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Buchanan County MOGenWeb Project

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Biographies of Buchanan County Residents:


Transcribed by Danielle Thompson

From the History of Buchanan County and the City of St Joseph and Representative Citizens


  WILLIAM H. BARTLETT, a pioneer citizen who had been engaged in the real estate business at St. Joseph for 40 years, passed out of life, at his home, No. 804 Hall street, on September 19, 1904. Mr. Bartlett was born on a farm in Ripley County, Indiana, June 26, 1845, and was one of a family of five children born to David L. and Phoebe (ELSWORTH) Bartlett.

     In 1858 Mr. Bartlett's parents removed to Atchison County, Missouri, where he attended school and became a teacher himself, when but 16 years of age. In 1862 he came to St. Joseph and found employment in the recorder's office in this city. In 1864 he associated with his brother Herschel and he embarked in a real estate business in this city, a third brother, Latham, entering the firm in 1874. About this time the scope of their business was expanded and they began to make loans for Eastern investors on real estate security. For 40 years the brothers continued together, our subject's death making the first break in a closely united business and fraternal union.

     On October 26, 1887, Mr. Bartlett was married to Euphemia H. NIMMO, who is a daughter of the late James Nimmo, a former prominent banker of Canada. Mrs. Bartlett still survives with their two children, William N. and Margaret.

     Mr. Bartlett passed many happy years in the beautiful family home, located in a choice section of the city. Here he was prostrated by the illness of six weeks' duration, which terminated in his death. Surrounded by a large concourse of friends and business associates, his remains were laid to rest in Mount Mora Cemetery.

     The late Mr. Bartlett was a man of great determination and persistent energy. By strict attention to business and ever adhering to his unswerving standard of business ethics, he lived to see his firm, founded in the city's early days, become one of the leading institutions in its line in this part of the State. He was a man of acute perceptions, a great reader and a competent judge of men and affairs. He inspired all with whom he came in contact with supreme faith in his judgment and confidence in his integrity.