty of their friends and neighbors surprised Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Church at their home five miles northwest of town, last Sunday afternoon, the occasion being their sixtieth wedding anniversary.
Mr. Jesse Church and Miss Caroline M. Wiggins were married in Wyoming county, New York, May 30, 1855  They came to Missouri in 1867 and have resided in Bates county since 1874.  Mr. and Mrs. Church are honored and esteemed by their many friends, who wish them many happy returns. Republican Press -- The Adrian Journal, June 10,1915, Page 1 column 7, Anniversary
 

Catron, baby girl
Dr. Pope reports the birth of a baby girl to Mrs. Ernest Catron last week. -- The Adrian Journal, June 10, 1915, Page 8 column 3, Birth
 

McLay-Owen
Albert McLay and Miss Ina Owen, of the Altona neighborhood were married in Butler, Wednesday, Rev. Shelton officiating. -- The Adrian Journal, June 10,1915, Page 4 column 1, Marriage
 

Satterlee, baby girl
A girl baby was born to Mr. and Mrs. Jay Satterlee last week. -- The Adrian Journal, May 20, 1915, Page 4 column 3, Birth
 

Moore-Holwell
Wednesday evening, May  12, Mr. Percy L. Moore and Miss Minnie N. Holwell were quietly married in Butler at the home of Rev. Claude S. Hanby, the officiating minister.  Only a few relatives and dear friends were present.
The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. R . E. Holwell, of Shawnee township.  Mr. and Mrs. Holwell are among the best citizens of their community.  The bride is a lady of merit and deserving of the highest commendation.  She has been a faithful sister and daughter in the highest sense and has always made a host of friends wherever she went.  Miss Holwell was reputed to be one of the best teachers in Bates county having taught several most successful terms of school in this county.
The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Lee Moore.  He is a well known gentleman and citizen of northern Bates county, being acquainted with many framers thru the stock business and has a host of friends.  He is one of Shawnee’s most substantial farmers, one who makes good.
Mr. and Mrs. Moore will reside on the Moore farm in Shawnee. -- The Adrian Journal, May 20,1915, Page 4 column 5, Marriage
 

Tichnor, Dr. C.H.
The Rev. Dr.  C. H. Tichnor, pastor of the Butler Presbyterian church, died suddenly last Friday morning of apoplexy.
Dr. Tichnor had been located in Butler three years and in these years he had endeared himself to almost every citizen in butler and many in the county outside. He was born in England. The body was taken to Indiana for burial. -- The Adrian Journal, June 3,1915, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

Steele, Mrs. W. S.
H. L. Steele was called to Butler Monday to attend the funeral of his mother, Mrs. W. S. Steele.  The Steele’s were pioneers in Bates county and widely known. -- The Adrian Journal, June 3, 1915, Page 1 column 5, Death
 

Barker, baby boy
Dr. Robinson reports the birth of a boy baby to Mrs. Ward Barker last week. -- The Adrian Journal, June 3,1915, Page 8 column 5, Birth
 

Lucas, Jennie
Miss Jennie Lucas was born in Fulton Co., Ill., 1875.  Came to Missouri with her parents N. H. Lucas and Mary Lucas in 1882, has resided there almost continually since that time except during the illness and death of her mother and sickness of her brother, of Texas.
During the last nine years she has been a continual help to her widowed sister and two little children with money and time. She was a given Christian from childhood which was a great comfort during last illness.  In January of 1914 she had pneumonia and never full recovered from the severe attack.  She took a relapse and combined with heart trouble and despite all that could be done she passed to the other side of the river of death, may 21, 1915.
Funeral services were conducted by a Baptist minister of Adrian, Mo.  Laid to rest in Garden City cemetery.
She leaves a father, three brothers and three sisters.  When asked if she was ready to go, she said, she was ready to take her long sleep.  Mr. and Mrs. Williams and Mrs. Collins attended the funeral.  The death was such a shock to the aged father and family in Texas were unable to attend. -- The Adrian Journal, June 3,, 1915, Page 4 column 2, Death
 

Sperry, Mrs.
Mrs. Sperry an aged lady, died at her home near Amsterdam Tuesday. Funeral services were held from her home Wednesday, conducted by Rev. W. S. Courtney, of this city.  The body was shipped to Illinois for burial. -- The Adrian Journal, May 13, 1915, Page 5 column 6, Death
 

Cherrington, Mattie A.
Mattie A. Matthews was born in Washington county, Pa., on March 20, 1842, and was transferred to the higher realm May 12, 1915, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. J. O. Zorger at Adrian, Missouri.  She was united in marriage to Leonidas L. H. Cherrington, March 22, 1866, at Pittsburg, Indiana.  Mrs. Cherrington is survived by three children, viz: Emory C., of Lowry City, Missouri; Effie M. Zorger, Adrian; Eddie H., of Plains, Montana; one grandson, Glenn L., of Lowry City and a sister, Mrs. Maggie Matthews Mack, of Warrensburg, Mo.  One son, Frank N., died September 19, 1895, at Warrensburg, Mo., where he had gone to attend school.
In early life Mrs. Cherrington united with the United Presbyterian church and remained a member of that church until the time of her marriage when she transferred to the Methodist Episcopal church, which was the church of her husband’s choice.
After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Cherrington emigrated to Baxter Springs, Kansas, where they spent four years, they then bought a farm home in St. Clair county, Missouri, midway between Deepwater and Appleton City, where they resided until the husband’s death.  November 20, 1906.  For many years they were members of the Deepwater M. E. Church, and Mrs. Cherrington’s name remained on the roll there until the time of death.
All that loving hands could do did not avail and after several years of invalidism death claimed her for his own.  Her sufferings at time were great, but her fortitude was unfailing, her patience inexhaustible, her faith abiding and her triumph complete.
Funeral service was conducted by Rev. Courtney at the Methodist Episcopal church of Adrian this morning, after which the remains were laid to rest beside the husband at Appleton City. -- The Adrian Journal, May 13, 1915, Page 4 column 5, Death
 

Chrisman, Mary Ellen
Miss Mary Ellen Chrisman was born in Independence, Mo., January 22, 1865, and died at her home near Burdett, Thursday, April 29,1915; aged 50 years 3 months and 7 days.
Miss Chrisman came with her parents to Bates county in 1877 and located on the farm where she died, 1 ½ miles north of Burdett, where she spent the remainder of her life on the old homestead.  In early life she was converted and united with the Methodist church and lived a faithful Christian life.  She is survived by two brothers and two sisters Mrs. Chrisman was an excellent woman.
Funeral services for Miss Chrisman were held from the home Friday, conducted by Rev. Courtney, of Adrian, burial was made in the Burdett cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, May 6, 1915, Page 4 column 5, Death
 

Harper, Richard P.
Richard P. Harper was born in Henry county, Missouri March 1881.  When quite young his parents died and he was raised by his uncle, Henry H. Wyse.  In 1901 Mr. Harper was united in marriage with Miss May McDaniel, who survives him.  The located on the Harper farm, near Adrian, where they lived until three years ago, when they moved to Colorado Springs.
Mr. Harper was a member of the Adrian Methodist church and when here was an active church worker.  He was a member of the various Masonic bodies, an Odd Fellows and the Rebekah Lodges.  Mr. Harper was a good citizen and loyal to his friends.  The Harper home was one of the best and most hospitable in this community and they were popular in the social life of this city and vicinity.  Richard was widely and favorably known as a courteous gentleman.
The body was brought here for burial.  Funeral services were held from the Methodist church Sunday and that large building was too small to accommodate the large congregation of friends that assembled to pay a tribute of respect to their former neighbor.  Rev. Courtney, assisted by Rev. Chatten, conducted the funeral services, and both these gentleman made very appropriate addresses.  The masons had charge of the burial.  Dr. Floyd Bates, the Master, made the arrangements. The Knights templar, Eastern Stars and Rebekahs acted as escorts. The pall bearers were W. T. Hoover, Dr. Floyd Bates, George Dowell, Howard Smith, Earl J. Haas and D. B. Reist, friends of deceased, Mr. Harper selected them before he died.
The widow has the sympathy of a host of friends in this bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, May 6, 1915, Page 4 column 5, Death
 

Allen, E. D.
Evi Dixon Allen died at his home in this city Saturday evening, February 6, 1915, aged 60 years and 18 days.
Evi Dixon Allen, son of Mr. and Mrs. Wilson Allen, was born in Miller county, Missouri, January 19, 1855, his parents moved to Moniteau county when he was quite young, thence to Bates county in 1875.  January 2, 1875 Mr. Allen was united in marriage with Miss Sarah F. Murray, to this union five children were born, viz: W. A. Allen, of Hoxie, Kansas; Mrs. D. A. Cummings, of Morland, Kansas; Mrs. A. L. Finney and Miss Eula Allen of Adrian, and J. T. Allen, the last named died in infancy.  Mr. Allen united with the Baptist church at the age of twenty two years and remained a faithful member until death.  He is survived by his widow, four children, father and mother, two sisters and four brothers.  Mr. Allen and the editor had lived in adjoining places for about twelve years and we take this opportunity to say that he was a good neighbor, quiet, and accommodating and courteous at all times.
Funeral services for Mr. Allen were held from the Adrian Baptist church Monday afternoon conducted by  Rev. R. L. Wood, burial in Crescent Hill cemetery.
The widow and children and relatives have  the sympathy of friends in this bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, February 11, 1915, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

Moles, Andrew
Uncle Andrew Moles died at his home in this city Monday February 15, 1915; aged 81 years 10 months and 1 day.
Andrew Moles was born in Fenter county, Tennessee, April 14, 1833, and lived in his native state until he was eighteen years old when he moved to Kentucky, thence to  Bates county, Missouri, twenty one years ago, where he resided until his death.  Mr. Moles was united in marriage with Miss Rebecca Garner October 14, 1858.  To this union seven children were born, six of whom are living, viz: Mrs. Addis Woodson, Fairland, Oklahoma; Mrs. Janie Hay, Seventysix, Ky; Henry and John Moles, of Shawnee township; Mrs. G.J. Ragan, of Adrian; Mrs. Sylvester Catron of Altona. During the Civil War he served in the Union army.  Mr. Moles was converted some thirty years ago and later united with the Methodist church.
Uncle Andy as he was called by his friends, was a good man.  He always manifested a sweet spirit toward all, and was loved by all who knew him.  Age with its infirmities did not dim the buoyancy of his genial nature. Few men, young or old, are more agreeable than was Uncle Andy and he will be sadly   missed by his many friends. The aged widow and children have the sympathy of their friends in this bereavement.
Funeral services for Uncle Andy were held from the Adrian Methodist church Wednesday morning, conducted by his pastor, Dr. W. S. Courtney.  Burial was made in the Altona cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, February 18, 1915, Page 4 column 5, Death,
 

Cruse, Barney
Uncle Barney Cruse died at the home of his son Norman in Grand River township, Monday morning, February 1, 1915; aged 79 years, 3 months and 1 day.
Barney Cruse was born in Union county, Illinois, November 1, 1835.  Mr. Cruse came to Bates county, Missouri, about forty three years ago and had since resided here.  He was a member of the Progressive Dunkard church and lived a consistent Christian life.  He was a good citizen and an accommodating neighbor.  Mr. Cruse leaves a widow and three children.  The children are Mrs. John Howard, of Nevada; Norman and Charles Cruse, of near Adrian.
Funeral services for Mr. Cruse were held from the home of his son Norman Tuesday afternoon at 1 o’clock.  Burial was in the Altona cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, February 4, 1915, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

Gillispie, Charles
Charles Gillispie died at his home, one mile south of Archie, Saturday evening, January 30, 1915; aged about 65 years.
Mr. Gillispie was a bachelor and he and his sister had lived on the farm where he died for many years.  He was an industrious and prosperous farmer and a good citizen.
Funeral services for Mr. Gillispie were held Monday and the body was laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, February 4,1915, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

Burton, baby
The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Burton died at the home of the grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. John Cantrell, Shawnee township, Wednesday, February 3, 1915. Funeral services will be held today. The young parents have the sympathy of their many friends in this bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, February 4, 1915, Page 4 column 2, Death
 

Murphy, Clovis Icy
Clovis Icy, the little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. T. A. Murphy died at their home n Grand River township February 27, 1915; aged 2 months and 27 days.
The young parents have the sympathy of their many friends in this great loss. -- The Adrian Journal, March 11, 1915, Page 1 column 2, Death
 

Wright, Anna
Anna M. Wright died at the home of her brother, James A. Wright, near Cottonwood, Idaho, February 2, 1915; aged 51 years, 1 month and 8 days.
Annie M. Wright was born near Washington, Illinois, Jan. 17, 1864, and resided there until 1868, when she came to Bates county with her parents and located on the old home place three miles southwest of Adrian.  In the year 1906 she went to Idaho, where she resided until her death, which came suddenly from cerebral hemorrhage. She leaves one sister and three brothers, viz: Mrs. M.L. Burnett, P.K. Wright and H. L. Wright of Adrian, Missouri, and James A. Wright, of Cottonwood, Idaho. -- The Adrian Journal, March 11, 1915, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

Bruckner-Ehler
Mr. J. Bruckner and Mrs. Laura Ehler were quietly married at the county seat Tuesday afternoon.  Mr. Bruckner will return to his home at White City Kansas, today, Monday.  Mrs. Bruckner will not leave Archie for awhile, as both have children in school here and they want them to finish the term. -- The Adrian Journal, March 11, 1915, Page 5 column 4, Marriage
 

Cordell-Black
Miss Geneva Black and a Mr. Cordell of Austin, were married at Butler Saturday afternoon, March 6, 1915. -- The Adrian Journal, March 11, 1915, Page 5 column 4, Marriage
 

McReynolds, Annie Laura
Mrs. Annie Laura McReynolds died at her home in this city Thursday night, March 11, 1915; aged 67 years, 9 months and 17 days.
Miss Annie Laura, was the daughter of Benj. And Martha Hampton, and was born in Butler county, Kentucky, May 24, 1848.  Her father died in her infancy, but her mother lived until a few years ago.  Miss Hampton moved to Missouri in 1867, and located near Chilhowie Johnson county.  Miss Hampton was united in marriage to Mr. B. K. McReynolds, May 7, 1868. To this union three sons and four daughters were born.  The sons are, Benjamin, of this city, at whose home the mother died. William of the Fairview neighborhood, and Bruce, who resides on the old home farm. The eldest daughter, Mattie, died in young womanhood and was a charming lady; Enola married Mr. Frank Wyatt and they reside at Salina, Kansas; Binnie married Mr. Boyd Ecton, the reside in Cass county, near Harrisonville. The McReynolds family moved from Johnson to Bates county in 1880 and located on the McReynolds farm, four miles west of Adrian. The husband died several years ago. Two years ago Mrs. McReynolds moved to Adrian with her son, Benj.
Mrs. McReynolds united with the Presbyterian church in early life and lived a devoted Christian life.  She was one of the most amiable ladies it was ever our pleasure to meet.  A devoted wife, loving mother and a true and loyal friends.  As a neighbor none stood higher.  She was ever ready to do a deed of kindness or speak a word of comfort.  Those who knew her best admired her most and her death was a great loss to the community.  The children will miss mother and in their sorrow they have the deep sympathy of their friends.
Funeral services for Mrs. McReynolds were held Saturday afternoon from the Adrian Methodist church, conducted by Rev. Dr. Courtney.  Burial was made in Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, March 18, 1915, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

Gilham-Martin
Watson Gilham and Media Martin were married at Madison, Kansas, Wednesday of last week. They came to Adrian to visit the groom’s mother and other relatives for a few days.
Watson is an Adrian boy, for several years he has been express messenger on the Mo. Pa. Railroad and is making good, he is a first class gentleman.  The bride is a stranger here but is said to be an excellent young lady.
They will reside at Madison, Kansas. -- The Adrian Journal, March 18,1915, Page 4 column 5, Marriage
 

Blount, Allen
Uncle Allen Blount dropped dead at his home, three miles northwest of Adrian, Monday morning, March 14, 1915; aged 80 years. He had been about the place as usual that morning and seemed in his usual health, be sat down in a chair and without a moments warning fell to the floor and died with a struggle.
Mr. Blount was born in Tenn. And came with his parents to county in 1850 and resided here until his death, nearly all these years he lived on the farm where he died. -- The Adrian Journal, March 18, 1915, Page 4 column 5, Death
 

Reeder, William Franklin
William Franklin Reeder died at his home, this city, Saturday, February 20, 1915; aged 66 years, 8 months and 4 days.
Mr. Reeder was born in Mingo township, Bates county, Missouri, June 16, 1848, and spent his entire life in the county of his nativity.  He was a pioneer with the genial pioneer spirit that always wins friends.  In 1879 he was united in marriage with Miss Tilpha Briggs, who departed this life in June, 1910.  Mr. and Mrs. Reeder were converted soon after their marriage and united with the Altona Christian church, moving their membership to the Adrian Christian church when they  moved to this city, this membership he retained until death called him to the higher life.  On September 16, 1911, he was married to Mrs. Anna Mathers, who survives him.  Mr. Reeder was the fourth in order of birth of a family of ten children, and was the first to break the family circle by death, all having grown to mature years, the youngest one forty nine years old.
Frank Reeder was a god, clean, Christian gentleman, one who lived a life above reproach.  A good neighbor and an upright citizen.  Such men are always loved and respected.
Funeral services for Mr. Reeder were held from his late home Monday afternoon, February 22, conducted by Rev. Dr. Courtney who spoke eloquently of the life of the departed one. The remains were laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery.
The relatives have the sympathy of friends in this bereavement. -- The Adrian Journal, February 25, 1915, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

Walter, baby girl
A girl baby was born to Mrs. Arthur Walter Monday morning February 22nd.  Mother and babe doing well but papa Arthur is up in the air. -- The Adrian Journal, February 25,1915, Page 4 column 2, Birth
 

Schmidt-Moore
Christian Schmidt, of Mound township, and Miss Juanita Moore were united in marriage at the home of the bride in Butler Wednesday, February 24th.
These young people are numbered among the best in the county.  The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Moore of Butler, and is a handsome and accomplished young lady. The groom is known by everyone in this part of the county as a clean young gentleman and a prosperous farmer. -- The Adrian Journal, February 25, 1915, Page 4 column 3, Marriage
 

Covert-Simpson
Frank Covert and Miss Lelia Simpson, worthy young people of Deer Creek township went to Butler Wednesday afternoon and were united in marriage. The groom is a hustling and prosperous young farmer and an honorable gentleman.  The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Simpson and is a worthy young lady. -- The Adrian Journal, February 25, 1915, Page 4 column 3, Marriage
 

Skinner-Davis
Robert Skinner and Miss Maggie Davis, prominent young people of the Altona neighborhood, were married in Butler Wednesday. -- The Adrian Journal, February 25, 1915, Page 4 column 3, Marriage
 

Harrison, James Coleman
James Coleman Harrison died at his home in this city Monday, March 1, 1915; aged 70 years 7 months and 1 day.
Mr. Harrison was born in Morgan county, Missouri, July 30, 1844, and resided there until 1868, when he came with his parents to Bates county, locating on a farm near Altona, where he resided until 1893, when he moved to Adrian where he resided until his death.  After moving to this city he was engaged in business for some years but two years ago sold his grocery and hardware store and retired.  Mr. Harrison was united in marriage with Miss Elizabeth Crawford November 6, 1870.  Of this union five children were born, one son, James Archibald, died at the age of three years; one daughter, Cora Lee, died at the age of eight years.  The widow, three daughters and an adopted daughter survive.  The living children are Mrs. Ida Tabler, of Adrian; Mrs. Pearl Steven, of Decatur, Illinois; Mrs. Ethel Jones, of Topeka, Kansas, and Miss Jessie Harrison.
Mr. Harrison was converted September, 1888, and united with the Altona M. E. church South and held his membership there until death called him to his reward.  He was a good man, a kind neighbor and an excellent citizen, he measured up to every requirement of good citizenship and had the respect and esteem of all who knew him.
Funeral services for Mr. Harrison were held at Adrian from the Methodist church Tuesday morning, conducted by Rev.  W. S. Courtney, assisted by Rev. R.L. Wood.  The service at Altona was held from the Methodist church Tuesday afternoon, conducted by Rev. Reed, of Passaic.  These services were largely attended.  Burial in the Altona cemetery.
-- The Adrian Journal, March 4, 1915, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

Ritter-Blackmon
Mr. William P. Ritter and Miss Ruby Blackmon were married at the home of the bride’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. B. Blackmon, East Boone township, Monday, March 1, 1915, at 1 p.m., Elder Pfost, of Adrian officiating.
After the ceremony a big wedding dinner was served and heartily relished by the guests.
The contracting parties are excellent young people and are held in high esteem.  The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs.  C.H. Ritter of East Boone township, and is a prosperous farmer.  The bride is a handsome young lady and will do her part toward achieving success in life.
They will reside on a  farm in the Blackmon neighborhood. -- The Adrian Journal, March 4, 1915, Page 1 column 4, Marriage
 

Blackmon-Ricketts
Mr. C. F. Blackmon and Miss Grace Ricketts were married at the home of the bride’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. R. R. Ricketts, in Grand River township, Sunday March 1, 1915, at 12 o’clock noon, Rev. Reed, of Passaic, officiating.  Only the immediate friends of the contracting parties were present.
These young people are numbered among the best in the county. The groom is an industrious and prosperous farmer of East Boone township a man of good habits and honorable in his dealings.  The bride is an amiable and popular young lady, and is well known in Adrian.
The happy young couple will reside on a farm two miles west of Adrian. -- The Adrian Journal, March 4, 1915, Page 5 column 4, Marriage
 

Stephenson, John
An estimable family and a wide circle of friends were bereaved early Monday morning by the death of John Stephenson at his home here at the age of 77 years, from Bright’s disease and  an affliction of the heart.  His surviving children were all at his bedside except his eldest son, J. O. Stephenson, of Adrian, Mo., who had started for Elk River Saturday but did not arrive until Tuesday.
The funeral services were held yesterday, J. E. Lansburg officiating, and a large concourse of friends testified to the esteem in which Mr. Stephenson was held.  His remains were taken to his old home at Amoret, Mo., yesterday accompanied by the family, except one son Jerome, and his daughter, Mrs. Thomas Smisser.  They will probably remain in the east.
John Stephenson was born at Knoxville, Indiana, August 18, 1837, and moved with his parents to Falls City, Nebr.  He served during the Civil War in Co. C., Fifth Mo. Cav. and at the close of the war became one of the freighters and plainsmen to the trans-Missouri country.  In 1880 he was appointed U. S. surveyor and held that position two years.
Mr. Stephenson was married April 5, 1877, to Harriett J. Boylan, at Waconda, Kans; of this union 7 children were born, of whom five survive, as well as the mother.  Mr. Stephenson moved to Idaho four years ago.  He united with the Methodist church at the age of 20 and to the day of his death was a devout practical Christian.
Since they have lived here the family has made many warm friends and the deceased, although confined to his home much of the time by his illness, he was well liked by all who knew him.  Elk River sympathizes with the bereaved family and regrets their departure.  Elk River Sentinel -- The Adrian Journal, March 4, 1915, Page 5 column 6, Death
 

Austin, Omar D.
Omar  D. Austin, for nearly forty-eight years editor of the Bates County Record, died at his home in Butler, Tuesday afternoon, March 2, 1915; aged 73 years 5 months and 25 days.
Mr. Austin was born in Ohio.  His ancestors were from France and came to this country during the colonial days. After attending school in Ohio and Illinois he entered the office of the Mansfield Ohio, Herald at the age of seventeen years and learned the printers’ trade, later he held a clerkship in the treasury department at Washington.  He was in Ford’s Theater the night President Lincoln was assassinated.  He located permanently in Butler in October 1867.
Funeral services for Mr. Austin were held from the home Wednesday afternoon conducted by the Masons.  Rev. Dr. C.H. Ticknor, pastor of the Butler Presbyterian church, preached the sermon and it was an able address.  The text “The Greatest of these is Love”, was selected by request of the family.   It was Mr. Austin’s favorite scripture, his Christian creed.  And those who knew Mr. Austin will testify that he lived up to his creed.  Amiability was the crowning virtue of his life.  He was a high class gentleman who would not stoop to the level of the vulgar and petty things of life.  As an editor he lived his creed.  During the nearly half century of activity in Butler how many words of encouragement has he published for the living? How many hearts have received comfort from his able pen? How many beautiful tributes has he written of the dead?  Love for God and his fellowman governed his life. While others were in the mad rush gathering in the dollars, Austin was disseminating sunshine to others.  Such was his life, such is the mission of the country news paper, giving out the energy of the body, the activity of the mind and the sympathetic of the heart.  Omar D. Austin performed that mission well and has gone to his reward. -- The Adrian Journal, March 4,1915, Page 4 column 5, Death
 

Denver-Timmons
Mr. William Elmer Denver and Miss Ona Timmons drove to Butler Tuesday and were united in marriage by Judge Carl Henry.
The contracting parties are numbered among the very best young people in this community.  The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Jon Denver of Mound township, and is an industrious and prosperous young farmer.  The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Warner B. Timmons of Shawnee township, and is an amiable young lady.
The happy young couple will reside with the grooms parents, three miles southeast of Adrian. -- The Adrian Journal, March 25, 1915, Page 1 column 3, Marriage
 

Hamilton, James E.
James E., son of Mr. and Mrs. James W. Hamilton died at the family home, near Centerville, Kansas, March 17, 1915; aged 19 years.
The young man was born on a farm near Adrian but moved with his parents to the Kansas home about fifteen years ago. Those who knew him say that he was a young man of excellent habits and none stood higher in the community where he resided most of his life.  The young man had been in failing health for several months but was thought to be convalescing.
The parents have the sympathy of their Adrian friends in this great sorrow. -- The Adrian Journal, March 25, 1915, Page 1 column 5, Death
 

Blount, Allen
Allen Blount died at his home, near Adrian, Monday, March 15: aged 79 years 11 months and 16 days.
Allen Blount was born in Smith county, Tennessee, March 29, 1835, in his boyhood he moved with his parents to Illinois thence to Cass county, Missouri, in 1850 and from there to Bates county in 1858, locating on the farm where he died.
In October 1855 Mr. Blount was united in marriage with Miss Eliza J. Atkinson.  To this union nine children were born, five of them preceded their father in death.  James died at the age of 32 years.  Four children survive viz: E. M. Blount, of San Simon, Arizona; J. W. Blount, of Coffeyville, Ks.; Walter and Mabel, with whom the father resided on the old home farm.  The mother died thirty two years ago.  In early manhood Mr. Blount united with the Baptist church and was a Christian gentleman, a good neighbor and loyal friends.  For fifty seven years Mr. Blount resided in Deer Creek township.  When he located here this country was in a primitive state of development, and he was a factor in making it a pleasant place to live.  He endured all of the hardships and privations of pioneer life and came through them with the genial spirit of the pioneer.  His neighbors have for him only kind words and pleasant memories.
Funeral serviced for Mr. Blount were held from the family home Tuesday afternoon, March 16th,  conducted by Elder A. Showalter who had been his neighbor for forty four years.  Elder Irvin V. Enos assisted in the service, after the services at the home the body was laid to rest in the Crescent Hill cemetery.
With the passing of Mr. Blount, only a few of the older settlers are left. -- The Adrian Journal, March 25, 1915, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

Foster, James Wayne
James Wayne Foster was born July 3, 1869, died March 18, 1915.  Jim Foster was a good boy, perhaps but few knew how noble a man, earnest, honorable, conscientious and true.  He was possessed of a big loyal, loving heart, tender as a woman’s, there was no room in it for a vile thought.  Like Henry Clay “had it been turned wrong side out there would not have been found one dark spot”.  From childhood he was a person of strong religious convictions.  He was anxious to do good, to live a righteous life, to leave the world as he expressed it, better for having lived.  He was possessed of an intellect above the average, so much so that his friends prophesied an unusually bright future for him, but instead misfortune seemed early in his manhood to have claimed him for her own.  The lines of his life ever fell in harder places that falls to the common lot of man.
He began is career as teacher when a mere boy and taught altogether seventeen years.  As a teacher he was a faithful worker and was successful in spite of the handicap of ill health.  Indeed it seemed that first one then another of natural causes conspired to wreck his health and undermine his constitution that was naturally as splendid as his physique.  The state of his health obliged him to give us his beloved profession of teaching and content himself as he said with a plodding existence.  He sad “the state of his health reminded him of a child who never became able to walk, who constantly arose only to topple over again.”  So it was with his hopes, his fair and noble ambitions and his sublime aspirations. Just how great a disappointment this was to one of his disposition cam be but faintly imagined. How little did he realize that the last years of his life were those of a hero.  Hit untiring devotion to his remaining loved ones was something so perfect, so beautiful as to have reached the sublime.  Who can say that there is not a limit to human endurance?  Jim was far from being a weakling.  He struggled bravely on under the most trying circumstances, before which the bravest hearts would surely quail.  He said often of late that his burden was becoming greater that he could bear for God hath said, “Come unto me ye that are heave ladened and I will give you rest”  What are we that we should judge another?  Every heart knoweth its own sorrow.  Why some things are as they are, why true and courageous hearts should bleed is beyond the wisdom and vision of mortal, but some day, some way when we stand in the presence of the infinite, who doeth all things well will understand.
There remains of the family a father, a sister and a brother to mourn the loss of the most loving, devoted, best of sons and brother. -- The Adrian Journal, March 25, 1915, Page 8 column 5, Death
 

Vogler, baby girl
A daughter was born to Mr. and Mrs.  C. E. Vogler Monday night. Dr. Robinson attending physician. -- The Adrian Journal, March 25, 1915, Page 5 column 3, Birth
 

Vogler, Vernie Clarence
Vernie Clarence, little two year old son of Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Vogler, who was stricken with mumps ten days ago, but complications setting, so poisoned his system that medical treatment could not control or destroy the disease and last Sunday at 4:30 p.m. his little spirit was called away. So sad to the community but sadder still to the mother who was almost prostrated with the care of her baby yet in her sadness must see him taken away.  Burial in Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, March 25, 1915, Page 5 column 3, Death
 

Heck-Muiller
Mr. Emil Heck of Lawrence, Kansas, and Miss Minnie Muiller were married Wednesday afternoon, march 25,1915 at the home of the bride’s mother in Grand River township, Rev. Wehrmeister, of Virginia, officiating.  A large number of the relatives and friends were present to witness the ceremony and to partake of the excellent wedding dinner which was served  immediately following the ceremony.  It was a very popular and enjoyable social event.
The bride is one of the most popular young ladies in this community where she had lived all of her life, and is admired by all who know her. The groom is a stranger here but is said to be an excellent young gentleman. They will reside on a farm near Lawrence, Kansas. -- The Adrian Journal, March 25, 1915, Page 4 column  5, Marriage
 

Garvey, baby boy
Dr. Bates reports the birth of a boy baby to Mr. and Mr. Arthur Garvey last week. -- The Adrian Journal, April 1, 1915, Page 1 column 3, Birth
 

Barclay, Louisa Frances
Mrs. Alexander Barclay dropped dead at her home, five miles southeast of Adrian, Thursday evening, March 25, 1915.  She had been in her usual health and was doing her evening work when death came without a moments warning.  The husband left the house to do some chores at the barn, he was gone but a few minutes, when he returned he found Mrs. Barclay lying on the floor dead.
Louisa Frances Janes was born in Pulaski county, Kentucky November 12, 1846, and died March 25, 1915; aged 68 years, 4 months and 13 days.  She was united in marriage with Alexander Barclay December 8 1869 in Kentucky. To this union two daughters were born, viz: Mrs. W. G. Dillon who lives near the Barclay home in Mound township, the other daughter, Mrs. Susie E. Jenkins died about eighteen years ago.  Mrs. Barclay was converted in early life and united withy the Methodist Episcopal church of which she was an acceptable and faithful member at the time of her death.
In November 1878 Mr. and Mrs. Barclay moved from their native state to Bates county, Mo., locating in the Mt. Olivet neighborhood where she resided until death. during these thirty seven years Mrs. Barclay had been an important part of the life of the community in which she lived.  She was a faithful worker in the church.  As a neighbor Mrs. Barclay was ever ready to do a favor or help in the time of need and to comfort the sorrowing ones. She was a good woman and will be sadly missed by all who new her.
Funeral services for Mrs. Barclay were held from the Mt. Olivet church  Saturday morning, March 27th, conducted by the pastor, Rev. Courtney.  The large congregation present was an evidence of the high esteem in which Mrs. Barclay was held by her neighbors.  Burial was in Mt. Olivet cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, April 1, 1915, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

Bowman, Mary
Mrs. Mary Bowman, eighty five year old, died at the home of her nephew, W. I. Hardman, in East Boone township Wednesday, March 31st.  Funeral will be held at Burdett this, Thursday afternoon. -- The Adrian Journal, April 1, 1915, Page 5 column 3, Death
 

VanSandt-Sterling
Arthur Sterling and Miss Ollie Vansandt, prominent young people of the Archie neighborhood, were married in Butler Saturday. -- The Adrian Journal, April 15, 1915, Page 4 column 4, Marriage
 

Atchison, son
The three year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Atchison fell in a post hole at their home near Archie Wednesday evening, April 14th  and was drowned. A physician was called and vigorous measures taken to resuscitate the child but these failed. -- The Adrian Journal, April 15, 1915, Page 4 column 4, Death
 

Claunch, William Lloyd
William Lloyd Claunch died on Tuesday, April 13, 1915, at the home of Charles Thomas in Lone Oak township, from pneumonia, after an illness of only four days.  He is survived by his father, James Claunch, a twin brother, Floyd Claunch, and a sister, Mrs. Eva Howard, of Park Hill, Oklahoma.
Mr. Claunch was born in Allen county, Kansas, April 1, 1897, and at the time of his death was aged 18 years and 12 days.  Burial will be at the Mt. Olivet, services will be conducted by Rev. Spencer.-Butler Daily Democrat. -- The Adrian Journal, April 15, 1915, Page 4 column 3, Death
 

Feeley, Betty
Mrs. Betty Feeley, widow of the late Morris Feeley, died at the Bud Hardman home near Burdett, Wednesday, April 7th.  Burial today in Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, April 8, 1915, Page 4 column 2, Death
 

Meyer, Clasie
Miss Clasie Meyer, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joe Meyer died at the home of her parents in Butler Wednesday morning, April 7th. -- The Adrian Journal, April 8, 1915, Page 4 column 3, Death
 

Jones, Thomas
Thomas Jones died at his home in this city Friday night, April 16, 1915; after a lingering illness of tuberculosis; aged 34 years 6 months and 28 days.
Thomas Jones was born in Kentucky, September 18, 1880.  His parents moved to Bates county, Missouri in 1881, locating at Crescent Hill and since that time Mr. Jones spent most of his life in this vicinity. He united with the Christian church several years ago; he was also a member of the Archie Knights of Phythias Lodge and of the Kansas City, Kansas Odd Fellows Lodge. The lodges stood by him loyally during his illness, never for a moment did they waver in their allegiance to their afflicted brother.  On February 10,1907 he was united in marriage with Miss Cassie Strange, who survives him and who gave him the tenderest care during his long illness. Besides the widow he is survived by one brother and three sisters.
Thomas Jones was a good citizen and a pleasant gentleman and was respected by all who knew him.
Funeral services for Mr. Jones were held from the Crescent Hill church Sunday afternoon, April 18, 1915, at 2 o’clock, conducted by Elder W. S. Hood, pastor of the Christian church, the Knights of Pythias had charge of the services. Burial was made in Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, April 22, 1915, Page 1 column 4, Death
 

Jayne, W. F.
W. F. Jayne was born in Lee county, Va., March 8, 1847, died at his home in Archie, April 16, 1915.  He was married to Sarah Snodgrass, Feb. 20, 1867, came to Missouri in the year 1868 and to Archie in 1883.  To this union were born five children, three girls and two boys, all these have gone to rest except one daughter, Mrs. Myrtle Anderson, of Chicago who reached here after the death of her father.  The funeral was held at the Baptist church conducted by Rev. Keele to a large and sympathetic crowd, after with the body was laid to rest in Crescent Hill cemetery. -- The Adrian Journal, April 22, 1915, Page 8 column 4, Death
 

Watson, Daniel
Daniel Watson was born in Vermillion county, Indiana, on March 31, 1830, and died April 16, 1915; aged 85 years and 16 days.  He was united in marriage with Lydia Evans August 23, 1855, in Madison county, Ohio. To this union three children were born, one son and two daughters, two of whom with the wife and mother are left to mourn the loss of a kind and loving husband and father.  He was converted to God in young manhood and sought to honor Him by doing good to his fellowman through a long and useful life. When the time came for him to bid farewell to earth and loved ones he went without a murmur saying “All is well”.
He came with his family to Bates county, Missouri, in November 1865, and had made his home in Grand River township for almost fifty years.  We shall miss him so much, but our loss is his eternal gain.
Funeral services for Mr. Watson were held from the Altona Methodist church Sunday afternoon, conducted by Rev. Keele.  A very large congregation  was present to pay a last tribute of respect to the memory of a good man. -- The Adrian Journal, April 22, 1915, Page 5 column 3, Death
 

Ketron, W.H.
W. H. Ketron died at his home three miles east of Adrian, Wednesday night, January 27th at 10 o’clock; aged 73 years, 10 months and 23 days.
Mr. Ketron was born in Tenn. And moved from thence to Iowa, and came to Missouri about twenty years ago, locating on the farm where he died.  Mr. Ketron had been a member of the Methodist church for many years and was a Christian gentlemen, a good neighbor and a loyal friend.  Mr. Ketron was a veteran of the Civil War.
Mr. Ketron is survived by his wife and three children.  The children are, Mrs. Chas Timmons of Adrian, James Ketron, of Mound township, and Mrs. Wesley Steward, of Nampa, Id.
Funeral services for Mr. Ketron will be held from the Mt. Olivet church Friday, January 29th. -- The Adrian Journal, January 28, 1915, Page 5 column 3, Death
 

Elliott, Eula
Eula Ellen, the 2 year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Elliott, died at the parental home near Dixie school house, Sunday, January 10,1915.  Funeral services were held at the Sharon church, Monday, January 11th, conducted by Rev. W.S. Courtney, of this city. -- The Adrian Journal, January 21, 1915, Page 1 column 2, Death
 

Lightfoot, Mrs. Thomas
Mrs. Thomas Lightfoot died at her home in East Boone township Thursday, January 14, 1915, after a lingering illness of tuberculosis; aged 45 years.
Mrs. Lightfoot was born in Kentucky, the daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Austin Mudd. The family moved to Bates county, Missouri, when Mrs. Lightfoot was a small girl and the remainder of her life was spent here.  In early life Mrs. Light foot was converted and united with the Baptist church and lived a devoted Christian life until death called her to rest.  Mrs. Lightfoot was a good neighbor and loyal friends.
Funeral services for Mrs. Lightfoot were held from the Adrian Baptist church Saturday afternoon, conducted by Rev. W. S. Weir of Warsaw, Missouri.  Burial was made in Crescent Hill cemetery.  The husband has the sincere sympathy of friends in his sorrow. -- The Adrian Journal, January 21, 1915, Page 1 column 4, Death
 

Medlin-Bullock
Mr. H.L. Medlin and Miss Mable Bullock of Urich were married last Monday in K.C. Kansas. -- The Adrian Journal, January 21, 1915, Page 5 column 4, Marriage
 

DeArmond, Urless L.
Mr. W. H. DeArmond received a message Sunday morning announcing the death of his son, Urless, at his home in Denver, Colorado.  Mr. DeArmond received a letter from his son last Thursday in which he stated that his health was good and the telegram following closely after the receipt of the letter indicates that death came suddenly, although definite news as to the cause of death had reached this office Monday, Mr. and Mrs. DeArmond left Sunday noon for Denver and at that time the could give no information as the funeral arrangements.
Urless DeArmond grew to manhood in this city and was one of the best young men that we have ever known.  About twenty years ago he went to Kansas City, thence to Denver, where he entered upon a very successful business career.  Being a man of good habits and excellent business methods he accumulated a comfortable fortune.  It is not known just what his estate is valued at but it is said to be close to $100,000.
Mr. DeArmond was about 48 years old and unmarried. The earlier settlers here remember Urless as a clean, manly man, ever courteous and always an exponent of the things that tend to elevate and ennoble mankind.
His death came as a great shock to his aged father, who had a just pried in the success of his only son. -- The Adrian Journal, January 7,1915, Page 1 column 3, Death
 

Lentz, Henry P.
Henry P. Lentz was born at New Paris, Elkhart county, Indiana October 8, 1850, and died January 3, 1915; aged 64 years, 2 months and 25 days.  In 1864 Mr. Lentz moved with his parents to Montgomery county, Illinois, thence to Bates county, Missouri, in 1882, where he had since resided.  June 16, 1872, he was united in marriage with Miss Hannah DeLong, to this union five children were born, three sons and two daughter.  One son, Wm. Franklin, died in infancy. The living children are; Ira I. Lentz, of Adrian; Mrs.  Cora May Hope, of Adrian; Mrs. Elizabeth A. Clark, of Kansas City, and Burley B. Lentz, of Adrian.
The widow also survives to mourn the loss of the devoted companion.  Mr. Lentz is survived by eight grandchildren and six brothers, five of whom attended the funeral.  The brothers are, A. J. Lentz and S. W. Lentz of this city; Warren and elder George Lentz, of Kansas City; John Lentz, of Lordsburg, California, and Chas. Lentz, of Leeton, Mo.
Mr. Lentz was converted and united with the church of the Brethren in 1878, and remained faithful member until death.  His daily life was at all times consistent with His Christian profession.   He was an ideal citizen in every sense of the meaning of that term.  If we were called upon to express the purpose of his life in one brief sentence were would choose the following, “Prove all things, hold fast to that which is good.” -- The Adrian Journal, January 7, 1915, Page 1 column 4, Death
 

Tuttle-McCombs
Mr. Leland Tuttle and Miss Eletha McCombs were married at the McCombs residence Wednesday evening at six o’clock, Rev. Hood officiating. -- The Adrian Journal, January 7, 1915, Page 5 column 4, Marriage
 

Wallace, Alfred Milton
Alfred Milton Wallace was born in cooper county, Missouri May 12, 1849. Died in Bates county, Mo., December 30, 1914, aged 65years 7 months and 16 days.  He was united in marriage to Sarah E. Williams, of Pettis county March 15, 1877.  He came to Bates county, settled on a farm half miles west of Hume, but on account of his wife’s health soon returned to Pettis county, where she died September 23, 1879.  On January 11, 1881 he was married to Amanda Barnes of Saline county.  They came immediately to Vernon and Bates counties,, where he has since resided with the exception of one year at Eureka, Kansas.  To this union two daughters and a son were born all of whom survive him Mrs. A. J. Walter, of Adrian, Mrs. Chas. E. Horton Jr., of Hume and Clay H. Wallace of Altamont, Mo., the wife and mother having passed away November 20, 1912.
For many years he has held positions of trust through the confidence of the people having served Hume as postmaster for four years and held most of the township offices of his home and from January 1909 to 1913 was deputy sheriff of Bates county.  He was created a Pythian Knight as a charter member of Hume Lodge 311, August 1894, since which time he has been honored as a past Chanceler and always a devoted and loyal Knight.  The universal expression of those who knew him best was, Alfred Wallace was a kind and obliging neighbor and friends, an affectionate and indulgent father, and a loving and devoted husband.  A life full of noble deeds, love and virtue, ought be a sweet consolation to his bereaved family and friends. They must feel as assured that he has only gone to enjoy that higher reward of Christian virtue to receive his crown of eternal glory.
Funeral services over the remains were held in Hume, Saturday morning at 10 o’clock from the M.  E. church, south.  Rev. Campbell assisted by Rev. Hunt conducted the services at the conclusion of which the  Knights of Pythias rendered the ritualistic services. -- The Adrian Journal, January 7, 1915, Page 5 column 4, Death
 

Porter-Mouse
At the home of the bride’s parents in Altona, in the presence of eighty five guests, on Wednesday afternoon, the thirtieth of December, 1914, at four o’clock, Mr. Clifton Herbert Porter and Miss Lena Bell Mouse were united in marriage, Dr. Coggins of Warrensburg, officiating.
To the strains of “Lohensrin” and “Mendelssohn’s” wedding marches played by Mrs. Frank Mouse, of Marquette, Kansas, the bridal party descended the stairs and took their places beneath a beautiful arch of smilax, interwoven with pink and white roses, where Dr. Coggins, in a brief but impressive ring ceremony pronounced them man and wife.
The attendants of the bridal couple were: Master Herbert Austin Mouse, attired in white, who bore the ring in a calla lily; little Miss Jewell Mouse, wearing a dress of pink and white, and acting as flower bearer, scattered rose petals along the pathway.  Miss Estella Pheasant of Appleton City, Mo., gowned in pink satin, with over dress of brocaded chiffon was maid of honor, and Mr. Leonard Finley, attended the bridegroom, who wore the conventional black. The bride, wearing a dress of ivory satin, made in train, with chiffon drapery trimmed in pearls, and a veil caught in cap effect with orange blossoms, carried a shower bouquet of bride’s roses and lilies of the valley.  She was given in marriage by her father.
Immediately following the ceremony the wedding party led the way to the dining room where an excellent two course luncheon was served by Misses Ina Owen, Venelia Riddell and Doris Bates.  Miss Eula Car and Mrs. Scott Mouse presided at the punch bowl.  A feature of much interest was the cutting of the bride’s cake which was quite beautiful.  The house was tastefully decorated for the occasion with evergreen, smilax pink and white roses and carnations.
The bride was the recipient of a number of handsome and costly gifts.
The groom is a young man of good morals and strict integrity admired by a wide circle of friends.  The bride is the only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. M. H. Mouse.  She is popular with all who know her and a girl of rare personality.
The happy couple left on the train for an eastern honeymoon.  They will be at home after February first near Adrian. --The Adrian Journal, January 7, 1915, Page 4 column 3, Marriage,
 

Tuttle-McCombs
Married at the beautiful home of Mrs. J.H. McCombs on Wednesday Jan. 6, 1915, Eletha Mary to Leland S. Tuttle.
Promptly at six thirty Miss Frona Hood sang “Loves Old Sweet Song” accompanied by Mrs. Geo. Lawson.  After which the bridal party led by Rev. W. S. Hood, marched to the conservatory where the ceremony took place, Miss Opal Hogan playing the wedding march.
Mr. Ray Packer acing as best man, and Miss Lila Wilhite as bridesmaid.  The bride was beautifully gowned in white crepe meteor and lace caught up with pearls and carried a beautiful bouquet of bride’s roses, the bridesmaid was gowned in light blue satin and carried roses.
Immediately after the ceremony they were let to the dining room by her mother where a delicious two course supper was served the color scheme of pink and white was beautifully carried out.  The remaining part of the evening was spent in congratulations and music.
About one hundred and twenty five people were present.
Out of town guests were: Mr. Fred Stahl, Warrensburg, Mo., Mrs. Fred Stahl and children of Garden City Mrs. Geo. Neff and daughter, of Montserate, Mo., Mrs. Wm. Jennings and daughter, of Eldorado Springs, Mo.
They were assisted by the following: Mr. Harry Tuttle, Aubrey Harmon, and Miss Opal Hogan, receiving.
Misses Mayme Packer and Millie Jennings receiving the presents upstairs.
The Misses Elinor Ferrell, Frona Hood, CoraAllen,Louise Stone, Nell Wright, Wilma Bates, Elsie McReynolds, Leona Tabler, Lenna McDaniel  Hood passed the finger bowl.  Mrs. James Hall seated the guests in the dining room. -- The Adrian Journal, January 14, 1915, Page 1 column 4, Marriage
 

Wright, baby girl
A fine daughter is reported to Mr. and Mrs. Harve Wright. -- The Adrian Journal, January 14, 1915, Page 5 column 4, Birth


Submitted by: Sandee Hubbard

Note: The information provided by Sandee Hubbard has been made available for personal genealogy research.
It may not be copied or reproduced without gaining her written permission to do so.

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