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This website is dedicated to preserving the history of Franklin County, Missouri and to providing helpful information and resources to people researching Franklin County history and genealogy. It is not connected to any historical society or governmental body; however information about such organizations is included herein. The content is copyrighted and is not to be used without permission.

 History and Genealogy of  Franklin County, Missouri

 

 

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African American History and Genealogy
in Franklin County

If you would like to contribute information to be added to this site, please contact Sue Blesi. This site needs YOUR contributions. Remember to check the Message Board for your surnames and to post obituaries and other information.

 

click below to follow links to African-American information:

Franklin County Wills and Probate

Franklin County Poor Farm Records

Franklin County Newspaper Articles

Franklin County Schools

Franklin County Churches

Franklin County Social Events

Links to Other Internet Resources

 

Links

As I get more information, I will add additional listings. If you know of sites that should be listed here, please let me know.

To post or read slave data or related information. It includes tons of resources for research.
http://www.usgennet.org/usa/mo/topic/afro-amer/indexusg.html


Slave schedules and other resources
http://www.usgennet.org/usa/mo/topic/afro-amer/slaveinfo.html
 

Mid-Continent Public Library... Genealogy Section
If you type "Franklin County MO" into the search engine, you will get 37 hits of documents.

Traci Wilson-Kleekamp

African Americans in Missouri
http://www.missouri-slave-data.org
 

This search engine -- allows you to research collections at university libraries. For example Duke University has 11 boxes of records on the TUTT family that migrated from VA to Missouri.. and settled in Callaway County first.

  http://www.loc.gov/coll/nucmc/

 

Slave information found in Franklin County Probate Records
(thus far, from my personal research)
(The use of "???" indicates illegible writing)

From the Will of Vincent Cheatham

The will of Vincent Cheatham, drawn up April 5, 1847, provided that the slaves, Lee and Richard, be given to his son, William H. Cheatham; that the slaves, Frank and Creed, be given to his son, John E. A. Cheatham; that the slaves, Green and Mat, be given to Robert T. Cheatham; that the slave James, be given to his grandson, John M. Booth, and that the balance of his slaves (unnamed) be given to his wife Martha Cheatham

From the Will of Valentine Hunter

Esther, a free woman of color as principal and Dyson Johnson as security are held and loaned to the state of MO in sum of $500 lawful money of US for payment of which will and truly be made we b??? ourselves our heirs executor and administrators jointly firmly and severally. In testimony whereof we have set our hand and seal this the 12th day of Nov 1850. The c???rtion of the above bond is such that when as the said Esther a free woman emancipated from slavery by the will of Valentine Hunter, deceased, has made application to county court of Franklin County for license to remain in said state. Shall be able to act as a woman of good behavior and in every respect conform to the laws ??? ??? the licensing of free negroes and mulattoes then the above bond to be void. Otherwise to remain in full force or effect. ??? ??? ??? and seven day & year aforesaid. [mark]. John, a free man. Nathaniel J. Ferguson as security. Also released from slavery in will of Valentine Hunter. Document had similar wording to that of Esther above. Curry, a free man. Signed by Wilson Johnson who is security for this person. Also released from slavery in will of Valentine Hunter. Document had similar wording to that of Esther above.

 

African American History found in Franklin County Poor Farm Records

Note: The poor farm, also known as the county infirmary and  the almshouse, was established in 1851. People were sent there for reasons of poverty, insanity, basically for the inability to care for themselves and not having the financial means available for obtaining care in this era prior to the establishment of welfare programs. Prior to the establishment of the poor farm, these people were farmed out to families who provided for them and were paid by the county. A few had been relatively affluent earlier in their lives.

Bacchus (former slave), no date, 75 years. Boarding exp of Dr. Butler. [These people were sent to the poor farm for reasons of poverty, insanity, etc. Some of the dates pre-date the founding of the poor farm and they were instead cared for by private individuals, sometimes doctors, who in turn billed the county for housing and feeding them. Poor farm established in 1851. Dates are included when known. Names could be misspelled. Source: Four Rivers Genealogical Society]

Baker, Governor: See Social Events - Labadie Picnic.

Butler, Jane (Mrs.), colored, of Washington, 96, died at county infirmary 8/5/ or 8/25/1920. From book on poor farm at Four Rivers Genealogical Society

Coleman, Archie, colored, of Pacific, admitted to county infirmary May 7, 1929, and died there January 29, 1930. From book on poor farm at Four Rivers Genealogical Society

Davis, Anna (Mrs.), colored, St. Clair, admitted August 16, 1928, died August 16, 1928. From book on poor farm at Four Rivers Genealogy Society

Elliott, William and Jennie: Society circles of Reedville and vicinity are in a whirl of excitement by the elopement of James H. Burgess (white) and Jennie Elliot (colored) on the night of the 14th inst. Mr. Burgess is a man of culture and refinement and lived with his wife, an esteemed lady and two children on a sheep ranch, owned and controlled by him and known as "Dixie Land Sheep Ranch," situated 3 1/2 miles east of Reedville. It seems that his wife was paying her parents a visit in the state of Georgia and, during her absence, he (Burgess) has been very intimate with the colored populace and paid marked attention to Wm. Elliot's wife, a copper-colored negro with two children, and finally ended in an elopement as above stated. The following note was left by Mr. Burgess: "Wm. Elliot, Sir: I suppose you will be surprised when you read this. You know that you have proved yourself unworthy of Jennie. I have taken her and will protect her. It is useless for you to drag after us or attempt to search for her for I intend to protect her and myself. J. H. Burgess, dated 7/13/1888" July 27, 1888 Franklin County Tribune

Elliott, Jennie: The colored woman that eloped with Mr. Burgess some time ago returned home last Saturday. August 31, 1888 Franklin County Tribune

Givens, Levins, colored, of Union, age 70, died at county infirmary November 15, 1919. From book on poor farm at Four Rivers Genealogy Society

Grant, Edward, age 8, male, black. 1870 poor house census.

Jenkins, Henry, colored, of New Haven, age 80 years, died at infirmary 5/21/1920, From book on poor farm at Four Rivers Genealogical Society

Perkins, Kate, 35, female, black. 1870 poor house census.

Perkins, William, age 10, male, black, 1870 poor house census.

Wahundren, James, age 14, male, black. 1870 poor house census.

Wells, Samuel, colored, of Union, a former slave from Virginia, age to have been about 105 years, died at infirmary 12/19/1927. From book on poor farm at Four Rivers Genealogical Society

 

African American History from Newspapers

Absont, Julia, black, age 103, died last Monday four miles southeast of Berger. Burial was on the Stoeppelmann farm. One son and one daughter survived her. 1-9-1914 Franklin County Tribune [from the personal research of Sue Cooley]

Adams, Joseph N.: Two colored boys of pacific, Charles W. Turner and Joseph N. Adams, left last Saturday for Jefferson Barracks for examination. 9/4/1942 Pacific Transcript [from the personal research of Sue Cooley]

Aitch, Aaron "John": Aaron "John" Aitch died December 8, 1882 at his home in Union, age 52. He was one of Union's most worthy colored citizens. Source: December 14, 1922 The Franklin County Record.  [from the personal research of Sue Cooley]

Aitch, Earl Alfred: was born January 28, 1914 in Moselle, the son of George and Maggie Aitch. He died April 23, 1972 at St. Louis State Hospital. He married Dorothy Jenkins February 28, 1914. They had three children: Martha Jane Parson of Webster Groves, Mornet Doris Whitson of Kirkwood, and Earl Aitch, Jr. of St. Clair. He had three brothers, including Clifford Aitch of Washington. Burial was at the Aitch Cemetery at Moselle. Source not named in my research notes but was probably the Franklin County Tribune or The Republican Tribune. [from the personal research of Sue Cooley]

Aitch, Emeline: Obituary for Emeline Aitch: The subject of this sketch was born in the Indian Prairie neighborhood about 87 years ago and died at her home in Union, December 22, 1920 after an illness of several months. The funeral was held on Christmas Day at 2 o'clock in the afternoon from the St. James A.M.E. church of Union and was conducted by Rev. W. Chester. Deceased is survived by one son, Herman Aitch; five grandchildren, other relatives and many friends. The grandchildren are S. M. and C. G. Bryant of Wellston and Ethel, Alma and Uncas Aitch of Union. Aunt Emeline, as she was called by those who knew her, was born in slavery and was, at times, the property of the Billups and the Goodes, people of this county and this neighborhood. It may be truly said of her that she was a good Christian woman. She was always ready to help those who were in need of her service and died respected by all who knew her and the circle of her acquaintance extended to many parts of Franklin County. Most people in Union knew her well for many years. Peace to her ashes. Source: December 31, 1920 The Republican Tribune.  [from the personal research of Sue Cooley]

 Aitch, Ethel: Miss Ethel Aitch left this week for Jefferson City where she will enroll as student in Lincoln Institute. This will make her second year in school and we are informed that she is a very successful student. Miss Kitty Bryant also left for Jefferson City and will be student at Lincoln Institute. This is her first year there. Source: September 3, 1915 Republican Headlight

Aitch, Maggie: The following colored girls started to Lincoln Institute: Maggie Aitch, Nellie Parks and Alice Goode.  From 9-24-1920 Republican Tribune, column entitled "Thirty Years Ago" (actually occurred in 1890) [from the personal research of Sue Cooley]

Attucks: Goode, Ora (colored) is one of the graduates of the Attucks school of Washington and several of our colored people from here attended the closing exercises. Source: Friday June 14, 1907 Republican Headlight, Franklin County Historical Society [from the personal research of Sue Cooley]

baseball: 5-1-1884 Record: The Union Reserve baseball club played and won a match game with the colored boys last Saturday. They played for a Union League ball. On their last inning, the gentlemenof color were even on the tally sheet, and as soon as the Reserves made another successful run, threw up the sponge and acknowledged a fair beat. Reserve team Charles Leiser, Edwin Baur, Chas. Achenback, Walter Budd, Hudson Halligan, Frank Evans, Andrew Manion, Tom Bruch. Colored team: Bodd Goode, Tom Hall, Lonz Henson, John Goode, sonny James, Julius Roberts, Herman Aitch, Chas. Willis. 5/1/1884 Franklin County Record [from the personal research of Sue Cooley]

Bass, Joe: Joe Bass (colored), died Sunday after a lingering illness and was buried Monday. Source May 10, 1912 Franklin County Tribune, Labadie items

Beasley, Lou: A colored girl visiting at "Aunt Jane's," by the name of Lou Beasley, died last Thursday and was buried on Friday. Her home was in St. Louis.  September 7, 1888 Franklin County Tribune

Bryant, Kitty: Miss Ethel Aitch left this week for Jefferson City where she will enroll as student in Lincoln Institute. This will make her second year in school and we are informed that she is a very successful student. Miss Kitty Bryant also left for Jefferson City and will be student at Lincoln Institute. This is her first year there. Source: September 3, 1915 Republican Headlight

Buril, G. M., a progressive colored farmer of Labaddie, had business at the county seat yesterday. We acknowledge a pleasant call. 12/27/1907 Republican Headlight, Franklin County Historical Society [from the personal research of Sue Cooley]

Cayce, J. O.: J. O. Cayce, principal of the colored school in Union, came up for trial Monday in police court. Accused of having assaulted John Goode, another negro and his landlord. Goode is alleged to have abused Cayce on several occasions. Sat Cayce was moving and Goode came and started abusing him again. Cayce stood it as long as he could and then proceeded to change the contour of Goode’s physiognomy. Goode had Cayce arrested for assault. When the case came on for trial, W. L. Cole, who represented Cayce, had the case thrown out of court because of error in the information. Costs were assessed against the plaintiff. Cayce says he is not ready to tackle Jack Johnson yet, not being in training. Cayce later had Goode arrested for disturbing his peace. Goode was released on his own recognizance and later asked for a change of venue which was granted. Case will be tried before Squire Jno R. May at Labadie Sat Dec 16. Source: December 8, 1911 Franklin County Tribune

Clay, Charles: Charles Clay and family of DeSoto, MO passed through here on their way to visit Mrs. Clay’s mother, Mrs. Lige Richardson, of near Union. Source: "Among the Colored People of Moselle", column in October 22, 1926 issue of The Republican Tribune from the Franklin County Historical Society.  [from the personal research of Sue Cooley]

Clay, Maggie: Maggie Clay, (colored) aged 8 years, whose parents live at Derry, three miles east of Union, died Wednesday and was buried yesterday evening. July 13, 1888 Franklin County Tribune

Clay, Raymond: Clay, Raymond: There was some excitement in town Wednesday when the small house in which Raymond Clay, colored, was living, caught fire. The building was all flames by the time the water was turned on but they were soon quenched. There did however, seem too much friction between the men holding the nozzle for it seemed that everybody wanted to direct the procedure. There was no system. It seems that now is the time to remedy this before some large fire occurs where system will be needed. Some willing available men organized and drilled in their duties would be an asset to the community. Someone start it up and there will be plenty ready to organize. Source: August 8, 1913 Franklin County Tribune

Clay, Squire: His obituary is posted on the boards.

Clay, Squire: Wanted – 50 or 50 woodchoppers at Derry. Apply to Squire Clay. [local news] November 2, 1888 Franklin County Tribune

Crowder,  Christ: Christ Crowder, one of the county’s oldest colored residents was buried in the colored Baptist cemetery on Wednesday. March 19, 1915 Republican Headlight, St. Clair items.

Evans, Beckey, a colored woman, had a stroke of apolex last Wed. 5/3/1907 Republican Headlight, Moselle items, Franklin County Historical Society [from the personal research of Sue Cooley]

Goode, Alice: The following colored girls started to Lincoln Institute: Maggie Aitch, Nellie Parks and Alice Goode.  From 9-24-1920 Republican Tribune, column entitled "Thirty Years Ago" (actually occurred in 1890) [from the personal research of Sue Cooley]

Goode, L. M. L. M. Goode is getting along fine on his house that he is building in Moselle. Source: January 14, 1927 issue of The Republican Tribune, column entitled: "Among the Colored Folks of Moselle" from Franklin County Historical Society.  [from the personal research of Sue Cooley]

Goode, Murriel: Colored teachers taking regular examinations were Ethel Aitch, Hallie Goode, Murriel Goode, Marie Henson, and Kathryn Henson, all of Union. Source: June 20, 1913 Franklin County Tribune

Goode, Ora: Ora Goode, colored, is one of the graduates of the Attucks school of Washington and several of our colored people from here attended the closing exercises. Source: Friday June 14, 1907 Republican Headlight, Franklin County Historical Society [[from the personal research of Sue Cooley]

Hall, James: James Hall and Permelia Perkins (colored) were married Monday evening by J. R. May, justice of the peace. Source: November 28, 1913 Franklin County Tribune

Harris Schoolhouse: The colored folks had a large meeting at the Harris schoolhouse at Indian Prairie on Sun and were preached to by Rev. Mose Withington. Franklin County Record 7-26-1883 [from the personal research of Sue Cooley]

Harris, Della (Miss), the colored school teacher who has been visiting Mrs. Evans, returned to St. Louis last Sunday. Moselle items. Fri May 17, 1907 Republican Headlight, Franklin County Historical Society [from the personal research of Sue Cooley]

Henson, Alonzo: Bread and water is the ration in Franklin County Jail. Hard Boiled Disturber is on diet. Peace Disturber from Pacific Meets Heavy Fists of Janitor: The Franklin Co jail menu for the balance of this week will be bread and water. That was decided upon by Sheriff Arthur Gorg yesterday following an attempt of the lone prisoner to get hard boiled and govern the rules of the jail. Roy Yates was brought up from Pacific Wednesday evening of this week and lodged in the county jail with a charge against him of disturbing the peace. Prosecuting Attorney Jenny, it is said, had practically agreed to ask for a fine of $1 and costs for Yates. Yesterday morning when Alonzo Henson, the big colored janitor of the courthouse and jail meal ticket went to feed the prisoner and at the same time, noting that the peace disturber needed a wash, apprised him that he would have to clean up. This peeved Yates and he told Henson in no uncertain terms that he would do as he pleased. Sheriff Gorg happened in about that time and Yates spoke the same way to him, adding some vulgarity to his remarks. Matters must terminate and this incident ended in a fracas with Yates being the owner of several black eyes inflicted by the big colored janitor and skinned knuckles being evident on both Sheriff Gorg and Janitor Henson. Yates is now thriving with a diet of bread and water. Just what disposition will be made of his peace disturbance charge at Pacific is not known. Source: December 3, 1926 issue of The Republican Tribune from the Franklin County Historical Society. [from the personal research of Sue Cooley]

Henson: Colored Teachers taking regular examinations were Ethel Aitch, Hallie Goode, Murriel Goode, Marie Henson, and Kathryn Henson, all of Union. Source: June 20, 1913 Franklin County Tribune

Hinkle, Polly, daughter of our colored school teacher, died here Thursday night of consumption and was buried Sunday in the colored cemetery. May she rest in peace. Labadie Locals. 3/15/1907 Republican Headlight, Franklin County Historical Society [from the personal research of Sue Cooley]

issues: In 1876, there was a negro on the petit jury and, in one case two jurors from the western part of Lyon township by the names of Henry Lawson and Ambrose Scott refused to consider a verdict with a nigger. Judge Seay gave them from 12:00 to 1:00 to decide whether to serve or be heavily fined or go to jail. They served, but each paid $82 for contempt of court. 6-3-1921 Republican Tribune, column entitled "Looking Backward: Forty-five years ago" [from the personal research of Sue Cooley]

Jones, Arthur: Pacific High School. Jones was from Moberly, he had four years experience as teacher of a colored high school. Was engaged as a teacher at Pacific for 1942-43. 8/28/1942 Pacific Transcript [from the personal research of Sue Cooley]

Moungo, Walt: Oldest Slave Dies at Valley Park. Walt Moungo, former negro slave, died at his home in Valley Park last Friday. Moungo, who was born in Franklin County, Missouri as a slave on the George Bowles farm, moved with the Bowles family to a farm about two miles south of Valley Park before the Civil War. Estimates of his age varied from 104 to 110, but documents in the family established it at about 109. For many years he was a familiar figure on the streets of Valley Park. He made his living gathering roots and herbs in a small cart and selling them in St. Louis. He is survived by a son and three daughters. Source: April 2, 1943 issue of Meramec Valley Transcript  [from the personal research of Sue Cooley]

Murray: A colored man known as Uncle Murray dropped dead Friday. He is the oldest colored man in the community. St. Clair items. February 2, 1912 Franklin County Tribune

North, Ellen S. (colored) of Washington, MO was a carded teacher 1876 to 1883. She taught the colored school in Washington, MO in 1880. This information came from the Kiel Files of the Franklin County Genealogical Society at Washington. [from the personal research of Sue Cooley]

North, Jack, colored, whose family lived at Pacific, was cook on the work train and while passing from one car to another to get some coal, the car suddenly jerked and he was thrown into a culvert over which the train was passing. He died at Jefferson City. April 1, 1880 Franklin County Record. This information came from the Kiel Files of the Franklin County Genealogical Society at Washington. [from the personal research of Sue Cooley]

North, Lulu (colored) was a carded teacher in Franklin County 1900, 1901, 1902, 1903. Also a Lulu M. North of Labaddie was a carded teacher 1894, 95, 96, 97, 1900, 1901, 1902. She taught in the country districts and in Sullivan. Married Mr. Ried, St. Louis MO, Olive-Tuxedo Park (Webster Groves). I am not sure that these two references are about the same person. This information came from the Kiel files of the Four Rivers Genealogical Society at Washington. [from the personal research of Sue Cooley]

North, Rena (Mrs.) Is the oldest colored woman in the county. Aged 101 per August 2, 1901 Franklin County Tribune. [from the personal research of Sue Cooley]

Osborn, Dave: Colored Man Kills Wife. As atrocious murder was committed in Union last Sun night at 8 when Dave Osborn, colored, killed his wife with a carpenters’ hammer. The victim lived only for a short time after the murderous assault. Her skull was badly crushed and she must have been hit on the head with the hammer several times. After Osborn realized what he had done he went to the house of Louis Clark, colored, told the family what he and done. The authorities were notified and Dr. Stierberger summoned. Mrs. Osborn died soon after the doctor arrived. Tom Bruch, accompanied by the marshal, went to the Clark home and arrested Osborn and lodged him in jail. Coroner Miller of Labadie held an inquest over the remains Mon morning and the verdict of the coroner’s jury was to the effect that the victim came to her death at the hands of her husband. Osborn was given a preliminary hearing and bound over to await the action of the circuit court. March 28, 1913 Franklin County TribuneT

Osborne, Mamie: Mamie Osborne (colored), dau of Crockett Osborne of this city, was shot and instantly killed by a negro man in East St. Louis, IL early in the morning of Wed Nov 29, 1911. The body was taken to the morgue and remained unidentified for some time and was brought to Union for burial Monday. It was the night before Thanksgiving and four of them, two men and two women, were playing cards for a turkey. An argument arose over who had won the turkey and in the ensuing fight, the shooting occurred. This makes the third daughter of Crockett Osborne that has met death in a similar manner in St. Louis. December 8, 1911 Franklin County Tribune

Pacific: school: The corp of teachers in charge at Pacific’s public schools this year is composed of S. L. Cayton, W. B. Hardesty, Misses Lizzie Eisenhuth, Ashworth, and Cora Muench, with Prof. C. L. Robinson in charge of the colored school. 9/6/1907 Republican Headlight, Franklin County Historical Society [from the personal research of Sue Cooley]

Parks, Nellie: The following colored girls started to Lincoln Institute: Maggie Aitch, Nellie Parks and Alice Goode.  From 9-24-1920 Republican Tribune, column entitled "Thirty Years Ago" (actually occurred in 1890) [from the personal research of Sue Cooley]

Perkins, Robert, colored, Pacific, or one-legged Bob, died of consumption on September 27 at the home of a relative in Pacific. He worked at the depot, hotel and saloon. Source: October 7, 1904 Pacific Transcript

Perkins, M. J., a prominent colored citizen of this viciity, who has been confined to his bed the past five-and-a-half years, being paralyzed, died Tuesday April 11 [1922]. Source April 14, 1922 clipping from Kiel Files, Four Rivers Genealogy Society

Perkins, Rosa A., colored, of this city, called at this office on Thursday and requests us to state that the current rumors concerning the late difficulty in which it is alleged that she played a prominent role are unfounded and unwarranted. Source: March 8, 1889 Washington Observer

Perkins, Permelia: Hall, James: James Hall and Permelia Perkins (colored) were married Monday evening by J. R. May, justice of the peace. Source: November 28, 1913 Franklin County Tribune

Perkins, Chole "Sook" and Mary: The Perkins family history (white) as told to Keith Wilson by Lillie Wilson, includes this story. I am assuming these Perkins slaves took the name of Perkins. If anyone has information to the contrary, please let me know. John Moseby Perkins (white) brought boatloads of shoes across the river from Augusta where he purchased them, Most were for the small black children. He would carry the shoes by stringing them around his neck. John Moseby Perkins had two black slaves named Chole "Sook" and Mary. The two women fought constantly. Chole  was larger and always picked on Mary. John Perkins would put the two women on opposite sides of a picket fence and give each a switch. Mary, being a tall slender woman, had a longer reach so this method of letting them fight it out gave Mary an edge. [from family history -- not newspaper]

Richardson, Lige (Mrs.): Charles Clay and family of DeSoto, MO passed through here on their way to visit Mrs. Clay’s mother, Mrs. Lige Richardson, of near Union. Source: "Among the Colored People of Moselle", column in October 22, 1926 issue of The Republican Tribune from the Franklin County Historical Society.  [from the personal research of Sue Cooley]

Roberts, Ed: See Social Events Labadie picnic.

Roberts, Hannah. Died on Friday the 24th, Hannah Roberts, colored, who was probably the oldest person in the county. She was brought from old Virginia by the Roberts family when quite young. Mrs. Nancy Roberts, a widow, married Esac Stoner of this county and, at the time of freedom, was the property of the Stoners. Her only boy, owned by Judge Dickinson, was killed in the army at the beginning of the war and it was for this boy the old mother received for so many years, a pension. She had a most wonderful memory and could tell of events and things that happened over a century ago although it was but yesterday. She lived with her son-in-law, Frank Shores. March 3, 1905 Franklin County Tribune.  [from the personal research of Sue Cooley]

Robinson, Professor, who has been reemployed in our colored school, spent a few days here this week. Pacific items, Friday, July 5, 1907 Republican Headlight, Franklin County Historical Society [from the personal research of Sue Cooley]

Shobe, Charles and Elvina Winkle (colored) were united in happy bonds of matrimony Sunday at the colored church. Labadie Locals. Friday 3/15/1907 Republican Headlight, Franklin County Historical Society [from the personal research of Sue Cooley]

Shores, Frank M.: Obit posted on Boards.

Shores, James and Nathaniel. See 1919 for brief biography.

Shores, James: James Shores, a colored man, age about 70 years, was found dead in a well on his farm a few miles east of Union. It was decided that he was killed by a bruise on his head, but it could not be told whether he fell in and hit the side of the well as he went down or whether he had been killed and thrown into the well. Source: December 10, 1920 Republican Tribune, column entitled "35 Years Ago". (actual event took place in 1885.)  [from the personal research of Sue Cooley]

Shores, Lylas: Lylas Shores and son, Carlee, were visitors at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Nathional (sic) Shores Sunday. Source: January 14, 1927 issue of The Republican Tribune, column entitled: "Among the Colored Folks of Moselle" from Franklin County Historical Society. [Note: spelled as Nathaniel in another place] [from the personal research of Sue Cooley]

Shores, Nathional: Nathional Shores and wife were called to St. Louis on account of the death of Mr. Shores brother. Source: October 15, 1926 issue of The Republican Tribune from the Franklin County Historical Society [from the personal research of Sue Cooley]

Shores, Squire, a colored man, had the misfortune to cut his knee very bad last Saturday while cutting corn. Moselle items. Friday, Sept 27, 1907 Republican Headlight. Franklin County Historical Society [from the personal research of Sue Cooley]

Shores, Walter: Walter Shores and sister, Miss Mable, were called to St. Louis last week on account of the death of Mr. Shores’ brother. October 8, 1926 issue of The Republican Tribune from Franklin County Historical Society

Shores, Virginia (married a Proctor), died 1927. Obituary posted to New Boards.

Stanley: See posted obit for Frank Shores. His wife was a Stanley.

Turner, Charles W.: Two colored boys of pacific, Charles W. Turner and Joseph N. Adams, left last Saturday for Jefferson Barracks for examination. 9/4/1942 Pacific Transcript [from the personal research of Sue Cooley]

Wells, Agnes: Mrs. Agnes Wells, an old and well known colored lady of this place, died last week and was laid to rest Saturay in the colored cemetery east of Union. Aunt agnes, as she was best known to the older residents of Union, reached a ripe old age. For quite a number of years she and her husband, Sam Wells, made their home about a mile east of Union on the Union-St. Louis road. So far as we know, Mr. and Mrs. Wells were the onlly surviving slaves in this community and with the death of Mrs. Wells, Uncle Sam is the lone survivor. Both Mr. and Mrs. Wells had many friends among the white people as well as among the colored people who sympathize with Uncle Sam in his bereavement. Source: April 13, 1923 The Republican Tribune

Withington, Mose (Rev.): The colored folks had a large meeting at the Harris schoolhouse at Indian Prairie on Sun and were preached to by Rev. Mose Withington. Franklin County Record 7-26-1883 [from the personal research of Sue Cooley]

 

Franklin County Schools

There were a number of African American schools in Franklin County. If you can contribute any information about these schools, please contact me. I would welcome photographs, teacher lists, student lists, and stories. I need your input to make this site what it should be. Some listed probably had different names.

Booker T Washington School (New Haven)

Christopher Attucks (Washington)

Drake School (Robertsville area)

Harris School (Indian Prairie)

Labadie School

Pacific School

The Red Tin School   (New Haven)

Union School

Washington School - Christopher Attucks

W. E. B. Dubois School - Moselle

The Booker T. Washington School

Built in 1924 at New Haven. See New Haven - the Early Years for more information. Please contact with more information.

The Drake School

The Drake School, #079, was located at Robertsville. The first known black Drake School was held for three months of the year in the white Drake School building on Willowford Road, about one-fourth mile from the black school that was later erected.

It was decided that the black children of the district should have their own school so they could have a longer school year. Land was donated and a one-room structure was erected on Highway N in back of property belonging to Walter Shores (in 1997).

Each day, two children from the black school and two children from the white school were assigned to carry water from the spring on Schuster's property.

In 1920-1921, school records show that Estes Perkins was paid $70 per month to teach the white Drake School and Shephard Hinkle was paid $40 to teach the black Drake School.

Used textbooks were passed from the white school to the black school Playground equipment was nonexistent.

In later years, the school employed Delma Brown as the first cook. Helen McCullough, wife of teacher Miles McCullough, was next. Sometimes Sherwood Hulsey would catch a rabbit on the way to school and the school cook would prepare it for his lunch. However, there was no cook during the last year of classes at Drake and students were, once again, carrying their lunches.

In the early years, children walked to school or rode horseback. In later years, Larun and Vera Boyd picked the children up in a panel truck. Eventually, a regular school bus was employed.

In the fall of 1959, as a result of integration, Drake students entered Lonedell School.

At a joint meeting of the two school boards, Lonedell board member, Arthur Williams, who had donated land for the Lonedell School, reassured the black community that their teacher, Annie Baker, would be welcomed into the Lonedell School. [note: She later taught at St. Clair.]

The students entered Lonedell School, uncertain what to expect, but Principal Maude Lefler handled the change smoothly.

Partial List of Drake Teachers

1916-17    Donnie Shepperd
1918-19    Shephard Hinkle
1919-20    Shephard Hinkle
1920-21    Shephard Hinkle
1935-36    Willa E. Cummings
1936-37    Willa E. Cummings
1937-38    Willa E. Cummings
1938-39    Willa E. Cummings
1939-40    Willa E. Cummings
1940-41    Alfreda Coleman
1941-42    Alfreda Coleman
1942-43    Willa E. Cummings
1943-44    Savannah J. Roy
1944-45    Leeya Kemp (or Lillian?)
1945-46    Alfreda Coleman
1946-47    Helen Crawford
1947-48    HelenCrawford
1953-54    Miles McCullough
1954-55    Miles McCullough
1955-56    Annie Baker
1956-57    Annie Baker
1957-58    Annie Baker
1958-59    Annie Baker
 

Some Drake Graduates:

(about) 1919:        Bernice (Bland) Hulsey

1956:                    Julius Flemings
                            Sam Hulsey
                            Nevada (Brison)

1959:                    Spencer Johnson
                            Willie G. Brison
                            Eugene Flemings
                            Margaret (Dickerson)
             

Harris School:

The Harris Schoolhouse was located at Indian Prairie, north of St. Clair. At this point, no further information is available.

Labadie School:

Enumeration of colored youth, taken May 12, 1910 [source Washington Historical Society -- contributed by Sandra Gurnow]] This is transcribed from the actual handwritten enumeration and some of it is very difficult to decipher and there could be errors in transcription. For example Lewis (Perkins) seems more likely than Gewis, but the first letter of his name looked like the "G" in other names. It may be another name starting with "G."

Boys
    Mertin Bradley, age 14
    Arthur Brown, age 19
    Jabez Brown, age 14
    Willie Clark, age 13
    George Clark, age 11
    John Clark, age 9
    Eliza Clay, age 14
    James Claggett, age 9
    Harvey Claggett, age 7
    John Ellis, age 12
    Richard Ellis, age 8
    James Ellis, age 6
    Charles Hall, age 17
    Lee Hall, age 15
    Stonewall Hall, age 13
    Charles Hardin, age 11
    Henry Hardin, age 6
    Allison Hinkle, age 16
    Glen Hinkle
    Guy Hinkle
    Ambrosa Perkins, age 15
    Harry Perkins, age 10
    Gewis Perkins, age 9
    Ernest Clark, age 6
    Willie Hall, age 19
    Jabez Hall, age 18
    Abe Perkins, age 6

Girls
    Gertrude Bradley, age 12 or 10
    Virginia Bradley, age 11
    Beula Bass, age 14
    Mattie Bass, age 11
    Effie Bass, age 9
    Clara Bass, age 6
    Lillie Brown, age 15
    Carrie Brown, age 9
    Eugenia Clark, age 16
    Willetta Ellis, age 13
    Orvilla Hall, age 11
    Nancy Hall, age 9
    Grace Hardin, age 8
    Susie Hinkle, age 14
    Alice Perkins, age 12
    Leona Clark, age 8
    Mona Perkins, age 16
    illegible, age 8
 

Pacific School:
    1906-07    Professor C. L. Robinson
    1907-08    Professor C. L. Robinson

Red Tin School - This school, located on Olive Street in New Haven, was the first school for blacks in that town. More information needed.

Union School:

Union: There will be a special school meeting on the 31st of July for the purpose of voting on removing the site of the colored schoolhouse, and to select a new one in lieu of the old one. July 13, 1888 Franklin County Tribune.

Union: At the special school meeting held in Union on Tuesday last, it was decided to remove the site of the colored schoolhouse near the center of the district, by a vote of 63 to none against it. Col. Maupin, J. H. Pugh, and three or four others refrained from voting, and claimed that a majority of the voters of the district had not voted in favor of the change, consequently that the whole action of the meeting was illegal. The site selected was two lots belonging to Jim Roberts, near the southeast corner of the town. August 3, 1888 Franklin County Tribune

Union: There was a special school meeting held in the schoolhouse in Union on the 12th inst. at which it was decided by a vote of 80 to 1 to move the site of the colored school building to the southeast part of town on some lots to be purchased from T. A. Lowe for two hundred dollars. There were three voters present who did not vote, however. November 16, 1888 Franklin County Tribune.

Union: The colored school of Union had their closing exercises at Terschluse’s hall Sat evening. The attendance was good and the program arranged by the teacher, J. O. Casey, was good and rendered credibly. Source: May 30, 1913 Franklin County Tribune

Union: J. O. Cayce, the teacher of the colored school in Union, d last Mon 12/8/ after an illness of several weeks. The deceased was apparently a strong, healthy man of some thirty odd years of age and since he came to Union 5 yr ago, he had been active in his school work. Soon after he began his term of school in the fall he began suffering from liver trouble. Since that time he grew constantly worse until the end came Mon night. His remains were taken to his old hoe town in Fredricktown, MO for burial. Under the mgmt of Mr. Cayce the colored school has prospered. In fact, his adm was acknowledged to be the best the school has ever had. He was an exemplary citizen in many ways, honest, industrious, and faithful to duty, and he had gained the respect of both colored and white people. He leaves to mourn his loss his wife and three small children, besides his mother and a number of brothers and sisters. Source: December 12, 1913 Franklin County Tribune

Washington School - Christopher Attucks: No additional information yet.

W. E. B. Dubois School - Moselle

The W. E. B. Dubois School (black). In November 1874, Moselle district clerk advertised for a competent person to teach a colored school in District No. 5, Township 43, Range 1 East. Source: Franklin County Record, 10 November, 1874

In 1921, it was reported that the black students, under leadership from their teacher, Mrs. Cornelia M. McAllister, presented one of the best school entertainments that had been witnessed there for many years. Every seat was filled a half hour before the program was to start. The white people sat on one side of the church where the program was given and the black people sat on the other side. The teacher explained that the object of the entertainment was to raise funds to purchase needed supplies for the school. The children, reportedly, did a beautiful rendition of the Motion Song. Professor Lewis, of the white school, said the program was one of the best he had ever heard and urged parents and teachers to cooperate in order to accomplish the most good. Republican Tribune, 14 October, 1921.

 

Franklin County Churches

Labadie          New Haven          Moselle          Union

Labadie A.M.E. Church. The A.M.E. church of Labadie had their spring rally Sunday, the 16th instant, which proved to be a grand success, $90.00 being raised. Misses Mary and Wilma North raised the amount to $95.00 by donating $5.00. John Ellis and Miss Nellie Brown, captain of Club No. 3, were the successful competitors for first prize, they having raised $43.00. Club No. 2, John Brow, Captain, raised $24.00; and Club No. 1, William Price, Captain, raised $23.00. We are very thankful to our white friends of Labadie who helped us to reduce our debt from $127.50 to $47.50. The membership of our church was wonderfully increased during our revival last September. Our membership has increased from 27 to 65 since conference in September last. Thanks to one and all. W. C. Williams, Pastor; M. G. Newmann, Secretary, April 28, 1899 Franklin County Tribune

Moselle: The work on the Moselle church is just about completed. Source: Newspaper column entitled "Among the Colored Folk of Moselle", September 17, 1926 issue of The Republican Tribune from Franklin Countly Historical Society.

New Haven: The Second Christian Church began right after the Civil War and was rebuilt on Catawba Street in 1893.

Union: The members of the A.M.E. church contemplate building a house of worship near their present schoolhouse. Handcock & Son will put up the building. November 16, 1888 Franklin County Tribune

 

Social Events (Dances / Picnics / Etc.)

The colored picnic at Labadie last Saturday was quite well attended, and a good time generally was had with but one incident to mar the day's enjoyment. Some of the young bloods took a jug of whiskey and hid it in the bushes. Although the jug was kept hid, the effects of the whiskey showed itself upon a few. At night one Ed Roberts seemed to regard himself as lord of the grounds, and began to amuse himself by shooting at the lights, regardless of the proximity of the lights to the heads of his brethern. Some of the old ones tried to stop him; first persuavive words were used, but these only provoked Roberts and he became very abusive and threatening, and he finally drew his knife upon one of the peacemakers by the name of Governor Baker. After giving him plenty of warning, Baker drew a revolver and shot Roberts through the abdomen, inflicting a painful, but not necessarily a fatal wound. Gallenkamp was sent for, but after learning the facts, he refused to prosecute Baker. August 10, 1888 Franklin County Tribune

 

 

This page was last updated Monday February 27, 2012 .

  Sue Blesi, Franklin County Coordinator, Missouri USGenWeb Project

 

©Copyright 1996-2012, Sue Blesi. All rights reserved.