Writing Better Queries

The idea is to encourage people to reply, right?
They are more likely to do so if they recognize your family as related to people they have researched. Include some details about when and where your family lived. Always include:

Name Place Date and put them near the beginning. If you don't know exact dates, estimate. For GenWeb queries, you should include the county name in its appropriate connection for your information. Moderators may not post queries if they don't seem appropriate to a specific county. Not everyone can remember the name of every tiny town in a county, and many moderators coordinate several counties at once.

It is also a good idea to follow the common practice of putting each surname in all capital letters. This helps the reader who is scanning for familiar names, and will catch his or her attention if there is a connection.

Look at these good examples:


Smarter Searcher

LEGGETT Rufus; Columbus, Cherokee Co, Kansas, USA; 1860-1940. My great-grandfather Rufus LEGGETT died in Columbus, Kansas when my mother was a little girl, sometime in the 1930's. She thinks he was in his 70's then, maybe somewhat younger. I'm looking for information on when and where he was born, as well as his parents.


Metoo Metoo

ZAHM/SAUM; anywhere; anytime. I'm studying the ZAHM family worldwide. I've traced my own line to villages in Lorraine, France near the German border in the 1700-1828 timeframe. I have information on branches of the family in Clay Co, IN, as well as places in IL, KS, OH, NY, VA, and also Lorraine and Saarland. Interested in contacting any other members of the family to share information.


Smart Researcher

CROUCH; Franklin Co., Ohio, USA; 1840-1930. I'm looking for information about my grandfather, William CROUCH. He died in Columbus, OH in the late 1920's. We think he was in his late 80's then. My Dad, James CROUCH, was his only son, born in Columbus, OH about 1892. I'm interested in finding William CROUCH's wife and parents.


Now you've given us enough clues that someone might recognize the family, or point you to the right resources for the time and place so you can learn more about the family. Good Hunting!