Harrison County Missouri Obituaries

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Subject: ELDER JOHN S. ALLEN
Submitted by: Phil Stewart (JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Democrat, Dec 28, 1893

Elder John S. Allen died Dec 13, 1893, at his residence in Bethany, Mo. He was born in Overton county, Tenn., June 26th, 1814, and like a majority of men who rule this world, he was born and raised on a farm. His father was William Allen and his mother was Mary (Copeland) Allen.

The subject of this sketch emigrated to Illinois in 1832 and to this county (then unorganized) in 1841, in company with John Brown and wife, Thomas Tucker and family, W. R. Allen and family, Lawson Jennings and wife, Rev. Ephriam Stewart and family and A. W. Allen, all of whom became well known and prominent citizens of this county.

Mr. Allen was married in Illinois to Nancy Childress in 1835, who survives him after 59 years of married life.

He left surviving him the following named children to wit: Emaline Templeman, wife of William A. Templeman, Mary King, wife of Dr. R. D. King of St Joseph, MO., Elizabeth Roberts, wife of James M. Roberts, and the following named grandchildren viz: Mrs Bessie Wanamaker, nee Templeman and wife of George W. Wanamaker Esq., who has been appointed administrator of his estate, John A. Templeman, editor of The Democrat, of this city, Hattie Hohr nee Templeman widow of William Hohr deceased, Emma Templeman, Willie Templeman, Marion Templeman, Charles Allen and Elmer Allen of Colorado, and Robert Allen and John Allen, children of James R. Allen, deceased, and Mary E. Allen, and Vesper Allen, Ada Allen, Francis W. Allen and James W. Allen, children of Willard C. Allen, deceased, and Maud M. Allen, of this city, also the following named great-grandchildren, viz: Bessie Vandivert, daughter of Rosa Vandivert, nee Templeman, deceased, and Dr. A, H. Vandivert of this city, Ernest and Hazel Wanamaker, children of George W. & Bessie Wanamaker, afore mentioned, and Lucile Allen, daughter of Robert L. and Maud Allen.

Elder Allen was converted and became a member of the Christian church in 1837 and in 1838 was ordained an elder or minister of that denomination. When he came to this county in 1841, he was both a pioneer settler and preacher. He preached in numerous localities all over this Grand River country, securing converts to his denomination and organizing churches. He organized the Christian church of Bethany in 1842 at the residence of John Poynter, father of our townsman, Amos Poynter, of which he became and continued to be its pastor till about the war period. Such was his ability and Ernest devotion in his church work, that up to the late war, his church occupied the whole ground, religiously, in Bethany and vicinity. Up to that time no other church organization existed in Bethany. His devotion to his church was remarkable. In addition to giving much of his time to preaching at home and through the surrounding counties, he has, through his whole life, contributed lavishly of his means for the upbuilding of his denomination.

He contributed $1,000 for the erection of the two church houses in Bethany, $550 for the erection of a parsonage, $300 to the Church Extension Fund, $100 to the fund for the support of the superanauted preachers, $1,500 to the Orphan School at Camden Point, Mo., and $2,000 to the Christian College of Albany, Mo. In addition to all this, he, during his life, contributed to the erection of more than 20 church houses of his denomination in different places in this section of Missouri.

Few instances indeed can be found where a preacher, after giving so largely of his time to his duties in preaching, and that, too, with very limited compensation, should have so liberally contributed money for the furthering of the interests of his denomination. Surely his life should occupy a bright page in the history of his church.

Mr. Allen's success in his church work grew out of the mental and moral structure of the man. He was a man of intense convictions, both in matters pertaining to religion and politics. Like most men of strong convictions, he was somewhat inclined to be prejudiced against those who stood in opposition. This, however, should not be considered at least a very serious criticism, for my experience in life leads me to believe that a man with strong convictions and strong prejudices accomplishes more good and achieves greater success than one without convictions. This, however, does not preclude the truth of the proposition, that strong convictions without prejudice is the standard to which we should aspire. But our human nature is such, that, as a rule, strong convictions and prejudice against opponents go hand in hand. There are exceptions to this rule. One exception, indeed was so perfect and glorious that the world has gazed upon it with reverence and admiration for a generation. Abraham Lincoln was a man of the most earnest convictions yet he was absolutely tolerant, charitable and unprejudiced toward those who differed with him.

When the locality upon which this city is built was elected for the county seat, Mr. Allen was appointed by the county court as Commissioner to purchase the land, plat the town and sell the lots, and is entitled to the honor of being the founder of Bethany. I trust his friends will not consider me irreverent, in such a connection as this, if I should barely suggest that his capacity as a preacher, a businessman and as an orator, was somewhat in excess of his capacity as a plat maker of a new town. Mr. Allen held the office of County and Circuit Clerk about the time of the organization of this county.

One of the most remarkable traits of Mr. Allen was his independence of his environments in the formation of his opinoins and his moral courage or courage of his convictions. In the exercises of his judgement he seemed never to regard what others thought, but followed his own intellectual process. One of the most remarkable illustrations of his moral courage occurred in 1859. At Fairview church, in what was then Sugar Creek township, in this county, there was held a joint discussion between the Rev. Henry Howe, of the Methodist church, upon the question in substance: Does the Bible teach that human slavery is right? Rev. Planck took the affirmative and the Rev. Howe the negaitve. Mr. Howe, in his argument, denied that the great God of this universe taught in His revealed word, that slavery was right. For so denying in effect shortly after the discussion the Rev. Howe was arrested upon a criminal charge under the slave code of Missouri and brought to Bethany for trial. Mr. Allen deeming the arrest unfair and an infringement of the right of free speech, volunteered to defend Mr. Howe who belonged to a church he did not approve, and who had been opposed by Rev. Planck who belonged to his own denomination. No one coming on to life's stage since the war can in any degree appreciate the independence and moral courage manifested by Mr. Allen in thus volunteering to defend Mr. Howe. Mr. Allen was born and raised in the south. His environments politically and to some extent religously were pro-southern and pro-slavery. This county then was pro-slavery six to one, and the older citizens well know how cruel, relentless and intolerant were the pro-slavery men as a rule in slave states against even the slightest manifestation of sympathy for men who were in any degree anti-slavery. Throwing all these things aside, facing the obloquy of his best friends, casting from him the influence of his birth and early life, thinking only of the right as God gave him to see the right, he walked erect and defieant down to the court house and tendered without pecuniary reward his services to defend this unpopular preacher, and his then unpopular cause. Largely through his services and influence the prosecution ultimately was dismissed. This, to my mind, well constitutes one of the brightest pages of his history. Hundreds of the older citizens in this section of the state will reverently treasure in their memories, so long as life lasts this trial and the brave man who dared to defend an unpopular cause, because he deemed it right. The war came and thousands of good men in the border slave states were hesitating as to which side they ought to take. Not so with Mr. Allen. Without waiting to see which side would be the most popular, he came out boldly for the union and the old flag. He became a candidate for and was elected a delegate in 1861 to the state convention to consider the relations of the state to the federal union. This convention was the most important deliberate body ever assembled in this state and it saved Missouri to the union. History does not quite sufficiently attach importance to the attitidue of the border slave states in the great work of preserving the union. The speech of S. A. Douglas at Springfield, Ill., May 1, 1861, the efforts of J. J. Crittenden, of Kentucky, operating nationally by their prominence, and the bold and outspoken position of hundreds of such men as John S. Allen, operating locally in the border states, together with the conservatism and tact of Abraham Lincoln, saved the border states to the union.

Mr. Allen was a many sided man. Successful as a preacher, in the political field as an ardent democrat whenever he chose to enter that arena, and as a businessman. He accumulated more property during his life than is usual for a clergyman. He was much sought after in financial enterprises, for he had the qualities that make a successful businessman. Prudent in expenditure, conservative in investments, and above all having absolute integrity, he secured that reputation which gave credit to any financial enterprise with which his name was connected. He was president of the Behtany Savings Bank for 20 years. He was a director of a bank in Chillicothe, MO., and was connected with several other banks in the state.

For a long time in Bethany he was almost the only man who would denounce publicly the sale and use of intoxicants as a beverage. The healthy sentiments (compared to other towns) in Bethany on the temperance question by which no saloon has ever been in this town for 30 years, is largely due to his work in that line. He had the attributes of an orator. His voice was pleasant, has manner dignified, his argument clear, he had also wit and humor. He had one deficiency, he lacked ambition for worldly fame and power. But for this I have always thought since I became acquainted with him he might have attained a national reputation. Yet he was not singular in this. The world is full of mute, inglorious Miltons whose fame is unsung because they cared not for it. About 20 years ago some person in this town published an article in one of our town papers charging him with inconsistency and hypocrisy on the temperance question. On the next Sabbath he announced in church that on a given night named during the following week he would reply to these strictures upon his character. The night came and the church was full. For once at least, Mr Allen was fully aroused. I never heard a better speech in all that constitutes a great speech, to wit, argument, biting sarcasm, with and pathos. The effect upon the audience was marked. His newspaper advocary was annihilated, his pen stopped and no reply was ever heard of in newspaper or other place. What he did that night indicated to me that he could achieve success as a debater in a deliberative body.

Mr. Allen was tender and affectionate in his domestic relations. He loved his home better than any place on earth except, perhaps, his church house. Do we always appreciate what it is to have a good home and to love it? The home is the nursery of the church; the foundation of our social and political life. Thoughts of home are the sweetest on earth; home scenes and associations are the dearest to our hearts. Payne wrote a song about home. It had no literary merit, yet it is sung and read more often than any other, because the song is of home and its dearly loved scenes. At the World's Fair in the Art Gallery were grand pictures by famous artists. Near these grand pictures was a small one representing a tender home scene. The crowds that gathered around this home picture were many times larger and lingered much longer than at any of the great pictures near it.

With advancing age, Mr. Allen and his aged wife moved down the decline of life hand in hand, heart to heart. At night they would meet at the old fashioned fire place and talked about the past when life was young and their hope of that future that endeth not.

The 59th anniversary was approaching and sickness came to both.

The aged wife and mother earnestly expressed the hope that she would go before him. But that was not to be. He has gone before, and she is left. But listen venerable widow, keep a cheerful heart, for according to the course of nature you too will soon pass over to the "golden shore" where your 59 years of wedded life and home communion will, as we all hope, expand to a time that hath no end, as is promised to those who love the Lord and keep his commandments.

D. S. Alvord

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Source: Bethany Democrat, Jan 4, 1894

Tributes of Respect Paid to the Memory of Eld. J. S. Allen by Friends of Many Years

The Democrat takes great pleasure in reproducing the following tributes to the memory of Eld. John S. Allen.

After giving a biographical sketch and review of his life's work, Col. D. J. Heaston contributes the following to the Ridgeway Journal:

"I believe he was the most even tempered man that I ever knew. At all times, in all places and under all circumstances, he was the same calm, cool and consistent Christian gentleman. With him there was no high tide and no low tide, but the same constant, unhurried, everflowing stream, as if supplied from the same unvarying foutain. It may be permitted me to echo what I believe to be the general sentiment of esteem in which he was held by all who knew him. As a man he was frank in disposition, courteous in manner, generous in spirit, brave in principle, true to every trust reposed in him. There was about him no pomp, ostentation or desire to be conspicuous, but on the contrary he was modest, retiring, somewhat reticent and therefore needed to be thoroughly and closely clutivated to be fully understood and appreciated. He was not ambitious of outward show, notoriety, or political distinction, but all he did was in the spirit of meekness, and for the advancement of the Master's cause. He hated shams and false teachings, and despised hypocracy. He felt that it was his duty to antagonize error, and to fight sin. He was an uncompromising temperance man, because he believed that intoxicating liquors were the cause of much sin and misery. He said to me once that he disliked making temperance speeches, because he could hardly do so without offending somebody and a temperance speech that did not attack the rum traffic had as well not be made. In his kindness of heart he was sorry to hurt the feelings of even the rum seller.

Parson Allen had but poor school privileges when young, but by extensive reading and close observation of men and things, he became a well informed man. He was not an orator, but he could speak well. He spoke from the sincerity of motive and was filled with an honest conviction of right and duty, and this made him always appear earnest. He spoke from the heart and generally reached the heart. He had a superb voice, clear and crystal and ringing like a bell. He had a commanding appearance and large brain, and when he arose before an audience he attracted their attention at once and held it until he closed. He was an original thinker and naturally witty, and seasoned his addressess with enough wit to please, while it entertained and convinced. He spoke to the common understanding. He carried conviction by conviction. He interested his hearers by the honest utterence and honest faith of an honest and sincere man. He believed what he said, and a zeal which only comes from devotion to truth, kindled corresponding fires in the hearts of his hearers. He was simple, plain and honest in his every day life, and his purity of character was a great element of his strength. The personal character of Parson Allen was full of noble qualities, endearing him to his friends while living and making his memory a constant delight. Kindness of heart seemed to mellow his whole nature. There was in him neither envy nor hate, and only generosity, charity and good will. In many respects Parson Allen was a remarkable man, For the past fifty years he has been the most prominent and remarkable man in our county. To him are we more indebted for good society, for religious development and for all that makes our people happy and good than any other man that ever lived in the county. "With charity for all and malice toward none," he went about among his neighbors doing good. It was his mission to "preach the word", to help the poor and to aid the deserving. Every good work received his pure heart and noble soul. He had the zeal of a martyr and the valor of a patriot. In him was greatness, but it was the greatness of unselfishness, gentle and pure as the heart of a child. In him was charity - charity white and gentle as the moonlight that shines into the shadows of night. In him there was heroism - it was the heroism of the knight that draws no sword, but waved in his hand, high above his benevolent brow, the sacred wand of religion, of love, of fraternity. By reason of strength and good habits his life was lengthened out to the Psalmist's four score years. But now he is gone. He has fallen like the mighty oak in the stillness of the forest. We can only mourn his loss, and indulge the fond hope that the good he has done may live after him, that this sad bereavement may do much to seal the truths he so long taught, that his public utterances like good seed sown upon fertile soil may continue to bring forth good fruits of an hundred fold, and that the hearts of his neighbors may be brought together in a union of fraternal fellowship and love. Having known Parson Allen intimately for more than a third of a century, having counseled and associated with him closely, and having been in perfect accord with him on nearly every question, I deem it a pleasure to bear witness to his many good qualities of head and heart, to make this statement voluntarily and without solicitation, to pay this tribute of respect to one I have known and admired so long. Farewell kind teacher, dear friend, farewell."

W. H. Hillman, who will be remembered by all the old settlers, writes the following from Kansas to the Albany Ledger:

"In looking over the Albany Ledger of 22nd inst., I noticed that Elder J. S. Allen departed this life recently at his late residence in Behtany, Mo. I understand he died in his 80th year. The writer of this paper heard him preach the gospel of Christ forty years ago this winter in Bethany, Mo. Then I was 16 years old, now I am 56 years old.

Elder J. S. Allen's life was one that is pleasant to remember. For nearly 36 years he was our pastor in the Christian church at Bethany, so your readers can see that I knew him intimately - for about forty years, and all this time his life was full of beneficent labors, rich in good deeds, abounding in helpfulness; so today I am glad to be able to testify to his uniform kindness and his absolute integrity of character. Integrity expresses well his character. It means unbrokenness, wholeness, soundness. His purposes were pure; he was honest under all circumstances - in the church, in the family, in society. Bro. Allen was thoughtful for others. In business he was energetic and successful, but he never gave place in his heart to avarice. Truly, in the death of Elder Allen, a prince and a great man has fallen from among the people at Bethany. Mr. Editor, should I dictate his epitaph, I would like to write this: "Here lies an honest man, a friend and a believer in humanity. He sought to make the world better for having lived in it. He was not narrow minded. He accepted the world as his country; his leading theme, the gospel of the son of God, and to do good was his religion." Farewell, Brother Allen; we loved you in this world, and we love your memory still."

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Subject: MARY JANE ALLEN
Submitted by: Phil Stewart (JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican, Mar 2, 1904

Mary Jane Allen was born in Delaware, July 25, 1824. Most of her childhood was spent in Maryland. She moved to Illinois with her uncle, when but 13 years of age, and later came to Missouri. Was married in 1842 to Tilford Hogan, living with him but a short time. On May 3, 1846, she was married to Josiah J. Allen, and lived with him until she departed this life, Sunday, February 21, 1904.

Deceased was a member of the Christian church at Mt. Gilead. She had suffered many years, but bore her suffering patiently and passed quietly away. She was the mother of nine children, four of whom are still living. Three were present during the last sickness, one lives in Kansas.

Mother Allen was a lady of strong mind and force of character, a true wife, a devoted mother, kind and attentive to the sick, and would do all in her power to make others happy.

The funeral was preached by the writer at Mt Gilead, in the presence of a large gathering of relatives and neighbors, after which her remains were taken to the Allen cemetery and laid to rest, where many of her old time friends and relatives were sleeping.

--- J. H. Coffey

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Subject: MRS. J.T. ALSUP (JOSIE F. NORTH)
Submitted by: Colleen Dobrzynski (c_dobrzynski@hotmail.com)
Source: Maryville Daily Forum, Tuesday 3 October, 1944

Mrs. J. T. Alsup Dies

Mr. and Mrs. X'a Lincoln of of south Maryville received word today of the death of Mrs. J.T. Alsup formerly of Maryville, who died at 3 o'clock yesterday afternoon at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Winifred Weed of Longview, Wash. When the Alsup family resided in Maryville, the late Rev. Alsup held pastorates at Pickering, Elmo and Ravenwood.

Funeral services will be held at 2 o'clock Sunday afternoon at the Christian Church at New Hampton. Burial will be at New Hampton.

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Subject: NONA MARY AXAM
Submitted by: Deb Dailey (daileyknd@grm.net)
Source: Unknown Newspaper and Date

Nona Mary Axam, daughter of John T. and Daisy Boyd Axam, was born near Pleasanton, Decatur County, Iowa, October 20, 1908, and died September 17, 1931, near Kellerton. Her early childhood was spent in Mercer and Harrison Counties, Missouri, and later the family moved to Potter County, South Dakota, where she engaged in teaching in the public schools of that county. She leaves to mourn her departure her father and mother, two sisters, Anne and Viola, one of whom now lies seriously ill with typhoid fever at the home of her aunt, Mrs. Ed O. Moore, and two brothers, Alfred and Marvin, all residing at home in Lebanon, S.D., and two grandmothers and other relatives and a host of friends in Missouri and South Dakota. Funeral services were held from the Christian Church, conducted by the pastor, Rev. Kratzer, and burial was in the Maple Row Cemetery.

Submitter's note: Nona's middle name was MAY, not Mary. The surviving sister was ANNA, not Anne.

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Subject: ORA AXAM
Submitted by: Deb Dailey (daileyknd@grm.net)
Source: Yuma Pioneer, Thursday, August 28, 1930

ORA AXSOM SHOT AND KILLED AT STRATTON, NEBRASKA

Coroner's Jury Renders Verdict of Suicide, But Relatives Think He Was Murdered

Ora Axsom a resident of this section for the past fifteen years, was seriously shot and killed early Monday morning at Stratton, Nebraska.
The body of the slain man was in the basement of a barber shop where a card game had been in progress during Sunday night.
It has been possible for Yuma people to obtain only very meager reports of the tragedy. The only communication received directly was the statement from Stratton that Ora Axsom had shot himself to death and an inquest would be held. But no word in Yuma has been officially received as to the result of that inquest. It was learned from Stratton that the coroner's jury reached a verdict of suicide. But friends who have seen the body reject the idea of a self-inflicted wound. They point to the fact that the deceased's head showed no sign of ? or powder marks. They insist that if the man had held the gun to his head and fired, the explosion would have left some marks. They insist that the man would have been compelled to hold his hand in a very awkward position to fire the shot. It was reported that the coroner's jury was over 18 hours reaching a verdict with no indications that Axsom met his death by other than his own hands. A son is expected to go to Stratton today and further investigate the shooting and place the case in the hands of the district attorney.

His wife and seven children, six sons and one girl, besides his mother and other relatives survive him. During the past several months Mrs. Axsom and the youngest children have been residing in Greeley, this state, the children attending school in that city. The older boys have been attending to the farm work while their parents were away. One of the sons went to Greeley as soon as he heard of the tragedy and brought Mrs. Axsom and the young children back to Yuma.

The funeral was held from the Yuma Methodist Church Wednesday afternoon, August 27, Rev. William I. Jones officiating and the interment was at the Yuma Cemetery.

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Subject: IDA BELLE DOWNEY BAILEY
Submitted by: Marla Potts (pottsmarla@yahoo.com)
Source: The Davis City Advance, Davis City, Iowa Thursday, October l0, l895

A Sad Occurrence

Six short months ago, Mr. Albert Bailey led to the altar Miss Ida Downey of Ridgeway, Mo.

A short time after their marriage Mrs. Bailey's health began to fail, and last night death released her from her terrible sufferings, which only those who are victims of the dreaded disease, consumption, can understand.

Mrs. Bailey was l8 years old and a native of Mo. She came here last winter and made her home with Mrs. Refine Harvey. After her marriage she lived with her husband and his family at the Union House, where she has been confirmed invalid during her married life. She will be buried tomorrow at Andover, Mo., where her mother lies, and where she requested them to place her.

Her life has been one of simple Christianity, which makes death sweet by the knowledge that there is a happy home awaiting her, where cares and sickness are unknown. Mr. Bailey has the sympathy of his many friends who mourn with him for the loss of his wife.

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Subject: LIVY ANN SMOTHERS BARRITT
Submitted by: Barbra Chambers (MOHarris-Admin@Rootsweb.com)
Source: The Cainsville News, Thurs. Feb. 8, 1917

Grandmother Barritt who resided 2 miles east of Cainsville, passed away Sunday, Jan. 28, 1917, at the home of her son, Ab. She had not been seriously ill but the infirmities of old age were her's. She was in her 88th year, and was truly one of the pioneers of this part of Missouri.

She acted her part in all that went to make the state what it is today. She was industrious and persevering, a good nabor (sic) and friend and was loved by all who knew her. Years ago her husband went to Arkansas where he died, and she came back to make her home among her kindred.

Funeral services were held at the Cain Church Monday, Jan. 29, at 3 p.m. in the presence of a large audience of friends who came to show their love and respect for her. The entire service was a tender one and she is embalmed in our tears. The lesson was part of I Cor. 15:19. "Hope after Death" was the thought. The song service was good. After the parting look was taken we laid her to rest beside many of her kindred and friends of 60 or 70 years ago.

J.H. Burrows

(Please see biography on Bio page.)

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Subject: LOWELL J. BEALS
Submitter: Cheryl McCombs (cherylmccombs@comcast.net)
Source: Unknown, perhaps Bethany newspaper, Mar/Apr, 2004

Lowell J. Beals, 94, Bethany, Mo., died March 26, 2004, at a Bethany nursing home. Mr. Beals was born in Harrison Co., Mo., on Aug. 9, 1909, the son of William Thomas and Sarah Elvir (Hoover) Beals. He married Thelma Fordyce on March 18, 1932, and she preceded him in death on Dec. 29, 1994. He was a farmer and member of the American Hereford Cattle Association and the Hampshire Swine Association. He was also a member of the Bridgeport Christian Church. He was also preceded in death by his parents, two brothers, George and Earl Beals, and granddaughter Linda Lynette Conover. Surviving are son John F. Beals and wife Joan of Bethany; daughter Sherral Ann Conover and husband Frankie, Kearney, Mo.; three sisters, Gladys Harrison, Gilman City, Mo., Lois Selby, Ridgeway, Mo., and Marjorie Morris, Kansas City, Mo.; three granddaughters, Leslie Ann Folgate, Mt. Moriah, Mo., Melanie Denise Harryman, Grimes, Iowa, and Sonya Anette Britton, Eagles Mountain, Utah; four grandsons, Robin Lynn Conover, Fraizer Park, Calif., Rodney Wayne Conover, Orlando, Fla., Randy Duane Conover, Bentonville, Ark., and Richard Todd Conover, Orlando, Fla.; 16 great-grandchildren, Jason Folgate, Natasha Conover, Skyler Conover, Brandon Conover, Emily Folgate, Jordon Conover, Jared Conover, J. T. Conover, Cheyenne Conover, Zach Conover, Alexis Conover, Madison Conover, Hayley Conover, Jaclyn Conover, Jay Conover, and Kathryn Conover, and special friend Marie Pixley. Services were held March 30, 2004, at the Roberson Funeral Home in Bethany. Burial was in the Miriam Cemetery. Memorial gifts may be made to the American Cancer Society in care of the funeral home, P.O. Box 46, Bethany, Mo. 64424.

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Subject: JULIA ETTA (BONIFIELD) BEEBE
Submitted by: Patricia Surber (fsurber@kc.rr.com]
Source: Handwritten Document

Mrs. Julia Etta Beebe

Julia Etta Bonifield was born near Zanesville, Ohio, January 4, 1847, one of a family of nine children and passed on to her reward at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Lela Brower, in Cameron, October 14, 1936, at the age of 89 years, 10 months and 10 days. She was converted in the Methodist Church at Afton, Iowa, in 1863, under the preaching of the Rev. Williams. In November 1866 she was united in marriage to John Carper Beebe. To this union were born five daughters and two sons. These were: Iona Beebe now deceased; Candy Beebe now deceased; Mrs. Josie Pierce now deceased; Mrs. Lela Brower of Cameron, Mo; John Beebe of Cainsville, Mo; Mrs. Daisy Thompson of Cainsville, Mo; and Mrs. Vernell Baker of Kansas City, Mo. She also had three step daughters: Mrs. Dora Booze of St. Joseph, Mo; Mrs. Kate Risser of Chicago, IL now deceased; and Mrs. Jennie McClellan of Mount Vernon, Oh. She leaves twenty living grandchildren, twenty-three great grand children, and one great-great grandchild. Mrs. Beebe lived in Cainsville for some sixty years. In 1918 she moved to Cameron to live with her daughter Lela.

Aunt Julie, or Grandma Beebe, as she was known to all her friends, was always active in church work until her health and eye-eight failed nine years ago. She was always ready with willing heart and hands to help in any way possible. She was a member of the Women's Christian Temperance Union. When in Cainsville she served as president of the Ladies Aid Society and helped to organize the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society there, which society was named for her. Her children were all with her in her last illness. Her prayers and pleadings for her friends, her children and even the whole world will ever live in their hearts. A short time before she passed away, about two days, she sang, "Abide with Me," and "God will take Care of You," as Ailene played for her.

Friday, October 1st, she said "I remember a piece of poetry I recited sixty years ago. I think I can repeat it now. Write it down." And she recited again a piece of verse which was published in 1876 in a Princeton, Mo news paper and committed to memory by heart that time. The poem is:

The Tangled Skein

Our lives are crowded with fears,
Repeating again and again,
As our feeble hands have vainly tried
To straighten the tangled skein.
'Tis a sad voice of memory whispers
Of a robe of innocence worn,
When young hearts pure and stainless stood
At the rosy gates of morn.
Have you raised your eyes in pleading
As heavens pure smiling bloom,
And longed with unspoken languish
To begin your lives anew?
Have you made a few feeble efforts
To reach the gates of gold;
While the eyes of the world are looking
Watching you stern and cold?
The world saw only the fearful fall,
When we slipped from the narrow way;
But God sees the dark temptation
That leads our feet astray
. They may point with mocking laughter
To the waste and barren lands;
For God sees the dark temptation
That binds our helpless hands.
For His ears are never heavy
Nor His eyes are never dim;
For what the world misunderstands
Is clear as light to Him.
The sun keeps steadily shining,
Though the skies be overcast,
And patient toiling efforts
Will untangle the skein at last.

Funeral services were held Thursday morning at nine o'clock, in Cameron, conducted by Rev. M.M. Wolff. The remains were then brought to Cainsville, where another service was held at 2 p.m., Rev. Wolff being assisted in the service by Rev. Clay. She was laid to rest in the Akron Cemetery.

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Subject: GABRIEL BELL
Submitted by: Phil Stewart (JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican, March 25, 1909, page 5

Death of Gabriel Bell

Once again the death angel has visited our midst and called home another highly respected citizen and friend, Gabriel Bell. He was born November 22, 1840, at Borden, Clark County, Ind., and died March 3, 1909, at the home of his son Mark Bell, in Pawnee, MO. He was 69 years 4 months and 9 days old. He was married to Indiana Baggerly, January 10, 1861 at Borden, Indiana. To this union ten children were born, seven sons and three daughters. One son and one daughter died in infancy. Six sons and two daughters survive him; George and David Bell of Wray, Colorado; Mark Bell of Pawnee, Missouri; Mrs. Ida Daum of Hatfield, Mo; Jason and John Bell of Pawnee; Virgil Bell of Hatfield, Missouri; and Mrs. Lulu Thraikill of Pawnee, Missouri. Four sons and one daughter were at his bedside. Lulu was sick and was unable to be there, and George and David were unable to be there from Colorado.

He moved, with his family, from Indiana to Taylorsville, Ill., in 1875 and remained there until 1876; then he moved to Pawnee, Mo. In 1900 he began to carry the Star Mail from Hatfield to Eglinth. Then he moved to Hatfield, making it more convenient for his business. He lived there seven years. After quitting the mail route, he returned to the farm. In 1870 he united with the Christian Church. In later years he changed his membership to Saint Church and lived a Christian until death called him home. He was loved by all who knew him and was always so cheerful. It seemed as though he tried to look on the bright side of life. It was only ten months ago that his darling companion preceded him to the beyond. He was only sick about two weeks with pneumonia. He told them all that he did not want to get well and that he was prepared to go. He called the children to his bedside a few hours before his death and told them all to live so as to meet him in a better world, and that he wanted all things straightened up and to always remain loving brothers and sisters and not to have any trouble. His last words were of Lulu, who was unable to be at his bedside.

It seemed since his wife's death that he was always longing to be with her. He has only one brother living, and he resides in Indiana, but was unable to be there. He leaves six sons and 2 daughters and 1 nephew, Thomas Bell, of Pawnee, Missouri, and several grandchildren to mourn his death. Funeral services were conducted Saturday at 11 o'clock at the hall by Elder Snively, where a large congregation assembled to pay their last tribute of respect and show something of the esteem in which he was held in the community in which he lived. He was laid to rest in the Payne Cemetery. Sympathy is extended to the bereaved ones in the hour of trouble. Thus one by one we are passing on and one by one we are crossing the silent river to the great unknown - Yet while life's chain is never really broken and each link must fall away in death, we must turn thought and hope to the land where parting is unknown.

(Written by Evelyn Shackleton)

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Subject: INDIANA BAGGERLY BELL
Submitted by: Phil Stewart (JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican, May 7, 1908, page 8

Indiana Baggerly was born May 17, 1844 near Borden, Indiana and died at her home in Pawnee, Mo., April 27 1908. She was married to Gabriel Bell, Jan 10, 1861. To this union ten children were born, seven sons and three daughters. One son and one daughter died in infancy. The other eight were at her bedside during her sickness. Two sons George and David, went to home before she died. They live in Colorado. She was a member of the L.D.S. Church. The funeral was preached at the residence by Elder Joseph Snively, after which the remains were taken to the Lone Rock (Payne) Cemetery and laid to rest. She was a loving wife, mother, and kind neighbor. The husband and children have the sympathy of the neighborhood in their hour of trouble.

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Subject: DR. C. J. BLACKBURN
Submitted by: Phil Stewart (JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican, Jan 24, 1907

TRIBUTE TO THE MEMORY OF DR C. J. BLACKBURN

Dr. Charles J. Blackburn was born in Charlottesville, Va., February 11, 1826, and died at his home in this city at one o'clock a.m. January 19, 1907, thus closing a long and useful life.

Dr. Blackburn was reared at Staunton, Va., where he received his education. He left his native state in 1844 and came to St Louis, Mo., where he began the study of medicine. Two years later he went to Memphis, Mo., and entered the drug store of Dr. Hudnall, and began the practice of medicine a year later in partnership with Dr. Hudnall, and was married to Ermina E. Hudnall in 1847. Of this union ten children were born: Mrs Arabella Newman, deceased; Mrs Kate Taylor, of this city; Charles, died in infancy; Paul Guy, died in infancy; Mrs Clara Dunn, of this city; Alice, died in infancy; W. L. of Oklahoma; Claud, deceased; Mrs Nellie Prentiss, of this city; and Mrs Grace Derry of Oklahoma.

Mrs Blackburn died, from an accident, in July, 1884, and in 1885 Dr. Blackburn was united in marriage with Miss Ella Prentiss, a daughter of the late General B. M. Prentiss, of this city, who survives him.

Dr. Blackburn made the trip, overland, to California in 1849, returning in 1851. After practicing his profession in Howard County, Mo., for a short time, he came to Bethany in July, 1854, which has ever since been his home. He at once acquired a large and lucrative practice and was very successful. He possessed the starling and hustling qualities of the Missouri pioneer, and soon extended his business to farming, stock raising and general merchandising, at all of which he was successful. He was postmaster of Bethany during the latter part of President Buchanan's administration. He was the supervising architect in building the first brick court house and jail in Harrison county. His last service in this line was superintending the building of the beautiful Christian church of this city.

During a protracted meeting held here in 1861, Dr. Blackburn became a member of the Christian church, under the preaching of Elder W. D. Stewart. He served the church as an elder for a number of years, but when his health failed, five or six years ago, he requested to be relieved from active duty, but the church was loth to lose his services and they selected some younger and more active man, but continued him as an advisor and life member of the official board.

Funeral services were held from the Christian church at 2:30 p.m. Monday, Jan 21, 1907, conducted by his pastor, Eld T. J. Golightly, assisted by Rev. Hood, of the Presbyterian church, and Rev Reed of the M. E. churches. Elder Golightly spoke from Rev. 14:13, to a large and attentive audience. The floral offerings were many and beautiful. After the funeral, all that was mortal of Charles J. Blackburn was laid to rest in Miriam cemetery, under auspices of the Bethany Lodge No. 97, A.F. & A.M., of which he had been a member for more than half a century.

The family has the deepest sympathy of the entire community. Dr. Blackburn was a kind husband, an indulgent parent and of a generous disposition. His name is indelibly stamped on enterprises of Bethany, and is a rich heritage to his children.

[NOTE] The above article also contains a picture of Dr. Blackburn. Information indicates that Charles Blackburn may have been the son of Thomas Rolander Blackburn and Mary Ann Wright. The obituary also contains a lengthy tribute by the Masonic lodge.

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Subject: BIRDIE BLESSING
Submitted by: Phil Stewart (JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper, Aug 3, 1989

BIRDIE BLESSING:

Birdie Blessing, 87, New Hampton, died Wednesday July 26, 1989, at a St Joseph hospital.

Born in Wesley, Iowa, Mrs Blessing was a member of the United Methodist Church, New Hampton.

She married Clyde Blessing November 24, 1921 at New Hampton. He died August 25, 1986.

Surviving are six daughters, Dorothea Gardner, Cocoa, Fla; Blanch Ross, Bethany; Olive Swope, Amazonia; Marle Morgan, McFall; Shirley Ann Faulk, Rushville; and Rosalie Brmager, Aurora, Colo.; three sons, Marion, St Joseph; Harold "Red", New Hampton; and Merle Dwaine, Montrose, Iowa; a sister, Daisy Robinson, St Michael, Minn; a half-sister, Cora Cook, Ottawa, Kan.; 22 grandchildren; two step-grandchildren and 31 great-grandchildren.

Services were Saturday at Noble-Roberson-Polley Funeral Home, New Hampton, with burial in the Foster Cemetery, New Hampton.

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Subject: CLYDE BLESSING
Submitted by: Phil Stewart (JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper, Aug 23, 1986

CLYDE BLESSING, New Hampton:

Clyde Blessing, 86, died Monday afternoon, Aug 25, 1986, at a hospital in Albany, Missouri.

He was born at New Hampton and was a retired farmer and carpenter. He was a member of the United Methodist Church at New Hampton.

Surviving are his wife, Birdie Blessing of the home; six daughters, Dorothea Gardner, Cocoa, Fla; Blanch Ross, Bethany, Mo; Olive Swope, Amazonia, Mo; Marie Morgan, McFall, Mo; Shirley Ann Faulk, Rushville, Mo; and Rosalee Brimager, Aurora, Colo; three sons, Marion Blessing, St Joseph; Harold "Red" Blessing, New Hampton; and Merl Dwaine Blessing, Montrose, Iowa; a sister, Roberta Wright, New Hampton; 23 grandchildren and 24 great-grandchildren.

Services will be at 1:30 p.m. Thursday at the Noble-Roberson-Polley Funeral Home at New Hampton. Burial will be in the Foster Cemetery south of New Hampton. The family will receive friends after 7 this evening at the funeral home chapel.

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Subject:: NORA B. BOWMAN
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHist@grm.net)
Source: Ridgeway Journal, May 25, 1891

Death Takes It's Way
Three Harrison County Citizens
Called Home to Their
Creator

Nora B. Bowman

Miss Nora B. Bowman, aged about twenty-one years, died last Sunday afternoon at 4 o'clock, and was buried Monday, April 27, 1891, in the Yankee Ridge cemetery. Brother Burris, of Cainsville, conducted the services.

She was a devoted Christian, having joined the Christian church at Ridgeway when eighteen years of age. She passed quietly away to join her Savior, whom she has been serving. We extend our sympathy to her bereaved parents, and hope they may all be prepared to meet her in Heaven.

(Note: The other two were Levi Grant and John Ruff. Please see alphabetically.)

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Subject: SUSAN ELIZABETH ELLIOTT BOYD
Submitted by: Deb Dailey (daileyknd@grm.net)
Source: Unknown Newspaper and Date

Susan E. Elliott was born October 7, 1864 in Tippicanoe County, Indiana, and passed away at her home December 26, 1859, at 9:25 p.m. at the age of 95 years, 2 months, and 19 days. The family moved from Indiana to Iowa in 1869 and from then on to Missouri in 1870.

She was married to Santford C. Boyd on January 12, 1884, and to this union ten children were born. Maude Maroney, Cora Axsom, Alva Boyd, Alfred Boyd, Daisy Axsom, Gilbert Boyd, Mamie Flanagan, Edith King, Madge Hamilton, and Clark Boyd.

Mrs. Boyd was a grandmother many times over, having twenty four grandchildren, 73 great grandchildren, and 24 great-great grandchildren. Also surviving are two sisters Mrs. Dove Moore and Gerogie Meadows.

Her husband and three children have preceeded her in death. She was baptized into the Christian Church at Fairview, by uncle Billie Moore& had remained steadfast to her faith ever since, attending church even more than her feeble strength would allow. She now leaves to mourn her passing, many endearing friends and a host of relatives.

Life's labor done, as sinks the day
Light from it's load the spirit flies;
While heaven and earth combine to say,
"How blest the righteous, when he dies!"

Crossing the Bar

Sunset and evening star, and one clear call for me,
And may there be no moaning at the bar, when I put out to sea,
Twilight and evening bell, and after that the dark,
And may there be no sadness of farewell, when I embark.
And though from out our borne of time and place, the flood may bear me far,
I hope to see my Pilot face to face, when I have crossed the bar.

Services were held from the Christian Church in Cainsville, Tuesday afternoon December 29, 1959 at 2:00 o'clock, with the Rev. Glenn Wilson officiating. Mrs. Orel Hrdlicka and Mrs. Helen Bauer sang "Does Jesus Care", "God Will Take Care of You", and "Asleep in Jesus". accompanied at the piano by Mrs. W.S. Colville.
Pallbearers were Harold Flanagan, Warren Boyd, William Boyd, Harley Flanagan, Julian Heitz, and James Boyd.
Flower bearers were Mrs. Julian Heitz, Mrs. Slyvia Flanagan, Helen Dingman, Beatrice Boyd, Nadine Boyd, and Ruth Dale.
Interment was made in the Fairview Cemetery, E.J. Stoklasa, Mortician, in charge.

Card of thanks
Our heartfelt thanks to all who extended comforting sympathy and help in our recent sorrow. For the beautiful service, floral offerings and other kindnesses, we are deeply grateful.
Cora Axsom and family
Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Boyd and family
Daisy Axsom and family
Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert Boyd and family
Mr. and Mrs. Johnny Flanagan and family
Mr. and Mrs. Cliff King and family
Mr. and Mrs. Clark Boyd
Melvin Maroney and family.

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Subject: JANE BRADFORD
Submitted by: Phil Stewart (JJHist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican, June 13, 1917

CALLED HOME

Aunt Jane Bradford (colored) was born in Kentucky, in the year 1835, and died at her home in Bethany, Mo., Wednesday, June 6, 1917. The deceased had lived in Bethany since her husband's death. Her departed companion was A. J. Bradford, an honest and industrious man, who enjoyed the respect and esteem of all his white acquaintances, as well as that of his own race. This estimable couple were married at the home of Elder J. S. Allen, in the year 1866, and lived on a farm near Bethany until his death in 1886, after which Aunt Jane moved to Bethany, where she has lived for twenty-seven years.

She owned the home where she died. She had no living relatives, and she left her property by will to Miriam Lodge, I.O.O.F. for the upkeep of her lot in Miriam cemetery, where she and her husband are buried. A goodly number of her own race and many of her white neighbors and friends attended her funeral. A few weeks ago she suffered a stroke of paralysis which was very severe, and from which she was unable to recover, although the very best medical attention was bestowed and in her last moments she was given the kindest care and attention.

Her's was a useful and helpful life, thoroughly Christian in its entirety, the kind that serves the greatest in the kingdom of Heaven. Aunt Jane belonged to a type of her race that is rapidly passing away, and the world is the richer for their unselfish and devoted lives.

The funeral was held at the home on Thursday, June 7, 1917, conducted by Rev L. Layman, local pastor of the Presbyterian church, and interment in beautiful Miriam cemetery. Scripture used, Rev 22:2-5.

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Subject: JANE BRADY
Submitter: Kelly Meek Claycomb (claycomb97@earthlink.net)
Source: George Myers Family Bible, 1890-1900

Elizabeth Bunn Jane Brady, daughter of Maholn Ashbrook, died Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock, September 13, 1896. Funeral today at 8:30 o'clock from residence, No. 922 North Nineteenth street. Friends invited to attend.

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Subject: ADAIR BRILL
Submitter: Kathy Eaton (grannykaty@yahoo.com)
Source: Eagleville, Missouri Newspaper, April 10, 1974

EAGLEVILLE ----- Adair R. Brill, 90, died April 3 at a Bethany hospital. He was a longtime resident of the community, a retired farmer, and a member of the United Methodist church.

He is survived by his wife, Belle of Lamoni Manor; a son, Wayne Brill, Eagleville; two brothers, Elmer Brill, Seattle, Washington and Perry Brill, Park Rapids, Minnesota; and two grandchildren.

Services were conducted(sic) last Friday at the Eagleville United Methodist Church by the Rev. Oren Cossey. Burial was in Eagleville Masonic cemetery.

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Subject: MRS. ELLEN BRILL
Submitter: Kathy Eaton (grannykaty@yahoo.com)
Source: Bethany Republican Clipper, Eagleville, Missouri, May 14, 1930

Friends were grieved to hear of the very sudden passing of Mrs. Ellen Brill, Saturday evening. Mrs. A. G. Johnston, who lives in rooms at the Brill home, thought she could smell something burning and upon investigating, going into Mrs. Brill's room found it full of smoke, caused by the burning of a pan of soup Mrs. Brill had placed on the stove in preparation of her supper meal. Mrs Johnston found Mrs Brill lying partly on the bed, dead. A physician was summoned and pronounced it a stroke, as Mrs Brill had high blood pressure and had not been so well the last week, but was able to be up and about her work. Her husband, G. Brill, passed away a few years ago and Mrs. Brill continued to live in her home here since his death. Adair Brill, living north of Eagleville, is her son, and had been very attentive to his mother. Funeral services have not been arranged at this date.

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Subject: MRS. ELLEN BRILL
Submitter: Kathy Eaton (grannykaty@yahoo.com)
Source: Bethany Republican Clipper, Eagleville, Missouri, May 21, 1930

Eagleville News

Funeral services of Mrs. Ellen Brill were held at the M. E. Church Wednesday afternoon, May 14, conducted by the Rev. E. P. Reed. "Face to Face" and "Looking This Way" were sung by Mrs. Raymond Becks, Mr. Cassdy, Mrs. Edythe Hon, Hon, J. O. Bartels, and Mr. and Mrs. Eddie Boothe. Pallbearers were her six sons: Chas E., Harry G., Lee, George, Elmer and Adair Brill. The body was laid to rest by the side of her husband in the family lot in the Masonic cemetery. Mrs Brill passed away at the age of 72 years, 8 months, and 12 days. She was a kind and loving mother, a good neighbor and a very quiet home loving woman. Her many friends express sympathy to the bereaved relatives.

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Subject: MRS. EVA BELLE BRILL
Submitter: Kathy Eaton (grannykaty@yahoo.com)
Source: Eagleville, Missouri Newspaper, September 24, 1975

EAGLEVILLE ---- Mrs. Eva Belle Brill, 85, died last Thursday at a Lamoni, Iowa, rest home after a long illness. She was a member of the Eagleville United Methodist Church.

She is survived by a son, Wayne Brill, Eagleville; two grandchildren and one great-grandchild.

Services were conducted Sunday at the Eagleville United Methodist Church, Burial was in Eagleville Masonic Cemetery.

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Subject: JOHN FREDERICK GUSTAV BRILL
Submitter: Kathy Eaton (grannykaty@yahoo.com)
Source: Eagleville, Missouri Newspaper, March 31, 1926

John Frederick Gustav Brill BRILL, son of August and Minnie Fisher Brill, was born January 21, 1851, at Milo, Germany and died at his home in Eagleville, MO., March 29, 1926.

He was, 75 years, 11 months, and 29 days old.

He came with his parents to America in 1865. He was married to Ellen Rundquist, July 11, 1880.

To this union seven sons were born: Chas F., of Duluth, Minn.,; Adair R. of Eagleville, MO.; Perry G. of Park Rapids, Minn.; Leander D. of Harrisonville, MO.; George C. of Kansas City, MO.; and Elmer R. of Chicago, ILL.

On March the 17th he was taken sick with paralysis shortly after midnight. Everything that medical attention and kind care could do was done, but of no avail, and on the 20th(sic-see date in first paragraph)at 11:08, he peacefully passed away. He is survived by his widow, six sons, two brothers, one sister and several grandchildren.

He was born into a Lutheran home, was baptized and confirmed in the Lutheran Church, and remained faithful to the training he received in that church. He was a good husband and father. A kind neighbor and a good citizen of his adopted country.

The funeral services were conducted from the M. E. church at Eagleville. The sermon based on Psalms 116-15, was preached by the pastor, Rev. L. F. Harmon.

The body was interred in the Masonic cemetery.

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Subject: MICHAEL BRINIGAR
Submitted by: Phil Stewart (JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: Ridgeway Journal, Jan 19, 1911

Tribute to the Memory of Michael Brinigar

The subject of this sketch was born in Lawrence county, Indiana, June 21st, 1819. He came of German parentage. His father, Thomas Brinigar was born in North Carolina, and his mother, Barbara Stipp, was born in old Virginia. On Dec 6th, 1849, he was united in marriage to Emily Kreamer, and to this union were born four children, two sons and two daughters, Thomas Brinigar, who resides only a quarter of a mile from the old home place; W. J. Brinigar, with whom the old folks made their home, Mrs. Ellen Hurd, wife of W. W. Hurd, and Mrs. Luella Wilson, of this place. Besides the children he leaves an aged wife to mourn his departure.

In June, 1876 he emigrated to this state and settled in the home near Blythedale on which he resided until called to his reward, Dec 19, 1910, aged 91 years, 5 months and 28 days. In politics he was a staunch Democrat and was a devout Methodist, but for several years previous to his death was not identified with any religious denomination.

God had blessed him with a robust constitution and the activities of life in his advanced years were much more than the ordinary, and, believing in the theory that it was better to "wear out than rust out," he could be seen almost daily going about the place doing light choring, or, until the last few months, walking to town a distance of one and a half miles, to while away a few hours in social conversation or visit a few hours with a favorite daughter. He took a great interest in the activities of life and was always ready to discuss the leading issues of the day. The hospitality of the Brinigar home was known for miles around and no man seemed more pleased to visit with friends than he. He looked on the bright side of life and was always ready to crack a joke with his friends. His illness was of short duration, only a few hours, for the sun of life was gradually sinking, and he realized that the summons was near.

NOTE: Michael Brinigar and Emily Brinigar (along with other family members) are buried at Cedar Hill Cemetery on the west edge of Blythdale, Harrison County, Missouri.

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Subject: MRS. J. C. BROMAN (ELLEN MATILDA HAGAN)
Submitter: Joe Cochran (joecochran@hawaii.rr.com)
Source: Newspaper name and date unknown.

Mrs. J. C. Broman, 86, Dies at Home of Son

Mrs. J. C. Broman, 86 years old and a well-known resident of this city, died Saturday at the home of her son, Col. C. M. Nelson. The funeral was held Sunday from the Moss Funeral Chapel, being conducted by the Rev. Father C. A. Curry of Trenton. Burial was made at St. Mary's Cemetery. The six nephews of Mrs. Broman acted as pallbearers. Ellen Matilda Hagan, daughter of James A. and Mary Rebecca Hagan, was born in Kentucky March 26, 1851. At the age of five years she moved with her parents to Illinois where they resided two years and then moved to Missouri where Mrs. Broman spent the remainder of her life in Harrison and Mercer counties. She was of a family of thirteen sons and daughters. Those who survive are James R. Hagan, Pleasanton; Mrs. L. J. Hamilton, Westphalia, Kans.; Mrs. Ben F. Willis, Blythedale; Mrs. E. M. Willis, Pleasonton; Mrs. E. M. Schiefelbusch, Stanberry, Mo.

She was married to John M. Nelson Jan. 1, 1876, and to them were born three sons, Charles M. Nelson of Princeton, Theodore M. Nelson who died at the age of thirteen years and James M. Nelson who died at the age of eleven months. Mr. Nelson was drowned in the river north of Princeton October 6, 1881.

Mrs Nelson was married to Charles J. Broman August 7, 1890. To them was born a son Joseph H. Broman of Des Moines. Mr. Broman died January 7, 1928. Mrs. Broman was a member of St. Mary's Catholic Church in Harrison County. She made her home with her son, Charles M. Nelson the last eight years.

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Subject: ZERITA V. BROOKE
Submitter: Phil Stewart (jjhist@grm.net)
Source: Newspaper name and date unknown.

Zerita V. Brooke, 90, of Bethany, died Thursday August 2, 2007 at a Bethany, MO hospital

. She was born November 10, 1916 in Harrison County, Missouri, the daughter of Elmer and Agnes (Prather) Taylor. On July 13, 1947, she married Deane Brooke in Bethany, MO. He survives at the home.

Zerita taught school at Bethany and the county schools in the area. She was a member of the VFW Auxilary and the Pleasant Hour Club. She was also a member of the Pleasant Ridge Methodist Church of Bethany.

Survivors, in addition to her husband, are daughters Carol Shipley, Lees Summit, MO; Mary Boehner, St Joseph, MO; Margaret Groves, Bethany, MO; Kathy Lee, Kearney, MO; and son, Edward Brooke, Bethany, MO; 13 grandchildren and 12 great grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her parents and 3 sisters, Monice Moore, Bonnie Cook and Georgia Carothers

. Funeral services will be at 11:00 a.m. Monday, August 6, at the Roberson Funeral Home, Bethany, MO. Burial in the Coffey Cemetery, Coffey, MO. The family will receive friends from 10:00 - 11:00 a.m. Monday at the funeral home where friends may call after 2:00 Sunday. Memorial contributions may be made to the Bethany VFW Post #2176 and/or the Coffey Cemetery.

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Subject: ALBERT BROWN
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHist@grm.net)
Source: Cainsville News, Mar 7, 1908

center>Albert Brown Albert Brown, an old and highly respected citizen of Clay township, Harrison County, Mo., died at his home in Akron, March 3, 1907. The life of this good man was a very remarkable one as will be seen by the sketch which follows that was handed to the writer by the relatives of the deceased at the M. E. church at Akron, where the funeral was preached March 5, to a large and sympathizing congregation of relatives and friends using as a text 1st Cor., 15, chapter and 55 verse.

May God abundantly bless the aged companion and sorrowing children and friends is the prayer of their friend and brother.
---- V. M. Harper

Historical

Albert Brown was born in Pike county, Ohio, November the 24th, 1824 and died March the 3rd, 1907, aged 82 years, 3 months and 9 days. Deceased came to Muscatine, Iowa in 1847 and was married to Elizabeth A. Hayman in that place May 5th, 1850. They moved to Clay township, Harrison County, Missouri in May 1856 and have lived in the same township ever since, has resided on the same spot of ground for 48 years. To this union was born 7 children, all of whom are now living.

In 1864 he enlisted in the army and served to the end of the war, since then he has lived a quiet retiring life. He came to this country in an early day and has seen this country develop from a will uncivilized country to what it is now. He was a man that took a great deal of interest in education having served 40 years continuously as a school director. The latch string of his door was always long on the outside and no one was ever turned away from his door. He lived in Clay township 51 years and never was known to have a law suit. His only religion was Charity backed by the golden rule.

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Subject: FERN BROWN
Submitter: Deb Daily (dailyknd@grm.net)
Source: Unknown newspaper clipping, Tuesday, Oct. 26, 2004

Funeral services for Fern Brown will be held at 1 p.m. on Friday, October 29, 2004 at the Whitaker-Eads Funeral Home in Trenton. Burial will be in the Rural Dale Cemetery, east of Trenton.

A family visitation is scheduled one hour prior to the funeral service at the funeral home.

Miss Brown, an 85-year-old resident of 1713 Bolser St. in Trenton, died at 7:10 a.m. on Sunday, Oct. 24, 2004 at her home. The family suggests memorials to the American Cancer Society.

Note: Fern Brown was born and raised in Brimson, Missouri. She was the sister of Lawrence Dale Brown.

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Subject: GEORGE BROWN
Submitter: Deb Daily (dailyknd@grm.net)
Source: Harrison County Newspaper Thursday March 20 1941

George Brown Dead

Blue Ridge Bachelor, 75, Suffered Apoplectic Stroke in Service Station Café Friday

Funeral rites for George Brown, a 75-year-old laborer, who died in a Blue Ridge café Thursday afternoon of an attack of apoplexy, were held Saturday morning at 11:00 o’clock from the Christian Union Chapel, near Gilman City. Rev. A.H. Smith, Baptist minister, officiated. The body was at the Hanes funeral home in Gilman City.

Brown was alone in the service station when he suffered a stroke. Just a short while before he ate a hearty meal there and was waiting for the return of the proprietor. He fell to the floor and in doing so struck his head on the edge of a stove. Coroner R.H. Beets accredited death to an apoplectic stroke indicated by hemorrhagic bleeding from the nose.

Brown was a bachelor and lived with Mr & Mrs. A.M. Morris in Blue Ridge. He is survived by two brothers, Frank of near Blue Ridge, and Lewis of Jamesport. He was born in Grundy County, but lived in Harrison County most of his life.

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Subject: LEONA GRACE MAXWELL BROWN
Submitter: Deb Dailey (dailykind@grm.net)
Source: Whitaker-Eads Funeral Home

Grace Brown, a 94 year old Trenton, MO resident, passed away at 6:04 a.m., Thursday, April 14, 2011 at Sunnyview Nursing Home in Trenton.

Funeral services are scheduled for 1:00 p.m., Tuesday, April 19, 2011 at Resthaven Mortuary of Trenton. Burial will be in Resthaven Memorial Gardens. Open visitation will begin Monday morning. Grace requested memorial donations to Wright Memorial Hospice in lieu of flowers.

Leona “Grace” Brown was born September 21, 1916 at the family farm in Brimson, MO. She was the 7th child of Thomas Whitten and Gilly Mae Higdon Maxwell. On July 22, 1939 she married Vermal Brown of the Blue Ridge community. He passed away Oct. 10, 1997. Grace worked at Mattingley’s Variety Store in downtown Trenton and then Eastgate Shopping Center when the store became Matco. She retired from the store May 4, 1979 after 26 years. Grace enjoyed bowling at the Trenton Bowl and quilting. She was a member of the Cat Creek Baptist Church.

Surviving relatives include her daughters Charlene Ann Smith and her husband Jim of Kansas City, MO and Janet Mae Axsom and her husband Bernard of Spickard, MO, a sister Minerva Brown of Brimson, MO, a niece Marsha Williams, a nephew Clyde Maxwell, 11 grandchildren and 20 great grandchildren.

Those preceding her in death include her parents, husband,a daughter Sharon Kay Crawford, a sister Evie Maxwell, five brothers James, Leland, John, Eugene,and Joseph Maxwell , and two nephews Jasper Maxwell and Lawrence Gale Brown.

Online condolences may be left at whitakereads.com

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Subject: LEWIS A. BROWN
Submitter: Deb Daily (dailyknd@grm.net)
Source: Newspaper clipping, unknown name and date

Church Rites Held For Lewis A. Brown

Funeral services for Lewis Albert Brown, Blue Ridge resident who died unexpectedly Friday, were held Sunday at the Blue Ridge Christian Union church. The Rev. Hubert Carter officiated.

Music was furnished by Juanita McBride, Mildred Smith, Gail Smith, Heslep Courter and Roy Hutchinson sang, "Will the Circle Be Unbroken," and "Precious Memories".

Pallbearers were Ralph Archer, Glen Hockridge, Glenn Taylor, Orville Taggart, Homar Looman and Harley Long. Wives of the pallbearers carried the flowers. Burial was in the Christian Union Chapel Cemetery.

Mr. Brown was born April 11, 1881 in Grundy County, a son of William and Jane Blanchard Brown. He was the last of a family of ten children.

He was reared near Trenton and in May 1913 was married to Maggie Smith. They were the parents of five children: Mrs. Edith Corbin, Mrs. Vermadean McCullough, and Vermal Brown of Trenton, Mrs. Lela Mae Burgess and Orval Lewis Stanley, address unknown.

He also leaves four grandchildren, Cecil Lewis Chambers, Charlene Ann Brown, Sharon Kay and Janet Brown of Trenton.

On May 28 19323 he was married to Clara Neill. For the last 30 years he lived in the Blue Ridge community. He was a member of the Christian Union Chapel and in later years had rededicated his life at the Blue Ridge Christian Union Church.

Surviving are the wife of the home, the children and the following stepchildren, Sherman Neill, Gilman City; Lyle Neill, Coffey; Mrs. Jesie Lierly, Niles, Michigan; Mrs. Gerald Henderson, Kansas City; Garland Neill, Banks, Oregon; Lewis Neill, Berkley, California; and Roy Neill, Alameda, California; several nieces and nephews and a host of friends, who he was always willing to lend a helping hand.

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[ hand dated Jan. 21, 1955]

Church Rites Held For Lewis A. Brown Former Grundy County Man Had Lived 45 Years In Blue Ridge Community Heart Attack Fatal To Gilman City Man

Lewis Brown of Gilman City died Friday morning at his home in the Blue Ridge community. Death resulted from a heart attack suffered while sweeping a walk for a neighbor.
Funeral services will be conducted at 2 p.m. Sunday at the Blue Ridge church. Burial will be in the Christian Union cemetery. Surviving are the wife, Mrs. Clara Brown of the home; a son, Vermal Brown of Trenton; and two daughters, Mrs. Verma Dean McCullough, and Mrs. Edith Corbin of Trenton.

Dropped Dead While Cleaning Snow From Sidewalk
Lewis Brown, 73 years old, of Blue Ridge, dropped dead Friday morning while cleaning snow from a sidewalk at the home of a neighbor, Mrs. Abbie Morris. He was accustomed to doing the chores each morning.
The Harrison County Coroner was summoned and pronounced death due to a cerebral hemorrhage. Mr. Brown spent most of his life in the Blue Ridge community.
Survivors are his wife, Clara Brown, of the home; one son, Vermal Brown; two daughters, Mrs. Edith Corbin, Mrs. Vermadeen McCulley., all of Trenton; and seven step-children.
Funeral services were conducted Sunday afternoon at Blue Ridge, by Rev. Hubert Carter and burial was at Old Union cemetery.

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Subject: MINERVA ALICE MAXWELL BROWN
Submitter: Deb Dailey (dailykind@grm.net)
Source: Trenton Republican-Times, pg. 12, June 8, 2012

Minerva Alice Maxwell Brown, an 89-year-old resident of rural Harrison County, died at 9:15 p.m. on Wednesday, June 6, 2012 at Sunnyview Nursing Home in Trenton.

Funeral services are scheduled for 10 a.m. on Monday, June 11, 2012 at Whitaker-Eads Funeral Home in Trenton. Burial will be at the Cat Creek Cemetery.

Open visitation will begin at noon on Saturday, June 9, 2012.

Mrs. Brown was born October 10, 1922, the daughter of Thomas Witten Maxwell and Gilly Mae Higdon of the Cat Creek community. She attended Stephens and Metcalf grade schools, Brimson and Gilman City high schools, Trenton Junior College and Northeast Missouri State University of Kirksville.

On Aug. 9, 1945 she married Lawrence Dale Brown, who preceded her in death on Sept. 17, 1987.

In addition to working on the family farm, Mrs. Brown taught school in Harrison and Grundy County. In 1961 she moved to Kansas City and taught for 21 years at Hickman Mills in South Kansas City. She retired to the farm in May 1982 after 31 years of teaching.

She enjoyed family history and worked on the Brimson History book and operated a grocery store in Brimson after retiring. She also enjoyed keeping busy with other business ventures.

Surviving relative include nieces, nephews, and cousins.

Mrs. Brown was preceded in death by her parents; her husband; two sons, Lawrence Gale Brown and a stillborn son Glen Dale Brown; five brothers, James, Eugene, Joseph Henry, LeLand and John Maxwell; and two sisters, Evie Maxwell and Grace Brown.

Memorial donations are suggested to the Green Hills Animal Shelter.

Online condolences may be left at whitakereads.com.

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Subject: VERMAL BROWN
Submitter: Deb Dailey (dailykind@grm.net)
Source: Newspaper clipping, unknown paper or date

Vermal Brown, 81, died at 12:30 p.m. Friday, October 10, 1997 at his home at 1078 Merrill St., Trenton. He had been in failing health for some time.

Graveside rites were held at 11 a.m. today, October 13, 1997, at Resthaven Memorial Gardens, north of Trenton, under the direction of Resthaven Mortuary. Paul Persell officiated.

Honorary pallbearers were Kerry Dauma, Chris Crawford, Shawn Crawford, Bobby Shalz, John Axsom, Kevin Dailey, and Tom Butler.

Mr. Brown was born on Nov. 23, 1915 at Gilman City, the son of Lewis Albert and Maggie Mae Webber Brown. He was raised in the Gilman City area, and was married on July 22, 1939 to Grace Maxwell in Trenton. They moved to Trenton in 1940.

Mr. Brown was employed by the Trenton Milk Company from 1943 until he retired in 1977. He was a member of the Blue Ridge Christian Church.

Survivors include his wife, Grace of the home; three daughters, Charlene Shank of Liberty, Kay, now Mrs. Bob Crawford, of St. Joseph, and Janet, now Mrs. Bernard Axsom of Spickard; one half brother, Junior Smith of Apple Valley, CA; one stepbrother Lyle Neill of Bethany; 11 grandchildren; 15 great grandchildren; and 1 great-great grandchild.

Mr. Brown was preceded in death by his parents; two sisters, his twin VermaDean McCullough, and Edith Corbin; one half brother; and one half sister.

The family suggests contributions to Wright Memorial Hospice in memory of Mr. Brown. These may be mailed to Resthaven Mortuary, Highway 65 North, PO Box 587, Trenton, MO 64683.

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Subject: MRS. LUCINDA BRYANT
Submitter: Linda Stewart (pamperedLin@juno.com)
Source: Bethany Democrat, Dec. 30, 1903

MRS. LUCINDA BRYANT

Lucinda Stewart was born in Wheeling, Virginia, September 11th, 1816, and departed this life at the residence of her nephew, Wm. C. Shumard, in this city, December 26th 1903. She moved with her sister, Mrs. Susan Shumard to Harrison county, Missouri in 1856, and for several years made her home with her sister and brother, Elder E. Stewart, now of Iowa. She was united in marriage with Stephen Bryant in 1859. Mr. Bryant died a few years after his marriage, after which Mrs. Bryant made her home with the family of the late John S. Allen up to about fifteen years ago, when she went to live with her nephew, Wm. C. Shumard, with whom she ever after resided. Mr. and Mrs. Shumard were at all times devoted to her welfare and made her declining years peaceful and happy. The funeral was held Sunday, Dec. 27th, from the Shumard residence, conducted by Mr. Oren Orahood, pastor of the Christian Church, after which burial occured at the Morris cemetery.

Early in life Mrs. Bryant became a member of the Christian church and was a consistant Christian the balance of her life. Mrs. Bryant was retiring in disposition and kindly to all. Those who knew her most intimately loved her best. She was sick but a few days and seemed to suffer but little. From the first day of her sickness her recovery, owing to her extreme age, was not expected. Her long life is now closed on earth and she will doubtless meet the reward that the righteous may expect. Peace to her memory.

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Subject: BESSIE LARA BUCK
Submitted by: Phil Stewart (JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Clipper, Friday, January 5, 1912

In Memoriam

Mrs. Bessie L. Pryor-Buck was born June 6, 1883. She was married to Orla M. Buck, July 3, 1904. To this union was born one child, Velma. Mrs Buck died December 22, 1911, at her home near Bethany, aged 28 years, 6 months and 16 days.

She professed faith in Christ and joined the Christian church at Bethany during the pastorate of Rev. Orahood.

Her funeral was held at the Christian church Sunday afternoon, December 24th, by the writer, assisted by the pastor, Rev. John Young. A large company of people was in attendance at her funeral to bear testimony to their love for the deceased.

Sister Buck was a kind, unselfish woman always looking to the interest and comfort of others. From the day she gave her heart to her Master she never forgot to trust Him. During her two or more years of affliction she was patient and sumissive to the ordeal she was passing through. She spent the last days of her life in praising God in song. She leaves her husband and relatives and a host of friends with a sad heart until they shall come into the greater life with her beyond the skies. Little Velma will not be privileged to know the sweet love of a dear good mother, but tender hands will watch over her and make her life as bright and happy as possible.

It was the writer's pleasant duty to unite her to Brother Buck on the above named date, and it was his sad duty to stand by her grave and perform the solemn duty in committing her body to the earth. May God extend His comfort to all the sorrowing hearts and guard every step of the dear little motherless daughter.

W. J. Willis

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Subject: ELIZABETH BUNN
Submitter: Kelly Meek Claycomb (claycomb97@earthlink.net)
Source: George Myers Family Bible, 1890-1900

Elizabeth Bunn Mrs. Elizabeth Bunn, consort of Geo. W. Bunn, departed this life at her residence in Bethany, Mo., on Thursday, May 26th, 1876, aged 32 years, 2 months and 5 days. The announcement of this lady's death caused much surprise and regret in the community, but few comparatively being aware of her illness. Those who were personally acquainted with her speak of her in the highest terms of affection and respect, and sympathize deeply with the afflicted husband and relatives. Deceased was the daughter of Francis and Alice Hunter, of Grundy County, Mo. She was born in England on the 24th day of March, 1844. She came to America in 1852, and made her home in the State of Ohio. In 1867 she removed to Missouri. She was united in marriage with George W. Bunn on the 25th of October, 1869 in Grundy county, Mo. She professed religion about seven years ago, and has since led a consistent Christian life, and was a member of the M.E. church at the time of her death. Her husband, parents, and a daughter of five years of age, survive her. Funeral services were held in the M.E. church on Saturday, Rev. A.N. Cave delivering an appropriate discourse, after which the remains were conveyed to Miriam cemetery for interment, followed by a large concourse of sorrowing friends.

Lizzie Lillian, infant daughter of the above was born May 19th, 1876 died May 29th, 1876.

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Subject: BENJAMIN FRANKLIN BURNS
Submitter: Phil Stewart (jjhist@grm.net)
Source: Cainsville News, Aug 29, 1918

B. F. BURNS DEAD

B. F. Burns, one of our oldest and most highly respected citizens, died at the home of his grand-daughter, Mrs O. Riley Bain, in this city at 10 a.m. Saturday August 24, 1918, aged 98 years, 6 months and 12 days. Death resulted more from general debility due to old age than from any particular ailment.

Funeral services were conducted at the Baptist church at 3:00 p.m. Sunday, Aug 25, 1918, in the presence of a large congregation of relatives and old friends. Rev R. L. Wood, pastor of the church, delivered the sermon after which burial was made in Oaklawn cemetery.

[NOTE] The article is incorrect about the location of burial. B. F. Burns is buried at Zoar Cemetery, which is less than 1/2 mile south of Oakland. Also, Mrs. Bain was his step-grand-daughter.

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Subject: ELIZABETH BURRIS
Submitted by: Phil Stewart (JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican, Mar 2, 1904

Elizabeth Burris, widow of the late Judge George Burris, departed this life at the residence of her daughter, Mrs W. N. Rucker, In Norman, Oklahoma, Monday night, February 22, 1904, at 10:30 o'clock, following only a few days illness of pneumonia, aged 72 years, 6 months and 15 days.

Deceased was born June 7, 1831 in Carroll County, Ohio. Her maiden name was Henry. She was married December 25, 1854 in the same state to Mr George Burris, who passed to the "Great Beyond" on the 8th day of May, 1893. To them were born ten children, seven of whom are living, namely, Frank P. Burris of Harrison county, Missouri; Mrs. Wiltha E. Mitchem of Grimes, Oklahoma; Mrs. Sarah C, Howell of Davis City, Iowa; Mrs. Lydia E. Hughes of Durham, Oklahoma; Mrs. Mary A Daily of Harrison County, Mo; Miss Cora B. Burris of Bethany, and Mrs. Susie B. Rucker of Norman, Oklahoma. All of these have families of their own, except one. There are thirty-two grandchildren.

Mr. and Mrs. Burris came to this county about fifty years ago, and settled on a farm six miles south of Bethany, where they built up one of the best homes in Harrison county. There their children were reared, and about twenty-two years ago, they removed to Bethany where they resided up to the time of their deaths.

It was just five weeks to a day, she with her daughter, Cora, went to Oklahoma to spend a few months visit with her daughter, Mrs. Rucker. Her trip out there was greatly enjoyed by her and she seemed so pleased at the change, and was in more than usually good health and spirits until taken suddenly down with the fatal disease. It was not from the effects of cold, but rather a sudden congestion of the lungs. Her sufferings were not great, but a general stuper came over her, and she slept her life away, peacefully and gently. The last end was like the going to rest of a child upon its mother's bosom. When asked how she felt, she said she placed herself in the hands of the Lord, and that all was well.

When a girl of fifteen, she united with the church and had continued a faithful member the remainder of her life. Greatly appreciating her old home and friends, she kept her membership in the church at Mitchelville where she hoped to be borne and and laid to rest beside loved ones gone before. Her life was as gentle and significant as was her death. Her multitude of acquaintances, relatives and friends will call her blessed. The children and grandchildren will revere her memory, a good name is rather to be chosen than great riches; her name was like ointment poured forth, and at its mention, the noble life she lived is recalled, which will prove a benediction for a generation yet to come.

To those related to her by the ties of nature, is left a rich heritage in her life. May it prove as a load-stone, drawing all of them to the nobler and higher life, until upon the plains of an eternal existence, they join her to spend a glorious eternity, basking in the sunlight of perpetual day. Death is but transition, and introduces the soul into its prepared final abode. Death has lost its sting, and the grave its victory, and has been swallowed up of life. Her funeral took place at the First M. E. church in Bethany, conducted by Rev Dr Carothers, attended by a large concourse of sympathizing friends, after which her body was taken to the country church at Mitchelville, where a short service was held, and the old neighbors and friends were permitted to take a last look at her familiar face, following which her body was laid to rest in the old home cemetery (Burris Graveyard) to await the Resurrection Morn. Great sympathy is expressed for the bereaved ones. May they be comforted by the ever present and adorable Christ.

The pall bearers selected for the occasion were James Kinkade, B. P. Sigier, John L. Cole, E. H. Frisby, L. P. Riley, and S. P. Davisson. These persons met the train on Wednesday and conveyed the body to her late residence, where it lay in state until 10 o'clock, Thursday, and was viewed by her multitude of friends, from thence it was taken by them to the church. Following the services, quite a number proceeded with the cortege to the country church, where a large congregation was present, to pay their last tribute of respect to the memory of the dear old mother. Special music was rendered by a quartette, consisting of Mrs. Anna Spencer, organist; Mrs. Ed Skinner, Miss Lillian Neville, A. S. Cumming and E. W. Prentiss. The flora display was exceptionally fine. The richest of flowers literally covered the casket. Flowers bespeak a glorious immortality, as well as to manifest sincere devotion. They fade, but character as pure as are blossoms, live forever.

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Subject: FRANKLIN P. BURRIS
Submitted by: Phil Stewart (JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Clipper, Jan 5, 1912

"A Good Man Gone"

The Death of Franklin P. Burris

Franklin P. Burris was buried last Friday afternoon. The funeral was very largely attended by friends from all over Harrison County, as Mr Burris was one of the most prominent farmers in the county.

He was born October 27, 1852, in Jackson County, Ohio. When five years of age he moved with his parents to Harrison County, Missouri, and settled on the farm upon which he resided until his death, December 27, 1911.

He was married to Emma C. Barlow, October 4, 1877. To this union were born George R., James Harvey, W. Clay, Frank Edwin, K. Clifford, Ruth, Joseph, Mary, Grace, Jhett, and Bruce, who survive him. Don died in infancy. He is also survived by his wife, Emma C. Burris, and his five sisters, Mrs. Weltha Mitchem of Tarkio, MO; Mrs. Nealy Howell, Davis City, Iowa; Mrs. Lydia Hughes, Oklahoma City, Okla; Mrs. Cora B. Weller, Katy, Texas; Mrs. Sue Rucker, Norman, Oklahoma.

Mr. Burris was a great man, viewed from every angle. His devotion to his family was beautiful. He lived for his home. His wife and children fairly worshipped him. He ruled his household well, not with a rod, for he never struck one of his children, but with that supreme power of love. Today, in the language of the scripture, his children rise up and call him blessed. They sincerely looked upon him as the truest and best man that God ever made. His life as a citizen was remarkable. In all his dealings he squared his actions by the Golden Rule. His word was as good as his bond. His name became a synonym for honor and honesty. No man stood higher in the estimation of his fellow citizens than did Frank P. Burris. He, with the uprightness of his life, was the embodiment of kindness. He trusted everyone, believed in everyone, because he expected others to do the square thing as he did. He was so open hearted that everyone with whom he came in contact admired him. He made friends everywhere, and it was the pride of his heart to win the good will of everyone. He made no enemies for himself, neither did he want anyone else to have an enemy. When he found there was a difference between two of his friends, he went out of his way to get them to understand each other and be friends. He was called "The Peacemaker". He informed one of his friends, a lawyer, that if he could have his way, there would never be any business for the legal fraternity.

As it is written, "Blessed are the peacemakers, for they shall be called the children of God." Mr. Burris was naturally a good citizen, but he was a Christian. While he never formally united with the church, never-the-less he was practically one of the most loyal members of the church at Mitchelville. He was always in this "little corner" as he termed it. Regular in attendance at the Sabbath school and church services, he was the main stay of the church, upholding it with his means and moral support. However, with all this, he stated to Brother Dotson, a neighbor, who is a clergyman, "I do not trust my salvation upon what good I have attempted to do, but in faith in Jesus Christ as my Savior. I am sorry to leave my dear wife and children, but am prepared to go to meet my Redeemer." With the poet he could sing:

"My God is reconciled;
His pardoning voice I hear;
He owns me for his child;
I can no longer fear."

Brother Burris was conscious until the last. He looked the future squarely in the face; made every material provision for the end with as much care and case as he did all matters of business. And then he left the priceless inheritance to each one of the family, his dying words, exhorting them not in material things, but spiritual matters. His great desire was that his stalwart sons and daughters should live the life of honor, of righteousness and purity. To one of his sons he presented his diamond ring, and as he placed it on his hand, said, "That is a clean hand, without the evidence of evil habit. I place this ring on your hand and ask that you receive this as a token of uprightness. Keep your hands and your life clean."

After the funeral sermon, Pastor Dotson of the Baptist church, made a very timely address, which was followed by Mr. Baldwin and Judge Ezra H. Frisby, who told of his honorable life; after which the I.O.O.F. lodge took charge of the services, consigning his body to the ground by their beautiful ceremony.

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Subject: REV. J. H. BURROWS
Submitter: Barbra Chambers (MOHarris-Admin@Rootsweb.com)
Source: The Cainsville News, 2 May, 1918, pg. 1

PIONEER CITIZEN PASSES AWAY

Rev. J. H. Burrows, Preacher and Business Man, Died Sunday Morning.

NEARLY 78 YEARS OLD.

Rev. J. H. Burrows, one of our most widely known and highly respected citizens, passed away at the family home just east of the city limits at 1 a.m. last Sunday morning after an illness of considerable duration, though he was actually confined to his bed but a week or two. He was 77 years, 11 months, and 13 days old at the time of his death.

Funeral services were conducted at the Baptist Church at two o'clock p.m., Tuesday, April 30, the sermon being delivered by Rev. M. P. Hunt, a life long personal friend of the deceased. The theme of the sermon was "He was a Good Man", in which the speaker paid tribute to the memory of the departed one, as a man, a citizen, and as a minister of the Gospel. The sermon was an excellent one such as the friends of Rev. Hunt would expect to hear from him.

A quartet composed of Messrs. C. H. Woodward and G. E. Girdner, and Mrs. F. M. French and Mrs. D. L. Oliphant sang some of the favorite hymns, and Mrs. French and E. W. Prentiss of Bethany, sang solos that were highly appreciated.

The floral tributes were many and very beautiful, attesting the love and esteem the donors had for the departed one, and the platform about the pulpit was literally banked with flowers and flags and presented a very handsome appearance.

Immediately after the sermon, Bethany Commandry Knights Templar, of which Mr. Burrows had long been an honored member, took charge of the body and burial was made to the funeral service of that branch of Free Masonry. Cainsville Lodge A.F. & A.M. was also in line.

The audience which gathered to pay its last tribute of respect to the deceased filled the spacious auditorium and connecting room and many were compelled to stand. It was without a doubt the largest audience ever gathered at a funeral service in Cainsville, all being anxious to catch a glimpse of the body of him they had known and loved so long.

To avoid a crush and consequently waste of time at the close of the sermon, the body was taken to the church at 10 a.m., Tuesday morning, where it lay in state until the funeral hour. From that time until afternoon there was a steady stream of his old friends and acquaintances at the church taking a last look at the long familiar features.

At the conclusion of the Masonic ceremony at the grave, all that was mortal of J. H. Burrows was lowered to its last resting place in Oaklawn Cemetery to await the Resurrection Morn, and the people returned to their homes with a feeling of sadness that this man who has been a resident of this vicinity nearly 50 years would be seen no more among men.

The aged companion and children have the sincere sympathy of all, in this sad hour of bereavement.

We leave to an abler pen the task of preparing a suitable sketch of the life of our departed brother.

(Please see biography on Bio page.)

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Subject: DR. E. B. BUSH
Submitter: Phil Stewart (jjhist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican, Jun 28, 1893

OBITUARY The subject of this sketch, Dr. E. B. Bush, was born in Barron County, Kentucky in 1809; moved to Illinois in 1832; from Illinois to Iowa in 1846 and from Iowa to Missouri in February, 1857, where he resided up to the time of his death, which occurred at his residence in Union township, this county, June 20th, 1893. He was married after coming to Missouri to Miss Mary Ray. His union was blessed with seven children, two of whom preceded him across the silent river. Five remain on the shores of time to mourn the loss of a kind and indulgent father. His wife, Mary Bush, died some ten years ago; thus leaving the care and responsibility of rearing a family of small children entirely upon him, which he did to the best of his ability, under the circumstances. Dr. Bush was well and favorably known over this county as a good citizen, neighbor and kind friend, ever ready to administer to the wants and necessities of the poor and afflicted. But his work is done and he is at rest. He perhaps had some failings but let us cover those with the mantle of charity, remembering that we have them too. Bro Bush had been a member of the Church of Christ for over fifty years and during these years, he did a great deal toward helping along the cause he loved so well. Funeral sermon was preached by Father Harlan, assisted by the writer. Thus ends a long and eventful life.

A. L. Johnson

[NOTE] E. B. Bush was Elcana (or Elcanah) Bush. Researches should note that the spelling of his first name and other information varies greatly from record to record, and he is often identified by his initials only. He is listed as being 60 years old in the 1870 census of Harrison County, MO. His wife, Mary was 22 years old. The 1880 census states he was born in Illinois. E. B. Bush and his wife, Mary are buried at the Bush Cemetery north of Bethany (Harrison County).

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Subject: ASAPH M. BUTLER
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican May 12, 1892

Asaph Butler, son of James D. and Polly Butler, was born in Chittenden County, Vermont on Aug 27, 1810 and died at his home in Cypress Township, Harrison County, Missouri on May 9, 1892. He was buried in Butler Cemetery, located on the family farm in Cypress Township, Harrison County, Missouri, on May 10, 1892.

DEATH: Death of Asaph M. Butler

Asaph M. Butler departed this life at his home in Cypress Township, Harrison County, May 9th, 1892, at 4 o'clock a.m., aged 81 years, 9 months and 12 days. He was born in the state of Vermont August 12th, 1810. While quite young he emigrated with his parents to Knox County, Ohio, where they remained until the year 1820 when they again moved to Illinois and settled on a farm near where the present city of Danville is now located. Here he remained with his parents until he arrived at his majority. The writer of this sketch has often heard him say that he helped to break the sod where the city of Danville now stands. About the year 1832 he married a very estimable lady, whose maiden name has escaped the writer's memory, with whom he lived happily until her death which occurred some 12 or 14 years ago. Six sons and three daughters were born to this union, all of whom survive him except three sons. The first son died quite young many years ago. Orlin has been dead 12 years and the late lamented Oscar died in Bethany several years ago. Mr Butler moved with his family from Danville, Ill and in the year 1840 settled on the farm where he ever since lived to the time of his death.

In 1845 when this county was first organized he was selected by the citizens of the county as a proper person for Judge of the county court and upon their recommendation the Governor appointed and commissioned him as one of the Judges of the first county court ever convened in this county. In March, 1845, he with his associates, Lewis Charlton and Samuel Edmiston, under a tree west of Big Creek near what is known as the Copeland Ford, held the first court session in Harrison County. After serving his people faithfully for the period for which he was appointed, he declined to allow his name to be used again as a candidate.

Mr Butler was indeed a pioneer in this county. His house was the first in the county furnished with glass windows, shingled roof and plank doors. Politically, he was an old time Whig as long as that party had an existence. He was among the first to assist in forming the Republican party and remained a staunch supporter of its principles up to the time of his death.

Mr Butler was a man of unlimited benevolence, always ready to extend a hand of welcome to all. He was strictly honest and honorable in all his transactions with his fellow men, and it was proverbial that to the rich and poor, high or low, bond or free, his latch string always hung out, and he greeted all who entered his door with such a hearty welcome that none ever left his house without feeling that it was good to have been there.

For the last five or six years he suffered and for the last two years suffered greatly from that relentless affliction, Bright's disease of the kidneys. Yet he bore his sufferings without a murmur, anxiously waiting for the day when all would be ended, until as before stated, at the advanced age of four score and nearly two years, he expired May 9th, 1892. Thus passed away the last member of the first court of Harrison County. His remains were laid to rest May 10th, 1892, on the farm where he so long lived, followed by his surviving sons and daughters and sorrowing friends.

Notwithstanding his death was expected at any time for several months, yet the intelligence thereof brings with it a sadness that the pen is wholly unable to portray. He is gone. His familiar face we will see no more. Nothing now remains of him only the sad memorial of man's mortality. That warm heart that always throbbed for others' woes will soon molder away and join its kindred dust. But his friends can proudly point to his amiable traits of character and the irreproachable example that he has left to those who mourn his loss and say 'Follow his precept and example'. He was strictly temperate in all things, always an ardent advocate for good morals, honest and upright in all his dealings, a man of firmness, always striving to do all the good he could. He was in every respect a truly exemplary man.

- A Friend

- Asaph Butler married Elizabeth Acree in Vermilion County, Illinois on Apr 22, 1832.
- Elizabeth Acree was born in Kentucky in 1811 and died in Harrison County on Feb 4, 1880. She is buried at the Butler Cemetery.

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Subject: MELVIN CARL CAMPBELL
Submitter: Phil Stewart (jjhist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper, Sep 24, 1985

Melvin Carl Campbell, son of Carl and Telore Shackleton Campbell, was born Jan 6, 1949 at St Joseph, Mo., and departed this life Sept 18, 1985 in Chanute, Kansas at the age of 36 years, 9 months and 3 days.

Melvin was a lifelong resident of Harrison County and the 3rd generation to operate the homestead where he resided.

As a youth, Melvin was baptised and became a member of the Eagleville Christian Church.

He graduated from North Harrison High School in 1967. Following graduation he served in the National Guard Reserve from 1968 thru 1974. On Feb 14, 1976, he was united in marriage to Linda Hamilton of Davis City, Iowa.

In 1972 Melvin and Harold Coulson organized the Hatfield Saddle Club.

Mel was a member of Lodge of Light No 257 A.F. & A.M., Eagleville, Mo.; No Na Me Shrine Club; Moila Temple A.A.O.N.M.S. of St Joseph, Mo.; Royal Arch Masons-Bethany Chapter No 80; Harmony Council No 53 and Bethany Commandery No 42.

He was preceded in death by his parents Carl and Telore and mother-in-law, Dorothy Hamilton.

He is survived by his wife, Linda of the home; four aunts, Felma Harker of Eagleville, Nina Rankin and husband Talmage of Rosemont, MN., Lucille Moore and husband Kenneth of Bethany, and Jala Lawrence and husband Denzil of Madrid, Iowa; father-in-law Ralph Hamilton and his wife Waneta of Kellerton, Iowa; cousins, other relatives and a multitude of friends.

Mel enjoyed many hours working the soil and caring for the livestock he loved so much. Time spent with his family and friends was a joy to him. He would want us to remember all the good times we've had together, whether at work or play, and cherish each memory, each moment we had with him during his short stay on earth.

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Subject: OMER CARL CAMPBELL
Submitter: Phil Stewart (jjhist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper, Oct 17, 1979

Omer Carl Campbell, son of Omer Lewis Campbell and Grace Gertrude Todd Campbell, was born at Hatfield, Mo., October 19, 1917, and passed away at the Veterans Hospital in Des Moines, Iowa, Sunday, Sept 30, 1979, at the age of 61 years, 11 months and 11 days, following a short illness.

Carl served 4 years in the South Pacific during World War II. He is a member of the American Legion Post in Eagleville.

February 15, 1946, he married Telore Shackelton and to this union was born one son, Melvin.

Carl lived his entire life in the Hatfield area. He loved the outdoors; farming the ground and watching the seeds grow. He enjoyed talking and getting to know everyone. He was a friend to all who knew him and a loving husband and father.

Carl was preceded in death by his parents and wife. He is survived by his son and daughter-in-law, Melvin and Linda Campbell, Eagleville; sisters Lucille and husband Kenneth Moore of Bethany; Nina and husband Talmage Rankin of Rosemont, Minn.; and Jala and husband Denzil Lawrence of Madrid, Ia.; uncles Ray Todd of Bethany and Cecil Campbell of Eagleville; aunt Clara Westlake of Bethany, nieces, nephews, other relatives and friends.

The body was laid to rest at the Masonic Union Cemetery of Eagleville.

[Note] Omer Carl Campbell is buried under the name "O. Carl Campbell" in the Masonic Cemetery of Eagleville. His wife, son and other relatives are also buried there. His parents, Omer and Grace (Todd) Campbell, are buried at Weaver Chapel Cemetery north of Martinsville.

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Subject: MRS TELORE CAMPBELL
Submitter: Phil Stewart (jjhist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper, Nov 24, 1976

Telore, only child of Harley and Leona (Richardson) Shackleton, was born in Ringgold County, Iowa, on March 24, 1920, and passed away in the Noll Hospital, Bethany, Mo., on Nov 4, 1976, at the age of 56 years, 7 months and 11 days.

She was a graduate from the Eagleville High School and did nursing in a hospital for some time. She was a member of the Eagleville Christian Church, doing her share as long as her health permitted. She was also a member of the Town and Country Club of Hatfield, Mo.

On Feb 15, 1946, she was united in marriage to Carl Campbell at Troy, Kansas. This union was made complete by the birth of a son, Melvin. They established their home in Harrison County and resided in the Hatfield-Eagleville community since. Their's was a home where relatives, friends and neighbors felt the warm welcome hospitality they shared with all.

Telore gave a helping hand to those in need, and her love and bright smile brought comfort and happiness to many.

Her long illness was patiently borne, her thoughts being for her loved ones.

She was preceded in death by her parents.

Survivors are her husband, Carl Campbell of the home; a son, Melvin Campbell and his wife, Linda, of Eagleville, Mo.; a cousin who was raised as a sister, Mrs Felma Harker; other relatives and a host of friends.

Funeral services were held Sunday, Nov 7 at the Boggess Funeral Chapel in Eagleville, Mo., with Rev. James Collins officiating. Interment was in the Eagleville Masonic Cemetery.

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Subject: ANGELINE BROWER CANADAY
Submitter: Carlton Canaday (theatre@spinn.net)
Source: Believed to be from the Bethany Republican-Clipper

IN LOVING REMEMBRANCE

Mrs. Angeline Canaday

Angeline Brower, daughter of James B. And Elizabeth Brower, was born July 16, 1852 and died at her home in Blythedale, August 26, 1918, being at the time of her death 66 years, 1 month and 10days.

She was united in marriage to Christopher Canaday, July 23, 1870. To this union were born four children, J. T. Canaday of Rialto, Calif; H. P. Canaday of Blythedale, Mo; Mrs. Chas. Baldwin of Neosha, Mo., and Mrs. P. J. Richardson of Eagleville, Mo. All except J. T. Canaday were with her at the time of her death. He failed to reach here until the day after.

She had been a patient sufferer almost her life time and all her loving companion could do was done. Several trips were taken in hopes of benefiting her health, but to no avail. Her first thoughts were of home and children and she was never so happy as when doing something to promote their welfare.

In the year 1902 she with her husband united with the Christian Church, Blythedale, and remained a member of that church until her death.

Those left to mourn are husband, children, three brothers, Rev. M. F. Brower of Maysville, Mo; J. L. Brower and J. S. Brower of Hobart, Okla.; two sisters, Mrs. Wm. Thompson of Lamoni, Ia.; Mrs. H. J. Cobertly of Oklahoma City, Okla.; seventeen grandchildren and one great grandchild. All the relatives were present at the funeral except two brothers, one sister and two grandchildren, they being kept away by sickness. One grandson, R. V. Canaday of Rialto, Calif., and grand-daughter, Winifred Baldwin, of Neosha, Mo., were with her the last six weeks of her life and whose presence she enjoyed so much.

Home in Blythdale, Thursday and the precious body taken to St. Joseph, and laid to rest in a vault there until one can be built at the home cemetery. Those accompanying the body were the husband, H. P. Canaday and wife, Mr. and Mrs. P. J. Richardson, J. T. Canaday and son Ray, Mrs. Chas. Baldwin and children, Rev. M. F. Brower and Mrs. A. E. (no surname given).

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Subject: CHRISTOPHER (KIFF) CANADAY
Submitter: Carlton Canaday (theatre@spinn.net)
Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper, Wednesday, August 10, 1938

Christipher (Kiff) Canaday, whose will, as details were disclosed recently, provides for a wildlife refuge near Blythedale, and also for the perpetual upkeep of Cedar Hill cemetery at that town, died at midnight Thursday at a local hospital at nearly 91 years of age.

Mr. Canaday had been a patient at the hospital since January for care. Sunday of last week he had his first automobile drive within a long time, into the Eagleville and Blythedale country. Wednesday evening he was found asleep in his chair at the hospital, and never awakened.

One of the most widely known men of the county and one as generous rest of sentence unreadable. Mr. Canaday had lived more than half of his life in and near Blythedale and son of Mr. and Mrs. William Canaday, he was born October 26, 1847 near Heyworth, Ill. and came to Harrison county with his parents when seven years of age. There were seven children in the family, of whom J.W. Canaday of Powell, Wyo., and Mrs. H.M. Hungate, Columbia, survive.

His formal education was received in the Canaday rural school and a business college at Leon, Ia., but his self-education was far more important and was builded upon a mind of brilliance; and his powers of analysis and his retention of detail amazed even his closest friends in the closing days of his life.

Became Merchant, Banker

In his early manhood he followed farming for several years, and then engaged in the mercantile business at Eagleville, the late Harve Wren being his partner. A few years later he returned to his farm northeast of Eagleville, and lived there until engaging in the mercantile business at Blythedale, beginning in 1897. His sons John and Harve were his partners there. Several years later he became engaged in banking, being president and director of Blythedale banks for many years. He also followed stock raising.

He was married July 3, 1870, to Angeline Brower, who died Aug. 26, 1918. Since then he had resided with his children, spending time with each one. He was in every way active until five years ago, when a stroke prevented his traveling alone. He had been in the home of his son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Baldwin, Siloam Springs, Ark., for three and one-half years before coming here to a hospital.

Influence Continues

Mr. Canaday's influence will extend into the indefinite future. Three acres of the original Cedar Hill cemetery at Blythedale always will receive upkeep, under terms of his will. Earnings from an 80 acres of land will provide for this and part of the 80-acres tract will be preserved as a wildlife refuge and recreation spot of which his hope was that the county finally could take charge. It is to become the site of a lake, under his plans. In the far future any excess earning from the land may be used for public or educational good.

He had made arrangements for his funeral services, which were Sunday afternoon at the Blythedale Christian church, the Rev. Dr. C. Breidenthal of Bethany officiating. Pallbearers were George R. Miller, Claude Fitzgerald, Fred Harrold, Claude Wyant, Otto Wilson, and Truman White; honorary pallbearers were John Leeper, B.B. Sharp, Harry Brenizer and E.E. Lake. There was a vocal solo by Mrs. Gertrude Edwards of Eagleville, a duet by Mr. and Mrs. W.H. Hass of Bethany, and a quartet by C. B. Neville and J.O. Reed of Blythedale. Colie Harrison of Cainsville, and L.E. Casady of Bethany. Mrs. Stella Neff and Mrs. Goldie Miller were accompanists. Flower bearers were Mrs. Dolph Little, Mrs. V.C. McCoy, Mrs. J.P. Ragan and Mrs. George R. Miller.

Burial was at the family vault at Cedar Hill Cemetery.

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Subject: HARVE PRESTON CANADAY
Submitter: Carlton Canaday (theatre@spinn.net)
Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper

In Fond and Loving Remembrance of Our Brother,
Harve Preston Canaday
August 15, 1872 – February 16, 1933

Harve Preston, son of Christopher and Angeline Brower Canaday, was born on a farm near Eagleville, Mo., August 15, 1872. He was one of four children. A brother, John, passed away at Los Angeles, Calif., July 10, 1928. Two sisters, Mrs. Mable Baldwin of Siloam Springs, Ark., and Mrs. Myrtle Richardson of Eagleville, Mo., with the father survive.

Harve grew to manhood on his father's farm, attending school at the Canaday district. Completing the grade work here, he entered the Stanberry Normal for three terms, then to Shenandoan, Iowa, to Northwestern college, for one term. He afterward attended two years at Humeston, Iowa, where he completed the scientific course which enable him to become one of Harrison County's most efficient school teachers. While attending college at Humeston he met Miss Nellie T. Carlton of Westerville, Iowa, also a student at that place, and on September 15, 1895, they were united in marriage. To this union were born six children – Pauline, Marguerite, John, George, Togo and Marvin. The young wife and mother passed away March 16, 1915.

The children, Pauline (Mrs. Clint Culbertson) Saratoga, Ark; Marguerite (Mrs. Lacey Barnett) Independence, Mo.; John, Garnet, Kan; George, Emporia, Kan; Togo, Independence, Mo.; and Marvin of the Marines, with 12 grandchildren, and two step-sons, Garland Harper, Eagleville, and Garner Harper, Kansas City, Mo., survive. For several years he was associated with his father and brothers in the mercantile business at Blythedale, after which he engaged in farming. With the exception of the time spent in college and one year in service for his country during the Spanish-American War, his entire life until the year 1920 was spent in North Harrison County.

On January 14, 1918, he was united in marriage to Daisy B. Harper of Blythedale and in the year 1920 they moved to a farm near Kincaid, Kan., where they resided six years. From there they moved to Bayard, Kan., residing there three years, when they located at Pleasanton, Kan., where his death occurred February 16, 1933, at the age of 60 years, six months and one day.

While in Pleasanton he was employed as distributor for the Kansas City Star and Times; where by his kind, friendly manner he gained the love and esteem of all with whom he came in contact, and great sorrow was expressed by his going. Many friends, neighbors and business associates visited the home frequently during his illness and assisted in every way possible in caring for him. He had not enjoyed good health for several months, but no alarm was felt in regard to his condition until a few weeks before his death, when on the advice of his local physician, he consulted a specialist who gave no hopes of a recovery. Harve realized his condition and while he expressed a desire to live, he was resigned and told his loved ones that all was well. He was confined to his room three weeks, during which time everything that devoted wife, children, and father, assisted by the faithful untiring physician, Dr. J. R. Shumway, and nurse, Miss Carico, could do was done to alleviate his suffering.

Those with him when the end came were the wife; three sons, George, Togo and wife, and John and wife; father, C. Canaday; and sister, Mrs. Myrtle Richardson. Other relatives with him during his last days were a sister, Mrs. Charles Baldwin and husband, Siloam Springs, Ark; niece, Mrs. Theo Almond, of Sulphur Springs, Ark; son-in-law, Lacey Barnett of Independence, Mo.; and step-son Garner Harper of Kansas City. Messages came to him from absent friends which he appreciated very much.

Funeral services were held from the M.E. church of Pleasanton, Friday morning, February 17, conducted by the Rev. E. Goss, a close friend and neighbor. After the services there, accompanied by the wife, children, father, sisters and niece, the body was brought back to the scenes of his childhood, where the body lay at the home of his sister at Eagleville, Mo., until Sunday, when another service was held at Blythedale Christian Church, conducted by N. N. Breckenridge with memorial address by Attorney C. C. Ross of Bethany. A quartet composed of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Haas and Mr. and Mrs. Ned Prentiss, with Mrs. Stella Hass Neff at the piano, all of Bethany, Mo., rendered several beautiful selections. Pallbearers were lifetime friends of the deceased – L. E. Casady, Harley Grenton, Frank Hefner, Roy Mullins, Charles Jones and Earle Spragg. These services were attended by a large crowd of old friends who had known and loved him since early childhood. Among them were his old pupils, Harlely Brenton of Bethany; Charles Kopp and Wm. NcNelly of Lamoni, Ia.; and Mrs. Harley Drew of Eagleville. Those from a distance were S. O. Carlton and son George of Osceola, Ia.; father and brother of his deceased wife, Mr. and Mrs. Less Barnett, Leon, Ia.; Mr. and Mrs. Harry Barnett, Lamoni, Ia.; Mrs Henry Hass, Mrs. George Miller, Mr. and Mrs. Lou Casady and son Ora of Bethany. After the services the flag draped casket was carried to the Cedar Hill Cemetery and he was laid to rest by the side of the wife of his youth, near the vault where his mother is entombed, and the graves of his grandparents, Wm. and Elizabeth Canaday. The wife left behind, who came into the home 15 years ago, working and striving to make life pleasant for himself and motherless children, has returned to the lonely home at Pleasanton to take up the work he left; and while it is so hard for her to pick up the broken threads and go on, she has the assistance of their many friends, who will help her to bear her loss, and we are sure her many Harrison County friends wish her success in her undertaking.

We extend our sincere thanks for the kind expression of sympathy extended us during our bereavement. Your kindness and thoughtfulness will ever be remembered.

A sister,

Myrtle Canaday Richardson

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Subject: WILLIAM CANADAY
Submitter: Carlton Canaday (theatre@spinn.net)
Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper

WM. CANADAY DIED AT THE AGE OF 95 YEARS

Resident of Harrison County for Sixty-five Years

Wm. Canaday was born in Ohio on April 15, 1823 and died at his late residence in Ridgeway, February 28, 1919, aged 95 years 10 months and 15 days.

His grandfather, Walter Canaday, was a southern gentleman and a Quaker in religion. His father, John Canaday, was born in Alabama in 1801. The family moved to Ohio in a covered wagon (called schooner), drawn by oxen, and located in southern Illinois, the deceased being six years old at that time. The nearest post office was forty miles away and letter postage was 25 cents, and was paid by the receiver. His education consisted of one week in school six miles from home and he was so homesick that his mother never sent him back. He learned his letters from the old Bible and in after years read the book to learn his duty to God and his fellow man. He qualified himself and taught school one winter.

Wm. Canaday was married to Elizabeth Leeper of Illinois, on March 24, 1842. To this union seven children were born: John Canaday, of Eagleville, Mo.; Christopher Canaday, of Blythedale, Mo.; Phoebe A. Poynter, deceased; Joseph W. Canaday, Wyoming; Carrie B. Hungate, of Columbia, Mo.; Charles and Benjamin Canaday, who died in infancy. Elizabeth Canaday, their mother, died in Blythedale July 10, 1907, age 82 years.

Wm. Canaday came to Missouri in 1854 and entered fourteen forties of land in Colfax township, and has been a resident of Harrison County sixty-five years. He was a charter member of the Bank of Blythedale, became justice of the peace in 1856, which office he held till 1862, when he was elected county judge. He has been an active member of the G.A.R. and has helped to build many churches by his liberal donations. He organized the Taylor Grove Christian Church in 1859. He was a member of the church at Eagleville and later transferred his membership to the Blythedale Christian church. Mr. Canaday practically built the church of Blythedale from a financial consideration.

Wm. Canaday cast his first vote for James K. Polk in 1844, about the time the telegraph was invented. Abraham Lincoln was entertained at his father's home in Illinois, and Mrs. Lincoln and Wm. Canaday played together as children at the home of her father, Dr. Todd.

In 1861 he enlisted and was commissioned first lieutenant. He received his discharge, with the rank of quartermaster at the close of the war.

Wm. Canaday was married to Mrs. Jennie Reed on January 6, 1909, and has spent his declining years at their home in Ridgeway, where his faithful and devoted wife tenderly cared for him until the end came on Friday night, February 28th at 9:30 o'clock.

Wm. Canaday leaves the wife, three sons, one daughter, grandchildren and great-grandchildren and a large number of old acquaintances who will miss him.

Thus passes one more of Harrison county's old citizens, highly honored and respected by all.

The funeral services were held on Tuesday afternoon at the Christian church in Blythedale, conducted by the writer of this article. The funeral was largely attended and the remains deposited in the beautiful Cedar Hill Cemetery.

A.C. Babcock

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Subject: GEORGE CASSADAY
Submitter: George Cassaday (george.cassady@comcast.net)
Source: County News, 19 Apr, 1879

George Cassaday: We have not often been called to attend a more solemn scene than the funeral of him whose name is written above. He was born in Harrison County, this State, October 7, 23 years ago. He was one of those friends that we are always glad to meet, for he always had something good to say to you. He leaves a young wife, (to whom we married him one year ago last Christmas) and a little child. It seems so sad to see a young girl's life and prospects blighted so. Still we know that God is too wise to err, and too good to be unkind. A large concourse of friends attended his remains, on the 7th inst., to their last resting place, in the home of the silent majority.
E.T. Ingle

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Subject: ALICE HOWARD CHAMBERS
Submitter: Barbra Chambers (MOHarris-Admin@Rootsweb.com)
Source: Cainsville News, Thursday, 17 Jul, 1913

Mrs. Joab Chambers Dead

Mrs. Joab Chambers who has been in a critical condition with dropsy and other complications for some months died at the family home in the north part of Cainsville last Friday night.

Funeral services were conducted from the residence Saturday morning at 9 o'clock by Rev. J. H. Burrows after which interment was made in the Zoar cemetery. Besides the husband she leaves a daughter, Mrs. O. R. Bain; three sons, Howard, Fred, and David; other relatives and friends to mourn her death.

She was a member of Cainsvile Baptist Church and had lived a constant Christian life for many years.

Obituary next week.

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Subject: ALICE HOWARD CHAMBERS
Submitter: Barbra Chambers (MOHarris-Admin@Rootsweb.com)
Source: Cainsville News, Thursday, July 24, 1913

Sister Alice Chambers, wife of Bro. Joab Chambers, passed to be forever with her Lord, at the late home in the north part of Cainsville Friday July 12, 1913. Her illness reaches back over weary months, her suffering at times was intense, all of which she bore with Christian resignaton and fortitude. She was a humble follower of the Blessed Master in Whom she had trusted for many years. She was a faithful wife, a loving mother, and a kind neighbor and a true friend. She was the embodiment of good nature and cheer. She will be greatly missed by her loved ones and by all who knew her best. Her ailment was dropsy and kindred diseases, incident to advancing age. All was done that was possible to stay the hand of death, but to no avail, and she passed to be with Jesus, her Savior. She had been a member of the Baptist chrch for more than a score of years, (no data being at hand at this moment). Her funeral was conducted by the writer at the late home, on Saturday July 13, at 9 o'clock a.m. assisted by Bro. Boyd, the text being, "I go to prepare a place for you", the theme being, Heaven a place, and not a state or condition, it being indicated as a home of fixed habitation. The parting look taken and the flower covered casket taken to the Zoar Cemetery and laid beside the dear ones gone before, there to rest. May the Holy One be very near all that are bereft in this death is my prayer, for Jesus sake.

Their brother, J. H. Burrows
Cainsville, MO, Thursday, July 24, 1913

(Please see biography on H.C. Biography page.)

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Subject: ERNEST CHAMBERS
Submitter: Barbra Chambers (MOHarris-Admin@Rootsweb.com)
Source: The Cainsville News, Thurs. 5 Jan, 1911

Ernest Chambers Dead.

Bro. Joab Chambers and wife were called to give up their youngest son to that grim tyrant of our race called death. Ernest was their baby boy and would have been 16 years of age on the 12th of this month. He was first taken sick with typhoid fever about six weeks ago, but was recovering from that when peumonia set up and his enfeebled body succumbed and he passed from earth Jan. 1st, 1911, at the home of his parents 4 miles north of town.

The funeral was conducted by the writer from the Baptist Church Monday, Jan. 2nd at 2 p.m., assisted by Bro. Z. H. Hall. The lesson was from Jno. XI:1-11, text Jno. 11:25. Appropriate hymns were tenderly rendered, the parting look taken, and we took the white casket to the Zoar Cemetery and laid him to rest beside three other children who had gone on before. He had always helped his mother with her house work and as he lay in the casket his pallid face looked more like a young girl than a boy.

May the Lord in His providence bless this bereft home and guide them all safely to the Better Land is my prayer.

J. H. Burrows

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Subject: JOAB CHAMBERS
Submitter: Barbra Chambers (MOHarris-Admin@Rootsweb.com)
Source: Cainsville News May 26, 1921 column 3 last page.

Joab Chambers, oldest son of John Q. & Margaret Chambers, died at the home of O. Riley Bain in the north part of Cainsville, May 19, 1921 at 8:15 a.m. after an illness of several weeks.

Uncle Joab, as he was best known, was born in Mercer Co.,Mo. November 13, 1852. He has always resided near Cainsville.

At the age of 22 years he was converted and joined the Baptist Church and lived a true devoted life. In the year 1915 he went into the Apostolic Church in which he remained until death.

He was married to Alice Howard, March 11, 1877. To this union 8 children were born 3 dying in infancy. Ernest dying at the age of fifteen, and his wife dying in 1913.

Left to mourn his death 4 children: Mrs. O. Riley Bain & Howard Chambers of Cainsville, David of Trenton & Fred of Reedlez, Calif. who was not able to be here during his father's illness: also 1 brother David M. Chambers & a sister Mrs. Mary Jacobs, several grandchildren and a host of friends and loved ones. On Friday afternoon May 20, at the home of his daughter, Bro C.E. Long of Creston, IA conducted services in the presence of many friends.

He was laid to rest in the Zoar cemetery with loved ones gone before.

C.E. Long

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Subject: JOHN R. CHAMBERS
Submitter: Phil Stewart (jjhist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican, Mar 28, 1905

John R. Chambers was born in the state of Indiana, Oct 18, 1837, and died March 11, 1905 at the home of his son, Isaiah, 6 miles northwest of Mt Moriah, Mo., where he had gone for a visit a week previous, being 67 years, 4 months and 21 days of age at death.

At an early date he, with his parents William and Ellen Chambers, moved and settled near Cainsville, Missouri.

On April 10, 1862, he was married to Elizabeth Cochrane, to which union four children were born, viz: Isaiah, James, John W. and Minnie. John W. died August 20, 1871, the rest of the family being present at his death.

A short time after marriage he moved to Mt Moriah where he resided the remainder of his life.

He was converted and on Thursday after the third Sunday in October, 1855, he was baptized into the followship of the old Zoar Baptist church near Cainsville, Mo. by Elder Chesley Woodward. After his change of residence he moved his membership and went into the organization of the Mt Moriah Baptist church in 1862, to which he continued to belong the remainder of his life.

He was to all who knew him a constant, gentle, patient, hopeful Christian. He loved the church and as the years grew his zeal was quickened for the Master's cause. The house of God was to him the gate of heaven. He knew where to go to renew his youth, and he retained his faculties unimpaired to the end of life. His illness of two years, closing with a week of the most intense and agonizing pain and suffering, ended in about 30 minutes of peaceful repose, and lifting his eyes he uttered his last works; "Its alright with me" - and he passed from earth into the beautiful gates of the New Jeruselem.

He was a precious and lovable husband and father, most tenderly loved in his own home. His going has left an aching void in our hearts that never will be stilled till we clasp glad hands with him on the eternal shore. His patience, under the fearful hand of affliction, was only excelled by the triumphant faith in which he gave up his life to be received into eternal habitiations by Him who "bore our sin in his own body on the tree of the cross."

He was a highly respected citizen, an agreeable and accomodating neighbor, a most endearing parent and husband. The church is void of one of its most tireless workers, the community a worthy citizen, and the home is made lonely on account of his home-going, but our loss is his and Heaven's gain. We mourn not as those who have no hope, but look forward to that bright day when we can meet our dear old father on Heaven's bright shore. The remains were taken to his home Saturday, kept one day and the funeral was held from the Baptist church Sunday, March 12, 1905, conducted by Rev V. M. Harper, using for a text the words "He was a good man", found in Luke. The remains were interred in the Mt Moriah cemetery, witnessed by a large concourse of friends and relatives.

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Subject: JOHN QUINCY CHAMBERS
Submitter: Barbra Chambers (MOHarris-Admin@Rootsweb.com)
Source: The Cainesville News, May 26, 1910

Answered the Last Roll Call

John Quincy Chambers, one of the few remaining pioneers, and an old soldier, answered the last roll call May 19, 1910. He was born in Jennings Co., Ind., in 1831, and so was in his 79th year.

He came to Harrison County, Mo., with his parents, John Chambers, Jr. and Elizabeth Hankins Chambers, in 1845; his father entering land in what is now the corporate limits of Cainsville, and has lived here the greater part of his life. He lived for a time in Pleasanton, Iowa; moved to California twice; had the management of the Harrison County Poor Farm two or three years; was proprietor of the Cainsville Flouring Mill for a time; and was the principal blacksmith here 20 or more years. He was ever a busy man and surely did his share of downright hard work.

He enlisted in the 35th Mo. Vol. Inft., Comp. F, serving until discharged. While in the service he contracted the disease which finally ended his life.

He was married to Miss (Margaret) Elizabeth Bishop on Nov. 17, 1850, and to this union 10 children were born, 4 of whom are living who with the widow mourn the death of a fond parent and true husband. He professed his faith in Christ in 1847 and was baptised by Eld. Ira Blakely on the 3rd Sunday in March of the same year. So for more than 60 years he has been a member of the Baptist church, and the writer owes him a debt of gratitude for his solicitude for our soul's salvation.

For five years previous to our conversion (1867) he, his brother Joe, and sister Rebecca, were our closest co-workers in the temperance work at Cainsville, and were true as steel in every emergency.

We have known him 48 years, and for the last 20 years he has been in the "Valley of the Shadow of Death", and often when he was our near neighbor we have seen him hoeing in his garden on his knees. His enfeebled body embittered his mind and he could not get out of life what he should. His church life was far from what it was 40 years ago and did not yield the consolation the Christian needs as they near the sundown of life, as his afflictions keeping him from God's house. But reader, did you ever think that

"Sometimes I think the Angel Death,
Comes down from realms above,
And grants to souls unfit for flight,
More time to learn God's love.

Sometimes I think the pitying tears,
Like rain on parched sod,
Brings forth new life from wearing years,
And brings us home to God."


David said: "It is good for me to be afflicted, that I might learn Thy precepts."

Funeral services, Friday, conducted by the writer, assisted by Rev. V. M. Harper at the Baptist Church at 2 P.M. Songs were feelingly rendered, the parting looking taken, and then the casket enbowered in flowers was taken to the Zoar Cemetery under escort of the I.O.O.F., and D. of R., interred according to their beautiful burial ritual. We left him to rest, and while his tired and emaciated body rests surrounded by its kindred clay, the spirit has returned to the God Who gave it. While we mingle our tears in sorrow here, he is enjoying the hallelujahs of heaven. Brother, friend, co-worker, adieu, until we meet again.

May the Holy Spirit keep and guide his loved ones is my prayer.

J.H. Burrows

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Subject: MARGARET ELIZABETH BISHOP CHAMBERS
Submitter: Barbra Chambers (MOHarris-Admin@Rootsweb.com)
Source: Cainsville newspaper, name and date unknown.

Margaret E. Chambers, whose maiden name was Bishop, was born in Decatur County, Ind., on July 11, 1833, and died at the family home in Cainsvile, Mo., Aug. 14, 1919, aged 86 years, 1 month, and 4 days.

She was married to John Q. Chambers Nov. 17, 1850, in Mercer County, Mo. To this union were born ten children of whom three are now living--Joab, Mary, and David M. She was converted and joined the old Zoar Baptist Church in August 1860, when there were but 59 members of this church.

Thus called home after a long life service.

The funeral service was conducted at the Baptist Church by Pastor R. L. Wood and the body was laid to rest in the Zoar cemetery to await the Resurrection Morn. We extend our love and sympathy to those who mourn the loss of a dear and faithful mother.

R.L. Wood, Pastor

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Subject: ETHEL JANE CLABAUGH
Submitted by: Phil Stewart (JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper, Oct 20, 1969

MRS WORTHY CLABAUGH, New Hampton:

Mrs Ethel Jane Clabaugh, 80, died Sunday at a nursing home in St Joseph. She was a lifelong resident of New Hampton and had been assistant cashier at the First State Bank of New Hampton for 32 years. She was a member of the United Methodist Church of New Hampton. She and her husband celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary in April of this year.

She is survived by her husband, Worthy G. Clabaugh of the home in New Hampton; a brother, Fay Cox, New Hampton; and a sister, Mrs Grace V. Snipes, St Joseph.

The body will be taken to the Noble-Roberson mortuary in New Hampton from the Heaton-Bowman mortuary in St Joseph today.

____________________________________________________________

Subject: AUBREY CLARK
Submitter: Robert W. Taylor (rtaylor@coin.org)
Source: The Bethany Republican-Clipper, 11 December 1929, p. 2, col. 3:

Aubrey Cleveland Clark, the son of B.P. and Mary E. Clark, was born in Harrison county, Missouri, February 24, 1883, and departed this life at his home near Matkins, Wednesday morning, December 4, 1929, aged 46 years, nine months and 10 days. Mr. Clark has lived most of his life in and near this community. He was one of a family of 14 children, five of whom have preceded him to the great beyond.

He was a big-hearted man - was fair and honest in business and expected like treatment at the hands of all men. He believed in God as Father and Maker of us all; five years ago he made a profession of religion and united with the Methodist church at Matkins.

April 16, 1929, he was united in marriage to Mrs. Cora Cooter, who survives him. His death came as a great shock to his family and friends,and he will be sadly missed by them all.

He leaves to mourn their loss, his wife, four children by a former marriage, namely Bonnie, Lois, Claudia, and Clarence Clark, and two step-children, Howard and Vernon Cooter, four brothers and five sisters, William Clark and Walter Clark of Bethany, Missouri, Jesse Clark of Protection, Kansas, and Benjamin Clark of Hamilton, Missouri, Mrs. Elizabeth Cole and Mrs. Glenna Cooper of Bethany, Missouri, Mrs. Lillie Francisco, of Colorado Springs, Colorado, Mrs. Callie Vance and Mrs. Corda Youngman of near Matkins, Missouri, and other relatives and a host of friends.

Just a thought of sweet remembrance,
Just a memory fond and true,
Just a token of affection
And a heartache still for you
Just a sigh for the olden moments,
Just a smile of love anew,
Just a tear in silence falling
And a yearning just for you.


The funeral services were conducted at the Matkins church, Thursday, December 5, 1929, at 2:30 o'clock p.m., by the Rev. H.G. Blomfield of Bethany, in the presence of a large number of relatives and friends. After the funeral service the remains were tenderly laid to rest in the cemetery near by. Pallbearers were W.C. Cole, C.M. Vance, Wm. Clark, W.W. Clark, J.O. Youngman and Benjamin Clark.

____________________________________________________________

Subject: BENJAMIN A. CLARK
Submitter: Robert W. Taylor (rtaylor@coin.org)
Source: The Hamilton Advocate Hamiltonian, 12 Apr 1978, page 2, column 6:

Benjamin A. Clark, 86, died Saturday, April 8, at his home. He was a retired farmer and a native and lifelong resident of Harrison County. Survivors include his wife, Mrs. Maggie Clark of the home; two sons, Benjamin P. Clark of Seymour, Texas and Lyle Clark of Hamilton; and two daughters, Mrs. Margaret Jessen of Dallas, Texas and Mrs. Josephine Burns of Manson, Wash.

The funeral was Tuesday at the Bram Funeral Home in Hamilton with burial in Highland Cemetery.

____________________________________________________________

Subject: EMMETT M. CLARK
Submitter: Phil Stewart (jjhist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican Clipper, date unknown

Emmett M. Clark, 94, St Joseph, died Tuesday July 8, 1997, at a St Joseph hospital after a lengthy illness. For 40 years, Mr. Clark was employed by Miller Chevrolet and Keith Marsh Chevrolet, retiring as a parts manager. Born in Bethany, MO., on July 3, 1903, he lived most of his life in St Joseph. He was a member of the Ashland United Methodist Church. Mr Clark was a member and vice-president of the Regional Parts Manager's Record Club, and was recognized for outstanding performance by the Division Headquarters of the Chevrolet Corp. He also played baseball on the Miller Chevrolet team. He was preceded in death by his wife, Dollie M. Clark, in 1985; his parents, Sherman T. and Vernitia A.; a brother, Gordon; and two sisters, Edith Clark and Edna Maple. Surviving are a son, Gerald E., St Joseph; a daughter, Vernitia Clark, Philippi, W.Va., four grandchildren, and three great-grandchildren. Graveside services and burial were at 1:00 Friday at the Ashland Cemetery of St Joseph, under the direction of the Meierhoffer-Fleeman Funeral Home of St Joseph.

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Subject: GEORGE W. CLARK
Submitter: Phil Stewart (jjhist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Clipper , Jun 14, 1914

GEORGE W. CLARK DEAD

George W. Clark died at his home in this city Friday, May 29, after a severe illness of two weeks. He was born July 22, 1837 in Marion county, Ohio, and at the time of his death was aged 76 years, 10 months, 7 days.

He was married Jan 12, 1859 to Mary E. Gearheart [sic] and to this union eight children were born, one dying in infancy. One daughter died only about three weeks ago. Three daughters and three sons survive him.

Mr Clark was an old soldier, enlisting in the 82nd Ohio.

Funeral services were held from the residence Saturday morning, conducted by Rev A. N. Cave. The remains were then taken to Mitchelville cemetery for burial.

In their double bereavement, the family has the sincere sympathy of their many friends.

____________________________________________________________

Subject: IRA CLARK
Submitter: Robert W. Taylor (rtaylor@coin.org)
Source: The Bethany Clipper, 3 September 1914, page 1, column 5:

Died in Arizona

Ira Clark died at Phoenix, Ariz., Monday night, Aug. 24, of tuberculosis.

He moved from here to Arizona three years ago. He was a brother of Mrs. W.C. Cole of this city. His father, B.P. Clark, left several days ago for Phoenix, and accompanied the wife home with the remains Saturday. Ira was about 25 years of age. Funeral services were held at Matkins last Saturday afternoon, and the body laid to rest in the Matkins cemetery.

____________________________________________________________

Subject: JESSIE CLARK
Submitter: Robert W. Taylor (rtaylor@coin.org)
Source: The Nevada Daily Mail, 1 Oct 1958, p. 3, col. 4:

Jessie Clark Dies
Jessie I.L. Clark, 73, retired farmer of the Montevallo area, died at 8:40 o'clock this morning at a local nursing home. He had lived in the Montevallo vicinity until entering the Nevada nursing home last February.

Mr. Clark was born Jan. 25, 1885, in Bethany, Mo., the son of Benjamin and Martha (sic) Clark.

Funeral arrangements are incomplete at this time and will be announced tomorrow, along with a list of survivors, by the Eichinger Funeral Home.

____________________________________________________________

Subject: JESSE I.L. CLARK
Submitter: Robert W. Taylor (rtaylor@coin.org)
Source: The Nevada Daily Mail, 2 Oct 1958, p. 3, col. 4:

Clark Rites Tomorrow

Graveside funeral rites for Jesse I.L. clark, retired Montevallo farmer who died Wednesday, will be held at two o'clock tomorrow afternoon at the Mt. Zion cemetery in Harrison County. The body will lie in state at the Eichinger Funeral Home after two o'clock this afternoon.

Mr. Clark had lived in the Montevallo area for eight years before he came to the Fanning Nursing Home last February. Prior to his residence in Montevallo, he lived in Protection, Kan., and was a member of the Protection Methodist Church.

Survivors include three daughters, Mrs. W.P. Gigax, Montevallo, Mrs. H.H. Bolen, Wichita, Kan., and Mrs. Thor McMillen, Albany, Mo.; three sons, Olin A. Clark, Boulder, Colo., Jesse J. Clark, Hutchinson, Kan., and Lester L. Clark, Garden City, Kan., 26 grandchildren and 20 great grandchildren, three sisters, Mrs. Claude Cole, Bethany, Mo., Mrs. Lillie Francisco, Colorado Springs, Colo., and Mrs. Fred Cooper, Bethany.

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Subject: JESSEE I.L. CLARK
Submitter: Robert W. Taylor (rtaylor@coin.org)
Source: Newspaper name and date unknown.

Jessee I.L. Clark was born Jan. 25, 1885, in Butler township near Matkins, and departed this life Oct. 1, 1958, at the age of 73 years, nine months and seven days.

He was the son of Benjamin P. and Mary Elizabeth Clark, who preceded him in death.

He was married to Elizabeth Belle Miller Dec. 8, 1904. To this union six children were born: Elma Gigax of Eldorado Springs, Mo., Olin A. Clark of Boulder, Colo., Jessee J. Clark of Hutchison, Kan., Lester L. Clark of Garden City, Kan., Belva Bolen of Wichita, Kan., and Thelma Miller of Albany, Mo. Also, he leaves 28 grandchildren, one brother, Ben A. Clark of Hamilton, Mo., and three sisters, Elizabeth Cole of Bethany, Mo., Lillie Francisco of Colorado Springs, Colo., and Glenna Cooper, also of Bethany, Mo.

Brothers and sisters who preceded him in death were William, Walter, Aubrey, Ira and Manly Clark, Callie, Corida, Idas and Gladys Clark.

Jessee was brought up in the Methodist faith, and passed away at the Fanning nursing home of Nevada, Mo. He leaves a host of nieces and nephews, and other relatives and friends.

"Gone is the face we loved so dear,
Silent the voice we loved to hear
Too far away for sight or speech,
But not too far for thought to reach.
Sweet to remember him who once was near,
And who, though absent, is just as dear.
In grief comes the thought so solemn and sweet,
He is not dead - only asleep."

____________________________________________________________

Subject: MANLY W. CLARK
Submitter: Robert W. Taylor (rtaylor@coin.org)
Source: The Bethany Clipper 13 July 1921, page 5, column 3:

Manly W. Clark, son of B.P. Clark and wife, was born on a farm near Matkins, Mo., Sept. 16, 1893, and died in Colorado Springs, July 5, 1921, age 27 years, 9 months and 19 days. He was married to Nellie Ricketts, December 2, 1914. She passed away January 14, 1918. To this union two children were born, Wilma, who is the sole survivor of the once happy family, and Vernon Leo, who died about two years ago.

Manly was again married to Sophia Fay Salmon, March 26, 1919. To this union was born one son Manly Wren, who is left to comfort his heartbroken mother. Bro. Manly never united with any church, but made a profession during his last illness. A Christian gentleman, whose name we did not learn visited with him and talked to him of Jesus' power to save till he professed Christ, and he told his loved ones not to grieve for him he was just going to sleep. His wife and children were with him when the end came, also his sister Lillie Fransico (sic). His brother, Ben Clark, was on the road but did not get there till after his death. He leaves to mourn their loss five brothers and four sisters, a wife and two children and a host of relatives and friends.

The funeral was held at Matkins Sunday at 2:30 o'clock by the writer. A very large crowd was present to pay their respects.

Those from a distance attending were: Mr. and Mrs. H. Streeter, Mr. and Mrs. L. Snyder, Will Streeter and family, Fred Woodrick and family, all of Hamilton, Caldwell county, Mo.

There were many lovely flowers offered. To the sorrowing ones we extend sympathy. W.O. Dotson


Card of Thanks.

We wish to express our thanks to our many neighbors and friends for their kindness during our bereavement.

Mrs. Fay Clark
Mrs. Glenna Cooper
Mrs. Lillie Francisco
Benny Clark

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Subject: MANLY W. CLARK
Submitter: Robert W. Taylor (rtaylor@coin.org)
Source: The Bethany Republican, 13 July 1921, page 6, column 5:

Dies at Colorado Springs

Manley Wren Clark died at Colorado Springs, Colo., July 5th, and the body was received at Bethany last Friday, July 8th. It was taken to the home of his wife's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wiley Salmon, and funeral services were held at Matkins on the 10th, conducted by Rev. W.O. Dotson, of the Bethany Baptist church.

The deceased was born July 16, 1893. The relatives and friends have the sincere sympathy of all acquaintances.

____________________________________________________________

Subject: SHERMAN T. CLARK
Submitter: Phil Stewart (jjhist@grm.net)
Source: Harrison County Times, Sep 2, 1944

Sherman T. Clark, 79, a former Bethany resident, died Sunday night in St Joseph following a heart attack suffered at his home at 1208 1/2 South Tenth Street. He was in an ambulance en route to a St Joseph hospital when death occurred.

Graveside services were conducted here Tuesday afternoon by the Rev J. W. Mino of St Joseph, former Baptist pastor here. Funeral rites were held earlier Tuesday at a St Joseph funeral home. Burial was in the Pythian cemetery.

Mr. Clark, a brother-in-law of Miss Mattie and Charles Arnold and of Mrs. Harry Garton, all of Bethany, moved away from here about 20 years ago. He was a retired carpenter for the Union Pacific railroad company and had been ill before the attack. He was a member of the Bethany Methodist church.

Surviving are two daughters, Miss Edith Clark of St Joseph and Mrs. Bonard Maple of Kansas City; two sons, Gordon and Emmett, both of St Joseph; two sisters, Mrs. Tom Schlosser of Burlington, Colo., and Mrs. Lillie Hamilton of Spickard; a brother, John Clark of Belle Plaine, Kansas, and 10 grandchildren.

His wife, the former Vernitia Arnold. preceded him in death a number of years ago.

____________________________________________________________

Subject: WALTER CLARK
Submitter: Robert W. Taylor (rtaylor@coin.org)
Source: The Harrison County Times, 21 November 1946, page 1, col.1

Walter Clark Dead

Suffered Sudden Heart Attack While at Work; Funeral Held Tuesday

Walter W. Clark, well-known Harrison county farmer who lived southwest of Bethany, died suddenly Sunday from a heart attack while working on a load of wood.

Funeral services were conducted Tuesday at 2:00 p.m. at the White Oak church by the Rev. O.D. Hedges. Burial was at the White Oak cemetery. Survivors are his wife, Lillie D. (Whiteley) Clark; two children, Erlin Gerald, who lives on an adjoining farm, and Mrs. Ruby Shinabarger of Council Bluffs, Iowa; four sisters, Mrs. W.C. Cole and Mrs. Fred Cooper of Bethany, Mrs. Jake Youngman of New Hampton, and Mrs. Lillie Francisco of Colorado Springs, Colo.; two brothers, Jesse Clark of Protection, Kans., and Benny Clark of Hamilton, Mo.

Mr. Clark, who was 70 years old, was born in Harrison county. He was the son of the late Benjamin and Betty Clark.

Pallbearers for the funeral were Paul Hiatt, William Ricketts, Dan Jones, Van Uber, Charles Green, Jake Youngman and Mat Scheughnessy.

______________________________

Source: The Bethany Republican-Clipper, 20 November, 1946, page 1, column 6:

Walter W. Clark Passes Suddenly

Dies on Load of Slabs After Complaining of Heart During the Day

Walter W. Clark, living in the Hiatt neighborhood southwest of Bethany, died suddenly of a heart ailment Sunday on a truckload of slabs being hauled from a sawmill near the Ray McDaniel home, south of Mitchelville. His son, Erlin Gerald Clark, who lives near the parents' home, was in the hauling group. Mr. Clark, 70 years old, had mentioned during the day that his heart was affecting his comfort.

Mr. Clark also is survived by his wife, Lillie D., and a daughter, Mrs. Ruby Shinabarger of Council Bluffs, Iowa. He was a brother of Mrs. W.C. Cole and Mrs. Fred Cooper, both of Bethany; Mrs. Jake Youngman of New Hampton, Mrs. Lillie Francisco of Colorado Springs, Colo., Jesse Clark of Protection, Kan., and Benny Clark of Hamilton.

The Rev. O.D. Hedges officiated yesterday afternoon at funeral services at the White Oak church, and burial was at that cemetery.

______________________________

Source: The Republican-Clipper, same issue, page 6, under "Hampton":

Walter Clark Dead

Walter Clark passed away suddenly at his farm home near Bethany last Sunday evening. He was a brother of Mrs. Jake Youngman and a brother-in-law of Mrs. Matt Scheughnessy of near here.

______________________________

Source: The Republican-Clipper, same issue, page 6, under "White Oak News":

Friends were grieved when news came of the passing of Walter Clark Sunday night. He had been in declining health for a long while, but had been as well as usual that day. He is survived by his wife, Lillie, a son, Gerald, and a daughter, Mrs. Harmon Shinnabarger, of Council Bluffs, Iowa, besides a brother and sisters. Funeral arrangements have not yet been made. Sympathy goes out to the family in their hour of bereavement.

______________________________
Source: The Republican-Clipper, same issue, page 6, under "Matkins News":

Walter Clark, a well known farmer of this community, passed away Sunday, following a heart ailment.

____________________________________________________________

Subject: WILLIAM M. CLARK
Submitter: Robert W. Taylor (rtaylor@coin.org)
Source: The Bethany Harrison County Times, 2 January 1936, page 4, column 2

Long Illness Fatal Sunday to William M. Clark

William M. Clark, born in Clay county, passed away Sunday at his home south of town, aged 66 years, six months and 14 days. Mr. Clark has been in ill health for two years and bedfast since last May. He was the son of Benjamin P. and Elizabeth Arnold Clark.

He spent practically all of his life in or near Bethany. A few years ago he lived for a short time at Hatfield. He was a farmer.

Mr. Clark is survived by his widow, Mrs. Minnie Clark, and six children: Ray Clark of Oregon, Roy of Bethany, Mrs. Eva Selby, Mrs. Artie Tilley, both of Bethany, Mrs. Jennie Neff of Jefferson City and Mrs. Herschel Sutton of Eagleville. He also leaves three sisters, Mrs. Maude (sic - should be Claude) Cole of Bethany, Mrs. Fred Cooper of Ridgeway, and Mrs. Charles Vance of near McFall; three brothers, Jesse Clark of Protection, Kan, Walter of Bethany and Benjamin of Hamilton.

Funeral services were Monday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock at the Mitchellville church conducted by the Rev. W.O. Dotson. Burial was in Burris cemetery nearby. The pallbearers: George Joyce, Otis Butler, Marion Hefner, Clay Burris, Marion Clark and Harlan Maize.

The singers were Mrs. Benton Crabtree, Mrs. Willie Ricketts, Mrs. Charles Myers, Mrs. Icie Hiatt, N.B. Harrison and W.H. Haas. Mrs. Loren Joyce was accompanist. The songs were "Does Jesus Care?" and "Going Down the Valley." Mrs. Myers sang a solo, "Some Day We'll Understand."

S.M. Haas & Son were in charge.

______________________________

Source: The Bethany Republican Clipper, 1 January 1936, page 1, column 1:

W.M. Clark Dies; 7 Are Survivors

Leaves Widow, Two Sons and Four Daughters - Had Been Ill Many Months

William M. Clark, 66 years old, long a resident of the Bethany vicinity, died early Sunday morning at his home south of the corporate limits. He had been in poor health for about two years, and since last spring his condition had been steadily worse.

He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Minnie Clark, two sons and four daughters: Roy Clark of Bethany, Wray Clark of Oregon, Mo, Mrs. Victor Neff of Jefferson City, Mrs. Argil Tilley and Mrs. Raymond Selby, both of Bethany, and Mrs. Herschel Sutton of Eagleville.

Mr. Clark was a native of Clay county. Of recent years he had lived part of the time near Hatfield.

Funeral services were Monday afternoon at the Mitchelville church, where the sermon was preached by the Rev. W.O. Dotson, and burial was at the Burris cemetery. Vocal music was by Mrs. C.W. Myers, Mrs. Paul Hiatt, Mrs. William Ricketts, Mrs. Harrison Crabtree, N.B. Harrison and W.H. Haas, with Mrs. Loren Joyce as accompanist.

Pallbearers were George Joyce, Otis Butler, Harlan Maize, Clay Burris, Marion Clark, and Marion Hefner.

____________________________________________________________

Subject: WILLIAM PERRY CLARK
Submitter: Phil Stewart JJHist@grm.net)
Source: The Bethany Republican, Dec 21, 1920

The subject of this memoir first saw the light of day in Hancock county, Indiana, Thursday, November 1, 1838.

At the age of 27 years he came west and located in Fox Creek township, Harrison county, Missouri. In his young manhood he was a teacher in the public schools, giving splendid satisfaction whenever employed. In those days the salary of school teachers was very small, not justifying a man who had ambition to forge ahead in the affairs of the world, to continue in the profession. So Mr Clark concluded he could do better at farming. Accordingly he purchased a farm in Bethany township, this county, where he toiled industriously through the years, to provide all things necessary and needful to his wife and children.

Sunday, March 1, 1868, Mr Clark was united in marriage to Miss Sarah E. Smith. This union was blessed with eleven children. Two of these, Matilda and Rosana, the latter, wife of William Miner, preceed their father into the great beyond. The children who survive him are Mazeppa, wife of John Needles, Nash, Okla.; George, Bethany, Mo.; Joseph, Albany, Mo; Nancy, wife of James Walker, Bethany, Mo; Edward, Grand Haven, Mich; Mattie B., Kansas City, Mo; Austin, Yuma, Colo.; Alvin, Frank, on the home farm, Bethany township.

In the year 1897 Mr Clark realized he was not living in accordance with the standard set forth in the holy scriptures. Deeply impressed with this conviction, it culminated in his conversion to the teachings of our blessed Lord, and he walked in the newness of life the rest of his days. He identified himself with the Mt Olivet charge of the Methodist Episcopal church, South, in Bethany township, remaining a faithful member of the church of his choice to the end of his earthly career.

Besides the children named, he is survived by his loving, devoted wife, a number of grand, great-grand and great-great-grandchildren. He will be missed not only by his immediate family, but by a host of neighbors and friends.

Mr Clark was a man of sterling honestly and upright character. He was a model farmer in order and neatness, of which his farm gives testimony. He was respected and esteemed by all that had the pleasure of his acquaintance. He lived among us for 82 years, 1 month and 13 days, then God took him.

Funeral services were at the church home by the writer December 16th, 1920, among a host of relatives, neighbors and friends. Interment was had in the cemetery adjoining.

So another good man has received his reward.

____________________________________________________________

Subject: ELIZABETH COLE
Submitter: Robert W. Taylor (rtaylor@coin.org)
Source: The Bethany Republican-Clipper, 23 March 1960, p. 1, col. 1:

Mrs. W.C. Cole Dies at 86 Years, After Long Illness
Well-Known Bethany Woman is Survived by Husband and a Son-Funeral Services Are Friday Morning

Mrs. Elizabeth Cole died at 3:00 o'clock this Wednesday morning at her home on Alder street in Bethany. She was 86 years old. Mrs. Cole, well-known and respected in Bethany circles had been ill four or five years. She had been admitted to a Bethany hospital for a few days last week, and was dismissed Saturday.

Mrs. Cole is survived by her husband, W.C. Cole of the home; a son, Melverne C. Cole of Bethany; and a granddaughter, Mrs. Ervin V. Osborn, also of Bethany. There are three great-grandchildren. A brother is Benjamin Clark of Hamilton, and two sisters are Mrs. Fred Cooper of Bethany and Mrs. Lillian Francisco of Colorado Springs, Colo.

Mrs. Cole was born in Harrison county, was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ben S. Clark. She was a member of the Pythian sisterhood, American Legion Auxiliary, the Woman's Society of Christian Service, and the Bethany Methodist church.

Funeral services will be Friday morning at 10:30 o'clock at the Haas funeral home. The Rev. Ted Masters will officiate. Burial will be at Miriam cemetery.

______________________________

Subject: ELIZABETH COLE
Submitter: Robert W. Taylor (rtaylor@coin.org)
Source: The Bethany Republican-Clipper, 30 March 1960, page 1, column 2:

Funeral Rites for Mrs. Cole at the Haas Chapel Friday

Funeral rites for Mrs. W.C. Cole were Friday morning at the Haas Chapel, with the Rev. Ted Masters officiating. Mrs. Cole died at her home early Wednesday morning of last week.

Mrs. Bill Butler sang, accompanied by Mrs. James Ferguson. Active pallbearers were G.H. Adair, Frank Snyder, V.N. Conger, R.S. Templeman, V.F. Guymon, Harry Webb, Peter Gehrke, Fred Stone and James Ferguson. Honorary pallbearers were A.C. Flint, A.T. Slatten, M.C. Duke, C.C. Ross, P.G. Wightman, C.S. Burg, L.G. Prentiss, S.S. Loeb, Ova Collings, A.R. Cushman and J.S. Nally.

Burial was at Miriam cemetery.

____________________________________________________________

Subject: VERDA COMER
Submitter: Phil Stewart JJHist@grm.net)
Source: Polley Funeral Home, Excelsior Springs, MO

Verda Comer, age 99, of Ridgeway, MO, passed away April 23, 2009.

She was born August 8, 1909 on a farm west of Eagleville, Mo. to Sylvester T. and Nellie Maude (Alston) Mathes. Verda was a proud graduate from Eagleville High School.

She married Ace C. Comer, April 16, 1929 and became a devoted farm wife, mother, aunt and wonderful grandmother.

She worked as a censes taker and was involved in numerous volunteer jobs. Her memberships included Hobbs Chapel Church and later Ridgeway Methodist Church, UMW, WTL, PEO and Garden Club.

Verda was preceded in death by her parents, husband Ace, an infant brother, and brothers Everett and Isam, sisters Bertha Ethel, Hessie, Ruby, Clara, Lois and Oral, son-in-law Dannie Westlake and granddaughter Dena Jean Dale Polley.

She is survived by a son, Gordon "Bud" Comer and wife Marnell, Bethany, MO., daughters Marilyn A. Henry-Flesher and husband Fred, Bethany, MO., Carolyn J. Polley and husband Junior, Mission, TX., and Patricia J. Westlake, Lea Wood, KS., 15 grandchildren, 42 great-grandchildren and 41 great-great-grandchildren, plus many nieces, nephews, cousins and friends. Her presence and laughter will be greatly missed.

Services at 1:00 p.m. Saturday, April 25, 2009 at the Ridgeway Methodist Church, Ridgeway, MO. under the direction of the Polley Funeral Home of Excelsior Springs, MO. Open visitation is scheduled from 9:00 a.m. Saturday morning until service time. Interment at the Rose Hill Cemetery, Ridgeway, Missouri.

Memorial contributions requested to the Rose Hill Cemetery or the Willing Workers of the Methodist Church and may be made in care of the family or the funeral home.

____________________________________________________________

Subject: GLENNA GLEE COOPER
Submitter: Robert W. Taylor (rtaylor@coin.org)
Source: Newspaper name and date unknown.

Glenna Glee Cooper was born in Bethany, Mo., June 7, 1898, and passed away at North Memorial Hospital, Kansas City, Mo., March 14, 1988.

Her husband, William Fred Cooper, preceded her in death in 1967 at which time she moved from Bethany, Mo., to Gladstone, Mo., to be near a daughter.

Her parents were pioneer Missourians, coming to Missouri in 1854. Her mother passed away when she was quite young and she went to Welch, Oklahoma with her father and two younger brothers in a covered wagon when she was seven years old. They went across the Missouri River in a ferry boat.

She was preceded in death by her parents, Benjamine Parkins and Mary Elizabeth Clark. She was the youngest of 14 children, having been preceded in death by six sisters and seven brothers.

Surviving children are Evelyn Sutherland, Gladstone, Mo., Bueford C. Cooper, Ridgeway, Mo., William D. Cooper, Moberly, Mo., and Vaunceil Bush, Belton, Mo. She is survived by 12 grandchildren, three step-grandchildren, 19 great-grandchildren and four step-great-grandchildren.

She was a member of the Northland Quilters Guild of Gladstone, Mo. Quilting was her pride and joy. She has quilted for several people in Bethany, Kansas City, Mo., as several states in the United States. Many of her quilts hung in quilt shows. She spent many hours quilting. She also loved her flowers and garden. She was a past member of the Bethany Garden Club. She was a Methodist and belonged to the Matkins Church.


Thanks

The family of Glenna Cooper wishes to express our sincere appreciation for the many acts of helpfulness, expressions of sympathy, cards, flowers, food and the many acts of kindness shown to us in our time of bereavement.

Evelyn Sutherland
Bueford Cooper
William Cooper
Vaunceil Bush

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Subject: EDITH CORBIN
Submitter: Deb Daily (dailyknd@grm.net)
Source: Newspaper clippping, unknown paper or date

Rites Held For Edith M. Corbin

Funeral services for Mrs. Edith M. Corbin were held at 2 p.m. Monday at Resthaven Mortuary, north of Trenton. The Rev. Larry Kackley, pastor of the Rural Dale Baptist Church, officiated.

Mrs. Corbin, 67, a resident of Route 4, Trenton, died early Friday morning in the Bailey Clinic at Jamesport. Special music was provided by Mrs. Carolyn Berry, who sang “The Old Rugged Cross”, and “Take My Hand, Precious Lord”. Mrs. Jackie Gibler played the organ accompaniment.

Pallbearers were Rex Harkins, Oliver Brewer, Alfred Urton, Leroy Corbin, Jim Spears, and Frank Spears. Burial was in Resthaven Memorial Gardens, north of Trenton.

Rural Trenton Woman Dies

Mrs. Edith M. Corbin, 67, a resident of Route 4, Trenton, died at 1 a.m. today at the Bailey Clinic in Jamesport, where she had been a patient one day.
Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m. Monday at Resthaven Mortuary, north of Trenton. The Rev. Larry Kackley, pastor of the Rural Dale Baptist Church, will officiate. Burial will be in Resthaven Memorial Gardens, north of Trenton. There is no family visitation scheduled at the mortuary.
Mrs. Corbin was born near Gilman City, Mo. on June 7, 1914, a daughter of Albert Louis and Maggie Mae Smith Brown. She was married to Harold Corbin on Feb. 6, 1954 in Trenton. They lived on a farm southwest of Trenton all their married life. Mrs. Corbin was a member of the Edinburg Baptist Church.
She is survived by her husband, Harold, of the home; one son, Cecil Chambers of Trenton; her mother, Mrs. Maggie Weber of Lamoni, Iowa; one brother, Vermal Brown, and one sister, Verma Dean McCullough, both of Trenton; two half brothers, Charles Smith of Springdale, Ark., and Junior Smith of Apple Valley, Calif., and two grandchildren. Mrs. Corbin was preceded in death by her father and one grandson, Gary Wayne Chambers.

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Subject: ERNEST FAY COX
Submitter: Phil Stewart (jjhist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper May 25, 1977

ERNEST FAY COX

Ernest Fay Cox, 81, died March 25 at the Gentry County Hospital, Albany, Missouri.

He was the son of Joseph and Roda (Stinson) Cox. He was born Sept 10, 1895 in New Hampton, Missouri. He was a veteran of World War I.

On December 8, 1917 he was united in marriage to Virgil L. Swartz in Bethany, Missouri.

He is survived by one daughter, Ellen Jane Roberts, St Joseph, Mo.; one son-in-law, Joel Roberts, St Joseph, Mo.; six grandchildren, Larry Ted Bridger, Bethany, Mo.; David Edwin Bridger, Ernest Woodson Bridger, Steven Lee Bridger, all of New Hampton, Mo.; Jura Louise Callaway, Emily Rose Kennedy, both of St Joseph, Mo.; 15 great-grandchildren and one sister, Mrs Grace Snipes, St Joseph.

He was preceded in death by his wife in 1968, his parents, 2 brothers and 4 sisters.

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Subject: MARY COX
Submitted by: Phil Stewart (JJHist@grm.net)
Source: The Cainsville News, Feb 11, 1904, page 3

The subject of this sketch was born in Alaka County, KY, June 15, 1815. Her maiden name was Long and her parents moved to Indiana when she was but five years of age.

Feb 28, 1832, she was married to Andrew Stafford and to this union 7 children were born, 2 of whom are still living - Rose and Ellen. She and her faithful husband united with the Christian church in 1838 and she has since lived a consistent Christian life.

Her husband died May 6, 1845, and she remained a widow for 12 years. In 1857, she was married to Wm. Cox, and to this union, a son, Lafayette, was born. On Aug 20, 1868, Mr. Cox died, and she remained a widow the rest of her life, and died Feb. 5, 1904.

"Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord."

She was a kind hearted christian mother, benevolent to the poor, and true to the church of her choice. The funeral service was conducted by the writer from the text found in 2 Cor, 5:1.10.

"Dearest mother thou hast left us, and this loss we deeply feel.
But, 'tis God who hath bereft us, But God can all our sorrows heal.
Mother, thou has gone before us, and our hearts are sad and sore,
Thou hast joined the happy chorus, of the blest upon that shore.
Dearest mother, how we miss thee, as we note the vacant chair,
But we know we soon shall greet thee, with Jesus in that home so fair."

J. M. Booth

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Subject: ROSIE (GUESS) COX
Submitter: Phil Stewart (jjhist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper June 20, 1968

OBITUARY - ROSIE (GUESS) COX:

Rosie L. (Guess) Cox, daughter of Matt and Eva (Bates) Guess, was born near Lone Star, Mo., on March 3, 1886 and passed away June 16, 1968, at the Crestview Rest Home in Bethany, at the age of 82 years, 3 months and 13 days.

On Oct 22, 1905, she was united in marriage to Floyd Thomas Cox. To this union three sons and one daughter were born.

She accepted Christ at an early age and united with the Lone Star Baptist Church. She later transferred her membership to the New Hampton Methodist Church where she remained a faithful member for the rest of her life.

She was a great lover of flowers and will long be remembered by the people of the community for the many varieties of beautiful flowers that she had in her home and in the yard surrounding it during the time that she was able to care for them.

She was preceded in death by her husband, Floyd, a son, Clifford, a brother, James and a sister, Lottie Lane.

Survivors are two sons, Donald and James, both of New Hampton; a daughter, Mrs Delores Edson of Bethany; eight grandchildren, nine great-grandchildren, two half-brothers, Riley Guess of Lone Star and Chester Guess of St Joseph, and a large number of other relatives and friends.

Funeral services were conducted at the Noble-Roberson Funeral Home June 18, 1968 with the Rev. Alvin Hillman officiating. She was laid to rest at the Foster Cemetery. Pallbearers were Lloyd Smith, Edgar Carter, Olin Wilson, Cleo Mock, Evertt Gardner and Arthur Schmude.

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Subject: VIRGIL LOTTIE COX
Submitter: Phil Stewart (jjhist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper Feb 7, 1968

OBITUARY - COX:

Virgil Lottie Cox, eldest daughter of Henry C. and Jane (Bush) Swartz, was born near New Hampton, Mo., Sept 20, 1894, departed this life at the Gentry County Memorial Hospital, Albany, Mo., on Jan 22, 1968 at the age of 73 years, 4 months and 2 days.

She was united in marriage to Fay E. Cox on Dec 8, 1917. To this union were born one daughter, Mrs Ellen Jane Roberts, St Joseph, Missouri.

At an early age she was united with the Methodist Church at New Hampton, Missouri.

On Nov 30, 1967, she suffered a broken leg from which she never recovered.

She is survived by her husband, daughter, son-in-law, six grandchildren, 8 great-grandchildren; one brother, Joe E. Swartz, Las Vegas; five sisters, Nora Murphy, King City, Mo; Breta Glenn and Bonnadine Ryan, both of St Joseph; Eva Williams, Jefferson City, Mo; and Reba Goble, McFall, Mo; five nieces and four nephews, other relatives and friends.

Her father and mother and one brother, Homer, preceded her in death.

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Subject: HUGH M. CRABB
Submitted by: Phil Stewart (jjhist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican Clipper,Wednesday, Nov 19, 1924

Ridgeway News

Word was received here last week of the death of H. C. Crabb, a former resident of Ridgeway, but of late years living at Selma, Cal., who died on November 11, following a third stroke of paralysis. The body is expected to arrive in Ridgeway today (Monday) and will be taken to the old home near Pleasant Valley. Funeral services will be conducted from the M. E. church Tuesday afternoon and burial will be in the Hughes cemetery north of town.

NOTE: The Hughes cemetery later became Rose Hill Cemetery. It is located just north of Ridgeway on Route T.

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Subject: ELI CRAIG
Submitted by: Deb Dailey (daileyknd@grm.net)
Source: Unknown Newspaper and Date

82 year old pioneer died at home of son W. A. Craig near Cainsville Wed., June 25 1924. Seven children survive. Came to Mercer County in 1859 with ox team and covered wagon, a 30 day trip. Born Indiana Sept 22 1841, there until Sept 15 1859. Came with parents to Mercer County, MO at age 18.

"I can remember well the hard times my parents had in Indiana. They made all of our clothes. I have pulled flax many a day and my mother had to spin the thread on a wheel and weave the cloth by hand. People lived in log houses with puncheon floors. No sawed lumber but split logs to make boards for doors. Used wooden pins to fasten boards together. Fire started by striking flint rocks.

When we landed in Princeton back in 1859, there were a few stores, the old court house and a jail. When we arrived in Mainsville it was a rough place."

Married 4 Jan 1862 Miss Sarah E. Brunton, ten children, WA, AL Craig, Minnie Carrington, Laura Barrett of May, Okla, Nora Holmes of Laclede MO, Lucy Craig, deceased. 2 children died in infancy. Wife died 7 years ago. Buried Fairview Cemetery, Cainsville.

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Subject: RODERICK CRAIG
Submitter: Deb Daily (dailyknd@grm.net)
Source: Cainsville News, Apr 26, 1900, page 3

RODERICK CRAIG

"Uncle" Roderick Craig, widely known in Harrison and Mercer counties, moved here in 1854 and has resided here ever since. He made many acquaintances and kept himself fairly well posted in the ways of the world. He was fond of conversation with well informed people and loved to read. He often inquired of us, as we passed his late residence, what the latest news was.

For many years it has cost him a struggle to live. Indeed he has lived on the border land of the valley of death for years. A great sufferer and a great care to his family and loved ones, but the weary march has ended, the last battle fought, the great enemy of our race has triumphed. Death came to his relief, Tuesday, April 17 1906 at 1:40 p.m. Came not with torture and pain but like the gentle zephyrs of spring, or a tired child falling asleep. He often marveled that his enfeebled life was prolonged when he could render so little assistance to his family.

He was born in Henry Co., Ind., June 8 1822. He was married to Miss Melvina Cook, April 12, 1849. Fifty-seven years of married life, eleven children born to them, 3 of which died in infancy. He served 3 years in Regt. M.S. M. Co. 2 and was always proud of the service he rendered his country in its hour of need. He took great pleasure in Decoration services and largely led in the services held at the Cain cemetery where his daughter, Bellzena, lays at rest.

The funeral services were conducted by the writer at the late home, Wednesday, Arpil 18, 1906, at 3p.m. The text was from I. Thes. 4 ch. 14 va. The lesson was from the 23rd Psalm. His remains were taken to the Zoar cemetery and laid to rest, there to wait the resurrection. Our deepest sympathy goes out to his aged companion who must now finish her pilgrimage alone after 57 years of heroic toil and sacrifice for those she loved.

May the lord sustain her and guide her and her children is my prayer for Jesus sake.

Bro. Hall gave an account of his enlistment 44 years ago, the first of this month and of his army life. He was a good soldier and a brave man. Only 6 of his company remains to answer the roll call. Deacon B.F. Burns is the oldest remaining.

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Subject: FRANK CROSS
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Clipper, Feb 9. 1912

Hangs Himself With Towel

Frank Cross Dies By His Own Hand in the County Jail

Frank Cross, who was brought here last Sunday by Sheriff Manifold from Des Moines, Iowa, and placed in jail on the charge of wife abandonment, committed suicide Tuesday morning by hanging himself with a couple of towels. City Marshal Tilley was the first person to see him after the act was done and it is supposed that he had been dead about thirty minutes when discovered.

Cross was a brick layer by trade and had made his home in Des Moines for several years past. A warrant was sworn out last week and requisition papers secured for his arrest. Unable to give bond he was ordered to jail, where the silent walls added nothing to his favor, and in a moment of despair and remorse, blinded all things of the past as far as he was concerned, by taking his life.

A coroner's inquest was held Tuesday morning at the court house which we publish in full. This report gives all the particulars of the sad affair at the jail, and anything further we might say or do could not add a thing to the comfort of those who are grieved at this time.

The Coroner's Inquest

At an inquest held before A. C. Bonser, coroner within and for the county of Harrison and state of Missouri, at Bethany, Feb 6, 1912, at the court house, over the dead body of Frank Cross, who was supposed to have come to his death by violence, the following testimony of witnesses was taken before said coroner and the jury, and was then and there reduced to writing and subscribed to by the witnesses.

William L. Tilley testified as follows:
I am city marshal, also deputy sheriff of Harrison County. I went down to the jail. Frank Cross' wife had come to talk with him. Bert Cross and Anthony Cross were there. They went into the parlor of the jail building. I told them I would go and get Frank Cross and bring him in. I got the key and opened the doors of the jail and I looked in and saw Frank Cross hanging in the cage door by the neck. I looked at him for some time to see if he was alive, but he did not move. I pulled the doors to and sent for the sheriff, J. B. Manifold. I observed that he was hung with two towels tied together and tied to the bars at the top of the door and around his neck. There were no other persons in the jail with him.

Dr. E. H. Bryson testified as follows:
I am a practicing physician and surgeon of Bethany. I was called by Prosecuting Attorney Lawhead and told that Frank Cross had hung himself in the jail and to come at once. I went to the jail with Coroner Bonser and was let in by W. L. Tilley and found the body of Frank Cross hanging from the cross bars of the door of the cage. He apparently had stood on a chair and tied the towel around his neck and one around the cross bar and the two tied together, and had either pushed the chair away or stepped off, his feet was hanging by the chair. I felt his pulse to see whether he was alive and then cut down the body. On examination I found he was dead and had been 15 to 30 minutes. I did not observe any marks of violence and everything tended to show he had taken his own life. It was in the morning of the 6th day of February, between 9 and 10 o'clock.

Moses Manifold testified as follows:
I am the father of the sheriff and live at the jail. Frank Cross was a prisoner there for the past two days. There was no other person confined in the jail. I saw him between 7 and 8 o'clock. Took him his breakfast and he ate it and said he would need some wood soon.

J. B. Manifold testified as follows:
I am the sheriff of Harrison County. I had Frank Cross confined in jail as a prisoner since Sunday last. I last saw him alive this morning just after he ate his breakfast and let him out to get wood and water. I came up town and was around the court house a few minutes before I opened county court, 8:30 a.m. One of the Cross boys came up and said his mother was at the jail and wanted to see Frank Cross. I went to the street and some one said there was trouble at the jail. I then saw Tilley at the jail and he told me in effect that Frank Cross had hung himself. I then called the Prosecuting Attorney and went and informed the coroner and they went to the jail.

Verdict of Jury

We, the undersigned jurors, impaneled and sworn on the 6th day of February, 1912, at the township of Bethany, in the county of Harrison by A. C. Bonser, coroner, to diligently inquire and true presentment make, how and by whom Frank Cross, whose body was found in the county jail, came to his death; having viewed the body and heard the evidence, do find that the deceased came to his death by his own hand by hanging himself in the county jail.

Given under our hand this sixth day of February, 1912.

F. V. Coffman
Miles Estep
W. W. Taggart
J. E. Webb
W. M. Foster
Wm Reynolds
A. C. Bonser, Coroner

Frank Cross was born April 7, 1868, died February 6, 1912, aged 43 years, 9 months, 29 days. Funeral services will be held at the home of his mother, Mrs Ellen Cross, this Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock, conducted by Rev John Young of the Christian church. Burial at Miriam Cemetery.

(NOTES) Frank Cross is listed in the 1880 Census of Bethany Township, Harrison County, Missouri in the household of his parents, S. B. and Ellen Cross. He is listed as 12 years old, born in Illinois. Also listed are his sisters, Jennie (age 14) and Bertie (age 4).

His father, S. B. Cross, was born in New Jersey on Mar 27, 1830 and died in Harrison County on May 18, 1910. He is buried at Miriam Cemetery in Bethany.

His mother, Ellen Cross was born in New York on Oct 15, 1833 and died May 16, 1916. She is buried at Miriam Cemetery in Bethany.

Although all indications are that Frank Cross was buried at Miriam Cemetery in Bethany on Feb 9, 1912, there is no stone bearing his name.

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Subject: CALVIN CROUSE
Submitter: Norma Hagan Sollman kcsollman@aol.com
Source: Cainsville News, Aug 1909

Calvin Crouse Mustered Out

The death of Calvin Crouse at the family home north of town on last Sunday morning Aug 8, 1909, while not unexpected since the critical surgical operation at St Joseph, yet it saddened our whole community. He has lived here more than 40 years and is widely and favorably known. He was born in North Caro., June 8, 1830, and was one of 9 brothers to enlist for the preservation of the Union, he and his brother, Eli, in Co. F 46th Ill. Vol. Inft. He participated in two battles - Fort Donelson and Shiloh - losing an eye in the latter engagement and the wound never healed.

He was married first to Miss Christiana Greenwood Oct 27, 1856, and to this union 11 children were born, all of whom are living and need no introduction to our people. His first wife died Oct 2, 1893. On May 21, 1895, he married to Mrs. Harriette Woodruff who survives him.

The deceased came to Mercer co., MO in 1868 and two years later moved to Harrison co., locating near this city where he has continued to reside. His was a strong personality, a man of positive habits, rarely changing his views; an obliging nabor, industrious, and of wonderful energy. He managed well and accumulated a fine fortune, but it did not change the man; he remained plain, positive and unassuming.

As a rule he looked upon the bright side of life, was full of good cheer, and one you were glad to meet. He carried his wound received in defense of his country with pleasurable pride. He was a strong partisan, but welcomed fair combat. He never made a profession of religion, but was ever ready to do kindly deeds for those in need. Four of his sons lived so far off that they could not attend the funeral.

Memorial services were conducted from the late home 1 1/2 miles northwest of town by the writer, assisted by Rev. W. H. Harper, from Ecl. 12-7--"Then shall the dust return to the earth as it was and the spirit unto God who gave it." The parting look taken, and then slowly we bore his remains to the beautiful Oakland Cemetery and laid them to rest beside his faithful companion gone before. The pallbearers were mostly members of the G.A.R. of whom he was always proud.

For several years he lived in Cainsville but he loved the farm and enjoyed farming. He had a 400-acre farm of rich valley land very productive except in such wet seasons as this. He had a large and comfortable home together with barns, out-buildings, etc., and fixed to live easily. He made a brave fight for his life, but death conquered.

May the peace of God attend his loved ones, is my prayer.

J. H. Burrows

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Subject: JAMES ROSS CUNNINGHAM
Submitter: Phil Stewart JJHist@grm.net
Source: Bethany Republican, Feb 10, 1904

Bethany Mourns The Loss of Another Good Citizen

Again, Bethany is called upon to mourn for one of our best citizens, in the death of Judge J. R. Cunningham who departed this life at his home last Saturday morning, February 6, 1904, at 4:50 o'clock, aged 69 years, 10 months and 26 days. The Judge had been seriously ill for several weeks, but up until the day before his death, he was thought to be improving and the news of his death came as a shock to most of our people.

Judge Cunningham had a very extensive acquaintance in Harrison County, and was universally recognized as an honest, conscientious, Christian gentleman. He had always been an earnest, uncompromising Republican and was honored by his party in his election to several responsible offices. As a member of the C. P. church of this city, he will be greatly missed as he was very faithful, being teacher of the Bible Class in Sunday School and at the time of his death was a Building Elder. His pastor, Rev W. J. Willis, furnishes us with the following biographical sketch of this truly good man:

James Ross Cunningham was born in McMinn County, Tennessee, March 11th, 1834 and was a son of Marshall and Sarah Cunningham, natives of Blount County, Tenn., and [unreadable] County Va., respectively. The father immigrated to Missouri in 1852 and located on a farm in Gentry County, where both parents died. They had six children: James Ross, Moses, Charles M., Robert A., and Richard S., all deceased and George W., now living in Ruth, Oklahoma.

J. R. Cunningham was reared to manhood on a farm and afterward he moved to Albany where he engaged in the mercantile business as a clerk for three years. He afterward served as deputy county and circuit clerk for one term of four years. He served as Provost Marshal at Albany during the war of 1862-64 and later engaged in the mercantile business there, in which he continued until 1872. From 1869 to 1871 he filled the office of postmaster with satisfaction.

In 1875 he came to Bethany where he served awhile as deputy county clerk, deputy sheriff and was employed for some time in the Treasurer's office. In 1880 he was elected Probate Judge, which position he held for two terms.

For a number of years he had been Justice of the Peace in this township. He was a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows.

May 9th, 1857 he was married to Virginia A. McConkey, a native of Gentry County, Mo., by whom he had four children; Mary, wife of W. F. McConkey, now in Hawaiian Islands, and Arthur Ross, who is with his mother at home.

He joined the Cumberland Presbyterian church with his family in 1895 and was elected and ordained Ruling Elder in this church in the fall of 1902.

Funeral services were held from the C. P. church last Sunday afternoon, at 3 o'clock, the church being crowded with sorrowing friends to pay this last tribute of respect to one whom we all honor. The pastor, Rev. Willis, was assisted by Dr. Carothers, of the M. E. church. The body was borne to beautiful Miriam Cemetery, where with the Odd Fellows impressive ceremony, the remains of this kind husband, father and good citizen were laid to rest. The floral tributes were beautiful, among them being an emblem from the I.O.O.F., a bunch of calla lilies from the C. P. Aid Society, elegant tributes for S. S. of the C. P. church and Epworth League, of the M. E. church, with many others from numerous friends.

The Republican sorrows with the bereaved wife, three daughters and son, and extends to them our deepest sympathy.

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Subject: FRANCES ISABELLE SMITH DAILY
Submitted by: Denise Daily Trued DDT@kc.rr.com
Source: Schell City, MO newspaper, Jan 26, 1956

Francis Isabelle Smith, oldest daughter of John W. and Adeline Smith, was born January 8, 1866 in Harrison County, near Bethany, Missouri, and passed away at her home in Schell City, MO, January 20, 1956. She grew to young womanhood near Bethany and was converted in early life, becoming a member of the Methodist Church at Bethany. December 31, 1885 she was united in marriage to William L. Daily. They spent a number of years on a farm in Harrison Co. Her companion became ill and passed away in October 1900. In May 1901 she was married to John R. Daily and they resided in and near Bethany until 1909, when they moved to Corpus Christi, Texas and later to Schell City. Mr. Daily passed away in March 1926. In June 1930 she was united in marriage to David L. Daily of Inovale, Nebraska. After two years in New Hampton, Mo., they came to Schell City where he passed away in December 1940. Mrs. Daily was the mother of twelve children, nine of whom survive. She loved children and was most happy when she could have her family near her. She liked to attend church and moved her membership to the Presbyterian church in Schell City, attending whenever she could. She lived her religion from day to day and followed the Golden Rule. She enjoyed having company and was never too busy to visit friends and loved ones and do kind deeds for others. She was most happy to be able to have as many of her children and grandchildren as could come and be with her on her 90th birthday, January 8. Her life has been a busy and a happy one, but on January 16th she suffered a stroke. All that loving hands could do for her was done, but on January 20th she passed peacefully away at her home at the age of 90 years and 12 days. She leaves to mourn her passing one brother, Dennis Smith, of Independence, MO, 5 sons, namely, Owen of Minden, Nebr., John W. of Napa, Calif., Charles D. of Kansas City, Mo., Garland of Craigmont, Idaho, and James R. of Schell City, Mo. 4 daughters, Mrs. Maude Pedersen, Curtis, Nebr., Mrs. Adeline Hoffman, Rockville, Mo., Mrs. Delores Dobson, Parsons, Kansas, Mrs. June Bain, Topeka, Kansas, twenty-nine grandchildren, forty one great grandchildren, five nieces, four nephews and many friends.

God hath not promised skies always blue,
flower strewn pathways all our lives through;
But God hath promised strength for the day,
rest for thy labor, light for the way;
Grace for the trials;
Help from above,
Unfailing sympathy
Undying love.

Funeral services held at 2:00 o'clock Sunday afternoon at the Methodist church with the Rev. Chester Smart officiating. Mrs. Ireta Davis, Mrs. Aldean Ditty, Mrs. Ida Colson, Mrs. Nita Moore sang, "Precious Lord, Take my Hand", "I Won't Have To Cross Jordan Alone", and "Sunrise", accompanied by Mrs. Fern Graham at the piano. Pallbearers were grandsons, Roy J. Dobson, Garland D. Bain, Larry Bain, John T. Dobson, Carl D. Smith and Dickie Smith. Burial was in Greenlawn Cemetery under the direction of the Lewis and Son Funeral Home.

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Subject: FRANCIS MARION DAILY
Submitted by: Phil Stewart JJHist@grm.net
Source: Eagleville News, Apr 27, 1876

Died

On the 21st inst., in Hamilton township, this county, Francis M. Daily, aged 30 years.

As will be seen by the above, another one of our most respected citizens has gone and left us. From parties who were acquainted with the deceased, we learn that he was born in Washington County, Indiana, April 21, 1846. In the year 1856 he moved to this county, and in 1862 he enlisted in the 35th Regiment of Missouri Volunteers. As a soldier he had but few equals, and as a citizen, he was loved and respected by all who knew him. He leaves a wife and three children to mourn the loss of a faithful husband and loving father.

NOTE: Francis Marion Daily was the son of William & Sarah (Sturdevant) Daily and died on his 30th birthday, April 21st, 1871. He married Dina Holloway on April 18, 1867. Some records spell the family surname as "Dailey". Francis Daily is buried at Brown Cemetery in Hamilton Township, Harrison County. An infant brother is also buried there. William and Sarah Daily are buried at White Oak Cemetery (Harrison County, MO).

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Subject: JOHN R. DAILY
Submitted by: Denise Daily Trued DDT@kc.rr.com
Source: Unknown newspaper and date

Mr. J. R. Daily was born in Harrison County, Mo., October 24, 1856. He grew to manhood in Harrison County and September 1880 married Miss Fannie E. Riggs. After their marriage they were converted and united with the Baptist Church. Four children were born to them, Manford now of West Plaines, MO., Alta M. Coleman, Bethany, Mo., W. E. now of St. Anthony, Idaho, and Russell who died in infancy. Mrs. Daily died March 13, 1899.

May 15, 1901, Mr. Daily married Miss Francis B. Smith. Five children came to brighten their home. Delores now Mrs. Claude Dobson of Kansas City, Dorothy A. at home, Mrs. Ira Bain, Schell City, Garland and Raymond of Kansas City. In 1909 Mr. Daily with his family moved to Texas and in 1910 they moved to Schell City, Mo. Mr. Daily has had poor health for some two years. After months of waiting in the vestibule of suffering God opened the door and on March 12, 1926 Bro Daily passed through entering the Church, Triumphant at the Haven of Rest.

During the last few weeks of his life he gave those who were with him strong evidence of his acceptance with God and of living grace.

Besides his wife and family he leaves two brothers, D. L. Daily, New Hampton, Mo., C. M. Daily of Webster County, Mo., two sisters, Mrs. R. J. Maize, St. John, Kansas, and Mrs. Jane Johnson, New Hampton, Mo., also eight grandchildren and many friends.

A short funeral service was conducted at the home by S. B. Weatherman, Saturday at 3:30 P.M. The body was taken to Bethany, Mo. for burial.
Buried at Mt. Zion Cemetery, near Bethany, MO

NOTE: Death Certificate states birth date as October 22, 1856. Age at death was 69 years 4 months 20 days. Birthplace as Eagleville, MO. Father was William Daily, born IN. Mother was Sarah Sturdevant, born IN. Death occured at 11:50 AM March 12, 1926.

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Subject: BESSIE DALE
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper, Feb 14, 1968

Mrs Bessie Dale, 80, long-time resident of the Bancroft community, died Tuesday, Jan 30, at Noll Memorial hospital, Bethany, after a short illness. Survivors include her husband, Ed Dale, of the home and one son, Richard Dale, Rockville, Md. Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at the Methodist church in Gilman City. Rev Alvin Hillman and Rev H. G. Carmichael officiated. Burial was in the Fairview cemetery north of Blue Ridge.

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Subject: ELVIRA RENFRO DALE
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHist@grm.net)
Source: Ridgeway Journal, Thursday, Jan 3, 1918

Obituary - Elvira Dale

Elvira Ann Renfro was born in Madison County, Illinois, Sept 15, 1944, and died in Okmulgee, Okla., Dec 23, 1917, aged 73 years, 3 months and 7 days.

On May 6, 1866, she was united in marriage to William Dale. To this union were born ten children, seven of whom, with the aged husband and father, are left to mourn the loss of a devoted wife and mother.

About forty years ago she united with the Christian church and continued to live a consistent Christian life until the call came to "come up higher".

Funeral services were held at the family home in east Ridgeway on Wednesday, Dec 26, conducted by Rev Daniel, pastor of the Christian church. Following this service, the remains were taken to the Yankee Ridge cemetery and tenderly laid to rest.

[NOTE: Elvira Renfro was the daughter of Silas and Sarah (Vanhoozer) Renfro. She and William Dale were married in Harrison County, Missouri on May 6, 1866.]

.

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Subject: JAMES J. DALE
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican, May 12, 1908

Obituary - James J. Dale

The subject of this sketch, James J. Dale, was born in Barren county, Kentucky, September 17, 1831, where he grew to manhood. He was married to Elizabeth Shirley May 7, 1861, who departed this life May 30, 1897. To this union three children were born, two boys and one girl, who still survive him and were present during his sickness and death. Bro. Dale united with the Christian church in 1855 and it was in this faith he tried to live a consistent Christian life, and was always found at his post of duty in the Sunday school and church services as long as he was able to attend, and his place in the church will be greatly missed, both from a spiritual and financial view, as he had acquired considerable wealth and he believed that the cause of his Master should have a part of the income, and he was growing more liberal with his means every year.

He served his country during the war of the rebellion three and one-half years, serving three months in the 10th Kentucky cavalry, then in the 26th Kentucky Infantry to the close of the war, and it was in the interest of his country that he was so deeply concerned even to the close of his life, which occurred May 9, 1908, near Eagleville, Mo., where he had lived for a number of years and where his funeral services were conducted by the writer in the Christian church on May 10th, in the presence of a crowded audience of sympathizing friends, after which interment took place in the cemetery nearby. The large procession was evidence of the many friends he had acquired during life, and the rites of true devotion were nobly exercised by the Grand Army of the Republic, of which order he was a member. May his children console themselves by imitating his noble virtues and Christian graces.

- W. H. Hobbs

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Subject: RUSSELL V. DeGRAW
Submitter: Phil Stewart (jjhist@grm.net)

RUSSELL V. DeGRAW

Russell V. DeGraw, 89, Bethany, died Saturday, February 7, 2009 at a Bethany, MO nursing home. He was born May 20, 1919 in Blue Ridge, Missouri, the son of Cameron and Eva (Johnson) DeGraw. On February 10, 1940, he married Frances Dinsmore in Princeton, MO. She survives of the home. Russell retired from the Missouri Department of Transportation. He was a member of the Assembly of God church, Bethany, MO. He was preceded in death by his parents, step-mother, Mary DeGraw; sister-in-law, Vivian; and son-in-law, Robert Yates.

Funeral services will be at 2:00 Monday, February 9, at the Roberson Funeral Home, Bethany, MO. Burial in Fairview Cemetery, Bethany, Missouri. The family will receive friends from 6:00 to 8:00 Sunday evening at the funeral home. Memorial contributions may be given to the Harrison County Hospice in care of the Roberson Funeral Home.

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Subject: AGNES "GAY" DINSMORE
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican Clipper, Nov 26, 1930

Obituary

Mrs Agnes "Gay" Dinsmore was born December 23, 1874 in Mercer County, Missouri, and departed this life November 18, 1930, at the age of 55 years, 11 months and 25 days.

She was united in marriage to Wm. Dinsmore December 14, 1890. To this union seven children were born, two preceding her in death. She leaves to mourn her departure a devoted husband, four daughters, Mrs J. E. Wilburn of Spickard, Mo., Mrs Chas. Adams and Mrs Alva Fitzpatrick of Mt Moriah, and Miss Hazel Dinsmore at home; one son, Herman Dinsmore of Worth, Missouri; 10 grandchildren; three sisters, Mrs E. B. Dinsmore of Mt Moriah, Mrs E. D. Whittington of Cainsville and Mrs S. S. Rittgers of Hillsboro, Kansas, and host of other relatives and friends. One sister, Mrs H. Whittington, and her father and mother, Mr and Mrs Joseph Gay, preceded her in death.

Mrs Dinsmore had served as a telephone operator at Mt Moriah 11 years and was highly esteemed in her work, always courteous and ready to render service at all times.

She united with the Methodist church in early life and has always lived a consistent Christian life, attending church and Sunday school when possible to do so, and was always ready to lend a helping hand. She will be sadly missed in the community and in the church, but most of all in the home.

Funeral services were held in the Methodist church at Mt Moriah Wednesday at 2:00 o'clock, the Reverend Mr McDougal of Ridgeway officiating. Interment in the Goshen cemetery.

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Subject: CORDILLA DINSMORE
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican Clipper, Jul 11, 1984

Cordilla Dinsmore, daughter of A. L. and Hannah Bradley Dinsmore, was born in Mercer County, Missouri on April 22, 1885 and departed this life on June 21, 1984 at Crestview Nursing Home at the age of 99 years, 1 month and 21 days.
"Dilla" as she was known by all, accepted Christ at an early age and joined the Highpoint Methodist Church near Cainsville. She remained faithful to that faith her entire life. She was church organist for many years and enjoyed singing in the church choir. Some of her most enjoyable mements were spent visiting with her family, ministers, neighbors and friends. She was a member of the Bethany United Methodist Church.
On January 22, 1915 she was married to Perry C. Banks. To this union 5 daughters were born: Lena, Lucille, Cecile and Beulah.
Her husband, Perry, passed away in 1929.
She later married Fred Redinger. After Fred's death, she married Nelson Foutch. He died a short time later.
Dilla was preceded in death by her parents, her husbands, 9 brothers and sisters, 1 son-in-law, Roy Beeson, 2 grandchildren, 1 great-grandchild and 1 great-great-grandchild.
She is survived by her daughters, Lena Beeson of Cainsville, Missouri, Lela Bain and husband Lee of Cainsville, Missouri, Lucille Lewis and husband Ted of Fort Worth, Texas, Cecile Jacobs and husband Dick of Largo, Florida, and Beulah Baker and husband Loren of Tuscon, Arizona, 1 brother, Lee Dinsmore of Humeston, Iowa, 17 grandchildren, 44 great-grandchildren, 11 great-great-grandchildren, nieces, nephews and other friends.
Funeral services were held Sunday, June 24, 1984 at the Cainsville United Methodist Church under the direction of the Roberson Polley Funeral Home. Services were conducted by Rev Charles Cheffey, assisted by Rev Glen Murphy. Brenda Kerr, a great-granddaughter, accompanied Barbara Crawley, a great-great-granddaughter, as she sang "In The Garden" and "Beyond The Sunset".
Pallbearers were a grandson and grandsons-in-law; Garland Beeson, Manly Baker, Jr., Gene White, Charles Hartschen, Jr., Rick Buckalew and Merlin McGinly.
Burial was in the Cain Cemetery.

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Subject: ELIJAH B. DINSMORE
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper, date unknown


OBITUARY - DINSMORE

Elijah B. Dinsmore, son of Squire and Lucrecia Dinsmore, was born Feb 26, 1865 in Warren county, Iowa, and departed this life at his home in Mt Moriah, Mo., Jan 19, 1948, being at the time of his death 82 years, 10 months and 24 days old.

Mr Dinsmore was the last surviving member of a family of nine children. He with the other children were bereft of a mother's care early in their childhood, and he, being one of the eldist, assisted in caring for the younger ones of the family.

On July 23, 1893, he was united in marriage to Joan Gay, and to this union four children were born: Tessie (Mrs Alfred Moss) and Cecil, who preceded him in death, Mrs Ruth Bane and Harold Dinsmore, both of Mt Moriah, who, with the loving companion, are left to survive him.

Most of Mr Dinsmore's life was spent in the High Point community, where he united with the High Point Methodist church at the age of 21 and lived a faithful Christian life, always being found in services when his health would permit. In 1939 they moved to Mt Moriah, where he was a faithful worker in the Methodist church.

Mr Dinsmore had been in failing health for several years, but his last illness was of short duration and his passing was as he had wished it to be - quiet and peaceful - and just as the day was beginning to wane Monday evening, he was called to his heavenly reward. Mr Dinsmore was a kind and generous man. He was truly loved and respected by everyone in the community where his kindly Christian life will ever be remembered.

[ Note: Elijah Dinsmore is buried at Goshen Cemetery in Mercer County, Missouri.]

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Subject: ELISHA SYLVESTER DINSMORE
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper, Jan 31, 1946

SYLVESTER DINSMORE DIED YESTERDAY IN BETHANY

Elisha Sylvester "Ves" Dinsmore, 63, died yesterday afternoon at his home on 15th street, following a long illness. Formerly of Mt Moriah, he had lived here the last year. Surviving are his wife, Nellie, and six children: Ernest, Frank, Mrs Opal Peugh and Mrs Frances DeGraw of Bethany, Elmer of Farragut, Iowa, and Vernie of Ridgeway.

Funeral services will be held at 2:00 o'clock tomorrow (Friday) afternoon at Goshen, conducted by the Rev. V. S. Walker of Princeton. S. M. Hass & Sons, Bethany morticians, are in charge of arrangements.

[Note: Elisha Sylvester Dinsmore was the son of Squire and Lucretia (Turner) Dinsmore.]

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Subject: HAROLD PAUL DINSMORE
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper, May 14, 1980

Harold Paul Dinsmore was born in Mercer County, Mo., August 25, 1908, and departed this life April 24, 1980, at the age of 71 years, 7 months and 29 days. He was the son of Elijah Dinsmore and Joann (Gay) Dinsmore.
He was united in marriage to Mary Beatrice Dinsmore July 4, 1927. They lived most of their married life in Mt Moriah, Missouri.
Harold joined the Air force in 1943 and serviced 2 1/2 years, most of that time serving overseas.
He leaves to mourn his passing his wife, Beatrice, one sister, Ruth Bane of Bethany, Mo., several nieces and cousins, a host of other relatives and friends. Preceding him in death, his parents and two sisters.
Harold accepted Jesus Christ as his personal Savior while he was a young man and remained a faithful Christian throughout his life. He was always thoughtful of others, never complaining of his lot even though he was an invalid the last several years of his life.
(poem omitted)
Funeral services were at the Mt Moriah Methodist church Saturday, April 26, 1980 at 2 p.m. with Rev Max Haggart officiating. Mr Bernard McMillan sang "I Won't Have To Cross Jordon Alone" and "How Great Thou Art" accompanied by Mrs Bill (Rosalea) Linthacum. Burial in Sharon Cemetery. Pallbearers were Jarol Arney, Victor Buntin, Kay Stoner, Clarence Francis, Eldon Power and Larry Peugh.

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Subject: LUCINDA SMITH DINSMORE
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper, Aug 23, 1972

Lucinda Smith Dinsmore, widow of the late James W. Dinsmore, was born Aug 27, 1876 in New Cambria, Mo., one of a family of eight children born to Josiah and Catherine Smith. She passed away July 14, 1972 at Crestview home, Bethany, Mo., at the age of 95 years, 10 months and 17 days. She was preceded in death by her husband of over 68 years, three sons, her parents, brothers and sisters.
She is survived by a daughter-in-law, Emma P. Dinsmore; three grandsons, James Lee Dinsmore and Elva, his wife, Forrest Carl Dinsmore and Mary, his wife, Max E. Dinsmore; three granddaughters, Mrs Wendell (Doris) Callis, Mrs Irv (Aimee) Bishop, Mrs Don (Elaine) Hines and their husbands; 18 great-grandchildren; 16 great-great-grandchildren; several nieces, nephews and friends to numerous to count.
At the death of their mother, Joe's sons, James Lee, 3 years, and Forrest Carl, 11 weeks, went to live with the grandparents, which they raised as their own sons.
She was a member of the Cainsville Christian church, Royal Neighbors and the American Legion auxilliary.
"Ma" Dinsmore, as she was lovingly called, lived a life of giving and caring for others. Her many friends are numbered by her cheerfulness through life. Services were held at the Stoklasa Chapel at Cainsville, Mo., July 17, 1972, at 2 p.m. for Lucinda Dinsmore. Rev Noel T. Adams and Rev Paul Gross had the services. Mrs Helen Bauer accompanied by Mrs Carlton Baker sang "The Old Rugged Cross" and "Precious Memories".
Paullbearers were great-grandsons and great-grandsons-in-law with the exception of Dee Burdett, an old family friend, filling in for Benny Dinsmore. Others were Marvin Dinsmore, James Dinsmore, Tom Earl, Virgil Slagle and Don Hays. Interment was at Zoar Cemetery.

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Subject: IDA (WOODERSON) DOWNEY
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper, Aug 30, 1961

Ridgeway News:

Mrs Ida Downey passed away at her home April 13 after a lingering illness. She is survived by five daughters, Mrs Vera Haggerty, Mrs Edith Scott, Mrs Lois Phillips, Mrs Elsie Wright, La Jaunta, Colo., and Mrs Gwendolyn Hubbard, Bethany, 17 grandchildren, 30 great-grandchildren and seven great-great-grandchildren.
Funeral services were held at the Christian Church Friday afternoon by the Rev Arthur Davis of Clearmont, Mo., and the Rev Claud Breidenthal, the local pastor. Burial was in the Sharon Chapel cemetery south of Mt Moriah.
Mrs Downey had lived in Mt Moriah and vicinity until five years ago, when she moved here. She and her husband, John Downey, celebrated their 59th wedding anniversary in March, 1943. Mr Downey passed away the following year.
Mrs Ida Downey died Wednesday morning at her home in Ridgeway, Mo. She had lived most of her live in Mt Moriah, moving to Ridgeway four years ago.
She is survived by five daughters, Mrs Edith Scott, Mrs Verda Hagerty of Ridgeway, Mrs Lois Phillips, Cainsville, Mrs Elsie Wright, La Jaunita, Colo., and Mrs Gwendolyn Hubbard of Bethany; two sisters, Mrs W. Fitzpatrick of Hatfield and Mrs Lee Planck of Bethany, several grandchildren and others. Funeral services were Friday afternoon at the Ridgeway Christian church. Burial was in Sharon cemetery south of Mt Moriah.

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Subject: JOHN F. DOWNEY
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican Clipper, Feb 28, 1945

John Franklin Downey, son of Charles and Martha (Moore) Downey, was born in Coles County, Illinois, Feb 24, 1872, and died Feb 8, 1945 at his home in Mt Moriah, Mo., at the age of 72 years, 11 months and 15 days.

When a small lad of five years his parents moved from Illinois to Harrison county, locating near Mt Moriah, Mo., where he since resided.

On March 16, 1893, he was united in marriage to Ida Wooderson and they had the happy privilege of celebrating their golden wedding anniversary March 16, 1943. To this union nine children were born: four sons and five daughters. The sons, Cloyd and Claude, twins, and Clarence, died in infancy, and Vilas preceded his father in death Aug 3, 1944. His loving companion with the daughters, Mrs Verda Gillespie of Ridgeway, Mo., Mrs Elsie Wright of LaJunta, Colo., Mrs Edith Scott of Ridgeway, Mo., Mrs Lois Phillips of Mt Moriah, Mo., and Mrs Gwendolyn Hubbard of Milwaukee, Wis., survive him.

He had been in failing health for some time but bore his suffering with patience and had a smile and a friendly greeting for all who came in contact with him. He will be sadly missed in the home and community.

He leaves to mourn his passing besides his wife and daughters, four brothers, Edd, Alfred, George and Willis Downey; and three sisters, Mrs Emma Clinkinbeard, Mrs Fannie Welden and Mrs Bessie Robertson. One sister, Mrs Rose Craig, preceded him in death. Her funeral was held the day of his passing. He also leaves 16 grandchildren and 10 great-grandchildren. Five of his grandsons are serving in the armed forces: Berle Scott, son of Mrms Dean Scott, Harold and Russell Wright, sons of Mrms A. M. Wright, Garvin Gillespie, son of Mrs Verda Gillespie, and Harold L. Hendren, husband of Betty Scott. Harold and Russell Wright and Garvin Gillespie are serving overseas.

Funeral services were conducted from the Mt Moriah Baptist church, Saturday, Feb 10, at 2:00 o’clock with the Reb Avery Wooderson officiating. Hymns ‘Good Night Here, Good Morning Up There’, ‘The Old Rugged Cross’ and ‘God Be With You Till We Meet Again’ were sung by Mrs Beulah Rhea and Mrs Lon Hamilton, with Mrs Tessie Norton at the piano. The beautiful floral offerings were carried by his five granddaughters and one niece - Miss Betty Downey, Mrs Betty Hendren, Mrs Christine Scott, Mrs Marion Ellsworth, Mrs Avis Whisler, Mrs Berniece Noble. Pallbearers were friends, neighbors and relatives - Virgil Hamilton, Russell Wooderson, Ted Gay, Harley Joiner, Junior Ellsworth and Lee Wooderson. Interment was at the beautiful Sharon chapel cemetery close by his four sons who preceded him in death.

‘Gone dear father, gone forever; How we’ll miss your smiling face. But you left us to remember, none on earth can take your place. A happy home we once enjoyed. How sweet the memory still! But death has left a loneliness that only God can fill.’

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Subject: JUANITA CATHALINE DOWNEY
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican Clipper, Feb 14, 1907

On Feb 10, 1907, at the home of Willis and Lizzie (Wooderson) Downey, near Gilman, a sweet little blue eyed daughter was given them, and was named Juanita Cathaline, but was only permitted to be with them ten short years, having passed away early Friday morning, Feb 16, 1917, at her home 1 ½ miles north of Trenton, Mo.

Little Juanita as all called her, was an exceptionally bright child for her age, and to meet her sunny face was to love her; was a favorite in the home and with many friends and relatives. She was the flower and sunshine of the home and why she was called away is something we cannot understand, but God has a place for her, and He says in his Word, ‘Suffer the little children to come unto me, and forbid them not, for such is the kingdom of Heaven.’ She will be sadly missed in the home and by relatives and how our hearts ache for her sweet face and childish ways, words cannot express. Then again, we think of her pure sweet life and now she is safe in the arms of Jesus; beckoning and waiting for the dear loved ones to meet, when Jesus calls them. Juanita was sick about ten days with that dreaded disease diphtheria, but all that loving hands and medical aid could do was done, but the Loving Father claimed her, and she fell asleep to be with him forever.

To mourn her death she leaves papa, mamma, Arleight, Chester, Bonnie, Estie, Little Gerald, Mrs Flossie Wickizer and Mrs Marie Gibson of St Joseph. All were present at the funeral.

The remains were brought the following day (Saturday) to Sharon cemetery, accompanied by relatives and friends and after a brief funeral service at the grave by Rev Potter of Mt Moriah, the little white casket was lowered in the grave.

May God bless each member of the family and heal their broken hearts, and may we stand true to our dear Savior and meet her sweet face again, when we are called as she has been, is the prayer of the writer, his aunt,
--- Mrs Nora Shipps

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Subject: MARTHA EVERLY DOWNEY
Submitter: Phil Stewart (jjhist@grm.net)
Source: Roberson Funeral Home, Bethany

Martha A. Downey, 101, Bethany, (formerly of Cainsville, MO) passed away Thursday, June 7, 2012 at a Bethany, MO nursing home. She was born May 25, 1911 in Brookfield, Missouri, the daughter of Paul C. and Allie (Miller) Everly. On May 20, 1940 she married Clell B. "Fleck" Downey. He preceded her in death in 1991. Martha retired in 1971 after 37 years of teaching school. She taught in Princeton, Mt Moriah, Cainsville, the Ruskin District in Kansas City and Bethany. She graduated from the University of Missouri with a teaching degree. She was a 60 year member of Chapter BX and BV P.E.O. and two honorary teacher's sororities, the Alpha Delta Pi and Delta Kappa Gamma. She was a chapter member of the Princeton Business Woman's Organization. In the past years, she was an active member of the New Century Club, the 20th Century Club of Cainsville and D.A.R. of Princeton. At an early age, she accepted Christ and was a member of the United Methodist Church of Bethany. She taught a Sunday School class of young adults many years in Princeton and Cainsville. She also was preceded in death by her parents and brother, Robert Everly. Survivors include 2 nieces, Roberta (Kurt) Wittges, Colorado Springs, CO and Susan Downey, Kansas City, MO; 2 nephews, Ralph McQuerry, Princeton, MO and Ron Downey, Manhatten, Kansas. Funeral services will be at 10:00 a.m. Monday, June 11, at the Roberson Funeral Home, Bethany, MO. Burial in Hamilton Cemetery, Modena, Missouri. The family will receive friends from 4:00 - 6:00 p.m. Sunday at the funeral home. Memorial contributions may be made to P.E.O. Educational Loan Fund in care of the Roberson Funeral home of Bethany.
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Subject: CHARLES ROSSCO DRYER
Submitter: Sherry L. Payne Weir (kb0shb@arrl.net)
Source: Harrison County Times, Oct. 8, 1936, under Gilman News

Charles Rossco Dryer, son of John and Maggie Dryer, was born in Bancroft, Mo., April 17,1881 and departed this life at his home in Gilman City, Mo., Sept. 25, 1936, at the age of 55 years, five months and eight days.

Mr. Dryer lived for several years in Oklahoma and Kansas City, but after the death of his father, he returned to Gilman City to care for his aged step-mother, Aunt Sis Dryer. This task was most faithfully done. An own son could not have been more loyal to her and considerate of her than he. He was a great hearted soul, full of kindness and good wishes for all his friends and acquaintances, and his sudden death came as a shock to the entire community. Ross' friendly disposition won for him many friends.

He leaves to mourn his sudden departure, three sisters and two brothers--Mrs. Roy Collins, Junction City, Kan.; Mrs. Mary Netherton, Kansas City, Mo.; Mrs. Anna Kirby, Pond Creek, Okla.; J. E. Dryer, Gilman City; and N. T. Dryer, Pond Creek, Okla. Also 10 nieces, six nephews and a vast number of friends who appreciated the big hearted friendship of this man. He was a devoted son, a loyal brother and as an uncle unexcelled, sharing joys, sorrows and cares with them.

Mr. Dryer is also survived by and aged aunt, Mrs. Sarah Harrison, of Kansas City.

Funeral services were conducted by the Rev. W. A. Pollock on the theme, "Kindness," from the Methodist church, on Sunday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock. Interment in the Hill cemetery. The pallbearers were E. W. McClelland, Mark Terry, John H. Cutshall, O. G. Ford, Lawrence Gwinn, and Walter Downey.

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Subject: JOHN DRYER
Submitter: Sherry L. Payne Weir (kb0shb@arrl.net)
Source: Gilman City Guide, Jan. 12, 1912, Gilman City, Missouri, front page


JOHN DRYER OBITUARY

John Dryer died at the family residence,in Gilman City, Jan.19, 1912. Mr. Dryer had been sick for the past three years, and for the last thirteen months, he had been confined to the house, where he was tenderly cared for by his bereft companion, who grieves over the loss of a loving husband.

The subject of the above was born in Tippicanoe County, Indiana, Jan. 9,1846, being 66 years and 9 days old at the time of his death.

Mr. Dryer moved from Indiana to Illinois and from Illinois to Missouri in 1873 where he has reamined ever since. He was a farmer by occupation, but for the past few years has resided in Gilman.

He was married forty years ago to Miss Maggie Conley to which union six children were born; J.E. Dryer, Mrs. Anna Kirby, Tone Dryer, Mrs. Zella Collins of Oklahoma, Mrs. Mary Netherton, and Ross Dryer of Kansas City.

Owing to illness in their families, only two of the children were present at the time of his death, J.E. & Ross Dryer.

Nineteen yrs. ago his wife died. Later he was married to Miss Clairinda Smith, with whom he lived a happy married life of thirteen yrs. Mr. Dryer was a member of the Christian Church for twenty-five years.

He served four yrs in the Civil War, and was honorably discharged in 1865.

A sister, Mrs. Sallie Hanison, was present at his bedside during his last hours.

The funeral services were conducted by Rev. W.H. McGowen, who in words of kindly symp &mforted the mourning family. After the funeral the remains were taken to the cemetery, where they were laid to rest. In the loss of Mr. Dryer the comunity has lost a good citizen, a neighbor and friend, whose place it will be diffcult to fill. The memory of his daily life will be a comfort to those left behind. The writer joins with many friends & neighbors in extending sympathy to the family.

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Subject: ALEXANDER WARREN ECKARD
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican, Aug 25, 1926

Alexander Warren Eckard was born February 9, 1868; departed this life August 13, 1926, at the age of 58 years, 6 months and 4 days. He leaves to mourn his departure, his wife and three sons, namely Clyde E., Floyd W. and Alvin L.; three sisters, Mary F. Steed, McLouth, Kan., Elizabeth Vanzant, Grant City, Mo., and Letitia Stewart, Brooklyn, Mo., and one brother, William Eckard of Hatfield, Mo., who were at his bedside when the end came; his parents and two sisters and one brother having preceded him to the great beyond.

"Bud" as he was known by his friends, came to Missouri with his parents in 1870 from near Galesburg, Ill.; he lived with his parents on a farm near Martinsville, where he grew to manhood.

He was of a retiring disposition- generous, thoughtful and a very conservative business man. During the last few years of his life, he was an active member of the official board of the Bank of Martinsville, and always kept in mind the interests of the institution and of his fellowmen. He was a devoted father, loving husband and a true friend.

On October 16, 1911, he was united in marriage to Ida L. Snipes; to this union were born three sons and one daughter, the daughter passing away March 25, 1917. Then on March 8, 1919, his wife, Ida Eckard, passed away.

He united with the Mount Olive church April 26, 1917 during the revival held by W. W. Kitchen. He lived a faithful Christian life until the end came.

On October 1, 1925, he was united in marriage to Christine Blomfield.

He was sick only a short time and all that loving hands could do was done to relieve his suffering. During the last week of his illness he was tenderly cared for by his niece, Elma Steed, a trained nurse from Leavenworth, Kansas.

The funeral services were conducted at the Methodist church at Martinsville, Mo., Sunday, August 15, at 3:00 o'clock p.m. by H. G. Blomfield, in the presence of a large number of friends and neighbors. The floral offerings were many and beautiful and represented the high esteem in which he was held by his friends and neighbors. After the services he was tenderly laid to rest in the Kidwell Cemetery.

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Subject: SUSAN SENSENBAUGH ECKARD
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Clipper, May 25, 1921

Susan Sensenbaugh was born December 31, 1835 near Dayton, Ohio. She afterwards moved to Salesburg, Illinois and was united in marriage to William Eckard Nov 9, 1865. They moved to Missouri in 1870 and have lived near Martinsville, Mo., ever since. To this union eight children were born, of which Barbary and Simon have preceded her in death. She leaves a husband and six children to mourn her death, namely: Mary Steed, Alexander Eckard, Elizabeth Vanzant, William Eckard, Anna Eckard and Letitia Stewart. In early life she united with the Lutheran church and afterwards she changed to the German Baptist and to this church she remained faithful till death. She died at her home near Martinsville May 19, 1921; aged 85 years, 4 months and 20 days.

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Source: Martinsville News, Bethany Republican, May 25, 1921

Mrs William Eckard died at her home about five miles north of here Thursday night. She had been in ill health for some time. The funeral was held Saturday morning at 10:00 at the home. Burial at Kidwell cemetery.

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Subject: MRS. FLORENCE E. (SORDEN) EDWARDS
Submitter: Phil Stewart (jjhist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Clipper - Sep 10, 1919

Mrs. Edwards At Rest

Mrs Florence E. Edwards died at Noyes hospital Sunday night, Sept 7, at 10:35 o'clock, aged 58 years, 7 months, 6 days. Mrs Edwards had been in failing health for several months and about a week before her death was taken to the hospital where an operation was performed for gall stones. She seemed to improve the first few days, but on Sunday morning she began to grow weaker, and lived but a few hours.

The remains were brought to Bethany Monday evening, accompanied by her daughter, Miss Forest, her sister and other relatives and friends. Funeral services were conducted from her home in this city Tuesday afternoon by Rev Alex Reid and the body laid to rest in Pythian cemetery.

Mrs Edwards was a noble Christian woman; a devoted mother and friend and to the two daughters, Mrs Harry Barton and Miss Forest Edwards, who have, by her taking, lost their best earthly friend, the sympathy of our people is extended.

[NOTES] Florence Edwards was the daughter of John and Mary Sorden, and was born in Marion County, Ohio on Jan 31, 1861. Her father died when she was about 8 years old, and her mother married Jacob Gearhart. This family moved to the Harrison and Mercer County area of Missouri. The daughter identified as "Miss Forest" was actually her daughter-in-law, Mrs Forest Edwards. Her death certificate states that she died of complications and "surgical shock" after an operation for cancer of the uterus.

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Subject: MARTHA EISENBARGER
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican, Apr 9, 1902

Martha Eisenbarger was born in Lancaster county, Penn., on March 9, 1818, was married to Martin Eisenbarger in 1832, moved to Harrison County, Mo., in 1851, and died April 5, 1902, aged 84 years. Eleven children were the result of this union, all of whom are living but two. Grandma Eisenbarger received an injury by falling some seven weeks ago that hastened her departure to the sweet by and by.

She united with the Christian church about forty years ago, and lived and died in the triumph of a Christian faith.

Funeral services were held by the writer after which the remains were laid to rest in the Magee cemetery near Martinsville, to wait the resurrection.

- L. R. Williams

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Subject: CHAMP TERRY ELLINGTON
Submitter: (ross@empowering.com)
Source: Ridgeway Journal, Harrison County, Missouri

Champ Terry Ellington was born in DeWitt County, IL, Mar 6, 1843. He came to Harrison County MO Oct 25, 1875. Moved on his farm six miles south of Ridgeway in 1876. He was married to Sarah Frances Shipley, Jan 16 1878. To this union were born two children Addy Dallas Ellington and Luis Ellen Ellington, the latter departing this life Sep 24, 1899. His son Dallas lives in Kansas and is a minister of the Gospel.

Under the ministry of Dr. D. W. Martin, Bro Ellington was buried with his Savior in baptism in 1892 & united with the Christian Church at Mt Olive.

Bro Ellington leaves to mourn his departure a wife, son, two sisters, and a host of friends and relatives.

He passed away at his home at 11 pm, aged 75 years. Funeral services were held by pastor A. L. Alexander at the home and he was laid to rest at the Dale Cemetery October 22, 1918.

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Subject: WILLIAM ELLINGTON
Submitter: (ross@empowering.com)
Source: Ridgeway Journal, Harrison County, Missouri

AN OLD SETTLER GONE

The funeral for the late Wm. Ellington was held at the Christian Church, Thursday afternoon at two O'clock. Rev Wm. Baler conducted the services. Deceased was born McLean Co IL Oct 1, 1839 and died Mar 9, 1912. He came to Harrison County MO in the fall of 1865, where he was married to Martha Kincaid, May 27 1866. To this union was born five children---Jefferson Ellington, Eva M. Ellington, Benjamin F. Ellington, Frederick Ellington. and Minnie Florence Ellington, all of whom are living except for the oldest, Jefferson M. Ellington, who died at the age of four years. Mr. Ellington made his home on his farm four miles north of Ridgeway until Dec 1899, when he moved to Ridgeway where he has since resided.

Mr. Ellington united with the Christian Church in February 1866 and remained a devoted Christian until the end. He leaves to mourn his loss, a devoted wife, two sons, two daughters, two brothers & two sisters and many other relatives. Interment was in the Hughes Cemetery.
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Subject: MARION LEE (DOWNEY) ELLSWORTH
Submitter: Phil Stewart (jjhist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican Clipper, Mar 6, 1996

Marion Lee Ellsworth, 72, Cainsville, went home to be with the Lord Tuesday, February 20, 1996, at the Harrison County Community Hospital.

Born in Mt. Moriah March 25, 1923 to Vilas and Wilma (Renfro) Downey, Marion lived most of her life in the Cainsville area.

She was united in marriage to Junior L. Ellsworth, September 23, 1941. Two children were born to this union; Sharon L. Skroh and Murray J. (Pete) Ellsworth. Their earlier years of marriage were spent farming, and in 1954 they started a custom harvesting business which took them to the western wheat fields until they retired in 1983.

Marion was saved and baptized in 1954, and a member of the Assembly of God Church in Cainsville.

Always joyful, she was known for her ability to make others laugh. Even though she had been disabled from the effects of a stroke since 1984, she never allowed her trials to keep her from enjoying life. And though she wasn’t able to participate as much in the church, the thing she loved most, she spent many hours praying for her family and others. Since she committed her life to Christ in 1976, she had a burden for the lost and always wanted to be a witness for the Lord. Even in her last hours of life, she was telling others of what Jesus could do for them as their Savior.

Survivors include her daughter, Sharon Skroh, son-in-law, Gene Skroh, a daughter-in-law, Violet Ellsworth; 5 grandchildren, Greg Skroh, Gena Woody and husband George; Colley, Dusty and Elke Ellsworth; one great-grandson, Braden Woody; 2 sisters, Betty Sparks and Rebecca Parsley, many nieces and nephews and a host of friends.

Funeral services were held at the Assembly of God Church in Cainsville, February 23, 1996. Burial followed in the Hamilton Cemetery, Modena, Mo. The Stoklasa Memorial Chapel was in charge of the arrangements.”

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Subject: SUSANNAH (STOTTS) FEARS
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Clipper, Feb 17, 1926

Susannah Fears, daughter of Mr and Mrs Abraham Stotts, was born April 27, 1850, and departed this life February 13, 1926. Had she lived until April 27 she would have been 76 years old. She was born in Ohio and moved to Harrison county when nine years of age. She was married to James R. Fears September 25, 1869. To this union four children were born, all of whom are living: Abraham Fears of Spickard, Sarah C. Fitzpatrick of Harrison county, Fannie E. Shepherd of Grundy county, and Joseph Fears of Mercer county. Besides these she leaves seventeen living grandchildren, six great grandchildren and a host of other relatives and friends. All of her brothers and sisters preceded her in death.

She lived in Harrison county 65 years and on the home provided by her husband about 36 years. The last twelve years, since the death of her husband, she has spent most of her time visiting with her children, although maintaining her own home.

She was a real mother of the kind that look after the home and children. Her personal contact among all who knew her speaks of the goodness of her life, and in speaking of her parting to meet her Master she felt she was ready and anxious to take the step to the life eternal.

The funeral sermon was preached in the Springer church February 14 by Rev H. E. Moore. Burial was in the cemetery adjoining.

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Subject: JOSEPHINE BROOKS FETTY
Submitter: Phil Stewart (jjhist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican, April 14, 1932

Born Sept 28, 1845 - Died Mar 24, 1932

Death comes an unsought guest to every home and at his bidding some loved one goes forth to his mysterious home, from whence none have ever returned. Time may teach us resignation but there is always a vacancy that never can be filled, and more especially when "Mother" is called, for her place, once empty, must forever remain so. She is the one who is associated with us in our infancy, youth and maturing age and when with all her love, her influence and care she ceases her beautious life, it leaves us desolate indeed, but when that mother has become infirm, her health impaired and having lived past the allotted time, it is a consolation to know and feel that she has finished her work on earth and reaping the reward of a well spent life, free from all pain and sorrow. Thus was the passing of "Aunt Josie" Fetty, who for many years had awaited the summons to come up higher. Her death occurred at the home of her son, Joseph, of near Beaconsfield, March 24, where she had resided the greater part of the last years of her life, and where she enjoyed the companionship of her little grandchildren, and where she was given every attention by the son and wife. Hers was a busy life, and full of hardships, but she faced her trials bravely and when we recall her as we knew her, these words come to our mind:

"Her life was crowded with work and care; How did she accomplish it all?
But no one ever heard her complain, although she was slender and small.
Motives of life that were selfish or wrong, with Christian grace did she smother;
She lived for God and her loved ones- This good old Christian mother.
The years of her life were over three score, when the messenger whispered low,
'The Master has come and calleth for thee.' She answered 'I'm ready to go.'
Their hearts are sad at her going, and more than ever they love her;
And they thank the Lord that gave to them this good old Christian mother."


Josephine, daughter of Vardeman and Huldah Wardrip Brooks, was born near Andover, Mo., September 28, 1854. She was one of 11 children- Editha, Uriah, Eunice, Josephine, George William, Vardeman, John, Nathaniel, Younger, Martha and Melvin. Editha (Mrs Newt Delong), George William, (Jett) and Melvin with the parents, preceeded her in death.

Josephine grew to womanhood in the Mt Pleasant neighborhood and when she was 25 years of age was united in marriage to William Fetty. To this union were born nine children - John, Hattie, George, Jacob, Frank, Ben, Sarah, Joseph and Newton. Three children, Hattie, Sarah and Newton are deceased, while the surviving sons are of the following places; John of Guthrie, Okla., Jacob of Boyles, Kan., George of Atchison, Kan., Ben of Lauratown, Ark., Frank of Clarinda, Ia., and Joseph of Beaconsfield, Ia. She is survived by 28 grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren, a number of other relatives and a host of friends.

Funeral services were conducted at the Mt Pleasant Baptist church of which she had been a faithful member since she was 15 years old, by the Rev T. Northup of Eagleville. Songs she had requested were sung: "Nearer My Home Today", "Tell Mother I'll Be There" and "God Will Take Care of You" by a mixed choir. Those from a distance attending ther services were George Fetty and daughter Erma and Mr and Mrs D. P. Sullivan of Atchison, Kan., Jacob Fetty of Boyles, Kan., Joseph Fetty and family of Kellerton, and neighbors and friends near his home. Burial was in the Mt Pleasant cemetery.

Written by a friend, Myrtle Richardson

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Subject: ANNA SLOAN FITZGERALD
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Repubican-Clipper, Mar 18, 1942

OBITUARY - FITZGERALD

Anna Sloan, daughter of Samuel and Mary Sloan, was born at Bedford, Ia., Sept 17, 1861 and passed to immortality the evening of Monday, Feb 23, 1942, being at the time of her death 62 years, and 18 days old.

While yet a small child, she was brought to Missouri, the family first living at Darlington. On Nov 13, 1884, she was married to William Fitzgerald, and this union was to last happily for 57 years, being broken then only by the death of the husband, Jan 2, 1941.

Upon Mrms Fitzgerald's marriage, they came to Blythedale to make their home, and for a number of years they lived on farms in the Blythedale community. Children came to them, the first a little boy who died in infancy. Next came a little girl, Bertha, and then four more sons, Roy, Dee, Claude and John.

With the children grown and gone from the family nest, Mrms Fitzgerald moved to Ridgeway and there they made their home for perhaps 30 years, and they celebrated their golden wedding, after which they were allowed seven more golden years together.

When the husband and father died, Mrs Fitzgerald decided to spend the years that were left to her in the home of her children and this she did, although the home of her daughter, Bertha, became her most permanent abode. There, through her last illness, she was given every care and attention which could add to her comfort, by her children, aided by Mrs Elizabeth Evans and a life-long friend, Mrs Jane Warner, who, over a period which had extended through a half century, had come to Mrs Fitzgerald's aid when there was a birth or death or sickness of any kind.

Early in life, Mrs Fitzgerald accepted the teachings of the Long Branch Baptist church to be her guide and mainstay as long as life should last. A kindly and generous woman, she won many friends and was highly esteemed and respected by all who knew her. Her friendliness and neighborly helpfulness will be treasured as one of life's dearest memories by a host of friends. Surviving Mrs Fitzgerald is the daughter, Mrs Lawrence Bandy of Blythedale, four sons, Roy Fitzgerald of Bethany, Dee Fitzgerald of Ridgeway, Claude Fitzgerald of Blythedale and John Fitzgerald of Kansas City; 10 beloved grandchildren and six equally beloved great-grandchildren. Also surviving are three sisters and two brothers, Mrs Belle White, St Joseph, Mrs Mattie Jenkins, Seattle, Wash., Mrs Addie Stewart, Clay Center, N.D., Allen Sloan, Eads, Colo., and William Sloan, St Joseph.

[ Note: Anna (Sloan) Fitzgerald is buried at Cedar Hill Cemetery in Blythedale.]

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Subject: CLAUDE HARVEN FITZGERALD
Submitter: Phil Stewart (jjhist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper, Nov 25, 1959

Claude Harven Fitzgerald, third son of William and Anna Sloan Fitzgerald, was born on a farm north of Blythedale, Mo., Sept 13, 1893. He attended the rural schools of Donaby, Canady and Fitzgerald. The latter school was named for Claude's paternal grandfather, John Fitzgerald, who lived in the neighborhood.

On Oct 10, 1915, Claude took as his bride Miss Elsie Fern Stephens. For some 40 years, until her death Feb 25, 1955, they lived on farms in the Blythedale community. After his wife's death, Claude continued to maintain the family home, south of Blythedale, where he was happy to receive visits from his friends and from his children and grandchildren. In his turn he enjoyed the extended visits he made in the homes of his children, but he never failed to keep his own home in the immaculate condition in which his wife had left it. He was a member of the Blythedale Community club, and this association with his friends and neighbors was one of his greatest joys.

On Nov 21, 1959, at the age of 66 years, two months and eight days, he passed away at the Noll Memorial hospital, Bethany, Mo., after two months of illness.

Preceding him in death were his parents, and one brother, Dee Fitzgerald of Blythedale. He is survived by two daughters, Lela (Mrs Cleo Wisman) of Kansas City, Mo., and Madelyn (Mrs Gordon Shaw) of Blythedale, and a son, Kenneth Fitzgerald, whose home is at Palatine, Ill., a suburb of Chicago.

Also left are one sister, Bertha (Mrs Lawrence Bandy), Blythedale, and two brothers, Roy Fitzgerald, Ridgeway, Mo., and John Fitzgerald, Kansas City, Mo.; six grandchildren, whose lives were enriched by the grandfather's love and devotion, are left to cherish happy memories of his companionship and of their association with him. They are Larry Greenwood, Kansas City, Mo.; Charles and Sherry Spurgeon, and Duane Shaw, Blythedale; Barry and Jan Fitzgerald, Palatine, Ill. A granddaughter-in-law is "Becky" Spurgeon.

Funeral services were Monday at the Blythedale Christian church, conducted by the Rev Elmer Evans of Mound City and the Rev Alan Dale of Eagleville. Burial was in Cedar Hill Cemetery, Blythedale.

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Subject: ELZA DEAN (DEE) FITZGERALD
Submitter: Phil Stewart (jjhist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper, Ridgeway News, May 16, 1956

DEE FITZGERALD RITES CONDUCTED; DEATH WAS FRIDAY

Funeral services for Dee Fitzgerald were held at the Christian church Sunday afternoon. Dee died Friday at the Wadsworth Veteran's Hospital where he had been a patient for some time.

Mrs Fitzgerald (Alice Cocklin) died several years ago and Dee was left with three small daughters to rear. He tenderly cared for them until they were grown and in homes of their own.

Two brothers and one sister survive.

_________________________________________

Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper, May 16, 1956

Elza Dean Fitzgerald, son of Anna and William Fitzgerald, was born near Blythedale, Mo., June 29, 1891, and passed away at the Veteran's hospital at Wadsworth, Kan., May 11, 1956 at the age of 64 years, 10 months and 12 days.
He was married to Alice Cocklin Aug 1, 1919 at Billings, Mont. Three daughters were born to this union - Mary Leone Bennett and Anna Mae Garten of Kansas City, and Mildred Ramey of Ridgeway.

He also is survived by nine grandchildren, one sister, Mrs Lawrence Bandy of Blythedale, and three brothers, Roy of Ridgeway, Claude of Blythedale and John of Kansas City.

He served his country in the World War I, having enlisted in the Navy.

Much of his time in the last few years was spent in the Wadsworth Veterans' Hospital. Here he received the best of care and all the benefits of modern medicine. Everything possible was done for his comfort.

Dee - his name was really Elza Dean - was born near Blythedale in 1891. With his sister, Bertha, and brothers, Roy, Claude and John, he attended school at Donaby. At different periods in his life he made his home in Blythedale and he had many friends here whose good will was retained throughout his life. He commanded the admiration of all who knew him for the brave and capable manner in which he reared his three little daughters following the death of their mother.

Funeral services for Dee Fitgerald were held at the Christian church Sunday afternoon. Dee died Friday at the Wadsworth Veterans' hospital, where he had been a patient for some time.

Mrs Fitzgerald (Alice Cocklin) died several years ago and Dee was left with three small daughters to rear. He tenderly cared for them until they were grown and in homes of their own.

Two brothers and one sister also survive.

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Subject: ROY FITZGERALD
Submitter: Phil Stewart (jjhist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper, Mar 31, 1965

Roy, son of Anna (Sloan) and William Fitzgerald, was born March 7, 1889, at Blythedale, Mo. He was one of five children, two of whom, Claude and Elza Dean, preceded him in death. Those surviving are Bertha Bandy of Blythedale and John of Kansas City.

On May 11, 1911, he was united in marriage to Willie Cocklin of Ridgeway. To this union one child, Evelyn, was born on July 16, 1914.

His death occurred Friday evening, March 5, 1965, within two days of his seventy-sixth birthday.
Roy spent most of his life in Harrison County with the exception of a few years spent as section foreman at Garden Grove and Kellerton, Iowa. He started working for the C. B. & Q. railroad in 1916 and at the time of his retirement in 1954, he was foreman at Ridgeway. He had also served at Blythedale and Bethany in this capacity.

Roy always regarded Ridgeway as his "home town" and his many friends here will miss him greatly, as will his wife and daughter and other members of the family.

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Subject: ALVA NOLAN FITZPATRICK
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper, Nov 16, 1966

ALVA N. FITZPATRICK, 61, DIES OF A HEART ATTACK

Alva N. Fitzpatrick, 61, died Monday of a heart attack. He had been a farmer in the Highpoint community east of Mt Moriah.

He is survived by his wife, Madge, of the home; four daughters, Mrs Patricia Querry, Bethany, Mrs Wanda Whisler, Mt Moriah, Miss Shirley Fitzpatrick and Miss Carolyn Fitzpatrick, both of St Joseph; four sons, Harold Fitzpatrick, Mill Grove, Kendall Fitzpatrick, Kansas City, Mo., William Fitzpatrick, Kansas City, Kan., and Arwood Fitzpatrick, San Diego, Calif.; a brother, George Fitzpatrick, Shelbyville, Ind.; three sisters, Mrs Kenneth Weathers, Cainsville, Mrs Marion Hutchison, Ft Madison, Iowa, and Mrs Alfred King, Kansas City; and 14 grandchildren.

Services were held at 2:00 p.m. today at the Mt Moriah Methodist church, with the Rev. Oren Cossey officiating. Burial was in Springer Chapel Cemetery.

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Subject: EDWARD GEORGE FITZPATRICK
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper, date unknown

Edward G. Fitzpatrick was born Nov 15, 1871 in Mercer County, Missouri and departed this life at his home south of Mt Moriah, Friday evening, Jan 26, 1940, at the time of his death being 68 years, three months and 11 days old.

He was united in marriage to Sarah Cordelia Fears on Jan 19, 1896 and to this union eight children were born: Roy of Colusa, California; Mrs Opal Hudson of Clarksburg, California; Alva of Gilman City, Mo.; Mrs Edith King of Waukee, Iowa; Mrs Lorena Hutchinson of Toledo, Iowa; Mrs Mildred Weathers of Cainsville, Mo., and George of the home. One son, Wilbur Ray, preceded him in death.

He was converted and became a member of the Mt Pleasant No 1 Baptist church in 1905 and remained a true and consistent Christian.

Most of his married life of 44 years was spent on a farm in Harrison county. Mr Fitzpatrick was a kind and loving father, a good neighbor and friend that will be sadly missed in the home and community.

He was one of a family of three brothers and six sisters. Three sisters have preceded him in death. He leaves to mourn his passing his wife, children, 18 grandchildren (one grandchild preceded him in death); three sisters, Mrs Nancy Cook of Oxford, Kan., Mrs Ella Hann of Gilman City, Mo., Mrs Nellie Robertson of Trenton, Mo., and three brothers, James Fitzpatrick, of Trenton, Mo., Jake Fitzpatrick of Clarksburg, Calif., and Henry Fitzpatrick of Bethany, Missouri.

Funeral services were conducted by the Rev harlie Power at the Springer church Tuesday afternoon. Burial was in the nearby cemetery.

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Subject: MADGE FITZPATRICK
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper, Nov 3, 2004


MADGE FITZPATRICK
Madge Fitzpatrick, 95, of Mt Moriah, Mo., died Monday, Nov 1, 2004 at a Bethany hospital.

Mrs Fitzpatrick was born March 16, 1909 in Mercer County, Mo., the daughter of William and Agnes (Gay) Dinsmore.

On July 21, 1929, she married Alva Nolan Fitzpatrick in Spickard, Mo. He preceded her in death on Nov 14, 1966. She was a homemaker and a lifetime member of the Mt Moriah United Methodist Church and also a member of the Methodist Quilting Club.

She leaves four sons, Harold Fitzpatrick of the home, Ken (and wife, Lois) Fitzpatrick, Gladstone, Mo., Bill (and wife, Arleta) Fitzpatrick, Kansas City, Kan., Arwood (and wife, Lucille) Fitzpatrick, Leavenworth, Kan.; three daughters, Wanda (and husband Dale) Whisler, Mt Moriah, Shirley Fitzpatrick, Prairie Village, Kan., Carolyn (and husband, John) Alexander, St Joseph; 19 grandchildren; 36 great-grandchildren; 10 great-great-grandchildren, and several nieces and nephews.

She was also preceded in death by her parents; daughter, Pat Querry; two sons, Marvin George Fitzpatrick and James Dale Fitzpatrick; one brother and five sisters.

Funeral services will be at 1-:30 a.m. Thursday, Nov 4, at the Roberson Funeral Home, Bethany. Burial will be in the Springer Chapel Cemetery, Gilman City, Mo. The family will receive friends from 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesday at the funeral home, where friends may call after 2 p.m.
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Subject: SARAH C. (FEARS) FITZPATRICK
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper, Sep 22, 1948

Mrs Sarah C. Fitzpatrick, 73, widow of Ed Fitzpatrick, died Wednesday at Nevada, and the body was returned here for services Friday at the Wheeler funeral home, preceding burial at Springer Chapel.

The Rev Avery Wooderson of Trenton officiated. Two duets were sung by Mrs Ruth McClain and Miss Helen Bauer, and there was a solo by Mrs Lucille Barnhouse. Mrs Pearl Phillips accompanied. All are from Cainsville. Pallbearers were Ennis Fears, Chester Shepard, Bernard Fears, Leonard Fears, Floyd Smith and Okla Fitzpatrick.

Daughters and sons surviving Mrs Fitzpatrick are Mrs Opal Hudson of Sacramento, Calif., Alva Fitzpatrick of Gilman City, Mrs Edith King of Trenton, Mrs Lorraine Hutchinson of Ft Madison, Iowa, Mrs Mildred Weathers of Cainsville and George F. Fitzpatrick of Kansas City.

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Subject: FRANK E. FORBES
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper, Jul 10, 1940

TO FRANK E. FORBES, 78, MULE KICK FINALLY FATAL

A kick in the abdomen by a mule, May 24, which burst the large intestine, finally brought death early Sunday morning at a local hospital to Frank E. Forbes, 78, whose home was 14 miles east of Bethany.

Showing an encouraging resistance, Mr Forbes withstood a first operation at St Joseph and appeared to be recovering. he was brought to his home, but was returned to St Joseph again about three weeks ago, and had submitted to two operations within that time. He was returned here Wednesday.

Surviving Mr Forbes are his wife, Emma, and a daughter, Mrs Bert Wooderson.

The Rev. H. G. Blomfield officiated at funeral services held yesterday at Sharon chapel, where burial also took place.

Hymns were sung by Mrs Grover Giles, Mrs Cole Rhea and Ed Norton. Pallbearers were T. F. Kelly, Garland Kelly, Charles Bolar, Boyce Bolar, Garland Bain and Daryl Wooderson.

[Note: Frank Forbes, son of James Harvey and Fannie (Graybill) Forbes was born Feb 16, 1862 in Elkhart, Indiana. The family is listed in the 1870 census of Sugar Creek Township, Harrison County, Missouri.]

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Subject: CHARLES CAMERON FORDYCE
Submitter: Cheryl McCombs (cherylmccombs@comcast.net)
Source: Bethany Republican Clipper, April 3, 1929

The subject of this sketch, a son of John A. and Margaret Ann Fordyce, was born in Washington county, PA, near Dallas, WV, July 7, 1853, and departed this life at his home in Grant Twp., March 12, 1929 at the age of 75 years, eight months and five days. He resided at the home of his birth until 19 years of age, when he came to Missouri, remaining a little over a year. Returning to his native state, he made arrangements to move to Missouri, which he did in 1875, setting in Harrison Co. On April 21, 1875, Mr. Fordyce was united in marriage to Miss Ida F. Boyce of Harrison Co., Missouri. He and his bride took up farming as their vocation in life. They started in renting land for a short time. When Mrs. Fordyce was given 80 acres of land by her father. After farming this tract they sold it and bought 160 acres in Trail Creek Twp.. This purchase comprised a part of the present homestead, 80 acres adjoining being purchased later. The family residence is located on this latter tract. From time to time Mr. Fordyce kept investing in real estate, his holdings at the time of his death amounting to several hundred acres of as fine land as there is in Harrison County. Mr. Fordyce was engaged in other enterprises. He was one of the organizers of the first National Bank of Ridgeway, Mo. He was president of that institution for 11 years, but his farming activities were multiplying, requiring more of his time and personal attention, and he declined to serve as bank president any longer. Mr. Fordyce was an industrious, hard working man. He knew how to make the farm pay. It took hard, steady work. He never willingly took an idle day. Born of Scotch-Irish and Scotch parents, he inherited from them frugality, economy, and industry and he made his work count. Right here, the writer, for the benefit of those who do not like farming, or who have become discouraged in farming, wants to record a statement Mr. Fordyce made to him. It was about a year ago. We were at his home. In talking about the condition of the farmer of today, he stressed that farming, to be made successful, required work and lots of it. "Why, Mr. Reid," he said, "I never did like farming; it did not appeal to me, but I was not equipped to take up any other occupation except day laborer, and I would not be that. So I made up my mind farming was all I could do. I also made up my mind I would follow it for a livelihood, and more, I would make it something else than drudgery. I would make it a BUSINESS. I stuck to that resolve. And I have always had enough to eat and to wear and to provide for my family." He farmed as he said. He made it a business. He used method, system and management, coupled with the caution of the "canny Scot," and for him, farming was a success. His neighbors and friends can attest to that. Mr. Fordyce was a man of exemplary habits. None of the petty vices, that so many indulge in were a part of his life. He was frugal, but not penurious, economical in a true sense, honest and upright and public spirited in any project that was for the good of his neighborhood. He was a friend to every well meaning person, a kind neighbor, a loving husband and father and a progressive citizen. In early life Mr. Fordyce was converted and united with the Methodist Episcopal church. After making his permanent residence in Grant Twp. he placed his membership in the Methodist class at Prairie chapel, where it continued to remain. Some months ago Mr. Fordyce was stricken with a serious illness. At first he thought little of it, but it continued to grow more serious. Medical skill, good nursing and constant attention by his family were futile and after weeks of intense suffering he quietly passed away. Mr. Fordyce was the father of seven children, Mrs. Gertrude Smith, of Ridgeway, Mo., Daniel B. of Oswego, Kansas, Mrs. Bessie Swain, Ora F., Roy H., Ralph and Lela Polley, all of Bethany Mo. Two sisters also survive, Mrs. Elizabeth Potter of Bethany, Mo., and Mrs. Lula Johnson of Bedford, IA, also 15 grandchildren. These with the bereaved widow and a host of friends mourn their loss, for he certainly will be missed. Funeral services were held at Prairie chapel Thursday March 14, conducted by the writer, Rev. W. O. Dotson assisting in the presence of a large number of neighbors and friends, taking into consideration the almost impassable condition of the roads. Interment was had at Fairview cemetery, Sherman Twp. There he rests from his labors.

Alex Reid



Card of Thanks

We wish to express our sincere thanks to all those neighbors and friends who so kindly and tenderly gave us their sympathy and assistance during the sickness, death and burial of our beloved husband and father, also for the beautiful floral offerings.

Mrs. C. C. Fordyce and children

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Subject: GOLDIE FLINT BUTLER FORDYCE
Submitter: Cheryl McCombs (cherylmccombs@comcast.net)
Source: Bethany Republican Clipper, April 22, 1987

Goldie Butler Fordyce, 96, Bethany, died Tuesday, April 14, , at the Crestview Home. Mrs. Fordyce was born Oct. 2, 1890, in Bethany. She was a member of the Bethany Christian Church and the P.E.O., the Daughters of the American Revolution, the Echo Club and the Christian Women's Fellowship. She leaves two daughters, Ruth Ida Stanberry, Bethany, and Janet Sue Yates, Bella Vista, Ark.; four grandsons, Mark Stanberry, Alan Stanberry, Mark Butler Yates and William Templeman Yates, and four great grandchildren. Funeral services were Saturday, April 18, at the Roberson-Polley Chapel, Bethany, with Rev. Donald Briley officiating.

Burial was in Miriam Cem.

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Subject: GOLDIE NIGHTHART FORDYCE
Submitter: Cheryl McCombs (cherylmccombs@comcast.net)
Source: Bethany Republican Clipper, March 23, 1989

Goldie (Nighthart) Fordyce, the daughter of Phillip and Elizabeth Smith) Nighthart was born in Sherman Twp. of Harrison Co., Missouri on May 24, 1892, youngest of a family of thirteen children, and passed away at the Noll Memorial Hospital in Bethany, Missouri on March 22, 1989 at 10:30 A.M., at the age of 96 years, nine months, and 22 days. Goldie was united in marriage to Roy Homer Fordyce on February 22, 1912 at the Bethany Christian parsonage at Bethany, Missouri by Rev. John Young. She was preceded in death by her husband, Roy Homer Fordyce, on February 6, 1949 and one daughter, Loree Walker, on December 28, 1987, the three grandsons, and one great-granddaughter. Survivors are three daughters, Mrs. Lowell (Thelma) Beals, Bethany, Mo., Vera Hullinger, Harris, Mo., and Mrs. Ralph (Frances) Criswell, Marshall, Mo., and two sons, Goldman Fordyce, Bethany, Mo., and Calvin Fordyce, Kidder, Mo.; 21 grandchildren, and 42 great-grandchildren, nine great-great grandchildren, which include nine sets of five generations from seven families.

______________________________

Source: Bethany Republic Clipper, March 27, 1989

Goldie Fordyce, 96, Bethany, died Wednesday, March 22, at Noll Memorial Hospital in Bethany. Mrs. Fordyce leaves two sons, Goldman Fordyce, Bethany, and Calvin Fordyce, Kidder; three daughters, Thelma Beals, Bethany, Vera Hullinger, Harris, Mo., and Frances Criswell, Marshall, Mo; 21 grandchildren, and 42 great grandchildren, and seven great-great grandchildren. Funeral services were Saturday, March 25, at Roberson- Polley Funeral Home in Bethany with Bro. Jewel Brammer officiating. Burial was in Miriam Cem.

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Subject: GOLDMAN L. FORDYCE
Submitter: Cheryl McCombs (cherylmccombs@comcast.net)
Source: St. Joseph News Online, September 21, 2003

BETHANY, Mo.
Goldman Fordyce, 86, Bethany, died Saturday, Sept. 20, 2003, at a hospital in St. Joseph. Arrangements are pending at Roberson Funeral Home, Bethany.

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Source: St. Joseph News Online, September 23, 2003

BETHANY, Mo.
Goldman L. Fordyce, 86, Bethany, died Saturday, Sept. 20, 2003. Survivors: daughter Linda Allen; son Roy Fordyce; brother Calvin C. Fordyce; sister Frances Criswell; four grandchildren, Mark and Eric Allen and Rachel and Austin Fordyce. Graveside memorial service and burial with military rites: 11 a.m. Thursday, Miriam Cemetery, Bethany. Visitation: 5 to 7 p.m. Wednesday, Roberson Funeral Home, Bethany. Memorials: Hands of Hope Hospice and/or Cameron Veterans Home.

______________________________________

Source: St. Joseph News Online, September 25, 2003

Goldman L. Fordyce, 86, Bethany, Mo., 11 a.m. today, Miriam Cemetery, Bethany, with military rites. Arrangements: Roberson Funeral Home, Bethany.
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Subject: LILLIE FRANCISCO
Submitter: Robert W. Taylor (rtaylor@coin.org)
Source: Newspaper name and date unknown.

Mrs. Lillie Francisco Services Saturday

Funeral services will be held at 9 a.m. Saturday in the Swan Funeral Home for Mrs. Lillie D. Francisco who died Wednesday in a local nursing home.

The Rev. Dr. Walter G. Schaefer will officiate and burial will follow in Evergreen Cemetery. Pallbearers will be David Frankforter, Dale Lee Frankforter, John Frankforter, Roy Rooks, George Rooks, and Don Tyrell.

Mrs. Francisco formerly lived at 316 E. Fountain St. She worked for Conway Brothers and the Alamo Hotel for 33 years and retired at the age of 75. She was the widow of Walter D. Francisco who died in 1956.

Mrs. Francisco was born Nov. 25, 1880, in Harrison County, Mo., and moved here in 1922.

She is survived by five daughters, Mrs. Agnes Ward of Centralia, Kan., Mrs. Pauline Berndt of Manitou Springs, Mrs. Helen Rooks and Mrs. Louise Frankforter of Colorado Springs, and Mrs. Betty Pride of Denver.

Mrs. Francisco is also survived by a sister Mrs. Glenna Cooper of Bethany, Mo., a brother Ben Clark of Hamilton, Mo., 15 grandchildren, and 28 great grandchildren.
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Subject: JOHN RAY FRISBY
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican, Jul 16, 1902

J. R. Frisby was born in Edgefield, Village, S. C., July 2, 1826 and died at Andover, Missouri, July 8, 1902, aged 76 years, and 6 days. He moved to St Louis in the early part of his life, and for years he was a pilot on the Mississippi River, where he was known as "Honest John" by everyone.

He was married in St Louis, March 26, 1864, to Rose Price, and they resided in that city for several years. To this union 9 children were born, 8 of whom are living. They moved to southern Iowa in the '70s where Mr Frisby was engaged in the mercantile business for several years in Davis City, Iowa, and since 1881 in Andover, Mo., where he lived the rest of his life. He is survived by his wife and eight children, William, Richard H., Walter Frisby, Mrs. Ida Brenizer, Mrs. Lou Humeston, Blanche, Frank and Wyona Frisby. Three sisters also survive him.

He was taken sick Tuesday, July 1, 1902 and was sick one week, dying July 8. He was patient all through his sickness and even when suffering untold agony he murmured not. He said the Lord had claimed him as His own and he was going home. He was conscious up to the last minute, and said, "No pain". He died a beautiful death, calm and peaceful.

He lived a good, moral life, was honest and full of integrity toward his fellow men and "Uncle Jack" was loved by all who knew him. His name and memory will live forever in the hearts of the people. He was associated with the late William Poland in the mercantile business at Andover for many years, and both men being popular, they soon built up a large business, which was continued after Mr Poland's retirement when Walter Frisby, son of the deceased, took his place. Deceased was a man of the most tender and generous impulses and no deserving person ever applied to "Uncle Jack" for assistance that he turned away.

The funeral services were held at the home by J. Willis at 3 o'clock, July 9, 1902, after which the remains were taken to the little village cemetery and laid away by loving hands. The funeral was very largely attended: in fact, it is said to have been the largest funeral ever held in Andover. This was a deserved tribute to a man who had been so generally and so highly respected.

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Subject: JACK R. GATES
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican Clipper, Mar 18, 1870

Husband of Former Leona Switzer Dies

Former Wyoming Gov. Jack R. Gates, 71, died Saturday at his home in Cheyenne. He was the husband of the former Miss Leona Switzer of Ridgeway and a brother-in-law of Mrs L. M. Crossan, formerly of Bethany.

Mrs Crossan had been with her sister for several weeks. Two other sisters, Mrs Cecile Miner of Kansas City, and Mrs Bernice Neff of Albany, Texas, are also at the Gate home.

Gov. Gate was named governor in 1961 to fill the unexpired term of Joe Hicky, who was appointed U. S. Senator. Last month, Gate received an honorary doctor of law degree from the University of Wyoming in recognition of his many years of service to the state.

[NOTE: This is submitted only because of the local ties. To my knowledge, Gov. Gage never lived in the area.]

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Subject: FLORENCE MAMIE GEORGE
Submitter: Pearl James (pejames@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper, July 18, 2007.

Florence Mamie George, 99, died Thursday, July 12, 2007. Florence was born July 17, 1907 at Cainsville, Mo.

She was preceded in death by her husband, Edgar; parents, William and Cora (Craig) Zimmerman; daughters, Peggy McKinney, Karan Marshall; sons, Jack, Richard, Max; grandson Robert; three sisters and three brothers.

Survivors include daughter, Delores Tulipana, Kansas City; grandchildren, Debora Squire, Jim and Elaine Tulipana, Randy and Shannon George, Gina Tulipana and Julip Marshall; son-in-law, Phil Marshall; daughter-in-laws, Nancy George, Shirley Nichols; great grandchildren, Holly and Shannon Blumhardt, Justin and Lindsey Kobolt, James Mongkhonvilary and Jenny Tulipana; and two great-great grandchildren.

Services were July 16, at Stoklasa Memorial Chapel, Pastor Mary Meinecke officiating. Burial in Fairview Cemetery, Cainsville.

Memorials: Fairview Cemetery.

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Subject: AMY (WATSON) GLENN
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper, Martinsville News, May 4, 1949

Mrs Amy Glenn, 90 years old, and highly esteemed by everyone, passed away at the home of her son, Steve, here in Martinsville Sunday afternoon, May 1. Her family were all present to help care for her the last few days. Edgar of California; Jake and wife from Nebraska; Joe and wife and two sons and family of St Joseph, besides the children who live in this county. Nothing was left undone that loving hearts and hands could do, but her stay on earth was over and she was called home. She was a very good woman, so dear to us that it seems as if a close relative has been taken. Reared in our parents' home, half a mile from theirs, we grew up to love and respect her with all our hearts. She often told us she loved our mother as she did her own sisters, and we will miss her so. Funeral services were Monday afternoon at the Christian church and burial was in Magee cemetery, east of town, where her husband is buried. Six sons and three daughters survive. Three children preceded her in death. The living are Steve, Bert, Joe, Edgar, Jake and Jim; Mrs Laura Johnston, Mrs Jennie Wiley and Mrs Minnie Hook. She had grandchildren, great-grandchildren and great-great-grandchildren.

NOTE: Amy Glenn was the daughter of Darius and Lucinda (Richards) Watson. She was born Apr 18, 1859 in Greene County, Missouri. She married James Greenberry Glenn on Feb 1, 1877 in Harrison County, Missouri.

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Subject: ELIZABETH JANE (WATSON) GLENN
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper, Apr 3, 1940

Elizabeth Jane Watson, daughter of Darius and Lucinda Watson, was born Dec 13, 1852. She departed this life March 16, 1940, at the family home in Martinsville, Mo., at the age of 87 years, three months and three days.

She was one of a family of 11 children, seven girls and four boys. One brother died in infancy. The other children all lived to be aged men and women. Only two of the family survive. They are Mrs Charity Glenn of Lakin, Kan., and Mrs Amy Glenn of Martinsville.

She was united in marriage to John A. Glenn of Martinsville Nov 19, 1877. Three children were born to this union: Frank Glenn and Mrs Lucinda Smith, both of Martinsville, and a daughter, Julia, who died in 1896 at the age of 16 years.

She leaves to mourn her passing, her aged companion, two children, four grandchildren and four great-grandchildren, two sisters and a host of other relatives and friends. She had but few if any enemies. She loved her family and home and her friends always found a welcome at her door. She was a woman of few words, and if she could not say something good of her fellowman, she said nothing.

Funeral services were conducted Sunday afternoon, March 17 at the church by the pastor, the Rev O.D. Hedges, and burial was in the Magee cemetery, east of Martinsville. Singers were Mrs Lucy VanHoozer, Mrs Charlie Walter, Mrs Leland Eisenbarger, Miss Elizabeth Henderson, Mrs Mary Saxon and Miss Eloise Hunt. Pallbearers were: Dean Glenn, F. J. McIntosh, Grant Lacy, Kyle Hook, Clifford Wood and Claud Fish.

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Subject: WILLIAM R. GOODELL
Submitter: Ginger Goodell (ginsfam@yahoo.com)
Source: Cainsville News, September 14, 1905, p 3

"TRANSFERRED"

His Warfare Closed--His Wearied March Ended--His Last Illness Brief--Peacefully Falls Asleep--The End a Surprise ,Yet Not Wholly Unexpected

This [sic] briefly stated are the closing events in the life of Eld. Wm. R. Goodell, whose mortal life came to a close in Cainsville, Mo., Tuesday, September 5th, 1905.

For several years his steps have been slow and tottery, (and like the path of all of us) winding towards the tomb. His life has truly been an eventful one; and to condense it ever so much, if given in detail, would require several columns so we must abridge it.

Born Sept. 1st, 1822 in Morgan county, Illinois; married in 1850; enlisted in 1861 in the army and was 1st Lieutenant of Company B, 30th Illinois Infantry; was a soldier in the Mexican War also. After the close of the War he came to Harrison county Missouri in 1864 and bought a farm east of Bethany 6 miles, sold this and purchased a half interest in a flour mill here in 1866. In 1868 traded same for a farm southeast of Eagleville; sold this and bought a farm south of Bancroft in Daviess county, Missouri. From there he went to western Kansas and then back to Cainsville some 12 years ago. The last decade of his life has been a quiet and retiring one. Naturally he was jovial and full of sociability.

In October, 1866, he and his good wife, who is left to finish life’s journey alone, united with the Baptist church; and 6 months later he was made a Deacon. In July 1867 he and the writer were regularly ordained to the work of the ministry. He held several pastorates in Harrison, Mercer and Daviess counties. He was among the unfortunates who exchanged good farms for territory in which to sell “The Footprints of Time".

Besides his aged companion he leaves four children to mourn his death. They are: Mrs. J. M. Moss, McCurtian [sic], Ind. Ter., Mrs. Andrew Shirley, Rossland, B. C., Mrs. John M. Rogers, Cainsville, Mo., and Mr. Jesse H. Goodell, Jamestown, Kans. Five of the children to this union have preceded him.

The funeral services were conducted by the writer at the Baptist church in Cainsville, Mo., Sept. 6, 1905, at 2 p.m. The lesson was from Romans viii, 18 to 36. The text was John xiii, last clause of 1st verse; "Having loved his own that were in the world he loved them unto the end". Christ’s undying love was the theme. Prayer by Rev. W. H. Harper. "How Firm a Foundation", "Jesus Lover of My Soul" and "Asleep in Jesus" were songs tenderly rendered. The parting look was then taken after which the remains were interred in the Zoar cemetery not far from the spot where he began his public ministry and where he was ordained 38 years ago.

The weather prevented a large attendance but deep sorrow was manifest, and the entire services, with old soldiers as pall bearers, were evidence of an appreciative community. Love and meekness becomes the minister better than ambition; striving to win souls and casting none away. It were well that all ministers would first preach to themselves and then to others. The greatest want of the times in which we live is a commanding ministry, one of piety, earnest,[sic] and of mightiest moral power; full of faith and of the Holy Spirit, who will proclaim old truths with new energy, not cumbered with drapery nor rubbish--preaching the truth as it is in Jesus.

May the Lord guide us all and comfort these bereft ones for Jesus’ sake is my prayer.

J. H. BURROWS

The family desire [sic] to express their thanks to one and all who lent their sympathy at a time when it was so deeply appreciated. May the Lord bless you all.

MRS. W. R. GOODELL.
MRS. JOHN M. ROGERS.
JESSE H. GOODELL

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Subject: BERNICE BONDENNA GRACE
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper, May 12, 1928

Obituary - GRACE

Bernice Bondenna Grace was born in Harrison County, Missouri, May 3, 1911, and died May 6, 1928 at the age of 17 years and three days, at the home of her grandparents, Mr and Mrs J. R. Grace, in Martinsville. She was the oldest daughter of Mr and Mrs David R. Grace. She leaves to mourn their loss her mother, one sister, Kathleen, three grandparents, besides a host of other relatives and friends. Her father and one sister preceded her in death.
She was converted and was baptized into the Christian church by Rev Havner during a series of meetings he held at the place about two years ago.
Bondenna was a girl that never had much to say to anyone but was of a very kind disposition and had a smile for everyone and to know her was to love her.
The funeral services were held at the Christian church in Martinsville May 7, 1928, conducted by the Rev Paul Mitchell of Savannah, and she was laid to rest by the side of her father in the beautiful Kidwell cemetery.

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Subject:: MARGARET (RIMMER) GRACE
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Clipper, Apr 29, 1937

Margaret Elizabeth Rimmer, daughter of David and Mary Rimmer, was born March 16, 1855 near Richmond in Ray county, Missouri. She passed away Thursday, April 8 at her home in Martinsville at the advanced age of 82 years and 22 days.

Her parents moved to Harrison County when she was 13 years old.

She was united in marriage to John R. Grace on October 18, 1874. To this union 12 children were born; eight girls and four boys; namely, Mrs Clara Stone deceased, W. J. Grace, Martinsville, Mrs Nora Clemens, Martinsville, Mrs Ado Poe, Grant City, Mrs Jessie Spillman deceased, Mrs Cora Maddy deceased, David R. deceased, Mrs Mary Howard, Albany, Curtis A. deceased, Lennie L. deceased, Roy R. deceased and Minnie L. deceased.

Besides the four living children, 17 grandchildren and 16 great-grandchildren survive, also two brothers and one sister; namely, John Rimmer of Eureka, Kan., William Rimmer of Chicago, Ill., and Nancy VanHoozer of Lawton, Okla.

At an early age she united with the Christian church and lived a faithful Christian life.

Her husband preceded her in death in December, 1929. Their married life was spent on their farm northwest of Martinsville, where they reared their family, moving to Martinsville in 1910. Here they spent their declining years until the Master called them home.

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Subject:: ROY RIMMER GRACE
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican, May 19, 1926

Roy Rimmer Grace, youngest son of J. R. and Margaret E. Grace, was born in Harrison County, Missouri 4 1/2 miles northwest of Martinsville, February 16, 1897 and departed this life May 6, 1926, aged 29 years, 2 months and 20 days.

He was converted at New Harmony church when 13 years old, afterwards moving his membership to Martinsville Christian church, under Rev Kitchen's preaching, remained a member of that church until his death. About nine years ago, Roy began failing in health, his father and mother going with him to New Mexico where he remained until about 3 years ago, when he returned to his hime in Martinsville. He was one of a family of 12 children, seven of whom preceded him in death. They were, Mrs Clara Stone, Mrs Jessie Spillman, Mrs Cora Maddy, Curtis A., David R., Lena and Minnie. He is survived by his parents, 3 sisters and 1 brother, Mrs Nora Clemmons of Martinsville, Mrs Ada Poe of Grant City, Mrs Mary Howard of Lone Star and William Grace of Martinsville.

Roy was a patient sufferer through all his sickness, and had many relatives and friends who did everything in their power for him, but death angel visited the home again and took another, leaving the aged father and mother more lonely.

Funeral services were held at the Christian church by Rev Hadley, M. E. minister, Friday afternoon at 2:30 and burial was at the Kidwell Cemetery.

(NOTE): Roy Rimmer Grace died of tuberculosis, as did most of his siblings.

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Subject:: ELAINE GRAHAM
Submitter: Deb Daily(dailyknd@grm.net)
Source: Princeton Post Telegraph December 13 2012

Cainsville, Mo.

Elaine Graham, 95, died Monday, Dec. 3 2012 at Harrison County Community Hospital in Bethany, Mo.

Funeral services were held Friday, Dec. 7 at First Baptist Church in Cainsville, Mo. under the direction of Bethany Memorial Chapel of Bethany. Burial was in Zoar Cemetery near Cainsville.

Mrs. Graham, daughter of Harley and Cora (Stanley) Maple, was born near Brimson in Harrison County, Mo., on Oct. 15, 1917. She grew up in the Akron community and graduated from Cainsville High School. She married Jack Graham on June 19, 1937. They actively participated in their church and community, and were engaged in farming until Mr. Graham’s death on Jan. 27, 1990. They enjoyed winters in Texas for 15 years, but her family was her greatest joy.

She accepted Christ at an early age and placed her membership in Cainsville First Baptist Church, and remained a faithful member until her death.

Survivors include her children, Phillip Graham (and wife Daniela) and JoAnn Johnson (and husband, Philip),; six grandchildren; seven great-grandchildren; and two great-great grandchildren; a brother-in-law Kenneth Bondurant; and cousins, nieces, nephews, and friends.

In addition to her husband, she was preceded in death by her parents; a brother, Stanley Maple; three sisters, Ilene Thomas, Kathleen Clegg, and Janna Bondurant, and a granddaughter, Sara Johnson.

Memorial gifts to Cainsville First Baptist Church or Zoar Cemetery may be left in care of the funeral home.

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Subject:: LEVI GRANT
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHist@grm.net)
Source: Ridgeway Journal, May 25, 1891

Death Takes It's Way
Three Harrison County Citizens
Called Home to Their
Creator

Levi Grant

Levi Grant died at his home two miles northeast of Ridgeway. Mr. Grant was aged about fifty years, had been a resident of Harrison county since the first settlement and was a member of the Christian church. His death was the effects of a disease contracted in the late Rebellion. The body was interred in the Yankee Ridge cemetery. Mr. Grant was one of the oldest and most respected citizens. He leaves a wife and several children to mourn his loss. Thus one by one our old settlers pass to that better Land where all is peace.

(Note: The other two were Nora Bowman and John Ruff. Please see alphabetically.)

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Subject: MRS. MARY A. BENNETT GRANT
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican, Mar 2, 1904

Mrs G. W. Grant Mary A. Bennett was born in Hocking county, Ohio, November 4, 1840, and moved to Iowa in 1856, and from there to Missouri in 1858. She was married to G. W. Grant, November 25, 1865. She was the mother of eight children, all of whom are living.

Her death occured at her home in Ridgeway, last Wednesday night, February 23, after a long illness.

Deceased united with the Christian Church about thirty years ago, and was a faithful member of the same. She was greatly loved by all, and her death is regretted by hosts of friends who sympathize with the bereaved ones.

Funeral services were held at the Christian Church last Friday afternoon, conducted by Mr. Oren Orahood of Bethany. A large number were present, showing the high esteem in which deceased was held. The remains were laid to rest by loving hands in Yankee Ridge Cemetery.

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Subject: JOSEPH GRAY
Submitter: Wilma (Greenpen2@aol.com)
Source: Republished in Oakley Graphic, Oakley, Logan County, Kansas, Friday, May 2, 1890 Society, Topeka, Kansas, microfilm Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, Kansas

JOSEPH GRAY

Bethany, Mo.--Joseph GRAY, living in Trail Creek township, this county, died at his residence on April 20, 1890. He was born in Morgantown, Va., on January 15, 1785, making him 105 years of age. He voted for Thomas Jefferson in 1804.

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Subject: ISAAC RILEY HADLEY
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: The Cainsville News, Cainsville, MO, October 26, 1911, pg. 4, col 3

I. R. Hadley, an old and highly respected citizen of this city, died at the family home last Sunday morning, Oct. 22, 1911, at 10 o'clock, after an illness of some weeks.

He was born in Morgan county, Ind., Oct. 21, 1829, and was therefore 85 years and 1 day old at the time of his death. He was married to Miss Eleanor Bain Nov. 14, 1847, and to this union 10 children were born - 3 boys and 7 girls, one of which died in infancy. Six of the children were born in Indiana. Mr. Hadley and family emigrated (sic) to Missouri in 1858, settling on a farm about 3 miles northwest of Cainsville where he continued to reside until 1882 when he moved to town to take charge of the post office which position he held for 10 or 12 years. Soon after the breaking out of the war, he enlisted in Co. I, 23rd Mo.Vol. Inft. and served faithfully until being honorably discharged June 10, 1865, when he returned and made this vicinity home until his death. He was Justice of the Peace in this township nearly a quarter of a century serving 22 yars at one time without a break in his service. He was a capable and painstaking official.

He was a member of the G.A.R., I.O.O.F., and M.E. church, and was especially prominent in G.A.R. circles. On memorial occasions he always carried the flag he loved so well and it occupied a prominent place among the decorations at his funeral.

His wife passed on to the Better Land Aug. 18, 1907, since which time he has kept house, one of his daughters living with him the last few years.

Funeral services were conducted at the M.E. church in Cainsville Monday, Oct. 23, at 2 P.M. conducted by Rev. W.E. Tinney, Pastor, from the text found in James 4:14, after which interment was made in the Oakland cemetery according to I.O.O.F. ritual.

He was a highly respected citizen and leaves a host of relatives to mourn his death.

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Subject: ENOCH HALE
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper, Eagleville section, Oct 9, 1949

Enoch Hale, of whose illness we have spoken from time to time, passed away at his home west of Eagleville, Wednesday evening, Oct 2, following an illness of several months. Mr Hale was 63 years of age and his entire life, with the exception of a few years, had been spent near Eagleville. All through his entire illness he was given every care possible by his companion and six children, Gladys (Mrs Dewey Allen), Helena, Mont., and Manly and family of Peoria, Ill., coming from their homes to be at his bedside; also the two daughters, Stella and Mrs Glade Nittler of Des Moines, Ia., came frequently to assist the mother and two brothers, Lee of Eagleville and Donald of the home, in making his last days comfortable. Funeral services were held from the M. E. church of Eagleville Friday at 2:00 pm, conducted by the Rev W. A. Pollock. Singing was by Mrs Lucile Johnston, Lois Sheeler, Edwin Edwards, Carter Richardson and Leonard Hale, with Mrs Clonda McElhiney at the piano. Pallbearers carrying him to his last resting place in Masonic cemetery were Lyle Creswell, Clarence and Dorl Roberts, Dolph Little, Ernest Payne and Arthur Roe. All members of his family were present at these services. Others from a distance attending were Mrs James Hansen and daughter, Doris, Leroy, Ia, Mrs Maggie Fuller, Welden, Ia., Mrs Floy Lowe, Mrms Otis Roberts and two sons, Mrs Mary Lowe, Mrs Gerald Harris, Mrms Arthur Roe, Humeston, Ia., Mrms Frank Hill, Lamoni, Ia., Orve Dickey, Mrms Lyle Creswell, Lamoni, Mrs Lorene Johnston, Miss Lenore Dickey, Mrs Marguerite Bridger, of Colorado, and Mrs Corena Jackson, Fairfield, Ill. There were many floral offerings, showing the love and esteem in which the family is held.

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Subject: FRANCIS I. HALE
Submitter: Cheryl Lepisto (clepisto@kc.rr.com)
Source: Bethany Republican, Jun 18, 1913, page 8

Francis I. Hale
Born January 9, 1827
Died June 10, 1913

Francis I. Hale was born on January 9, 1827, in Wayne County, Ky. When about one year of age, he moved with his parents to Morgan county, Ind.

In February, 1852 he was united in marriage to Miss Delilah Coffee and to this union seven children were born, three boys and four girls.

In the year 1855, he with his family moved to Iowa, and in December of the same year they moved to Harrison county, Mo., where he purchased 85 acres of land with improvements consisting of a good house and other buildings. The house burned down before he moved into it, and he put up a log cabin which served him as a house for many years.

In August, 1866, the wife died, leaving her husband and their small children, John H. Hale, Alonzo W. Hale, Mary A. Hale and Martha E. Hale, their other three children having died in infancy.

In the year 1867, on August 18, Mr. Hale was united in marriage to Miss Nancy Hobbs, and to this union four children were born, one child, Nora Bell, dying in infancy. The three remaining were Sarah, Charles H. and James H. Hale. Sarah and Charles S. Hale both died prior to their father.

During the war Mr. Hale enlisted, but was rejected on account of his eyes. He was a staunch Republican and took an active interest in politics until his health gave out, and his activities to decline.

He was 86 years, 5 months and 1 day old when he departed this life. He had been ill for several weeks.

Uncle Frank Hale has been a good citizen, a good neighbor, a kind and loving husband and father, and his aged wife, who walked as faithfully by his side, has been left to finish the journey alone, yet not without comfort, for she has one faithful son, James, close at hand to look after her wants and watch over her in her declining years.

Mr. Hale, though not a member of any church, was very active in the building of Hale Chapel, which is located near his house.

Funeral services were held at the house, conducted by Rev. Shultz, and the body laid to rest in the West cemetery on Wednesday, June 11, 1914, a host of friends paying their respect to their old neighbor and friend.

Uncle Frank Hale was a good natured and interesting character who loved a joke as few old people do. Age had taken away much but not his sense of humor, or his interest in those around him.

He leaves a wife, three sons and two daughters besides a host of grandchildren to mourn their loss and to them is extended the sympathy of many friends.

-- Mrs. O.W. Curry

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Subject: NANCY MCNELLY HOBBS HALE
Submitter: Cheryl Lepisto (clepisto@kc.rr.com)
Source: The Bethany Clipper, May 26, 1920

Mother Hale at Rest

Mrs. Nancy McNelly Hale died Friday evening at the home of her son Jas. Hale, west of town. Mrs. Hale was 83 years old, but had been in fairly good health until only a few days before her death. She was born in Indiana, March 21, 1837. Was married to Edmon Hobbs in 1855. One child was born to this union, Francis Hobbs who preceded his mother in death. In 1857 she came to Missouri and lived with her father. Here she was united in marriage to Francis Hale. They lived a number of years in a log house. Afterwards they erected a new house. Here they lived happily until death called Mr. Hale to the Better World. Two sons and two daughters were born to Mr. and Mrs. Hale, but three have gone on to their Heavenly Home, leaving one son Jas. Hale who lives at the old home.

Mother Hale has always been a good and kind neighbor and loved by all who knew her. She gave her life to Christ in love and service while young and united with the M. E. church. She remained a faithful member of this church until the U. B. church was organized in the old home school house, when she transferred her membership to that church. She was a faithful worker in both this class and the Eagleville class where her membership has been the past year.

Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at Hobbs Chapel by Rev. Hoagwood and interment in Hobbs cemetery.

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Subject: CHARLES LAFAYETTE HALL
Submitter: (ross@empowering.com)
Source: Bethany Republic, Harrison County, Missouri

Charles Lafayette Hall, son of Joel and Martha was born Dec 19, 1842 in Clinton, IL and died May 27, 1912 in St Joseph MO aged 64 years, 5 mo & 6 days. He was the second of eleven children. He came with his parents to Eagleville in 1857. When the Civil War broke out, he enlisted in Co E, 43rd Inf & served to the end of the war. When a young man, he learned the harness business, which has been his life work. He united in marriage Jul 21, 1866 to Sarah Ellen Fletcher. To this union three children were born: Mrs. Nettie Cressup and Gordon Hall, both of whom reside in St Joseph, MO and one child who died in infancy. In 1897, Mr. and Mrs. Hall moved to St Joseph where they have since resided. Since last Nov, his health gradually failed. It was thought a western trip would improve his serious condition and on May 27 he started with relatives to Portland, OR but before the train left the sheds, the sick man surrendered to his dread desease. He leaves a wife, son, daughter, five grandchildren, three sisters, and two brothers to mourn their loss. Funeral services were held at the M. E. Church at Eagleville, conducted by Rev George Meek. Interment at the Masonic Cemetery under the auspices of the GAR of Eagleville.

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Subject: MRS. MARTHA HALL
Submitter: (ross@empowering.com)
Source: Unknown

Martha Banta was born in Kentucky, Apr 8 1826. When quite young, she moved with her parents to Clinton IL. She lived there until after her marriage with Joel Hall, May 4, 1842. In 1858, she moved with her husband and four children to Eagleville MO, where her husband engaged in the mercantile business, in which business, he continued until his death Apr 29, 1883. She lived in Eagleville until last Oct, when she came to Bethany to make her home with her daughter, Mrs. Neville.
From a large family of brothers and sisters, only one sister, Mrs. Amanda Schuler, of Merrick, L I survives. Eleven children, four sons, and seven daughters were born to bless the union of Joel and Martha Hall, nine of whom lived to mourn their mother's death, two daughters having died in infancy. Three sons and one daughter was unable to be present at the funeral.
For forty years she had been a faithful & consistant member of the M. E. Church at Eagleville.

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Subject: CAROLINE S. HAMILTON
Submitter: Phil Stewart (jjhist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republic-Clipper, Mar 25, 1902, reprinted from the Gallatin Democrat

MRS HAMILTON DEAD

Caroline S. Hamilton, relict of Dr. J. B. Hamilton, who died in 1851, passed away last Tuesday night of old age a complication of diseases. Mrs Hamilton came here with her husband in 1851, and since that time made this her home. She was born in Georgetown, Ky., June 15th, 1816. Her father, Dr. Sanders, was a wealthy and prominent Baptist and built a church which he presented to the congregation at Georgetown. She was a good woman and was ever ready to lend a helping hand to those in need or afflicted. She died at the old home place south of town. Her three living children are William and May or Wood Hamilton of this place, and J. P. Hamilton of Bethany. Funeral services take place at 2:30 today at the home, conducted by Rev J. M. McManaway. Burial at the Brown cemetery. Many friends mourn with the family on the death of Mrs Hamilton.

[Note: References to "here" and "this place" refer to Gallatin and Daviess County, MO.... not Bethany and Harrison County.]

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Subject: MARGARET ELIZABETH CHAMBERS HAMMACK
Submitter: Barbra Chambers (MOHarris-Admin@Rootsweb.com)
Source: The Cainsville News, 16 Jan 1919, pg. 4

Mrs. Margaret Elizabeth Josephine Hammack, eldest daughter of Mr. and Mr. Joseph Chambers, was born Sept. 15, 1857. She quietly fell asleep in Jesus Saturday, Jan. 4, in Cainsville, at the age of 61 years, 2 months and 16 days.

For some time her health had been impaired, and when seized with the dread epidemic that is now sweeping our land, her constitution was not able to withstand the ravages of the disease.

When a mere girl she was of a religious disposition, and early in life she professed faith in Christ and was baptised into the fellowship of the Baptist Chruch at Cainsville, by Rev. J. H. Burrows. Later her membership was transferred to the Mt. Moriah Baptist Church, where for a number of years, she faithfully served her Master, when her membership was transferred to White Oak, where it remained until her death. While a stranger to the writer, yet I am told by those who knew her, that she lived her profession, and was kind and gentle in spirit and patient in suffering.

At the age of 22 she was united in marriage to John Ross, to which union two children were born--W. A. Ross, of Ridgeway, and Mrs. W. A. Wright, of Cainsville. In 1882 death claimed her companion, and she remained a widow for 8 years, when she married Rev. Isaiah Hammack. One son was born to this union--Delbert Hamack, of Mt. Ayr, Iowa. Her three children survive her. In 1916 Rev. Hammack passed away, and she remained a widow until death. Thus her life has been one of sadness and sorrow, as well as of sunshine and happiness.

Besides her children, she leaves behind her three brothers and three sisters--Frank Chambers, of Bethany; Ode Chambers, of Mt. Moriah; Alva Chambers, of Princeton; Mrs. W. J. Hammack, of Ridgeway; Mrs. Mary Dale, of Mt. Moriah; and Mrs. Cora Long, of Princeton. These all survive her, besides a host of relatives and friends to mourn her loss.

In the death of Mrs. Hammack, Cainsville lost one of its loved and respected citizens, and the cause of Christ a mother in Israel. Her place will be hard to fill. Many a drooping spirit has by her words of kindness been cheered, and many an aching head has her soothing touch given ease. May the lovely Christian mantle she wore, fall on her loved ones she left behind.

J. L. Presser

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Subject: ELMER E. HARPER
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: Cainsville News, Feb 1, 1917

OBITUARY

Elmer E. Harper was born at Hendrysburg, Ohio, June 14, 1861, and died at his home 5 miles northeast of Cainsville January 22, 1917, age 55 years, 7 months and 8 days. His parents moved to Noble County, Ohio and remained there until 1870 when the family came to Mo., and located on the farm on which St Paul Church now stands. Here he grew to manhood. During the winter of 1884 he was converted and united with the St Paul Church under the pastorate of Rev Thomas Evans.

About six years ago his membership was transfered to the Liberty Church.

He was married to Eva E. Adams at Modena Dec 18, 1901. To this union were born 4 children, two dying in infancy.

He leaves to mourn at this parting his wife, two children, William Henry and Margaret Amanda. Also one sister, Mrs Rose Adams of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, two brothers, Rev William Harper, Madison, Neb., John Harper, Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

During his childhood he became afflicted and for some years it seemed that he would not live to manhood. He later partially regained his health but has not at any time been very strong in body. The illness which brought his death began with a violent cold about ten days ago. At first his condition did not seem serious, but later pneumonia set in and his body soon yielded. Kindly considerate of others not with repining at his own fate, his last care was for the pain which his parting would cause his loved ones. The family will miss his love and council, and the community a good neighbor. The funeral service was held from the St Paul church. The sermon was preached by his pastor. The Saline quartet appropriately sang some selections which were very inspiring. The remains were laid to rest in the family burying grounds at St Paul to wait the resurrection morn.

- W. A. Yetter

[NOTE] Elmer Harper was the son of William and Margaret (Craig) Harper.

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Subject: GEORGE W. HAWK
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Clipper, Sep 11, 1913

ANOTHER OLD SOLDIER ANSWERED THE LAST ROLL CALL

George W. Hawk was born in Crawford county, Ohio, Oct 27, 1832, and died at the home of his daughter, Mrs Chas. Hogan, near Ridgeway, Mo., Saturday, Sept 6, 1913, after a long protracted illness.

He enlisted in Co K, 55th Ohio, and served during the war. He was in the Andersonville prison for a term of six months. After the war he came to Missouri and was married to Sarah Jane White Sept 6, 1868. To this union were born three children, Mrs Chas Hogan, George W. Jr., and Etta, who died in infancy.

He is survived by his companion, two children, four grandchildren and three sisters.

Funeral services and interment were held at Prairie Chapel Sept 7 at two o'clock conducted by the undersigned.

A. N. Cave

[NOTE] George W. Hawk's military service records state that he was captured during Stonewall Jackson's initial assault at Chancellorsville and was briefly held prisoner at Belle Isle prison at Richmond, Virginia. There is no indication that he was ever held at Andersonville prison.
Ridgeway Journal - Sep 18, 1913

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OBITUARY

George W. Hawk was born in Crawford county, Ohio, Oct 27, 1832 and died at the home of his daughter, Mrs Charles Hogan, south of Ridgeway, Mo., Sept 6, 1913. He was the son of George and Elizabeth Hawk. When he was nine years of age his father died, leaving him with the rest of a large family to battle with the world as best they could. When the civil war broke out he enlisted with Co K, 55th Ohio Reg., where he served during the war; he served as corporal and was in the Andersonville prison six months. Soon after the war he walked from Ohio to Missouri; went back to Ohio in 1867, then came back to Batesville, Mo. He was married to Sarah Jane White, Sept 6, 1868, and to this union three children were born, Mrs Chas. Hogan, George W. Hawk, Jr., and Tricy Etta; the latter died in infancy. His son was unable to be present at his funeral. Mr Hawk was a carpenter of no lean ability. He, with his brother Jacob Hawk, built many residences in Harrison, Mercer and DeKalb counties. For the last thirty years he lived in or near Bethany, except the last two years, he spent with his daughter.

The deceased was not a member of any church organization, but several times before his death he could be heard praying and making peace with his Savior. He was a true friend, a kind and loving husband and father.

The last year of his life he suffered with kidney troubles and at times his suffering was intense, but he was always jovial and had a kind word for all. Death has taken another neighbor whose face we will see no more, but we feel as if our loss is Heaven's gain. The crisis which he has met and passed awaits us all.

Beyond the curtain of the grave what shall befall us none shall know save this: A manly heart and brave, true to a friend, fair to a foe, that passing leaves a record clear, may face the void without a fear.

Funeral services were conducted by Rev Cave at 2:00 o'clock Sunday afternoon at the Prairie Chapel, after which he was tenderly laid to rest in the chapel cemetery.

The grief stricken relatives have the sympathy of all in their sad berievement.

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Subject: SARAH JANE (WHITE) HAWK
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Clipper, May 28, 1919

AT REST

Mrs. George White Hawk was born near Cincinnati, Ohio, Oct 7, 1815, and died at the home of her daughter, Mrs Charles Hogan, in Grant township, May 18, 1919 at the age of 73 years. 7 months and 11 days.

September 6, 1868, deceased was united in marriage to George W. Hawk at Batesville, Missouri. To this union were born three children, Mrs Charles Hogan and George W. Hawk, Jr., of Harrison County and Tricy Etta Hawk who died in infancy.

At the age of 10 years, Mrs Hawk was converted and united with the Christian church in which she retained her membership to the end of her earthly pilgrimage. For a number of years past, she was deprived the privilege of attending divine worship, having to care for her husband who was an invalid for a number of years and other circumstances beyond her control.

Since the death of her husband, which occured in 1913, Mrs Hawk lived with her daughter, Mrs Charles Hogan, where she was tenderly cared for in her declining years.

Besides her son and daughter, Mrs Hawk is survived by six grandchildren together with other relatives who mourn the departure of a good mother, grandmother and friend.

Mrs Hawk's illness was of short duration. She suffered little and quietly and peacefully passed away to her eternal rest triumphant in the faith of a crucified Savior.

Funeral services were held by the writer at Prairie Chapel Church, Sunday May 18 in the presence of a large number of sympathizing neighbors and friends, after which her mortal remains were laid to rest by the side of the sacred dust of her husband, there to be till time shall be no more. May God give the bereaved family comfort in the hour of their sorrow.

- Alex Reed

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Subject: WILLIAM HAWK
Submitter: Sherry L. Weir (kb0shb@arrl.net)
Source: Harrison County Times, Oct. 8, 1936, under Gilman News

William, son of John and Cyntha (Burris) Hawks, was born in Jackson County, Ohio, April 2, 1853, and died Sept. 22,1936, aged 83 years, five months and 20 days.

Mr. Hawk moved from Ohio with his parents in the year 1865 and remained in Missouri until about 30 years ago, when he moved to Kansas City, Kan., where he passed away. He leaves a wife, one daughter, Mrs. George Fox, and one son, McKinley Hawk, all of Kansas City; also one sister, Jane Aten of Gilman City, and one brother, Jas. Kenneth Hawk of Utah.

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Friday, January 16, 2009
Subject: MAZELLAH (MAY) MCCLURE HEASTON
Submitter: Phil Stewart (jjhist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican, April, 1940

Mazellah McClure, the daughter of Andrew and Mary Elizabeth (Grubb) McClure, was born at Edinburg, Mo., May 26, 1868, and passed away at Bethany, Mo., March 19, 1940, aged 71 years, nine months, 22 days. In early childhood her parents moved to Trenton, Mo. and in 1878 the family moved to Bethany, Mo., where she lived until her death.

She was married to Leonard Heaston Sept 30, 1888. To this union were born three sons, Bert Heaston of Fort Laramie, Wyo., Victor C. Heaston, of the home, and one son who died in infancy.

Besides her two sons she is survived by Flossie Heaston, her daughter-in-law of the home, one granddaughter, Mrs Carol Bennett of New York City, one brother, Clyde McClure of Albany, Mo., and one sister, Mrs Kate Avery of Port Byron, Ill., who was with her sister during her illness and death; two nieces and one nephew, and other relatives and friends. One sister, Veva Monson of Los Angeles, Cal., preceded her in death. She lived her entire life in Bethany, and for the last several years she had made her home with Victor L. Heaston and wife.

She was a loving, devoted mother and affectionate sister. The community in which she has lived so long, knew her as a good neighbor, citizen and friend. She has served her own generation by the will of God, and fell asleep. Her two sons and her sister were constantly by her bedside, doing all that loving hands could do to prolong her life, but to no avail; the life of this good mother peacefully passed away.

Funeral services were conducted by the Rev H. G. Blomfield at the Haas & Sons funeral home of Bethany, Mo., Thursday, March 21, at 2:30 p.m. She was then laid to rest in the Miriam Cemetery.

[NOTE] Mazellah's tombstone at Miriam Cemetery in Bethany identifies her as "May Z. Heaston". She and Leonard Heaston must have divorced because he married a Mamie Hook in 1929. Leonard died June 11, 1936. His death certificate gives his first name as "Len".

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Subject: HOMER WILBER HEDGES
Submitter: Phil Stewart (jjhist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican Clipper, Nov 8, 1990

Homer Wilber Hedges, 78, Glendale, Ariz., died Wednesday, Oct 31, at a Phoenix hospital

Mr Hedges was born Oct 20, 1912 in Bethany. He formerly resided in the New Hampton and Bethany areas but had lived in Glendale for the past five years.

He was a member of the First Christian Church.

He was preceded in death by his wife, Elva, on Nov 10, 1987. He was also preceded in death by a grandson, Dennis Weymuth.

He formerly worked at the Slatten Grocery Store in Bethany and also had served as manager of the Seitz Oil Co. and assistant manager of the Green Hills Grocery in Chillicothe.

He leaves three daughters, Betty Jean Akers, St Joseph, Blanch Weymuth, Kansas City, Mo., and Doris Akey, Glendale; one son, Donald Hedges, Engleside, Ill.; 11 grandchildren, and eight great grandchildren.

Funeral services were Saturday, Nov 3, at the First Christian Church of New Hampton. Burial was in the Foster Cemetery, New Hampton. The Noble-Roberson-Polley Funeral Home, New Hampton, was in charge of arrangements.

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Subject: LULU BELLE DANIELS HEDGES
Submitter: Phil Stewart (jjhist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican Clipper, Sep 15, 1982

Lula Belle (Daniels) Hedges was born November 14, 1888 near White Oak Church in White Oak Township [Harrison County, MO] and she departed from this life August 28, 1982, at Tiffany Square Convalescent Center in St Joseph, Mo. at the age of 93 years, 9 months and 14 days. She was the eldest daughter of William Kader and Viola Kathryn Daily Daniels. On October 11, 1905 she was united in marriage to O. D. hedges. To this union two sons were born: Garland and Homer. They moved to Illinois where O. D. attended Eureka Bible College. From Illinois they moved to Cainsville, Mo., where he preached in the Christian Church. From Cainsville they moved to Kidder, Mo., where he served the Christian Church. They moved from Kidder to Canton, Mo., where he finished his college degree and she helped as they both served student ministries. From Canton they moved to Marceline and from there to Lancaster. After Lancaster they moved to a farm south of Martinsville and from this residence they served the churches of Martinsville and New Hampton until their retirement when they moved to Bethany. They lived in Bethany until Rev. Hedges death in June of 1958. Lula lived in Bethany for awhile and then moved to New Hampton where she lived with her sister Effie for 8 years. When she became too handicapped by not being able to see, she moved to a nursing home in Green Top, Mo. to be near her son, Garland. Following Garland's death, she moved to Tiffany Square in St Joseph so she could be close to her son, Homer and family. The eldest of nine children, she was preceded in death by her parents, her husband, O. D., a son, Garland, three brothers and three sisters. She is survived by a son, Homer, four grandchildren, six great grandchildren and two step great-grandchildren, two sisters, Effie Claytor and Maxine Grabil.

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Subject: REV. OTIS D. HEDGES
Submitter: Phil Stewart (jjhist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican Clipper, Jun 10, 1958

IN COMMEMORATION OF THE REV. O. D. HEDGES

Born Nov 11, 1886 - Died June 2, 1958

There are men whose life work, as we survey it, makes the impression of solid strength and of noble service. Like the mountains which rise above the surface of the earth, they abide, steadfast in their place, enriching human existence. As the mountain purifies the air and sends it cooled and renewed over the heated plains and through the streets of the city to help maintain humanity, so such men are being efficient centers and sources of business and social activities whose influence is felt far and near. They are so strong and useful that we think of them as permanent forces and cannot realize they will sometime submit to that universal law of change and death.

Thus, were the thoughts entertained by the writer in regards to this friend in whose memory we pen these lines, and whose life was recognized as one of highest worth. And even though he was called from this life many weeks ago, we cannot ever after this lapse of time, realize he is gone, never to return, and mingle among us in the same happy helpful manner. However, there are compensations, and we will endeavor to find solace in this thought that our great Father of wisdom and love has pledged his word that in the glorious future we shall understand all of life's mysteries and know why God led us over this road of sorrow and grief.

Otis D. Hedges, son of Martin and Emily (Heath) Hedges, was born near Matkins, Mo., Nov 11, 1886, and departed this life June 2, 1858, at the age of 71 years, six months and 21 days.

He was educated in the public schools and at Culver-Stockton college, Canton, Mo. He was ordained as a minister Aug 2, 1908, and served as pastor of various Christian churches in Harrison county and adjoining counties, following this career for almost 50 years. He still held the pastorate at Martinsville, where he served 27 years.

He was dearly loved by all with whom he associated, not only in his own church, but others as well. "A friend to all". As a Pastor, he had conducted 1027 funerals, and married 371 couples. This attested his popularity and how wide was his acquaintance.

Funeral rites were held Wednesday, June 4, at the New Hampton Christian church, the Rev. Noel T. Adams officiating. Solos were sung by George Noble and Everett Belt, with Mrs Ed Beeler accompanist. Interment was in Foster cemetery, near New Hampton. Casket bearers were Lemon Barnes, Charley Walter, Van Faden, Floyd Eckard, Robert Hook and Virgil Adams.

Surviving are the wife, Lulu of the home in Bethany, where they had lived since October, 1956, following 26 years of residence on their farm home near Martinsville, also, the sons, Homer of Cameron, Mo., and Garland of Queen City, Mo.; his aged mother, Mrs Emily Hedges of Karval, Colo.; three sisters, Mrs Izetta Hill of Denver, Colo., Mrs Hila Webb of Karval, Colo., and Mrs Rosa Menginot of St Joseph; four grandchildren and friends innumerable.

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Subject: ESABEL ANGELINE HENDREN
Submitter: Phil Stewart (jjhist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican, July 1934
MRS HENDREN, PIONEER, PASSES AT AGE OF 88

Mrs Esabel Angeline Hendren, who was the widow of George Hendren and a pioneer in Harrison county, died early Friday afternoon in Bethany at the home of a son, Dr. G. E. Hendren and Mrs Hendren, at the age of 88 years.

Mrs Hendren had been an invalid for the last three years. She was born in Tennessee, March 26, 1846.

Members of her family are well known in Harrison county. Sons and daughters who survive are Lewis V. Hendren, Dr G. E. Hendren, O. C. Hendren, C. W. Hendren, and Mrs Rosa Jennings, all of Bethany or near here, and Mrs Della Wyatt of Topeka, Kansas.

The funeral service was at Morris chapel Sunday afternoon, the sermon being by the Rev J. W. Minor, Baptist church pastor. Vocal music was by Mrs Frank Ramey, Miss Edra Jean Kemp, Miss Ruth McCollum, Harvey McCollum and L. E. Casady, with Miss Juanita McCollum as accompanist. Pallbearers were Garvin Hendren, Woodrow Hendren, Victor Hendren, Frank Jennings, Paul Bartlett and William Barnett.

[NOTE] Mrs Hendren's given name is spelled "Isabelle" on her tombstone. She was the daughter of George and Elizabeth Kelley and is listed in their household in the 1860 census of Harrison County, Missouri. Harrison County marriage records list "Isabell" A. Kelley and George Hendren being united in marriage on Feb 7, 1869. She and her husband, George are buried at Morris Chapel Cemetery. She is listed as "Angeline" in the 1880 census of Harrison County, MO with her husband and four children.

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Subject: DR. G. E. HENDREN
Submitter: Phil Stewart (jjhist@grm.net)
Source: The Bethany Republican Clipper, Wednesday, Oct 19, 1938

DR. G. E. HENDREN, VETERINARY, DEAD

Bethany Practitioner Passes Monday Evening At Home - Funeral Today

Dr G. E. Hendren, who had practiced veterinary medicine at Bethany since his graduation from college in 1914, died about 7:00 o'clock Monday evening at his home on South Fifteenth street, where he had been ill since Wednesday. He was 66 years old.

Dr Hendren died of the effects of a stroke, the fifth he had felt in the last several years. His rigid determination to keep active is believed to have aided in his other recoveries, and this ability to resist the strokes had previously amazed his friends. He lost consciousness late Sunday evening and remained in a coma until his death.

Rites for Dr Hendren will be at 2:00 o'clock this afternoon at the Haas funeral home where the Rev J. W. Minor of St Joseph, formerly of Bethany, will officiate before burial at Morris chapel cemetery. They will be under the auspices of Miriam lodge I. O. O. F. Dr Hendren also was a member of the Yeomen order.

A son of Mr and Mrs George W. Hendren, Dr Hendren was born Aug 26 in Jefferson township. In his immediate family he is survived by his wife, Mrs Rosa Dell Hendren, a son, Kenneth Hendren, Chicago, Ill., and a daughter, Mrs Paul Bartlett, Bethany. Brothers and sisters are Lewis Hendren, Oliver Hendren, Walter Hendren and Mrs Jake Jennings, all of Bethany, and Mrs Della Wiatt, Topeka, Kansas.

CENTER>____________________________________________________________
Subject: JOHNNY ROY HOGAN
Submitter: Phil Stewart (jjhist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper, Feb 10, 1952

Pvt Johnny Roy Hogan, youngest son of Earnest and Anna Hogan, was born in Omaha, Neb., Dec 25, 1929 and died while serving his country in Korea on Oct 4, 1951, at the age of 21 years, nine months and nine days.

When Johnny was 10 days old his mother passed away, leaving his father with five small children, and it was when he was three months old that his aunt and uncle, John and Mary (Hogan) Bartlett took him into their home and he became a son and brother to them and their daughters, Mildred, now Mrs Andy Walker, and Mauree, now Mrs Raymond Allen. He was loved as their very own, and it was in their home that he grew up.

He lived all his life around Ridgeway, Mo., and attended grade and high school there. The last five years he spent in California. It was here again he was deprived of a mother's love, as his aunt passed away in 1948.

On March 14, 1951, he was inducted into the army at Ft Ord, Calif., and was later transferred to Camp Roberts where he finished his basic training. He left the States on Aug 1 and was sent to Korea and the front lines, where he served in the 8th Cavalry Regiment until his death.

Johnny was liked by everyone, and there never was a task too big for him to undertake and finish. He was always cheerful and had a smile and kind word for everyone. He was always a kind brother, and considerate and loving son.

Besides the foster father and foster sisters, he leaves his father and stepmother, Mrms Earnest Hogan; two brothers, Tom and Dale, and two sisters, Agnes and Mary Ann, all of Omaha, Neb., also two uncles, Charley Hogan of Ridgeway, Mo., and Homer Hogan of Gilman City, Mo., and many other relatives and a host of friends. His mother, one brother, and aunt preceded him in death.

Full military funeral services were Wednesday, Jan 23, at Kirkley chapel under the direction of the American Legion Post of Ridgeway. Music was furnished by the Kirkley chior, with the Rev E. I. Webber officiating.

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Subject: LUMMIE ALICE HOGAN
Submitter: Phil Stewart (jjhist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper, Dec 18, 1947

Lummie Alice (Arney) Hogan, oldest daughter of George and Hanna Elizabeth Arney, passed away following an operation at the Cullers hospital in Trenton, Mo., Nov 12, after an illness of two weeks. She had been in failing health for several years.

Mrs Hogan was born Oct 13, 1883, and died at the age of 64 years and one month.

When a very young girl she united with the Cat Creek Baptist church, later transferring her membership to Gilman City. She was a fine Christian and a wonderful mother.

Oct 14, 1901, Lummie was united in marriage to Homer J. Hogan. To this union seven children were born, five of whom survive. Two died in infancy. She leaves to mourn, the husband; Guy C. and Rex L. of Kansas City; George B. of Omaha, Neb.; Mrs Ray Moulin of Gilman City; Mrs Kenneth Meadows of Albany. Also surviving are six grandchildren, one of whom, Barbara Joy Hogan, daughter of George, makes her home with her grandmother.

The living brothers and sisters are: Tom of Ranger, Texas, Dee of Bakersfield, Calif., Floyd of Princeton, Orsen of Battle Creek, Mich., Mrs Bert Neff of Bethany, Mrs Rie Dickover, Marshalltown, Iowa and Mrs A. E. Butcher, St Joseph. A brother, James W., died in 1932.

Funeral services were conducted Friday, Nov 14 at the Blue Ridge Christian Union church, using the text "The Lord is my Shephard I shall not want". The Rev F. A. Funk of Gilman City Baptist church officiated. Music was furnished by Mrs Cecil Misner, Mrms Ira Oliphant and Charley Hurst. A special solo was given by Mrs Fay Ellis. The flower bearers were Alpha Foster, Maud Sanders, Maun Hallock, Merle Polley, Mary Hogan, Ruth Arney, Hattie Mae Pilcher, Maud Gillilan, Maxine Morris, Esther Burke, Marjorie Flint, Dorothea Scott and Lois Rea Cutshall. Pallbearers were her nephews - Jack, Rodney and Edwin Hogan and Glenn, Ray and Jerald Arney.

She was laid to rest in the Gilman Masonic Cemetery.

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Subject: RACHAEL HOPPER
Submitter: Phil Stewart (jjhist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper, Aug. 1, 1934

OBITUARY - HOPPER

Rachel E. Watson, daughter of Darius and Lucinda Watson, was born in Indiana November 16, 1854, and passed away July 21, 1934, aged 70 years, nine months and five days.

Her parents moved to Iowa when she was two years old, living there only one year, moving to Missouri where she spent the remainder of her life. March 28, 1875 she was married to Alfred Hopper, who preceeded her in death several years ago. Four children came to bless this union, namely William T., Mary L., Vena E. and Rosa. William died at the age of 12 years, Vena at the age of 42 and Rosa in infancy. Mrs Mary L. York is the only surviving child. She had seven grandchildren, one great-grandchild, two step-grandchildren whom she loved as her own,

She was a member of the Christian church at Hatfield, Mo. For years she had been deprived of her eyesight and spent much time in her own home.

She leaves five sisters, Mrs Mary Ann Rains of Oklahoma, Mrs Elizabeth Glenn, Mrs Amy Glenn of Martinsville, Mrs Rebecca Sullenger and Mrs Charity Glenn of Kansas, one brother, William Watson whose home is in South Missouri. Two brothers, Stephen and Jimmie, preceded her in death, while one sister, Mrs Levina Maddy of Kansas, passed away the day of Mrs Hopper's funeral.

Funeral services were held at the York home where she passed away Monday, July 23, conducted by the Rev Orla Hedges, pastor of the Martinsville Christian church. Burial was in Highland cemetery southeast of Hatfield, beside her husband.

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$2188 IS FOUND AFTER A DEATH
ABOUT $1500 SEWN IN POCKET OF UNDER GARMENT OF MRS HOPPER, HATFIELD

The seeming heavy weight of an under garment, removed from the body of Mrs Rachel Hopper, aged Hatfield woman who died Saturday, recalled two days later to the mind of one who handled it, resulted Monday in the discovery, in all, of $2188 which Mrs Hopper had hidden or saved.

Mrs Hopper was a pensioner, and died Saturday afternoon.

That night, J. P. Ragan, Ridgeway undertaker, was called to embalm Mrs Hopper's body and had some assistance from a young man named Wyant, of the Hatfield community. Wyant carried some of Mrs Hopper's garments out of the room where the body lay, and subconsciously noted the seemingly heavy weight of one of them. On Monday, just before the funeral, Wyant called Ragan aside. He had been thinking of this weight, he said, and asked Ragan, who also is coroner, to investigate. The clothing lay as it had been tossed. Ragan picked up the garment and found a pocket with a narrow opening. Inside it were envelopes, and in each of the envelopes were bills, some of them gold certificates, and all except two of the old size. There was approximately $1,500 in the pocket.

In a purse which Mrs Hopper had given to a daughter to keep was $690 and a liberty bond of $50. A little more than $20 was found in another pocketbook. In a kitchen cabinet was found a cigar box containing more money and several notes.

The total amount found was $2188.

Sheriff W. H. Webb was called to Hatfield Monday, and it was his investigation which disclosed the rest of the money. It was given into his charge to await the appointment of an administrator.

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Subject: EDMOND TAYLOR HUTCHINSON
Submitter: Tracy (Hutchinson) Friton (fxrsidecar@frontiernet.net)
Source: Newspaper and date unknown

Edmond Taylor Hutchinson Mr. E.T. Hutchinson who died at his home ten miles north of Bethany, Monday, July 8th, 1907, was buried in the family burying ground Tuesday, July 9th. Funeral Services were conducted by Rev. W. F. Bradley of Bethany. The following is an obituary, the greater part of which was dictated by the deceased a few days before his death.

E.T. Hutchinson was born in Henry County, Kentucky, Nov. 13th, 1833 and remained there until the winter of 1856 when he emigrated with his parents to Harrison County,Missouri until the winter of 1858, when he made a visit to Kentucky and remained there until the next spring when he returned to Missouri. At the age of fifteen years, he joined the Missionary Baptist Church, and remained a member of said church until he emigrated to Missouri, bringing his letter from that church and depositing it with the separate Baptist church in Harrison County and remained a member of that church until it disbanded. He afterward united with the Cumberland Presbyterian church and remained a faithful and consistent member. On the 19th day of August 1858, he was united in marriage to Mary E. Jones of Harrison County, to which five children were born, viz: William A. Hutchinson, who died in childhood and buried in the family burying ground: Eugene T. Hutchinson, who died and is buried at the Stanton Cemetery in Illinois; John H. Hutchinson, who lives in North Dakota; Lizzie J. Hutchinson, who lives in St. Joseph; James R. Hutchinson who lives in Hot Springs, Arkansas. In the fall of 1864, Mr. Hutchinson moved with his family to Illinois and afterward moved to McCoupin , Illinois where he lived until he returned to Missouri in the spring of 1866. Mr. Hutchinson's first wife Mary E. died on the 16th day of April 1867. Mr. Hutchinson was united in marriage with Amanda Ramey, March 11, 1869, to which union six children were born, viz: Mary F. Hutchinson, who lives in Harrison County; E. E. Hutchinson, who lives in Harrison County, and still remains on the old home place; Lydia A. Hutchinson, residence unknown; Cora and Dora, who died in infancy and were buried in the family burying ground; E.T. Hutchinson who lives in North Dakota . For the past two years Mr. Hutchinson has been in declining health and February 9th last, was confined to his bed, where he has been most all the time since, with a combination of dropsy and heart trouble. On Monday eve, about 6:30 , July 8th, he was called home. He was a patient sufferer until the end, and bore his afflictions well. Born November 18th, 1833, dies July 8th, 1907, aged 73 years 7 months and 25 days.

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Subject: WEBSTER JENKS
Submitter: Teddy Van Hoosen vanders@iowatelecom.net)
Source: Prairie City Iowa News, 1880 - 1900, page 1
Webster Jenks died at his home in Harrison County, Missouri the first part of August, 1880. He was the youngest son of Levi Jenks who lived south of Prairie City (IA) . He was a brother of Abner Jenks.

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Subject: NATHAN LEONARD KINKEAD
Submitter: Tom Kinkead(tomree@tampabay.rr.com)
Source: Ridgeway Journal, Jul 19 and Jul 26, 1900

Nathan Leonard Kinkead, born January 31,1867 at Ridgeway, Harrison County, died July 17,1900. Burial was at Blythdale cemetery.

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Subject: LOIS LAKE LASLEY
Submitter: Phil Stewart jjhist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper, Aug 24, 2006

Lois Lake Lasley, 92, of Bethany, Mo., died at a Liberty, Mo. hospital Aug 8, 2006.

She was born Dec 30, 1912 to Samuel Millard and Luella May (Eyerly) Cocklin at Ridgeway, Missouri.

Lois graduated from Ridgeway High School in 1930.

On January 17, 1938 she married Everett Edward Lasley who had three children, Idavee, Harold and Betty.

Lois lived most of her adult life in Decatur County, Iowa, where she was a homemaker. Later she worked at Hopkins Rexall Drug and enjoyed meeting people. She also enjoyed being a member of the American Legion Auxiliary, the Yadirf Club, Bridge Club, and Bridge Foursome. She was a member of the Ridgeway Christian Church, then the Leon Christian Church, and currently Trinity Christian Church. She loved to travel and read. Since Nov 1995, Lois made her home at a Bethany nursing home.

Preceding her in death were her parents; husband, Everett on Sept 12, 1973; brother J. E. Cocklin; sisters, Winnie Fitzgerald, Alice Fitzgerald, Ceville Myers, Bertha Hausmann, Marie Pearson, and infants Mary and Lenore Cocklin; stepdaughter Idavee Lasley, stepson Harold Lasley; and nieces Mary Bennett and Mildred Ramey.

Survivors include her stepdaughter, Betty Clark of Ventura, Calif.; nieces Anna Mae Gartin of Missouri, Kathy Ridinger and Connie Schuler, both of Oklahoma, Anna Fisher of California; nephew, Mitchell Pearson of Iowa; close friends Evelyn and Paul Eastin of Leon, Iowa; and other relatives and friends.

Funeral services were held at the Slade-O'Donnell Funeral Home in Leon, Iowa, August 12, with Rev. Terry D. Roberts officiating. Burial was in the Leon Cemetery, Leon, Iowa.

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Subject: PEARL LAWRENCE
Submitted by: Phil Stewart(JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Clipper, Friday, Jan 5, 1912

Death of Pearl Lawrence

Miss Pearl, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Reuben Lawrence, died at her home in this city Wednesday morning, Jan. 3, 1912, at 2 o'clock. Miss Pearl had been in poor health for several months, but not until the last few days was she compelled to take her bed. She was seventeen years old, a sweet Christian girl and an excellent student, being a Junior in high school. Funeral services will be held Thursday afternoon and the remains taken to Dale cemetery for interment.

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Subject: ELMORE M. LINGLE
Submitted by: Phil Stewart(JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Clipper, Friday, Jan 5, 1912

Death of Elmore Y. Lingle

Elmore Y. Lingle was born in Fulton County, Ohio, Jan 7, 1847, and died in Kansas City, Mo., where he had gone for medical treatment, December 30, 1911, aged 64 years, 11 months and 35 days.

He was married to Miss Marie Cline October 15, 1874. To this union was born one child, Walter, who with his mother survives the father.

Bro. Lingle professed faith in Christ and joined the Congregational church about the year 1890.

He served in the War of the Rebellion in Company E of the 68th Ohio Regiment, Infantry. He held his membership in the G. A. R. post in Bethany.

Brother Lingle was a man with great courage in fighting the ills of life, and did not surrender until he was completely worn out.

Bethany has lost a good citizen, the son a sympathetic father and the wife a true husband. Your loss though, is his gain.

Funeral services were conducted from the residence on Monday afternoon at 3 o'clock Jan. 1, 1912, by the undersigned. T. D. Neal Post G. A. R., conducted their service at the home, and the remains were laid to rest in Pythian cemetery.

May the conforting influence of the Spirit be yours during these trying days of sorrow.

W. J. Willis

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Subject: FREDERICK O. LONG
Submitter: Kelly Meek Claycomb (claycomb97@earthlink.net)
Source: George Myers Family Bible, 1890-1900

Frederick O. Long entered upon that peaceful day, March 15, 1899, at 9:07 p.m., a victim of that dread disease, consumption. He was born Aug. 22, 1861, in Delaware County, Iowa. His parents L. L. and Virginia Long emigrated to Missouri in Sept, 1866 settling near Brooklyn, Harrison Co., where he grew to manhood and made farming his business. He was married to Sarah Belle Drury Sept 21, 1882. To the union were born two girls, Muriel, aged 5, and Edith, aged 2. Realizing his condition, he went to Colorado hoping to be benefited; but all to no avail. He returned to his father's home near Bethany, Mo., to spend his last days with father, mother, wife and children. Everything possible that a fond, tender and patient wife, loving parents and kind friends could do was done. His passing was quiet and gentle, as an evening breeze. He became a follower of Christ but a short time before his death, and a more earnest worker in his little field was never seen; he being ready at all times to sound the praises of his Redeemer, admonishing and exhorting relatives and friends to prepare to meet their God in peace. He was not baptized Christian, but it was evident to all who ministered to him in his last moments that Christ's Spirit bore witness with his spirit that he was a child of God. An honest straightforward citizen, a loving father and husband and an obedient son is gone. Peace to his ashes.

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Subject: EMILY JANE GIBSON MAPLE
Submitter: Deb Dailey dailyknd@grm.net)
Source: Newspaper and date unknown

Emily Jane Gibson, daughter of Louisa and Matthew, born Harrison County, MO August 24 1866, died at her home near Gilman City January 1st 1946., 79y,4m, and 8 d. She lived her entire life in this county with the exception of one year in Nebraska. She married John Welsey Maple April 12 1885. Their children are Mrs. Noval Wilson, Bakersfield, Ca; Mrs. Warren Mitchell, Gilman City; Mrs. Floyd Miller, Brimson; Merlin Maple, Brimson; Harley E. Maple, Bethany; Bonard Maple, Bethany; and Eva Maple, who died at age nine. Brothers Luther Gibson, Brimson; and James Gibson, Kansas; sisters Mrs. Kate Neff, Gilman City; Mrs. Mary Campbell, Brimson. Twenty-eight grandchildren, twenty three great grandchildren. Converted 1891 to old Bolton church, later moving membership to Mt Pleasant No 1 Church. Services were held January 3 at Springer Chapel. Pallbearers were grandchildren: Cecil Smith, Clifford Roberts, Jack Graham, Stanley Maple, Johnny Miller, Vivian Maple. Flowergirls were grandchildren: Mary Maple, Bonnie Maple, and Kathleen Maple.

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Subject: WARDIE MARSTELLER
Submitter: Kelly Meek Claycomb(claycomb97@earthlink.net)
Source: George Myers Family Bible, 1890-1900

Wardie Marsteller died at the home of his parents Tuesday evening at 6 p.m. Feb 9, 1904. Dr. Marsteller was well known here as his parents resided several years on a farm some 3 miles north of currently where the doctor's boyhood days were spent. His parents left the farm and moved to Albany where he received his education graduating from the Christian College of that city, after which he chose the profession dentistry, graduating at the college of Kansas City. The doctor practiced his profession in our city, Albany, King City, and Hot Springs, Colorado where he lived up to a few days before his death. He was well liked by all who knew him, and in his profession he was second to none in northwest Missouri. He leaves a wife, father, mother and host of friends to mourn his untimely death.

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Subject: THOMAS ATWOOD MATHES
Submitter: Phil Stewart (jjhist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican, Feb 24, 1915

THOMAS ATWOOD MATHES Born February 3 Died Feburary 8, 1915

The subject of this sketch was born in Johnson county, Ind., on February 4, 1834. In April, 1854, he came to Harrison County, Mo., and took up his residence on a farm west of Eagleville, where he resided the greater part of his life.

During the civil war he enlisted in Co D, 23rd Reg. Mo. Vol. Inf, and served three years.

On July 12, 1857, he was married to Perlina Henson, who died April 4th, 1866. To this union, three children were born, William M., Mary J., and Matthew C, who died in infancy.

On September 10, 1866, he was united in matrimony to Elizabeth Hobbs. The children of this union are Barbara R., John B., James H., Sylvester T., Sarah J., Albert P., Bertha V. and a son who died in infancy. The mother and Barbara died in 1885 and Sarah J. in 1877.

His last marriage was to Rebecca J. Fortune, February 11, 1886. The children of this union are Frank S., Clarence E., Phoebe C, and Addie May. The mother, Rebecca J. Mathes, died January 19, 1904.

Since the death of his wife, Mr Mathes spent most of his time among his children and was at the home of his daughter, Mrs S. B. Skinner, when stricken with his last illness.

When a young man, he made the Christian profession and united with the M. E. church, South, of which he remained a consistent member until the end. He was also a member of Reuben Dale Post, G.A.R.

He was a man of fine character, honest, industrious and square in all his dealings with men. He was also progressive and took pride in his fine farm and comfortable home. His neatness of appearance was also worthy of comment as he never appeared in public without being perfectly neat and wll-dressed.

Mr Mathes was able to give to his children financial aid, but better than wealth was the training he gave them morally, and his mantle of honesty of purpose has fallen upon his sons and daughters as a legacy of more value than mere dollars.

The funeral services were held at Hobbs Chapel on February 11, 1915, conducted by Rev Weik and the body laid to rest in Hobbs cemetery, where a host of friends had gathered to show respect to the departed.

Of the stately old gentleman who has been laid to rest, can be truly said, "Blessed are the pure in heart, for they shall see God".

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Subject: EUGENE EVERETT MARTIN
Submitter: Susie Martin-Rott (rootboun@tampabay.rr.com)
Source: Quad City Times, Columbus Jct., Ia, Feb 29, 1988

Columbus Jct., Ia -- Eugene Martin, 71, Orlando, Fla, formerly of the Columbus Junction area, died Sunday at Veterans Administration Hospital, Tampa, Fla, after an extended illness. He was employed as a floor tiler in the carpentry business in Florida.

Mr. Martin married Elsie Titus in 1945 in Santa Barbara, Calif.

Visitation is from 4-8p.m. Tuesday at Stacy-Lewis Funeral Home, Columbus Junction. Services will be 1:30 p.m. Wednesday at the funeral home. Burial will be in Conesville Cemetery. A memorial has been established. He was an Army veteran of World War II.

Survivors include his wife; daughters, Nancy Carson, Monterey, Calif., and Susan Martin, Clearwater, Fla., a son, Danny, Casselberry, Fla, three grandchildren; sisters, Elizabeth (Mrs. Charles) Keef, Omaha, Neb.,and Alice Yotter, West Liberty; and brothers, William, Grandview; Thomas, Ainsworth; Arthur, North Liberty, and Harold, Muscatine.


(NOTES): Eugene Everett Martin was born May 30, 1916 near Blythedale, Harrison Co, MO, a son of Thomas and Alice Woodward Martin. The family removed from Harrison County in approximately 1926 to River Junction, Johnson Co, IA.

There are several errors contained within this obituary. Marriage year is 1943, not 1945. Correct spelling of son's name is Dannie. Eugene was a Staff Sgt in the 182nd Americal Division Company E stationed in the Solomon Islands during World War II and received a number of decorations including the Bronze Star.

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Subject: HENRY MAXWELL
Submitter: Deb Dailey(dailyknd@grm.net)
Source: Gilman City Guide

From Gilman City is reported the death Feb. 25 1948 in Kansas City of Henry Maxwell an early Harrison County teacher who returned to this locality during WWII and resumed teaching because he was needed in the emergency. He continued teaching with satisfactory results until his health failed. The death of this fine man occurred after an operation. His body lay in state at the Haines Funeral Home in Gilman City until Saturday when funeral services were conducted at the Church of Christ. Burial was at the Springer Cemetery.

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Source: Bethany Republican Clipper

Henry Maxwell 78 years old passed away Wednesday evening of last week at the General Hospital in Kansas City and on Thursday the body was brought back to the Haines Funeral Home where it lay in state until Saturday afternoon at 1 o'clock when funeral services were held and conducted from the Church of Christ by Brother Kenneth Main and interment was in the Springer Cemetery. Mr Maxwell was a resident of the Springer Community for many years but for some time had resided in Kansas City. He spent his entire life in the teaching profession. He is survived by one son Frank Maxwell of Kansas City. The date of his death was Feb. 25, 1948.

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Subject: HARRY E. MCKIDDY
Submitter: Phil Stewart (jjhist@grm.net)
Source: The Cainsville News, Thursday, Jul 20, 1916

CAUSE OF DEATH IS A MYSTERY - NOTHING DEFINITE KNOWN AS TO THE DETAILS

Little is Positively Known About the Exact Manner in Which Harry E. McKiddy Met His Death


The untimely death of Harry McKiddy is very mystifying. Without exact doubt the manner in which he met his death will never be solved. It is a gruesome story to tell and is given in answer to many inquiries. The solution is only theory, based upon circumstances.

On the 22nd of June Harry, in the company of Fred Tucker and William Fortner, went to Lewis, Kans., where they worked in the harvest fields two weeks. On the 11th of July they left Kinsely, Kans., boarding Santa Fe passenger train No 8, a long and heavy train. Perhaps some forty men "hopped" this train at Kinsley. The three boys became separated in the efforts of getting on the train. After it had started Fortner went over the top of the train and upon calling down between each coach found Harry riding the "blind" between the second and third coach. When he called, Harry answered "Settin' pretty", and was riding with two medium sized fellows they had seen at Kinsley when they went down but whom they did not know. The boys had planned to go to Omaha and from there to the Dakotas, having in the meantime planned if any of them were "ditched" they were to come on the next train possible and the others would wait at Omaha. They had cautioned each other to wait until the trains would slow down before alighting, stating they would rather be "pinched" by the yard detectives than risk an accident and Harry had especially cautioned Fred. At Great Bend, Fortner and Tucker were put off the train but when it again started managed to get upon the tender of the locomotive. When they had reached Hutchinson they were put off and could not get back on again when the train pulled out. The two boys went down the street from the depot to a water fountain, obtained a drink and sat down to bemoan their fate, thinking Harry was still on the train. About thirty minutes later the two men Harry was riding with came to them and said, "A man was killed at Adams street and we believe it was 'Shorty'. Whereupon they went back and found it was Harry. When they arrived at the scene the police, railroad officials and ambulance were present and as nothing could be done the body was taken to Johnson & Sons undertaking parlors and relatives here at home notified.

From the circumstances surrounding the accident, J. H. McKiddy, who went down to Hutchinson advances the following theories, any one of which might have been the cause:

"At the time of the accident No 8 was traveling East and Adams street in Hutchinson is three blocks west of the station. When the body was found it was lying with the head about seven feet north of the north rail and directly east of a switch stand which is about three feet high. The top of the head was entirely uncapped and only a piece of the skull about three by four inches was found. From the eyes to the hips no serious wounds existed. The hips were cut in two, the knees shattered, the legs at the shin also cut in two, but only the left foot being entirely severed from the body; the rest remaining attached by ligaments and flesh. The switch stand is about thirty feet west of Adams street crossing and at the crossing and about fifteen feet north of the tracks is a large electric arc light, and at no time on the north side would there be a shadow from the train, so that a man in getting off would be able to see a switch stand or other obstruction and the fact that his head at no time was under the train disproves the idea that he was getting off the train at this place. The train was running about 25 miles per hour when the accident happened. It would be almost an impossibility to shatter the head with so slight a fall. It would be an utter impossibility to place the head upon the rails, either to the north side of the north rail or the south side of the north rail, and reach the result of cutting the body only from the eyes up and from the hips down. Place the head upon the rails with the body entirely outside the north side of the rail. The body must be turned completely around and moved south about three feet in order to cut in two at the hips and lower limbs. Place the body entirely between the two rails with the head upon the south side of the north rail and the body must pass north and keep traveling in that direction until the lower limbs are cut and in passing out over the rail it would be almost impossible for the body from the eyes to the hips to pass out without being cut. The fact remains he either fell out from between the coaches or fell from the top. In either case he could have fallen, striking his head against the switch stand first and then the body falling under the train. Evidence shows conclusively his head struck the lower solid iron block of the stand. There can be no doubt but that death was instantanious.

In conclusion let us look at the suspcious side of the accident. When the boys passed through Kinsley going down, 2 medium sized men, names unknown, were seen at this place. For two weeks they did not work and on the same train on which the boys were "bumming" were these same two men and when Fortner went over and found Harry, these same two men were riding the "blind" with him. The home boys were all suspicious owing to the fact that as soon as workers had arrived from the harvest, hobos in great numbers have held them up and taken their earnings. The home boys had taken precaution to pin all their money in an empty tobacco sack next to the body and it is presumed Harry placed all his money in this manner. At any rate $39.45 was found in a tobacco sack.

Summing up, two medium sized men were at Kinsley without work two weeks; they were on the same train and the same "blind" with Harry. Two medium sized men were seen standing over the body when a switching engineer approached the scene of the accident and ran off as soon as discovered. Whether the two standing over the body were the two riding with Harry is the question and if so it is to their credit they notified Tucker and Fortner, yet at the same time they left Hutchinson that night. Could they have pushed him off with the intent of robbery? After Fortner went over the train Harry might have climbed up on top and in being held up put up a fight and was thrown off. He was a tenderfoot - easy prey for hobos. In Kansas this year it is the worst ever known. When Harry left home he had a small bill fold. This was not found; neither is it known whether it contained any money or not. From the description above of the surroundings, knowing the body was under the train from the hips down, how did it reach the position of being with the head fully seven feet to the north of the north rail?"

[NOTE] Harry Mckiddy was born Oct 3, 1891 and was the son of William and Ida Belle (Chambers) McKiddy and the grandson of John Quincy and Margaret (Bishop) Chambers. Harry is buried at Oaklawn Cemetery south of Cainsville. He was 24 at the time of his death. The "J. H." McKiddy mentioned in the article is most likely Harry's brother, John Harvey McKiddy.

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Subject: IDA B. CHAMBERS MCKIDDY
Submitter: Barbra Chambers (MOHarris-Admin@Rootsweb.com)
Source: The Cainsville News, 14 Mar. 1918, pg. 8

OBITUARY OF MRS. W. C. MCKIDDY

Ida B. McKiddy, daughter of John Q. and Margaret E. Chambers, was born in Cainsville, MO, March 31, 1863, and died March 2, 1918. She was married to W. C. McKiddy on May 10, 1883, at Princeton, MO. To this union four children were born: John H. McKiddy, Mrs. E. C. Mullins, Mrs. Dee Oliphant, and Harry E. McKiddy. The latter came to his death by an accident on a railroad July 11, 1916.

Mrs. McKiddy was converted and united with the Cainsville Baptist Church in 1879, and as her health would permit was faithful all through her life.

Funeral services were conducted at the Baptist Church Monday, March 4, 1918, at 3 o'clock, p.m. conducted by Rev. R. L. Wood, pastor of the church, after which the body was laid to rest in the Oaklawn Cemetery.

Our heart goes out to these children and the lonely husband who gave up their mother and companion. We have been informed that an awful blow fell upon this good family when the fire of 1903 swept away in a few minutes all their earthly possessions and left them homeless but not friendless. Slowly but surely from that hour, ill health began to lay hold upon the life of this wife and mother until for the past twelve months she had been robbed of her reason and finally ended her life by her own hand.

Never have we known a husband so faithful and true in caring for an invalid wife, nor have we ever lived in a community where the sympathy more generally went out to the grief-stricken ones as this community has given to this sorrowing family.

Thus we say mourn not as those without hope, for what we do not undertand here, we shall know hereafter. May the God of all consolation bind up your broken and sorrowing hearts.

R. L. Wood, Pastor

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Subject: ALBERT M. MCLAIN
Submitter: Connie Guldner (cguldner@pmma.org )
Source: Bethany Republican Clipper

Albert M. McLain, son of Samuel and Mary Leachman McLain, was born in Mercer County, Missouri on May 6, 1878 and passed away at the home of his son, Noel McLain of Cainsville, MO, on November 23, 1964. He was at the time of his passing, 86 years, 6 months and 17 days of age.

He leaves to mourn his passing his beloved wife, Mary, of the home. His children include Herbert McLain of Cedar Rapids, Iowa; Mrs. Mabel Zweimiller , Ms. Roma Butler and Mrs. Marguerite Cordle of Kansas City, Missouri; Earnie McLain of Mt. Moriah, Missouri; Noel, Clarence and Robert McLain of Cainsville, Missouri and a grandson, Ted McLain, whom they reared, of the home.

In addition to the immediate family, relatives include 31 grandchildren, 47 great-grandchildren, one brother, Tom McLain, numerous nieces and nephews and a host of friends.

Funeral services were held at the Assembly of God Church in Cainsville Wednesday afternoon, November 25, 1964 at 1:30 o'clock. The Rev. S.R. Cox officiating. Burial in the Zoar Cemetery (Cainsville, MO).

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Subject: DARRYL G. MCLAIN
Submitter: Connie Guldner (cguldner@pmma.org )
Source: Bethany Republican Clipper, May, 1998

Darryl Gene McLain was born March 13, 1932 in Mt. Moriah, Missouri to Earnie and May Wright McLain and passed from this life to eternal glory on April 25, 1998 in Trenton, Missouri at the age of 66 years, 1 month and 12 days.

Darryl grew up and attended school in Mt. Moriah. He served in the military from 1952-54 with an 18 month tour of duty in Korea.

In 1956, Darryl started his permanent career with the Missouri State Highway Departmnet. That same year, he was wed to Evelyn Leora Parkhusrt of Eagleville, Missouri. From this union four children were born: twins Ronnie Dean and Connie Jean, Sheryl Ann and Gary Wayne.

Darryl spent most of his life living and working in Mt. Moriah retiring from the State Highway Department after 37 years of sevice.

Darryl's family and grandchildren were important to him. He especially liked to spoil the grandkids with motorcycle and go-car rides and 4th of July fireworks.

Darryl also enjoyed several hobbies and interests. He spent several years playing guitar and singing with various country western bands. He loved his music and taught his son, Gary, to play the mandolin at a very young age. Other hobbies included hunting rattlesnakes, mushrooms, deer and rabbits, fishing and camping.

Preceding him in death were two of his children: Ronnie Dean in 1956; Sheryl Ann in 1980 and his parents: May in 1977, Earnie in 1980.

Survivors include his wife: Leora of Bethany; children Connie Guldner and husband, Jess, Wichita, Kansas; Gary McLain and wife, Debra, of Albany, Missouri; 8 grandchildren: Lindsey, Loni, Jake, Josh, Chad, Kelly, Cody and Salena; 2 great-grandchildren: Kristian and Dallas; and 2 brothers, Dean McLain of Mt. Moriah and Ted McLain of Blythedale.

Funeral services were held Wednesday, April 29, 1998 at the Mt. Moriah Baptist Church, Mt. Moriah, Missouri, with Bro.Vic Buntin officiating. Special music was performed by Darryl's son and daughter-in-law, Gary and Debra, with accompaniment by Jim and Becky Hunsucker and included: "Purple Robe," "That's the Man I'm Looking For," and "Sheltered in the Arms of God." Special tributes were given in the form of poems by his granddaughter, Lindsey Constable of Mt. Moriah and his daughter, Connie McLain-Guldner. Pallbearers were: Chad Johnson, Cody McLain, Bill McLain, Randy McLain, Jay Rhea and David Doty.

Interment was at Lloyd Cemetery north of Mt. Moriah which included full military rites by the American Legion and VFW posts of Bethany and Albany.

Memorials have been established with the Mt. Moriah Batptist Church and the American Cancer Society.

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Subject: DR. ROBERT L. MCQUERRY
Submitter: Phil Stewart (jjhist@grm.net)
Source: Unknown Source

Dr. Robert L. McQuerry, 67, Raymore, died Saturday, Aug 18, 2007 at the Missouri Veterans Home in Cameron, Missouri.

Dr McQuerry was born Nov 7, 1939, in Cainsville. He married Nancy Canaday on June 1, 1873, who survives of the home.

He worked in education for 37 years as a high school teacher, guidance counselor, superintendent of schools for Breckenridge, Braymer and Lowry City, MO school districts, a director of maintenance and transportation for the Grandview School District and an area supervisor for the state schools for severely handicapped in western Missouri.

Dr McQuerry was preceded in death by his parents, Eldon and Pauline (Barrett) McQuerry; and two brothers, Delbert and Dewayne McQuerry.

He served as a deacon for the Raymore Christian Church and was a mason, member of the Lowry City, Mo., Masonic Lodge and the Friendship Conclave No. 24 of Raytown, Mo., of the true kindred.

Additional survivors: his son, Kevin Patrick McQuerry, Kansas City; four sisters, Carolyn Williams (George), Springfield, Mo.; Judy Wilderson (Dennis), Union Star, Mo.; Susan Taber (Roy), Walnut Grove, Mo.; Sara McCollough (Johnny), Siloam Springs, Ark.; two brothers, James McQuerry (Patricia), Ridgecrest, California; and Ken McQuerry, Kansas City; and numerous aunts, uncles, cousins, nieces and nephews.

Services: 10:00 a.m. Wednesday, Meierhoffer Funeral Home. Interment: Memorial Park Cemetery [St Joseph, MO].

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Subject: LEDRIC E. MEYER
Submitter: Phil Stewart (jjhist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper, June 24, 1931

[NOTE] Although the obituary spells the given name "Ledric", his tombstone and most records have the spelling as "Ledrick".

OBITUARY - MEYER

Ledric E. Meyer, son of John H. and Mary Ann Meyer, was born in Daviess County, Missouri, July 27, 1873, and passed away at his home near McFall, Missouri, June 12, 1931, being at the time of his death, 57 years, 10 months and 15 days old.

He was united in marriage to Eva A. Woodring, February 25, 1897. To this union were born three children, Mrs Fred Walker, St Joseph, Mo., Aubrey G. Meyer, of McFall, Mo., and Leslie E. Meyer of the home. She [Mrs. Eva Meyer] proceded him in death June 25, 1903. On March 4, 1906, he was united in marriage to Tava Reager. To this union were born three children, Mary Virginia and Thelma Joan of the home, and John H. of New Hampton, Missouri.

Mr Meyer spent the greater part of his life on the farm where he passed away. He was a devoted companion, an affectionate, loving father and brother, a good neighbor and will be missed by all who knew him.

He was a member of the Woodmen of the World lodge.

He leaves to mourn their loss, his companion, the above named children, three grandchildren, Victor and Charlene Walker, and Reece Meyer, two brothers, G. S. and O. D. Meyer of McFall, three sisters, Mrs C. L. Christie, St Joseph, Mo., Mrs John Dosbaugh and Mrs C. E. Montague, of Woodward, Okla., and a host of other relatives and friends.

Funeral services were conducted from the Methodist church at McFall Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock by the Rev H. G. Blomfield of Bethany, Mo. A large assembly paid their last tribute of respect to a friend and neighbor, which gave testimony of the esteem in which he was held. Burial was in the McFall cemetery.

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We wish to express our sincere thanks to the friends and neighbors for their kindness and assistance and works of sympathy during the sickness, death and burial of our dear companion, father and brother, and for the beautiful flowers.
- Mrs Tava Meyer and family

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Subject: LESLIE E. MEYER
Submitter: Phil Stewart (jjhist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper, Feb 1, 1967

Leslie E. Meyer, son of Ledric E. and Eva (Woodring) Meyer, was born March 9, 1903, in Harrison County and passed away, Jan. 11, 1967, in Gentry County at the age of 63 years, 10 months, and 2 days.

He was one of six children. His mother, father, and one brother, Aubrey, preceded him in death.

On Dec 24, 1935, he was united in marriage to Georgia Vance. To this union were born two children, L. G. Meyer, Bethany, Mo, and Shirley Ramey, Ridgeway, Mo.

At an early age, Leslie was converted into the New Hope Baptist church, and later placed his membership to the McFall Methodist church.

Leslie spent his entire life engaged in farming around the Matkins community.

He was a devoted companion, father, neighbor and friend.

He leaves to mourn his wife, son, daughter, one daughter-in-law, Etta Meyer, one son-in-law, Gary Ramey, four grandchildren, Ray, Janice and Dennis Meyer and Lona Ramey, one brother, John Meyer, New Hampton, Mo., three sisters, Hallie Walker, Chillicothe, Mo., Virginia Meyer, and Joan Crosswhite both of Darlington, Mo., several nieces, nephews, other relatives and many friends.

Funeral services were held at the Haas chapel, Bethany, Mo., at 1:30 p.m. Jan 14, 1967, with the Rev Porter Hopkins officiating. Pallbearers were Lewis Hiatt, Eugene Clark, Russell Alley, Alton Carter, Delmar Fenimore and Ben Daniels.

Everett Belt sang "In The Garden" and "Beyond The Sunset", accompanied by Mrs Richard Douthat.

Interment was in the Foster Cemetery.

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Subject: AMANDA MICHEM
Submitter: Kelly Meek Claycomb (claycomb97@earthlink.net)
Source: George Myers Family Bible, 1890-1900

Amanda Michem departed this life at the home of her mother four and one half miles east of Coffey, last Friday, Aug 12, 1904, at the age of 51 years from a complaint the doctors pronounced paralysis. Her sickness was of a short duration as she was confined to her bed only a few days. Funeral was held at the home, conducted by Bro. Mitchell, after which the remains were placed in the Coffey Cemetery.

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Subject: MYRTLE MARIE MORGAN
Submitter: Phil Stewart (jjhist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper May 14, 2010

Myrtle Marie Morgan, daughter of Harlan Clyde and Birdie (Powelson) Blessing, was born November 14, 1927 at New Hampton.

She departed this life May 7, 2010 at Crestview Home at the age of 82 years, 5 months and 23 days.

She married William Thomas Morgan, November 14, 1945 in Troy, Kansas. To this union was born three daughters and a son; Mary Fish, Clyde, Linda (Tom) McFall, Bethany; Wilma Morgan, St Joseph; and Victor (Barbara) Morgan, McFall: seven grandchildren, 15 great-grandchildren. Also surviving are five sisters and three brothers; Dorothea Gardner, Cocoa Beach, Fla.; Blanche Ross, Bethany; Olive Swope, New Hampton; Shirley Faulk, Rushville; Rosalie Kaze, Aurora, Colo.; Marion Blessing, St Joseph; Harold Blessing, New Hampton; Dwain Blessing, Montrose, Iowa; and friend Max Clark, Bethany. A host of nieces, nephews and friends.

Services were 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, at the United Methodist Church of New Hampton. Burial in the Oakridge Cemetery of McFall. Memorial gifts may be made to the Harrison County Hospice.

NOTE: Oakridge Cemetery (McFall) is in Gentry County.

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Subject: ABRAM MYERS
Submitter: Kelly Meek Claycomb (claycomb97@earthlink.net)
Source: George Myers Family Bible, 1890-1900

Abram Myers was born near Stanford, Kentucky in 1812 and died July 28th 1888. He was married at the age of 20 to Mary Bryant who survives him, and for 56 years the devoted companions have dwelt together in more than ordinary marital happiness. Fourteen children have been born of their union, seven whom are now living. Mr. Myers joined the Christian Church when young and has ever been a consistent and honored member. He removed from Kentucky to Indiana where he resided until 1850, when he removed to Harrison County, Missouri, where he has lived an honored and highly respected citizen. Politcally, he was a follower of Henry Clay until the organization of the Republican party when his intense loyalty led him to espouse the principles and policy of that party. He was a kind neighbor, a faithful husband, and affectionate father, an earnest Christian and a true American citizen. He was extensively connected and a shade of gloom is thrown over many homes by his death. But he still lives in the memory and affections of all who knew him and his manly, Christian life has left an example of integrity and honor, that will make the world better where his influence has been exerted. His life and death was a victory.

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Subject: ETTIE MYERS
Submitter: Kelly Meek Claycomb (claycomb97@earthlink.net)
Source: George Myers Family Bible, 1890-1900

Ettie Long, a twin sister to Eva, was born July 29th, 1865 at Delaware County, Iowa. She moved with her parents Mr. and Mrs. L. L. Long to Harrison County, Mo., in September 1866, was converted and united with the Baptist church the winter of 1883 and was united in marriage to Warren D. Myers August 1st, 1888. Their union was blessed by four children, two having preceded her to their home in Heaven, and two little girls are with us yet. Ettie Myers was, to those who knew her best, a kind and gentle, patient and loving wife and mother, friend and neighbor. After much suffering her spirit took its flight December 26th 1897 at 7:15 p.m. aged 32 years, 4 months and 28 days. The funeral services were held at the residence at 10 a.m. Tuesday morning, conducted by Rev. E. J. Adams assisted by Eld. York, after which the remains were laid to rest at Antioch.

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Subject: WILLIAM L. MYERS
Submitter: Kelly Meek Claycomb (claycomb97@earthlink.net)
Source: George Myers Family Bible, 1890-1900

William L., little son of Warren D. and Etta Myers, was born December 6th, 1893 and died July 14th 1895, aged 1 year, 7 months and 8 days. Funeral services were conducted by Rev. McGee and Antioch, July 15th.

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Subject: WILSON P. MYERS
Submitter: Kelly Meek Claycomb (claycomb97@earthlink.net)
Source: George Myers Family Bible, 1890-1900

Died on Sunday evening December 13th, 1874, at the residence of his father Abraham Myers in Adams township, Harrison Co, Mo., Wilson P. Myers, of consumption, aged 20 years, 8 months, 15 days. He leaves a large circle of relatives and friends to mourn his death. But we sorrow not even as others who have no hope, for if we believe that Jesus died and rose again, even so they also who sleep in Jesus will God bring with him.

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Subject: THOMAS D. NEAL
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican, Sep 8, 1881

Death of Thomas D. Neal

Last week, in our notice of the return of Mr Neal from the north, we stated that his physicians were very much alarmed at his condition, and that the worst might be anticipated. We little thought at the time we wrote the article that the ink would not be dry on the papers issued last week before he had died. Yet such was the case. While his death was not unlooked for, still we had hopes that he would live at least until fall. Elsewhere in this paper will be seen the action taken by the Bar, the resolutions adopted and a biography of his life. He was buried last Saturday at Miriam Cemetery. The funeral services were conducted by Revs. I. Chivington and A. N. Cave. A large concourse of people followed the remains to their last resting place.

Thomas D. Neal had few if any equals in Harrison County in ability, honesty, integrity and true worth. His memory will live in the hearts of our people for many years. He had just attained that age in life when his powers of mind were at their brightest and fullest. A career more brilliant than ever was opening before him, but in the language of Hemans:

"Leaves have their time to fall.
And flowers to wither at the north wind's breath.
And stars to set - bear all.
Thou hast all seasons for thine own, oh Death!
We know when moons shall wane,
When summer birds from far shall cross the sea,
When autumn's hues shall touch the golden grain,
But who shall tell us when to look for thee?"

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In Memoriam

Thomas D. Neal

Meeting of the Harrison County Bar

The members of the Bar of Harrison County met at the office of Alvord & Woodruff on Friday, Sept 2d 1881 to pay proper respect to the memory of Thomas D. Neal, Esq., their late associate in the profession.

On motion, Judge Howell was called to the chair, and J. C. Wilson appointed Secretary, after which D. S. Alvord stated that the object of the meeting was to tender the services of the Bar at the funeral to the family of deceased, and to draught resolutions of condolence. The following members were appointed on resolution:

D. J. Heaston, D. S. Alvord and S. W. Vandivert

Other committees were appointed as follows:

Pall Bearers - G. W. Barlow, C. S. Winslow, G. W. Wanamaker, S. McCray, S, W, Leslie and William H. Skinner.
To procure carriages for Pall Bearers - Messrs. Wanamaker, Leslie and Vandivert.
Oscar Butler was appointed as master of ceremonies, and as committee to tender services of Bar to family.
On motion of J. H. Philebaum, it was declared that the members would close their offices on the day of the funeral, Sept 3d.
On motion of D. J. Heaston, a meeting was called for Sept 3d at 4 p.m. at Alvord & Woodruff's office, to receive the report of the committee on resolutions, and to adopt the same.

Adjourned to that date.

(Please see biography on H.C. Biography page.)

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Subject: ISAAC NELLES
Submitter: Phil Stewart (jjhist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican, Apr 26, 1926

OBITUARY - ISAAC NELLIS

[Note: Isaac's tombstone and associated probate records spell the surname "Nelles".]

Isaac Nellis was born November 2nd, 1842, near Toronto, Canada, and died April 5th, 1926, at his home near Ridgeway, Mo., at the age of 83 years, 5 months and 8 days. On April 10th, 1893 he was united in marriage to Rebecca Jane Colwell, and to this union twelve children were born, seven of whom are now living. All of them were with him at his bedside at the time of his death. They are as follows: W. A., of Hatfield, Mo.; W. H., of Neosho, Mo.; Mrs Mer Provins, of Ridgeway; Mrs Buford Kampman, Mrs Edgar Arkle and Merrel Nellis, all of Ridgeway. The children preceding their father in death were: Mrs James Fitzgerald, Gerushia A. Nellis, Delilah J. Nellis, Herman H. Nellis and one infant child.

He leaves a wife, seven children, twenty-two grandchildren and seven great grandchildren to mourn his loss. He was a good father and a loving husband, always bearing his trials and temptations without a murmer. He was converted and joined the Methodist church fourty seven years ago at Scotland, S. Dakota. When his time came he said he was ready to go to his reward. Funeral services at the home Wednesday of last week, were conducted by Rev Imes. The burial was made at the Yankee Ridge cemetery Wednesday, April 7, 1926.

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Subject: MERRILL MCKINLEY NELLES
Submitter: Phil Stewart (jjhist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper, Date unknown

Merrill McKinley Nelles, youngest son of Isaac and Rebecca (Calwell) Nelles, was born near Ridgeway, Mo. June 21st, 1898 and departed from this life June 15th, 1986 at Bethany, Mo., at the age of 85 years, 11 months and 24 days. Most of his life was spent in Harrison County except for three years while engaged in the service of our country during World War II. He was of a family of eleven children, the only one to have been born in the state of Missouri since his parents and the other children had emigrated from the homesteading territory of South Dakota for a new life in the midwest.

Merrill did not like a life of idleness. As a young boy he was taught the worth of a dollar and the labor required to earn it. As long as his health permitted he had but few idle days, realizing that God meant for man to earn his living by the sweat of his brow and his own desire to work.

Although Merrill did not have his name on a church book, according to God's Word, his name is recorded in the Book of life. This known evidence is because of a visit made by a minister of the gospel in the interest of his soul's salvation several months prior to his death. Merrill knelt on his knees and prayed the sinner's prayer, asking God to forgive his sins and come within his heart to dwell and be Lord of his life.

Merrill was preceeded in death by his parents, three brothers: Walter Nelles, Herman Nelles and William Nelles; five sisters: Anna and Delilah who died in early childhood, Rebecca Kampman, Edith Fitzgerald, and Myrtle Arkle. He leaves to mourn his passing two sisters: Miriam Ramey of Ridgeway, Mo., and Delissa Provin of Bethany, Mo., also several nieces and nephews.

Funeral services were held at the Roberson-Polley Chapel, Bethany, Mo., June 17, 1986 with Rev Don Walker officiating. Pallbearers were nephews Gene Kampman, Harold Powers, Neil Preston, Garland Provin, Max Provin, Gary Ramey. Burial was in Morris Chapel Cemetery, Bethany, Missouri.

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Subject: REBECCA JANE NELLES
Submitter: Phil Stewart (jjhist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican, Aug 10, 1942


CALLED HOME AT EVEN TIDE
A DEAR MOTHER
REBECCA JANE NELLES
Jan 10, 1855    July 23, 1942

After the sun has set beyond the western horison and the shadows gather o'er vale and hill, we behold a wonderous glow, transfiguring in glorious and beautiful colors the departing day. Thus it is when the noble life of a Christian mother comes to a close and those who are sorely bereft, feel about them the darkness of bereavement. But they may look upward and see the beautiful memories of her earthly life, set in the splendor of the promise of immortality.

The long useful life of Mother Nelles of 87 years is ended but her character, built upon the foundation of truth and rightousness, will abide forever, not only in the hearts and minds of her loved ones left behind, but in the life beyond.

Rebecca Jane Colwell was born Jan 10, 1855, at Kincardine, Bruce county, Ontario, Cananda, where she grew to womanhood. On April 10, 1873, she united in marriage with Isaac Nelles of Toronto, Canada. Shortly after their marriage they came to the United States, settling on a prairie homestead in South Dakota, where they resided 26 years. They underwent many hardships, as that was a new country, with only Indian trails. Their nearest town, the village of Scotland, S. D., consisted of one small store, blacksmith shop and hotel. Homes were many miles apart. Fuel was scarce and they took ox teams and drove 18 miles for wood. Mother Nelles often related how uneasy the wives of those men would be until their return for fear of hostile Indians.

In 1896 they moved to Harrison county, Missouri, east of Ridgeway, where they observed their golden wedding anniversary April 10, 1923. Three years later the husband was called home and this faithful wife was left in the old homestead, where so many fond memories clung. Nine years ago she established a happy home with her daughter, Mrs Omer Provin, and it was here she closed her eyes to the scenes of this life July 23, 1942, at the age of 87 years, six months and 13 days. How sweet to think of death as expressed in the following beautiful lines:

"Death is only an old door, set in a garden wall
On gentle hinges, at dusk, when the thrushes call.
Along the lintels are green leaves.
Beyond, the light lies still.
Very willing and weary feet
Go over that still.
There is nothing to trouble any heart.
Nothing to hurt at all;
Death is only a quiet door
In an old wall."

Twelve children blessed this home. One passed away, while 11 grew to maturity, but five preceded her in death; Jerusha A., Delilah J., Herman H., William H. and Edith (Mrs James Fitzgerald), whose tragic death by fire will be recalled by many. Surviving and mourning are four daughters and two sons: Mrs Omer Provin, Mrs Fred Ramey, Mrs Edgar Arkle of near Ridgeway, Mrs Buford Kampman, Bethany, Walter, DeSoto, Kan., and Merril, Ridgeway. She is also survived by 21 grandchildren and 37 great-grandchildren, and one brother, A. K. Colwell of Scotland, S. D. Early in life she accepted Christ as her Savior and united with the Methodist church, living a Christian life until the end, a kind, loving wife and mother, and a true friend.

Services were at the Methodist church of Ridgeway, July 24, conducted by the Rev H. E. Marshall. Hymns were beautifully rendered by Mrs Ercel Johnston, Mrs Doris Fancher, Vilas and Vern Young, with Mrs Agnes Lowe at the piano. Floral escort were the granddaughters - Ruth Johnson, Thelma Powers, Helen Peetoom, Bonnie Fitzgerald, Edith Preston and Verda Quillen. Those carrying her to her last resting place in Yankee Ridge cemetery were the grandsons - Ray, Eugene, Virgil and Verne Kampman, Earl, Garland and Max Provin, Guy, Everett Nelles, Guy and Veryl Ramey. Those attending the services from a distance were Mrms A. K. Colwell, Scotland, S. D., Mrs Gladys Nybakke and son, Bloomington, Ill., Mrs Verda Quillen, Joplin, Mo., Mrms Elmer Pulliam and family, Walter Nelles, DeSoto, Kan., Everett Nelles and family, Mrms Ruel Thompson, Birch Tree.

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Subject: COL. J. M. NEVILLE
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican, Feb 14, 1907

DEATH OF COLONEL J. M. NEVILLE

Col J. M. Neville died at the residence of his son, J. M. Neville, in Bethany, Mo, February 10, 1907, aged 91 years, 7 months and 15 days.

With the mustering out last Sunday of this noble old veteran, Col J. M. Neville, there passed to the Great Beyond the last of the most remarkable twins in the United States. The other twin, Col H. O. Neville, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs R. H. Grinstead, in Ridgeway, Mo., October 8, 1904. These brothers were born in Barren county, Ky. of June 25, 1815. They married sisters, Misses Rhoda and Lilly Ann Brooks, both of whom preceded their husbands to the spirit land a number of years ago. They moved to Harrison county in 1850, both making this their home until death claimed them. Both were farmers by occupation until retiring from active work. Both of them were active members of the Baptist church for many years and held offices of trust in same. Both were excellent singers. During the Civil War, both were Colonels. J. M. being Colonel of the 58th Enrolled Militia and M. O. Colonel of the 3rd Mo Cav., M.S.M. Both had also served as Colonel, at different times, of the 101st regiment, 20th brigade of Kentucky militia, before moving to Missouri. H. O. Neville was a member of the county court of Hart county, Ky., previous to his moving to Missouri, and in 1856 was elected to represent Harrison county in the Missouri legislature. J. M. Neville was elected as a member of the county court of this county in 1856 and twice represented this county in the state legislature, from 1858-60 and 1880-82. Both were stalwart and influential Republicans.

Their descendants number over 125. No better citizens and neighbors and earnest Christians than the colonels have ever lived and it is doubtful if any two other brothers could show such a remarkable record as that made by "the Neville twins".

Below we give the names and post office addresses of the children of the two brothers:

J. M. Neville's Family:
Mrs J. A. Poynter, Bethany
G. W. Neville, Dighton, Kansas
H. H. Neville, Kansas City
Mrs Bea Baker, LaJunta, Colorado
Mrs Vina Richardson, Myers Fall, Washington
J. M. Neville, Bethany
J. W. Neville, Atwood, Kansas
C. W. Neville, Boulder, Colorado
Mrs Wm Brown, Ridgeway
Mrs Ulysses Bridges, Blythedale

H. O. Neville's Family:
Geo T. Neville, St Joseph
Mrs R. H. Grinstead, Kansas City
Mrs Huldah Patton, Kohomo, Indiana
Mrs S. J. Kinkade, Dodge City, Kansas
Mrs R. Richardson, Nevada, Mo.
W. J. Neville, the first child, died at his residence in Blythedale about 7 years ago.

The funeral services of Col J. M. Neville were held at the Baptist church in Blythedale on Tuesday at 2:30 o'clock, conducted by Rev J. H. Burrows of Cainsville, after which the body was laid to rest in the Neville graveyard. Peace to the ashes of one of whom it may truly be said: "He has felt the breath of the eternal morning."

[NOTES] "H. O." Neville was Henry O'Bannon Neville. "J. M." was James Madison Neville. They were the sons of William and Millander "Mildred" Neville.
The article states that Colonel Neville was buried at the "Neville graveyard". Both brothers and other members of their families are buried at Cedar Hill Cemetery at Blythedale. Whether or not this cemetery was originally the Neville graveyard is unknown. The is no record of a Neville graveyard in the Harrison County list of cemeteries and known burials.
The tombstone of H. O. Neville and a few other family members who are buried at Cedar Hill cemetery spells the surname as "Nevill"... without the final "e".
The article states that M. O. Neville was colonel of the 3rd Mo Cav., M.S.M. The "M.S.M." stands for Missouri State Militia. These militia groups were locally organized and the officers were elected by the regiment. Their primary duty was the protection of the local population and property.

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Subject: MRS. BARBARA MCCLAIN OSBORN
Submitter: Michael Mellentine (mcm73@aol.com)
Source: Unknown

Died, October 22, 1905, at the home of her son in Clay Township, Harrison County, Missouri, Mrs. Barbara Osborn (nee McClain), aged 81 years, 7 months and 23 days. The deceased was a native of Bedford County, Pennsylvania, where she grew to womanhood, and at 24 years of age was married to Jacob Osborn, with whom she moved in 1853, to Jefferson County, Iowa, and in 1855 to Decatur County. She was the mother of five children, four sons and one daughter. The sons are all living but the daughter, the youngest of the family died at 35 years of age.She has been 44 years a widow. She endured many hardships and with much toil and great self-denial she raised her family. She was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, having previously belonged to the Winebrennarian and United Brethren Churches. She rejoiced in a full preparation for death and peacefully departed for her eternal home October 22, 1905 at 2:30 o'clock p.m. The funeral was in the home and she was buried in the McClain Cemetery.

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Subject: MARY GWENDOLYEN PILCHER
Submitter: Phil Stewart (jjhist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican Clipper, Jan 25, 1914

Mary Gwendolen Pilcher, little daughter of Jesse D. and Eliza (Stotts) Pilcher, was born Nov 18, 1910 and departed this life Dec 27, 1913, aged 3 years, 1 month and 9 days, leaving a father, mother, and two baby sisters to mourn her death.

The death of little Gwendolen was very sudden and unexpected, occasioned by burns. Saturday morning she and one of her baby sisters went upstairs and found some matches and lit them. The flames caught to Gwendolen's clothes.

Her mother had just stepped out and heard her screaming, she ran to see what was the matter and found her clothes in flames.

Dr Long of Mt Moriah and the two Dr Vandiverts of Bethany, were called and did all they could, but the little sufferer was burned so badly that ten hours after being burned she fell asleep in Jesus. She was such a bright sweet child it seemed so hard to give her up, but our loss is her gain. The remains were followed by a large number of friends to Sharon church where funeral services were conducted by Rev. Downey. The text used was St Matthew 19:11. After which the little form was laid to rest in Sharon cemetery to wait the second coming of Christ when the dead in Christ shall rise. The bereaved parents have the deepest sympathy of all in the loss of their sweet child.

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Subject: LELA JOSEPHINE FORDYCE POLLEY
Submitter: Cheryl McCombs (cherylmccombs@comcast.net)
Source: Bethany Republican, June 20, 1973

Ridgeway - Mrs. Lela Polley, 78, died Saturday at a Bethany hospital following several weeks of failing health. She was the widow of Clifford Polley and was a native of Harrison Co. Both she and her husband had been active church workers in recent years at Prairie Chapel and before that at Kirkley chapel church. She is survived by a sister, Mrs. Robert Swain, Bethany, and a brother, Ralph Fordyce, Bethany. Services were Tuesday at the Prairie Chapel United Methodist church, with the Rev. Alvin Hillman officiating. Burial was in Miriam cemetery at Bethany.

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Subject: JAMES PRICE
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican, May 3, 1893

Obituary - James Price

James Price died at his residence in Adams Township, Harrison county, Mo., on Wednesday, April 26th, 1893, at 7 o'clock, a.m., aged 72 years, 8 months and 11 days.

Deceased was born in Bracken County, Kentucky, January 15th, 1821. He moved to Tippecanoe County, Indiana in 1842. He was married to Mrs. Ellen Lane (nee Dimmitt) in Indiana on May 2nd, 1850. In the fall of that year he removed to Fulton county, Illinois. He again removed to Harrison County, Missouri in 1856, and in the following spring located on the farm where he continued to reside until his death, except a temporary residence at Edinburg for educating his children. At the age of twenty-one he made a profession of religion and united with the Baptist church at Middletown, Indiana, and continued a member of the Baptist church until his death, covering a period of more than fifty years. For twenty years he filled the office of deacon acceptably. He was the father of six children, all of whom, with his wife, survive him. His wife and children were all with him in the last sickness, and were present at his burial. His character was of singular simplicity and purity. He was modest in his demeanor, unselfish and conscientious in his purposes and efforts. He was a stranger to self-seeking and ostentation. Few, if any, more nearly lived the golden rule day by day.

Such a life and character found reward in the respect of all who knew him, in the confidence and esteem of a wide circle of friends and in the strong affection of his family and relatives. He endured his last painful sickness patiently, and passed under the shadow of death without fear or faltering. After living to see his children all grown and settled in life and members of the church of his choice, he died in the fullness of his years closing a blameless life and leaving a precious memory which will be to his children, especially, a benediction forever.

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Subject: DARBY RAGAN
Submitter: Lori Ragan (loriragan@hotmail.com)
Source: Newspaper and date unknown

Obituary of Darby Ragan: Died October 8, 1875, in Harrison County, Missouri.

Darby Ragan; aged sixty-seven years, four months, and nine days.

Bro. Ragan was born in East Tennessee, May 29, 1808; professed religion when young, and joined the Methodist Church, in which he served as class leader. He was married to Esther Barnett on the 20th of October, 1831. He lived in the Methodist Church until three of his children professed religion and joined the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. He then joined with them, his wife being a member of that Church before they were married. Soon after he joined the Cumberland Presbyterian church, he was elected and ordained ruling elder, where he served the Church faithfully until death. He moved to Missouri in the fall of 1851. He lost his wife, who died suddenly from a stroke of the palsy, August 6, 1871. Bro. Ragan was on his way home from attending the session of Chillicothe Presbytery, and visiting some of his children. There were four of them riding in a small wagon, he and his sister were sitting on the hindmost seat, it being a spring seat, was going up a hill. The horses going quite brisk the wheels on one side slid into a rut twelve or fifteen inches deep; when they struck the bank to rise out of the rut, they balanced back, upsetting the seat--they both went out backwards, he falling on his neck and shoulders, affecting his spine, bruising or breaking some blood vessels inwardly, as he threw up blood. He lived only seventeen hours, but he retained his proper mind. He gave instruction in regard to his temporal affairs, spoke of death with composure and resignation, and died as only the Christian dies, in perfect peace with God and all man kind. If he had an enemy no one knew it. He left seven children, all professors of religion, two of his children being ministers, five others gone before. The Church has lost a faithful servant, the world an ornament of piety and love, his children an affectionate father, whose decease they will mourn while life lasts. -- John Wayman

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Subject:: EDNA D. RILEY REDINGER
Submitter: Sheila Swigart Fichtner (garrard@gvtc.com)
Source: Newspaper and date unknown

Edna D. Redinger was born May 23, 1874, the daughter of John R. and Elizabeth Riley. She passed away July 8, 1951 at the age of 77 years.

On December 1910, 1905 she was married to George E. Redinger in Cainsville. To this union two sons were born, George Riley and Garland Dean. Her husband preceded her in death January 20, 1926.

Shortly after her marriage, she and Mr. Redinger united with the Methodist Church in Cainsville. She was a faithful and devout member of the church until her death. Though ill health prohibited her from attending church services regularly, her interest remained keen in the work of the church.

She is survived by her two sons, George Riley of St. Joseph and Garland Dean of Cainsville. Also surviving are two sisters, Mrs. Annie Laura Glendenning of Geneva , Indiana, and Mrs Alma O. Swigart, Marshall, Oklahoma; her daughters-in-law and four grand-children: Joyce, Harold, Nancy and Phyllis, and many other relatives and friends.

Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon July 11 at two o'clock at the Methodist church by the Rev. Marvin T. Judy. Mrs. Martha Downy, Mrs. Bess Pearson, Mrs. Maude Oliphant and Mrs. Mabel Tucker, accompanied at the organ by Mrs. Mary Baker, sang "Nearer My God to Thee" and "God Will Take Care of You." Mrs. Downy sang "Beautiful Isle." Pallbearers were Allan Frazier, George Thompson Jr., Adolph Peshek, J. W. Vanderpool, Jerry Brejnik, and Stanley Maple.

Burial was in Zoar cemetery with E. J. Stoklasa, mortician in charge.

CARD OF THANKS

We wish to express our heartfelt thanks and appreciation for the acts of kindness, messages of sympathy and the beautiful floral tributes received from our kind neighbors and friends during our bereavement in the loss of our Mother and Sister

Mr. and Mrs. Dean Redinger and family, Mr. and Mrs. Riley Redinger and family, Mr. Alma Swigart and Mrs. Laura Glendenning

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Subject: FREDERICK REDINGER
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHist@grm.net)
Source: Ridgeway Journal, February 1, 1912
Frederick Redinger was born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, January 23, 1834, of German parentage. He died in Ridgeway, Mo., Jan 29, 1912. When he was yet a small boy his parents came to Richland County, Ohio. Here he lived with his parents until he was twenty years of age, when with some neighbors he came to Cedar
County, Iowa. After he had been in Iowa about four years he was married to Miss Hannah Henry. Soon after his marriage he moved with his young wife to Harrison County, Missouri, where he resided until his death.

Six children were born to them, three boys and three girls: William A., George F., John F., Sarah C., Rosa B., and Mary L.

In 1860 through the ministry of Rev. Burton he and his wife united with the Methodist Episcopal church at Buckly Chapel.

Uncle Fred, as he was affectionately called, was a man of many excellent qualities. He was a kind husband and father, a good neightbor, a good citizen and a man of honor.
He lived in fear of God, loving His service and died in an unclouded trust. His last days were spent in conversation with neighbors and friends, exhorting them to give their hearts to God.
His memory will be precious to many who are left behind. The sympathy of all is extended to the bereaved family. Funeral services at M. E. church conducted by Rev. J. H. Walker and Elder W. H. Richardson. Interment in Ridgeway cemetery.
-- J. H. Walker

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Subject:: ELIZABETH LAY RILEY
Submitter: Sheila Swigart Fichtner (garrard@gvtc.com)
Source: Newspaper and date unknown

Elizabeth Lay was born in the state of Indiana, Dec 25, 1849, and died at her home in Cainsville, Mo., June 13, 1924. She re-moved to Missouri with her parents when a child settling on a farm north of Cainsville where she grew to womanhood.
January 29, 1871 she was married to John R. Riley. To them were born four daughters, three of whom survive their mother: Mrs. Laura Baker of Cainsville, Mo., Mrs. Edna Redinger, of Cainsville, Mo., and Mrs. Alma Swigart, of Marshall, Okla. The husband and one daughter, Mrs. Cora Hutchinson, preceded her in death.
. A number of years ago she gave her heart to God and united with the Methodist Episcopal Church of which she remained a faithful member until her death. She leaves besides the three daughters, one brother and three grand-children, with a host of friends to mourn her going.
Sister Riley has been a sufferer for years. While her going was sudden, yet not unexpected. She was ready to meet her Savior.

Funeral services were conducted at the M. E. Church, June 14, 1924, at 3:30 p. m.

CARD OF THANKS

We desire to express our sincere and heartfelt thanks to all who so kindly assisted us in the sickness and death of our mother.

The Children

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Subject:: MARY RIMMER
Submitter: Phil Stewart (jjhist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Clipper, Feb 28, 1908

It is with a sad heart that we make the announcement of the death of Mrs Mary Rimmer, who died February 15, 1908, at the home of her daughter, Mrs Lew Campbell.

Deceased was born in Ray county, Missouri in the year 1830, departed this life February 15, 1908, aged 77 years, 2 months and 18 days. She was a member of the Christian church of Martinsville for several years and lived a constant Christian life until her death. She leaves to mourn her death besides a host of friends, seven children all of whom survive her - three boys and four girls: Richard Rimmer, Barton county, Mo.; John Rimmer, Utopa, Kan.; William Rimmer, Esbon, Kansas; Mrs James Wiley, New Hampton; Mrs John Grace, Martinsville; Mrs Napoleon Vanhoozer, Nellie, Okla.; and Mrs Lew Campbell, Hatfield.

Funeral services were conducted at the Christian church at Martinsville by Rev Alsup. A sweet and lovable woman has passed into the great beyond, whose mysteries are unknown to us, but hope and faith tell us that something and some place we shall all meet again where no farewell tears are shed. She has answered the call and her life work is ended. She has kept the faith and received a crown of righteousness in exchange for a noble and Christian like life. Her dear companion left this world of care and sorrow several years ago. Oh, but it is pleasant indeed to imagine that these two faithful souls have been reunited, never again to be separated.

[NOTE] Mary Rimmer was the daughter of Martin and Nancy (Clevenger) Adams. Mary was about 10 years old when her father was stabbed to death on the town square of Richmond, Missouri (Ray County) in March, 1841.

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Subject:: BESSIE (DOWNEY) ROBERTSON
Submitter: Phil Stewart (jjhist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican Clipper, Feb 13, 1957

Bessie Jane (Downey) Robertson, daughter of Charles W. and Martha Downey, was born in Harrison County, Missouri, Aug 26, 1886, and departed from this life Feb 4, 1957, at the Noll Memorial hospital at the age of 70 years, five months and eight days. She was the youngest of a family of nine children, seven of whom have preceded her in death. Her entire life was spent in or near Harrison County.

On March 27, 1904, she was united in marriage to Daniel Allie Robertson, and to this union nine children were born. They are: Beulah Kunz, Chico, Calif., Floyd Robertson, St Charles, Mo., Carl Robertson, Dodge City, Kan., Belle Lewis, Bethany, Mo., Beatrice Gates, Bethany, Mo., Berneice Noble, Gilman City, Mo., Donald Robertson, Bethany, Mo., Lloyd Robertson, Bethany, Mo., and Cloyd Robertson, Bethany, Mo.

This young couple began their married life in the Cat Creek community. Before the children began to come to bless this union, this one, who was to prove to be such a wonderful mother, spoke her desire to see her children brought up in a Christian home, so she gave her heart to the Lord and became a member of the Cat Creek Baptist church, where her membership remained.

Always, her family was her greatest joy, and even after all the children had gone out from the home to establish homes of their own, her every plan and thought was for their happiness.

She was a devoted and loving wife and will be sadly missed by the companion who remains.

Besides the children and her companion, she is also survived by 13 grandchildren and two great-grandchildren; also one sister, Mrs Emma Clinkenbeard of St Joseph.

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Subject:: COL. WILLIAM PERRINE ROBINSON
Submitter: Denell Burks (DB1776-vacaville@comcast.net)
Source: Bethany Republican, Wednesday, June 29, 1904
{Note: This is retyped from a photo copy that is periodically difficult to read.)

CROSSED THE RIVER; MARCHED ON BEFORE

Col. W. P. Robinson Laid to Rest with Impressive Ceremonies.

None could have been more honored by a Public Service.

Thou hast the river crossed—marched on before
Into the better land—camped on that shore;
These thou for us wilt wait—we’re coming too
That we may share with thee—the grand review.

The funeral and burial services in respect to the memory of Colonel William Robinson held last Thursday afternoon, June 23, were of such a character as to seem to deserve a few words from us, in addition to the biographical sketch and tribute published below. (See biography on biography page of this web site.)

Unlike most others of this people, the writer had only a cursory acquaintance, having met the Colonel, but twice in life. The fraternal associations of which the deceased was a member, fulfilled all the obligations of their orders with a glad fealty that it is a great pleasure to commend. The Odd Fellows had charge of the remains, from the time of arrival, until relieved by the Masons for the last rites of internment.

All business was suspended in the city from 2 o’clock p.m. until the conclusion of the services at the church. The post office department being wired, answered with permission to close the office. This courtesy, on the part of the government, recognized the worth of Colonel Robinson, both as an officer and a man. The first instance in our city.

The funeral service at the Christian Church was under the care of Elder M. M. Goode of St. Joseph, ably assisted by Revs. W. J. Willis and B. Youngblood, of the Presbyterian and Baptist churches here.

The beautiful church was elaborately and tastefully decorated with Flowers and Flags, the first a type of immortality, the latter of the government of earth.

About the organ was draped the old silk flag of the 23rd Missouri. This flag was the personal gift of the Colonel to his regiment, and was by him given to Lt. T. D. Neal post, No. 124 G.A.R. of Bethany. When E. Prentiss, stood beside this tattered war-banner, and sang “Wrap the Flag Around Me, Boys,” it came to us as the meaning of the intensely beautiful tribute . . . (?) . . . has known, and tears, which surely did not shame our manhood, flowed afresh. We could but ask and ask again, and yet again, does the Colonel know that the son of his old Commander of the desperate, disastrous and death-strewn field of Shiloh is standing by his clay, in all the flush of splendid and manly manliness, paying glad tribute to his worth and work? It may be that General Prentiss and Colonel Robinson both know.

The theme of Rev. Goode, was “Immortality.” It was predicated on the words of the Savior: “In my Father’s house are many mansions, I’ve gone to prepare a place for you,” supported by the phrase of Paul, “ To die is gain.” It may not be unfitting of us to say of this, that Rev. Goode is ripe in the work of the ministry, and with sympathetic logic and choice oratory, led his audience, by the rites of reason from the scenes of time and sense to the regions of the Infinite, and proved beyond (?) or doubt that if man dies he shall live again.

The Old Flag was everywhere. The entire march to the cemetery was in funeral (?). The casket was draped with the national Colors—the flag he loved and had defended, (?) with the wealth of the earth’s choicest flowers. The sprig of evergreen and the Lamb’s Skin leather apron, the badge of the Mason, (?) are now with the tired warrior (?) his windowless place of rest. (?) bugle in gentlest melody sounded “taps” and lights are out.

All the exercises were simple, appropriate, (?) in accord with the splendid character of the brother, the comrade, the citizen and friend, who had since gone on before in the struggle of the earth-life.

Of the life and services of Colonel Robinson, we may only say he impressed us as a man of sterling moral worth and fine sensitiveness, a patriot and a lover. His reputation in this region is as high as man has climbed. He was honored and loved in life by all who seek to be just to their fellow man. He was feared by those who had little regard for moral relationships. His feet grew a-weary of the toils of the earth life, and gathering the draperies of his couch about him, he has lain down to rest.

The last words of the heroic Jackson were “Let us go over the river and rest under the shade of the trees,” and this other warrior forgetting the clash and the crash of battle, and forgiving the wrongs and ingratitudes of earth’s selfishness, has gone over the river to rest under the shade of the trees of Eternal Life.

Bethany was proudly glad to pay its tribute of respect to his manly worth, and gave his precious dust honored sepulture in beautiful Miriam cemetery. Fraternal brotherhood was glad to prove its fealty around the casket of an honored brother, and the veteran comrades, whose steps are so rapidly reaching home like his, were proud to salute and say, “Brave Commander, tried Comrade, true friend, Hale and Farewell".

TRIBUTE BY A FRIEND

Col. Robinson was a man of noble character, and always set for himself high standards.

Brave as a soldier, he was fearless as a public officer in civil life.

He was an upright man with a spotless reputation, such a man as entitled him to love, honor, and remembrance. Ever performing his own duties, ever mindful of the rights of others, he was a faithful officer, a good neighbor, a true friend, a good, kind, loving husband and father.
He was ever emulous of good associations and had a broader grasp than that of his own needs and wants. He was public spirited and liked to see progress and improvement. He was law-abiding, order loving and patriotic.

As a citizen, the questions to which he ever sought were, what is right? what is best for my country? and when he solved these in accordance with his best judgment, there was no swerving him from the conclusion reached.

His life stood for the best. His services to the country and his usefulness as a citizen in his community will long be remembered and appreciated. Those who knew him best, loved him most.

But he has gone to his reward as a true and faithful steward; he has entered into rest.

He will be missed by all and more especially by his family and “old Comrades of the 23rd Regt., MO. Inft,” of which he was Colonel.

As he was laid to rest in Miriam cemetery, and the mound over him was covered with flowers, their freshness and fragrance remind us of the beauty of his life among us, and the purity and sweetness of the life to which he has gone.

NOTE: Please see biography on Biography page on the Harrison Co. web site.

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Subject:: JOHN RUFF
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHist@grm.net)
Source: Ridgeway Journal, May 25, 1891

Death Takes It's Way
Three Harrison County Citizens
Called Home to Their
Creator

John Ruff

John Ruff, whose home was in Illinois, but had been spending the past six months with his son near here, died of heat disease last week. His other son, from Illinois, arrived too late for the funeral and returned a few days later. The remains were interred in the Wheeler cemetery, whither it was followed by sorrowing friends and relatives. The deceased was seventy-six years old and had been a member of the M. E. church for years. He was a man who commanded the respect of all who knew him.

(Note: The other two were Nora Bowman and Levi Grant. Please see alphabetically.)

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Subject: ANDREW RUPE
Submitter: Kelly Meek Claycomb (claycomb97@earthlink.net)
Source: George Myers Family Bible, 1890-1900

Andrew P. Rupe was born to Wm. P. and Hannah Rupe on the 20th of October 1841, at old Palestine, Kosciusko County, Indiana, and died October 6, 1899, of cancer of the stomach, at Indianapolis, Ind. aged 57 years, 11 months, and 14 days. He was one of seven children, five of whom are yet living; four in the state of Missouri and one in Oklahoma. In an early day his parents moved to the west locating in Iowa City, Iowa; a few years later they took up their residence at Bethany, Mo., where all the children were reared and educated. He was married at the age of eighteen to Aramatha Herald. Of this union there were nine children, five of whom are yet living. When the war of the Rebellion broke out, thrilled with an impulse to serve his country, he enlisted in the twenty-third Mo. Vol. Reg., Co. E, and served one-half years. After returning from war he settled down to the quiet life of a citizen and labored to support a wife and two small children. Soon, however, he was stricken almost blind, so that making a living by any manual labor was almost impossible; but he did the best he could to rear all the children to be good and honorable citizens. One legacy he left his children of which they should be proud is his own personal honor. He died with an assurance of living with Christ and loved ones gone before. The funeral took place on Huron street conducted by Rev. J.R.T. Lathrop, of the Edwin Ray Methodist Episcopal church. October 9th 1899. The body was laid to rest in Crown Hill Cemetery to await the Resurrection.

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Subject: BERTHA ALMA RUPE
Submitter: Kelly Meek Claycomb (claycomb97@earthlink.net)
Source: George Myers Family Bible, 1890-1900

Mrs. Bertha Alma Rupe, wife of Thos. N. Rupe, died at her home in Blue Ridge, Mo. on Thursday morning, October 24th, 1889, aged 15 years, 11 months, and 8 days. Her remains were brought to Bethany, and the funeral services were held at the residence of J.T. Rupe on Friday, Eld. W.H. Hook conducting the religious ceremonies. She was laid to rest in Miriam cemetery, a large concourse of relatives and friends following her to the grave. She was a young woman, loved and respected by all who knew her, and her early death has blighted many fond hopes that clustered around her home.

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Subject: HANNAH RUPE
Submitter: Kelly Meek Claycomb (claycomb97@earthlink.net)
Source: George Myers Family Bible, 1890-1900

Died, at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. W. H. Sharp, in Bethany, on Saturday, July 20th, 1895, Mrs. Hannah Rupe, aged 82 years, 5 months, and 5 days. Hannah Dussing was born in Packinham County, Va., Feb. 16th 1813. On Feb. 14th 1836, at Lower Sandusky, O., she was united in marriage to William P. Rupe. In the year 1838 or 1839, they moved to Indiana, thence to Iowa City, Ia., Sept 1854. Removed from Iowa City to Bethany, Mo., July 1856. Here after a residence of 17 years, William T. Rupe died, May 13th 1861, aged 62 years, 1 month, 14 days. Mrs. Rupe was the mother of 8 children, 6 of whom are living and today, Monday, July 22nd, accompanied by their children and a multitude of sorrowing, sympathizing friends, they laid the body of their sainted mother to rest in the silent city of the dead, there to await the Resurrection morning. Funeral services were held at W. H. Sharp's residence, conducted by Revs. Humphreys, Gillidett and Martin.

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Subject: MARY C. RUPE
Submitter: Kelly Meek Claycomb (claycomb97@earthlink.net)
Source: George Myers Family Bible, 1890-1900

The death angel visited the house of John T. Rupe and family and took from them their loving wife and mother, Oct. 12th, 1898, at 6:15 o'clock p.m. after a continual illness from cancer of the stomach since May 15th, 1898. The deceased was born in Hartsville, Ind., Feb. 5th, 1847 and died at Bethany, Mo., on Oct. 12th, 1898 at the age of 51 years, 7 months, and 17 days. She moved from Hartsville with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J.S. Collins to Cincinnati, Ohio, at age of 1 year. In the year 1850 she again moved with her parents to the state of Missouri and the county of Harrison, where she has ever since resided. She was united in marriage to John T. Rupe on Aug. 13, 1865. To their union was born 11 children, 5 boys and 6 girls, all of whom survive her, except one, a boy, at the age of 6 months in the year 1871. All of the surviving children attended the last sad rites except J. William Rupe, who is a member of Co. D, Fourth regiment, Missouri Volunteer Infantry, camped at Camp Meade, Middletown, Pa., who could not get furlough in time. Mrs. Rupe united with the Christian Church in Bethany in the year 1873 and has lived a consistent Christian life ever since. The funeral services were held at the family residence on Thursday, Oct 13th by Elder R. W. York, after which loving hands laid the remains to rest in Miriam cemetery in this city.

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Subject:: WILLIAM P. RUPE
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican Newspaper, Date unknown


LAMENTABLE AFFAIR

Wm. P. Rupe fatally injured by a Runaway Team

His subsequent death, and burial by the Odd Fellows

On Thursday, the 8th inst., Mr. William P. Rupe of this place, and his son Andrew, were unloading some wood from a wagon to which the old gentleman's team of two horses were attached, when an accident occurred the result of which has left a deep impress of sadness upon the community. As the owner of the team was descending from the wood on to the double tree, his foot slipped and a stick in his hand struck one of the horses at which the team became frightened and dashed off with great speed. The team ran across the road and over the sidewalk. The wagon struck the corner post of a fence, breaking the post in twain and smashing the wagon generally. Andrew Rupe, being on the wagon at the time, was precipitated to the sidewalk and received quite a cut on his hand, and either by the kicking of the horses or being run over by the wagon, or both, his father was fatally injured, being bruised and wounded upon the head, face and left side. He was taken home as soon as possible and his wounds dressed by Dr. G.W. Newman. He was affectionately attended by the physician, his afflicted family and many kind friends, who did all in their power to alleviate his sufferings and aid his recovery, but his injuries were both complicated and serious, culminating in his death at 10 o'clock A.M. May 15, 1873.

William P. Rupe was an old citizen of Bethany, having resided here about fifteen years. He was born in Pennsylvania, in 1811, and after leaving that State lived in Ohio, Indiana and Iowa, respectively. He had been a member of the Odd Fellows' fraternity since 1863, and we have heard it stated that during all that time he never missed a dozen of its weekly meetings. His remains were buried by that order, last Friday, with the fullest honor.

Deceased leaves a wife and six children to mourn his violent death. He was not a man of wealth, but made his living by the sweat of his brow, and in his 62nd year, while at labor, he received the injuries that caused his death. But one thing will be said by all who knew him--He was an Honest Man. We never yet heard one person say that William P. Rupe wronged him out of a cent. Such a legacy to his children is of more value than millions of gold. May his ashes rest in peace.

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Subject: WILLIAM RUSK
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican, Aug 2, 1893

Another Veteran Mustered Out

William Rusk

The subject of this sketch was born in Bourbon County, Kentucky, April 16th, 1816, and died at his home in Bethany, Missouri, July 12th, 1893, after a useful and honorable life of 78 years.

In his youth he removed to Illinois, where he married Miss Priscilla Eades, a sister of Henry Eades of this county. Twelve children were born of this union, ten of whom survive, to await the next meeting with their beloved father on the other shore. All but three of the surviving children were present at the funeral.

During the progress of the war of the rebellion, his intense loyalty led him in the path of duty and he enlisted in Co I, 1st Ill Vol. Infantry and served his country faithfully. In this service he incurred the chronic disease that clung to him until death came to his relief. Yet in all his sufferings he never expressed regret for the sacrifice he had made to save the country he loved, but gloried in the duty performed.

He removed to Harrison County, Missouri immediately after the war and settled on a farm in Sherman township where he lived happily and comfortably for many years until his children were grown and commencing life themselves, when he sold the farm and removed to Bethany where he has since resided

His beloved wife died June 26th, 1887, and the happy married life of 40 years duration was ended. Since her death he had lived with and been kindly cared for by his dutiful daughters.

He was a conscientious member of the Christian church for many years and although his earthly vision had become dim with age and disease, he was enabled with the eye of faith to see clearly into the future and beheld the promised glory of his Heavenly home.

The funeral services were held at the Christian church on the day after his death, conducted by Elder W. H. Williams.

The burial services was conducted by his comrades of T. D. Neal Post, G. A. R. and a large concourse of comrades and friends followed the hearse to Miriam cemetery where the solemn and impressive ceremonies were performed by the Post officials.

By his death the community has lost an excellent citizen, the church a valued and useful member, the Post a faithful and loyal comrade and his children a fond and cherished father.
Standing out prominently in the life of William Rusk were the characteristics of integrity and loyalty. He had the courage of his honest convictions and was loyal to his God, his country and his home. He has gone to the reward promised for a righteous life and with the saints of all ages, in the harmony of eternity and the joys of immortality, he will dwell forever more.

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Subject: IDA SALMON
Submitter: Robert W. Taylor (rtaylor@coin.org)
Source: The Bethany Democrat, 17 August 1905, page 1, column 1:

Mrs. Ida Salmon, of near Matkins, died August 12 of consumption. She was buried at the neighborhood cemetery, near her home.

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Subject: IDA SALMON
Submitter: Robert W. Taylor (rtaylor@coin.org)
Source: The Bethany Democrat, 24 August 1905, page 6, column 1:

IDES INA CLARK

Ides Ina Clark was born March 17th, 1887 and died August 12th, 1905, aged 18 years 4 months and 26 days. She was converted in a meeting conducted by Rev. Winn in 1900 and united with the M.E. church at Matkins at the time of her conversion, remaining a faithful member of the same until God called her home. She was united in marriage to George N. Salmon April 26th, 1905. How sadly she will be missed by husband, father, brothers and sister, but we should weep not as those who have no hope. We hope to meet her on a brighter shore, where sickness, sorrow and deaths are unknown.

Her funeral was preached at the Matkins church Sunday, August 13th, by the writer, to a large concourse of relatives and friends, after which, the remains were tenderly laid to rest in the cemetery to await the resurrection of the just. L.W. Jones

From the Bethany Republican 17 August 1905, page 6, column 2: Mrs. George Salmon (nee Clark) died Saturday morning of that dread disease consumption. She had been sick a long time. Her funeral was preached Sunday by Rev. Jones, after which the remains were laid to rest in the Matkins cemetery. Mr. Salmon has the sympathy of the entire community, as does also the father and brothers and sisters of the deceased.

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Subject: BESSIE l. and CHARLES I. SCOTT
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican, Mar 2, 1904

Charles Isaac Scott was born in Harrison County, Mo., February 7, 1882 and died at the home of his parents, 6 miles south of Bethany, Friday, February 19, 1904, aged 22 years and 12 days. There remained to mourn his death, a father, mother, four brothers and two sisters; one sister of whom has since gone to join him in the Spirit World. One sister and one brother died several years ago.

Charlie was just in the prime of life, when some time ago, while away from home for a few weeks, he was exposed to the rain and contracted a severe cold which terminated in consumption. All that medical skill, devoted parents, brothers and friends could do, proved of no avail.

In December, Charles, in company with his brother, Adolph, left for California in hopes he might regain his health, but in a few weeks he decided to return home. For awhile he remained about the same, but when a relapse came, he failed rapidly. He was of a kind, affectionate disposition, always pleasant with those with whom he associated. A few days before his death, he expressed himself to his mother, as not being afraid to die.

Funeral services were conducted at the home of his parents, by Rev. Oatman, assisted by Rev. Watson, of Coffey. The remains, carried by six young men, were quietly laid to rest in the Pleasant Ridge Cemetery.

Bessie L. Scott was born Oct 2, 1883, died Feb 25, 1904, aged 20 years, 4m, 23d. She grew to young womanhood surrounded by parents, brothers and sister and a large number of other relatives. Her friends she numbered by her acquaintances, for to know her was to love her.

A few short months ago, it seemed to all that she had a happy, useful life before her, much to the comfort of her father and mother, who soon will be going down the decline of life.

When doctors, praents and friends could hold out no encouragement to her, still she would smile and say that when it was warm and nice so she could walk out, she would get well. A day or two before her death, she spoke as though she thought she might not get well, and a few hours before her death she gave instructions as to what she wished to leave for her relatives and friends, then she called each one present to her bedside and kissed them "goodbye". She had often spoken of the two absent brothers, one in Atchison county and the other in California. She requested those present to sing and in one song, "Oh! Think of the Home Over There," her lips joined in the words which her voice was too weak to utter; then, with a smile on her lips, she passed to that home where death never comes.

On Friday at 1:00 p.m., funeral services were conducted at the twice stricken home by Rev. Oatman. Rev. Watson spoke a few words of comfort to the heart broken family, then the casket with the earthly remains, carried by the same six young men, by their side walked six young ladies, her most intimate friends, and the body was tenderly laid to rest in the family lot in the cemetery.

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Subject: JUNIOR ROSS SHAFER
Submitter: deb daily (dailyknd@grm.net)
Source: Newspaper clipping, name and date unknown

Services for Junior Ross Shafer, 47, of 4280 N.E. Eighth St., who died Wednesday of a heart attack at Veterans Hospital, will be at 10:30 a.m. Saturday at McLaren's Funeral Home with burial at Highland Memorial Gardens. Mr. Shafer was born in Cainsville, Mo., and lived in Des Moines 29 years. He was an inspector for the Firestone Tire and Rubber Co. and was a member of the Veterans of Foreign Wars, the United Rubber Workers Union Local 310, and was a veteran of World War II.

Surviving are his wife, Katheryn; five sons, George of Unionville, Mo., James of Indianapolis, Ind., William of Des Moines and Steven and Garld, at home; two daughters, Karen and Cindy, both at home; a brother, Dean of Des Moines; two sisters, Pauline Axsom of San Jose, Calif.,and Betty Ashley of Des Moines; his mother, Mrs. Amanda Shafer of Des Moines, and eight grandchildren.

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Subject: JACOB HOUSTON SHARP
Submitter: Sue Jackson (sjackso@ties2.net)
Source: Bethany Republican Clipper

Jacob Houston Sharp was born near Jacksonville, IL, January 16, 1854 and died in Pawnee, Mo., May 4, 1922 at the age of 68 years, 3 months and 18 days. He was married to Mary Rundquist on September 20, 1876. To this union, three children were born: Bertha Elizabeth Bartels who died Mar. 11, 1918; Charles Raymond of near Pawnee, and Eva Pearl Martin of Independence, Iowa. He leaves a devoted wife, two children and seven grandchildren to mourn their loss. Mr. Sharp will be greatly missed in the community as well as in the home. He was a quiet and peaceful man. He came to Harrison County with his parents at the age of two years and has lived here almost continuously, with the exception of one year in Harrison County, Iowa, and eight years in Cedar County, Ia. He also leaves one brother, B.B. Sharp, of near Blythedale and one sister, Mary Brown of S. Dakota. The funeral was preached by Elder Z. Mitchell of Eagleville at the Fair Haven church at Pawnee and the body was laid to rest in the Masonic cemetery at Eagleville to await the resurrection morn.

'Tis hard to break the tender cord
When love has bound the heart.
'Tis hard, so hard, to speak the words
Must we forever part?
Dearest loved one, we have laid thee
In the peaceful grave's embrace,
But thy memory will be cherished
Till we see thy heavenly face.
--M. N. Mallatt

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Subject: CHARLES ALLEN SHERER
Submitter: Phil Stewart (jjhist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Clipper, Sep 5, 1923

Charles Allen Sherer, son of Tobias Beechler and Serena Allen Sherer, was born in Bethany, Mo., August 16, 1861. He was the oldest of a family of five children, four sons and one daughter. Of these, one brother, Frank W. Sherer, survives him. His residence in Bethany was life-long. His grandfather, William Robinson Allen, was one of the first settlers in Bethany, coming to the county in 1840.

Charles acquired his education first in private schools and later in the public school of Bethany. At the age of 18 years he had completed more than the entire course of study required at that time. So ambitious and enthusiastic was he to acquire all the knowledge he could, that he carried two studies extra the last two years of the course. His instructor, John R. Kirk, now president of the Missouri State Normal at Kirksville, Mo., a teacher to whom Charlie became deeply attached and coveted his friendship, gave him encouragement to persevere. Every morning before schooltime Charles would have a recitation in chemistry and after school closed for the day he would stay and recite Latin. Taking up these two studies so delighted Mr Kirk that he gladly gave his time to help the young student. His ideal was to complete a course of study in medicine and he planned to go to the university of Pennsylvania in 1880. He wished to go there because his grandfather, Dr Jacob Sherer of Philadelphia, was a graduate of that institution. But it was not to be. His mother's failing health and death a few months later, caused him voluntarily to abandon his cherished plan, and whatever disappointment he may have suffered, no one knew. Cheerfully and courageously he joined hands with his father to keep the home intact and care for the younger children, and faithfully he performed his task, a task of love. His father came to Bethany in 1857 and established one of the first drug stores in this part of the country and continued in the business until the civil war. At the close of the war, Mr Sherer returned to Bethany and after a short time he again engaged in the drug business, and continued an active druggist until 1907. In 1880 the drug firm of Sherer & Son, T.N. Sherer and Charles A., was organized and continued until 1907 when failing health forced both father and son to retire.

September 14, 1886, Charles A. Sherer was united in marriage to Willimena Cumming, only daughter of Mr and Mrs Andrew Cumming of Bethany. Bethany has since been their home excepting four years spent in Colorado.

In 1885, Charlie united with the Christian church. In after years he transferred his membership to the Methodist Episcopal church, becoming an active member in all the different interests for the growth and advancement of the church. He delighted in Christian fellowship and in doing his bit for the kingdom of his Lord and Christ.

He was a member of the Mason fraternity, having attained to the Knights Templar degree; a member of the Knights of Pythias order; also a member of the Woodmen of the World and the Modern Woodmen of America.

Charlie's was a loveable character. There are few who are gifted with the naturally admirable and adaptable traits with which he was so richly endowed. Any change of circumstance or condition was met with the natural, unassumed and happy manner that became him so well. He was kind and companionable to children; genial, sociable and entertaining to his friends. He gave homage and reverence to old age. He knew no caste in the large circle of his acquaintance. A warm handclasp, a bright and kindly smile and a cheery greeting was his to give all he met.

Charlie was a public spirited citizen. In the first years of the twentieth century he was elected alderman of his ward. During his tenure of office his voice and vote were always given in favor of projects that would be for the betterment of Bethany. And why not? Bethany was his Alma Mater. About twenty years ago he suffered a physical breakdown, but recovered sufficiently to attend to his business for part of each year for five years, when he gave up active work. He was confined to his bed since December last, growing weaker and longing for release. Monday morning, August 13th, as the first ray of dawn penetrated the darkened sky and came shining through the leaf branches heralding the dawn of a new day, making a beautiful picture on which he gazed for a moment, and then we looked on the wan and weary face, and as we looked Charlie passed into his coronation day at the age of sixty-two years and seven days.

Funeral services were conducted by his pastor, Rev E. P. Reed at the Methodist church at 2:30 o'clock Friday afternoon August 17th, in the presence of a large number of his neighbors and friends. The text selected was the words "My Friend", which was well chosen. Burial was at Miriam cemetery under the auspices of his brethern of the Masonic fraternity using the ritualistic services of the order.

(NOTE - As Charles A. Sherer was rarely ever addressed by his friends in any other manner than by the use of his Christian name, because of the friendly affection and esteem in which he was held, the writer takes it for granted that all who knew him will approve the carrying out that sentiment in this obituary.)

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Subject: MARY CATHERINE SHIPLEY
Submitter: (ross@empowering.com)
Source: Source Unknown

Mary Catherine Shipley, daughter of John & Rachel Arabelle Hudson, was born in Harrison County,MO, Apr 27, 1875 and departed this life at her home in Ridgeway, Sep 12, 1939. She lived most of her life in and around Mt Moriah. She was united in marriage to H. E. Shipley June 17, 1900, to this union six children were born, two of whom, Albert S. and Rosa Elrura, preceded her in death. Those surviving are Elgin Shipley of the home, Mrs. Diamond Stoner, Jamesport, MO., Charles H. Shipley, Independence, KS., Mrs. Lake Powers, Brimson, MO, Mrs. Lottie Morris, Mt Moriah; three step-sons, Joseph Shipley, Mt Moriah, Harry Shipley, Shelbina, MO & Herbert Shipley, Jr. , Independence, KS.

She was converted and united with the Cat Creek Baptist Church in 1897. She leaves to mourn her death, the aged husband, H. E. Shipley, five children, three step-sons, 12 grandchildren, three brothers, two sisters and relatives & friends.

Interment was in the Cat Creek Churchyard Cemetery.

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Subject: ANITA MARION SIDDENS
Submitter: Phil Stewart(JJHist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper, Jan 23, 1985

Anita Marion Siddens, 77, former Eagleville resident, died late Saturday, Jan 19, at a Sulphur Springs hospital.

Mrs Siddens had been a resident of Sulphur Springs, Ark., since 1973. She was preceded in death by her husband, Emmery Siddens.

She had been an employee of the Citizens Bank of Blythedale and a member of the Blythedale Christian Church.

Survivors include two sons, Wayne VanDeventer, Homolulu, Hawaii, and Robert Siddens, Kansas City, Mo.; two daughters, Sharon Spicer, Gravette, Ark., and Dorothy Halderman, Sulphur Springs; two stepsons, L. Y. Siddens, Hutchinson, Kan., and Virgil Siddens, Osceola, Ia.; a step-daughter, Alice Jean Barnhouse, Blythedale, 10 grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren.

Services will be Wednesday, Jan 23, (today) at the Boggess Funeral Home at Eaglevulle at 2 p.m. Burial will be in the Blythedale Cedar Hill Cemetery.

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Subject: V. EMERY SIDDENS
Submitter: Phil Stewart(JJHist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican, Date unknown

V. Emery Siddens, son of Lowry and Grace (Edson) Siddens, was born July 18, 1909, in Bethany, Mo., and passed away Feb 19, 1973, at Noll hospital in Bethany, Mo., at the age of 63. He was preceded in death by his father and one sister.

Emery was united in marriage to Opal O'Neal and to this union was born three children: L. Y. Siddens, Oakhurst, New Jersey; Virgil Siddens, Osceola, Iowa; and Alice Jean Barnhouse, Blythedale, Missouri.

On Oct 22, 1941, he was united in marriage to Anita VanDeventer. To this union was born two children, Robert L. Siddens, Kansas City, Mo., and Sharon L. Richardson, Ridgeway, Missouri.

In addition to his children, he leaves two step-children, Wayne VanDeventer, Holloman Air Force Base, New Mexico, and Dorothy Holderman, Decatur, Arkansas. He is also survived by his mother, Mrs Grace Siddens of Kansas City, Mo., and two sisters, Irene Campbell, Independence, Mo., and Arlene Edwards, Los Angeles, California. He also leaves several grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

Emery spent most of his life in Harrison County, Missouri.

Funeral services were held Feb 21, 1973 at the Boggess Funeral Home with Rev Oren Cossey officiating. Hymns were sung by Wilma Wilson and Maxine Emerson. The organ was played by Pearl VanHoozer.

Pallbearers were Richard Elliott, Lyle Richardson, Glen Trullinger, Rogene Slaughter, Robert Richardson, and Verle Brooks. Flower bearers: Jane Richardson, Shirley Elliott, Rachel Trullinger, Nina Ury and Karen Slaughter.

Burial at Cidar Hill Cemetery, Blythedale, Missouri.

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Subject: WILLIAM R. SIMMS
Submitter: Phil Stewart(JJHist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican, Dec 23, 1880

In Memoriam

William R. Simms

Tribute of Respect

At a regular communication of Bethany Lodge No 97, A.F. & A.M., held at their hall in Bethany, MO, Saturday, Dec 11th, 1880 among the proceedings had were the following:

The death of William R. Simms, a member of this Lodge, being reported, on motion William C. Heaston, W. P. Robinson and E. W. Banton were appointed a committee to prepare suitable memorial and resolutions in reference to the deceased.

The committee reported the following which were unanimously adopted:

Brother William R. Simms was born in Clark County, Ohio, Aug 14th, 1833 emigrated to Kansas in 1855 and settled in 1856 in this county. He was married to Miss Elizabeth Endsley in 1858, who with six children survive him. From the time of his locating in this county until Augst, 1861 he was engaged in teaching school. He then enlisted in the army and was elected 1st lieutenant of Company E. 23rd Mo Infantry and promoted to the captaincy of said company in 1862; and served as such captain until the regiment was mustered out of service on the 22d of September, 1864, when he again returned to Harrison County and was elected sheriff and collector in 1866 and re-elected in 1878. In 1872 was appointed to the position of mail agent on the Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railroad which position he held until the time of his unfortunate and tragic death, which was caused by the train being thrown from the track near Edgerton, Platte county, Mo. Dec 6th.

Brother Simms was made a Mason in Pleasant Ridge Lodge in Harrison County in 1859, and united with the Bethany Lodge Oct 28th, 1865 and has been a faithful member of this Lodge ever since. Therefore be it:

Resolved. That in the death of our Brother his family have lost a kind husband and father, his aged father an affectionate and beloved son, the country a valued citizen and this Lodge an esteemed member.

Resolved. That while we bow in humble submission to the power which has inflicted this sad blow, yet we most deeply deplore the early and tragic death of our Brother.

Resolved. That as a token of esteem for our esteem for our Brother, our Lodge be clothed in mourning and that the brethren wear the usual badge for thirty days.

Resolved. That the above resolutions be published, and also placed upon the Records of this Lodge.

W. C. Heaston
W. P. Robinson
E. W. Banton

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Subject: MARY JANE TRAVIS SLATTEN
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican, Mar 2, 1904
Mrs J. P. Slatten

Mrs. Mary Jane Slatten, nee Travis, wife of J. P. Slatten, was born in Harrison County, Mo in the spring of 1843 and died at her home near Bethany, last Thursday, February 25, 1904, after a few days illness of pneumonia, aged 61 years.

Deceased was married to J. P. Slatten Dec., 1858. To this union were born five children, four boys and one girl; Benjamin, the oldest child, dying in infancy. The children who survive her are David Slatten, who lives near the home place, Charles Slatten of Jamesport; John Slatten, who is now in California; and Alice, wife of Dr. Davenport of Trenton. Those children, with the husband and two brothers and three sisters are left to mourn the loss of a good wife, mother and sister.

Mrs. Slatten united with the Christian Church in Bethany in 1877 and had to the time of her death continued a faithful member. She had many friends and acquaintances in the county and all were grieved to learn of her death. Though never in robust health, yet being very ambitious she would not give up, and through her last illness, was patient and thoughtful for all.

Funeral services were conducted by Mr. Oren Orahood at the residence Saturday at 11 a.m., and the remains were tenderly laid to rest in the Dale Cemetery.

NOTE: Mary Jane Slatten is buried at Miriam Cemetery in Bethany. It is unknown if the obit was in error or if the body was later moved.

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Subject: DENZIL SQUIRE
Submitter: Phil Stewart (jjhist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper Jan 19, 1980

"SLIM" SQUIRE:

Denzil E. "Slim" Squire, 78, St Joseph, formerly of Allendale, died Thursday (Jan 10, 1980) at a Kansas City, Kan., hospital. Mr Squire was born in Allendale but had worked for 49 years for the Burlington Railroad, retiring in 1966. He later owned and operated the Pony Express Antique Furniture Co. in St Joseph for 10 years, retiring in June of 1979. He was a member of the Methodist Church.

He leaves his wife, Lucille of the home; three daughters, Glenda Barnes, Tampa, Fla; Mrs Lu Barnes and Mrs Lois Pace, St Joseph; one brother, Hubert Squire, Santa Ana, Calif.; one sister, Clarice Wilson, Indianola, Iowa; 17 grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren.

Funeral services were Monday afternoon at the Heaton-Bowman-Smith Funeral Home in St Joseph with burial at the Foster Cemetery at New Hampton.

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Subject: ADELINE WALKER CLAYTOR SMITH
Submitted by: Denise Daily Trued (DDT@kc.rr.com)
Source: Unknown newspaper and date

Adeline W. Claytor was born in Tazewell County, Virginia, December 17, 1840, and passed away at the home of her son-in-law J. R. Daily of Schell City, Missouri, February l7, 1924 at the advanced age of 83 years, 2 months and 1 day. She gave her heart to God as a mere child and united with the Methodist church and remained faithful until her death. She moved with her brothers, Samuel and Milton Claytor, to Missouri when she was about sixteen years old and has spent practically all her life in Harrison County. She was united in marriage to John W. Smith , December 21, 1864. To this union seven children were born, five sons and two daughters, namely Mrs. Belle Daily of Schell City, Mo., with whom she had made her home the past four years; W. V. Smith and C. D. Smith, of Bethany, Mo., S. E. Smith, deceased, and Mrs. Sadie Burris, who passed away in 1892. Her husband died June 14, 1901. Two of the grandchildren, Ross and Clark Burris were raised by the grandparents. Beside the children Mrs. Smith is survived by twenty four grandchildren, fifteen great grandchildren, one sister Mrs. Fannie Smith of New Hampton and a host of friends, who will miss her so much. In her last hours she spoke often of her aged sister Fannie and seemed to think of her as a little child. She often quoted from the scriptures and mentioned the old song, "On Jordan's Stormy Banks" a song that was used when her mother was buried. Mrs. Smith was a good wife, an indulgent mother and a fine Christian woman. Her children will rise up and call her blessed. Funeral services were conducted Wednesday morning at the home of her son C. D. Smith by W. O. Dotson, assisted by Rev. B. Attebury,. Burial was at Mt. Olivet.

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Subject: JOHN WRIGHT SMITH
Submitted by: Denise Daily Trued (DDT@kc.rr.com)
Source: Unknown newspaper and date

John W. Smith was born in Davies County, Mo., September 8, 1831. Moved to Harrison County, Mo., in 1844, and in 1850, together with two of his brothers, Samuel and Nelson, and others from the county made the overland trip to California. At the end of five months they reached the gold fields of the Rocky Mountains. After three years spent in mining and prospecting and two years ranching, he returned home in 1855. He was married to Adeline W. Claytor, December 1, 1864. To this union seven children were born namely: Mrs. John R. Daily, Samuel E., Sarah E. Burris, W. V. and C. D. Smith, J. T. and J. A. Smith. His faithful wife, two sons, W. V. and C. D. Smith, and one daughter, Mrs. J. R. Daily survive him, the other four children preceding him in death. He was converted and joined the M. E. Church South, in 1870, and remained a faithful member to the end. He was a loving husband, kind father and a good neighbor, the large crowd at his funeral being a token of the esteem in which he was held. Funeral services were held at Mt. Olivet after which he was buried in the beautiful cemetery at that place Thursday morning, September 2, 1915. Services were conducted by R. M. Wayman of near Albany.

NOTE: John Wright Smith was the son of Vincent T. Smith and Sarah Emmaline Wright.

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Subject: KATIE CURRILLA STEWART SMITH
Submitted by: Phil Stewart (jjhist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper Aug 4, 1948

Death has again come to our community and one of our older citizens has answered the summons.

Katie Currilla Stewart was born July 24, 1878 near Lancaster, Mo., and departed this life July 19, 1948.

When three years old, her parents moved to the Mt Olive community, where she spent the remainder of her life. Early in life she gave her heart to her Savior and had no fear of death when suddenly called home while visiting a near neighbor, Mrs Taylor, where she and her daughter, Mrs Clara Fish, were calling.

March 9, 1902, she was married to Henry Franklin Smith. Six children were born. One infant son passed away at the age of two days. Those left to mourn her passing are Mrs Clara Fish of Mt Moriah, Leslie and Lawrence of Bethany, and Lee and Mrs Artie Smith of Martinsville, also 13 grandchildren.

After Mr Smith's death in January, she had made her home with her children, as she was very frail and not able to live alone. She was visiting in the home of her daughter, Mrs Clara Fish, when called home. She was the daughter of James and Melissa Eliza (Pooler) Stewart.

She leaves a brother, Jim Stewart of North Dakota, two sisters, Ida Geyer of New Hampton and Mrs Becca Solomon of Hiawatha, Kansas.

She will be greatly missed from the homes of her children, and her grandchildren will have a pleasant memory of grandmother. They have the blessed assurance that she is at rest, as she had made the preparation for her departure by accepting Christ as her Savior and was ready. She didn't have to cross Jordan alone, as her Savior was there to go with her.

A good woman is gone and we will miss her, as she was among us almost 70 years and is now at rest.

NOTE: Katie and Henry Smith are buried at Logsdon Cemetery in Harrison County, Missouri.

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Subject: SETH D. STANLEY
Submitter: Deb Dailey (dailyknd@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Newspaper, name and date unknown

Seth Stanley Dead

Met a tragic death either by his own hands or by foul play...coroner's jury unable to decide...still a mystery to all...funeral held Saturday.

Seth Stanley, a prominent citizen of this county, large landowner, and Bethany business man was taken from a well in his own marble shop, dead, last Thursday morning, March 10, after his unusual absence from his home all night.

His family gave the alarm early on Thursday morning that he had come to town as usual the evening before and had not returned, or communicated with them all night. The searchers went to his marble yard and found his Ford car parked across the street and his office door unlocked. Further investigation found his overcoat and cap on a chair, and the lid to the well covering open, and an examination found his body at the bottom of the well weighted down with a sack of sand tied with the well rope around his neck and when the body was raised out of about sixteen foot of water, it was seen that his hands were wired together, the right hand slipping out of the wire loop by the process of being taken from the well, but the wrists showed the marks of the wire having been securely fastened,. This fact caused the rescuing party to suspect foul play and the county coroner was notified and took charge of the body. A jury was impanelled and an autopsy held in their presence and after a number of witnesses were examined, rendered a verdict that he came to death by means unknown to them. Mr. Stanley was a character that his friends claim would not be one to committ suicide because of financial troubles. He was in good health and no known reason was given at the inquest why he would destroy himself. And on the other hand no one is suspected of foul play or nothing has developed that there would be a motive for any one to commit a crime like his tragic death.

On Monday the well was drained but revealed nothing that would throw any light on the mystery.

He visited different places of business during the evening, chatting as usual, and was last seen alive about 9 o'clock. About an hour later James Taylor in making his usual rounds tried the Stanley marble yard door and found it unlocked & going in, some one whom he recognized as Mr. Stanley's voice called to him from the rear of his shop, that he was there, and the night watch passed on his way.

This was 10 o'clock or after, the night watch says. The watch taken from Mr. Stanley's dead body having stopped at 9:45. The night watch might have been mistaken as to the time of his visit to the marble yard or the watch may have been stopped before it went into the well.

Wild rumors of cold-blooded murder have been advanced by persons not familiar with all the details, and before the coroners jury made their investigation, but so far nothing has developed that would conclusively show foul play. Most of his friends, which are numbered by the hundreds in Bethany and in his former home in the east part of the county accept the suicide theory, but are ready to consider & investigate anything that might look like murder.

Seth D. Stanley was born in Harrison County, Mo Jan 6 1870 and suddenly came to the end of his earthly life March 9 1921 aged 51 years, 2 months and 3 days. He was the son of John E. and Rebecca Stanley, and one of a family of eleven children. His parents were pioneers of Fox Creek township. He spent his boyhood on the old homestead together with his parents until his 23d year, when on December 13 1893 he was united in marriage to Nannie A. Higdon, a neighbor girl whom he had known since childhood. To this union were born four daughters, all of whom are living: Cora E. wife of Harley Maple, of Akron, Zula A. wife of Israel Chaney, of Melbourne, Eva R. and Grace of Bethany.
Besides his wife and children he leaves three grandchildren, one brother, M.E.Stanley of Wichita Ks., two sisters, Mrs. Ellen Griffin of Spickard Mo and Mrs. Hester Hudson of Gilman City, numerous other relatives, and many friends.
He was well known throughout the county, as an optomistic citizen, a friendly type of a man, four- square in all his relations with fellows.
He was a man of no great religious pretensions, but his every day life revealed a high type of Christian character.
His home life was ideal. A devoted lover of wife & children, impartial in his regard for relatives, congenial and affable to all his friends. He kept open house for all.
About twelve years ago together with his wife , he united with the Baptist Church at Mt. Pleasant No. 1, retaining his membership in that organization until his death.
Some time after his removal to Bethany he received the first degree of Free Masonry in Bethany Lodge No. 97 A.F. & A.M., and as soon there after as time would permit he became Worshipful Master of that lodge. At the time of his death he was High Priest of the chapter there, a Past Commander of the Knights Templars, a member of the Council and the Shrine at St. Joseph.
Together with his wife, he was prominent in the O.E.S.
He had been a member of the I.O.O.F. and Rebekah's for more than twenty years, and a member of the Knights of Pythias for many years.
Mr. Stanley was not only active in church & fraternal circles but in political and business as well.

It is hard for these to contemplate his mysterious departure, but they suffer not as those who have no hope.
His body will crumble into dust, but his soul and ours will live forever.

The Funeral

Seth D. Stanley, who so mysteriously came to death in his marble shop March 10 1921 was laid at rest in Sharon cemetery three miles south of Mt. Moriah Saturday March 12 1921. In writing this funeral account, it is not our intention to enter into an obituary, but just to give a brief analysis of the funeral proper. There was Scripture reading and prayer at the house at 9:30 a.m. by the Rev. W.O. Dotson and then the funeral cortege immediately started on its way to the place where the deceased had previously arranged that he should be buried beside the sacred dust of his parents.

The body was escorted by Bethany commandery No. 42, uniform following manner: Scripture reading and prayer by Dr. W.S. Welch, of the First Methodist Church, Bethany, and a synopsis of the life and character of the deceased was read by Rev. Floyd Morgan, of the First Methodist Church, of Rockport, Mo. The funeral sermon was delivered by Rev. W.O. Dotson of the First Baptist Church, Bethany. The song service was rendered by Mesdames Spencer and Prentiss and Messrs. Prentiss and Haas.

At the conclusion of the services in the church the massive casket was opened and the vast crowd filed past to take a last look at the features of their old friend and former neighbor. Many in the long line of march paused at the bier and heaved a sigh and often a tear drop was noticed glistening on the palid cheek of some old friend of him who lay so silently and cold in the beautiful casket, which was practically entombed in a labyrinth of choice flowers.

After the bereaved companion and daughters, with hearts almost bursting with grief, were persuaded to turn away, the casket was closed and the pall bearers slowly carried the mortal remains of their old friend to the grave passing between two lines of the uniformed commandry, who reverently stood with drawn swords.

At the grave the commandry took charge, and the beautiful and impressive Masonic funeral rites were read and amid the most profound and reverent silence, the massive casket encased in a steel vault, was lowered into the tomb, and the Rev. W.O. Dotson tenderly dismissed the solemn audience, who came from far and near to pay their last token of respect to that splendid citizen and four-square man, Seth D. Stanley.

The attendance at the church was so great that only a portion of the people could gain entrance into the building, there being fully as many on the outside as there were in the house. The floral gifts were the most elaborate we have seen in many years.

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Subject: RUTH IDA FORDYCE STANSBERRY
Submitter: Cheryl McCombs (cherylmccombs@comcast.net)
Source: Bethany Republic, February 1996

Ruth Ida Stansberry, 79, Bethany, passed away February 13, 1996, at a St. Joseph hospital. Mrs. Stansberry was born May 31, 1916, in Bethany. She worked as a homemaker and was also employed at the Corner Drug Store in Bethany. She was a member of the First Christian Church, Chapter BV of the P. E. O. Sisterhood and DAR of Bethany. Survivors include 2 sons, Mark Stansberry, Ivoryton, Connecticut, and Alan Stansberry, Springville, Utah; 1 sister, Janet Sue Yates, Bella Vista, Arkansas, and 5 grandchildren. Funeral services were held February 16, 1995, at the Roberson-Polley Funeral Home in Bethany with burial in the Miriam cemetery. Memorial contributions may be made to the First Christian Church, Bethany.

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Subject: SARENIA J. BLAKEMAN STANTON
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican, February 10, 1904
Sarenia J. Blakeman Stanton

The subject of this sketch was born in Albany, N.Y., Sept 10, 1838 and was married to Morris H. Stanton, July 3, 1858. She and her husband moved to Harrison County, Mo., in 1859. She professed faith in Christ and joined the Christian church in the year 1867. At the time of death she held her membership at Mt. Olive church. She has ceased to be a member of the church [unreadable] and has joined the church triumphant, Feb. 4, 1904. Her husband, two sons and one daughter have preceded her, leaving one daughter and two sons and a host of friends to mourn her loss, but this loss is her eternal gain. Funeral services were held at the late residence by the writer, after which the remains were laid to rest in the Logsdon cemetery.

---- J. R. Williams

NOTE: The tombstone at Logsdon Cemetery gives the first name as "Serena".
The 1850 Census of Albany lists a "Serana" Blakeman, age 12, in the household of Simeon and Margaret Blakeman.

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Subject: WARREN N. STEVENS
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Clipper, April 27, 1916

DEATH OF WARREN N. STEVENS

Warren N. Stevens was born in Jackson County, Iowa, December 6, 1844 and twenty two years later moved to Harrison county, Mo, where he lived until 1910 when he moved to Iola, Kan., where he died April 19, 1916 at the age of 71 years, 4 months and 13 days. He was married to Miss Martha W. Carpenter December 1, 1872 and to this union were born seven children, two of whom survive. They are Mrs Troy Davis of Weeping Water, Neb. and Mrs Byford Twadell of Iola, Kan.

Mr Stevens was a veteran of the Civil War and was captured and confined within the walls of Andersonville prison for a while. He was converted and joined the Methodist church at a great revival held by Rev Glen Lewis at Mt Moriah, Mo. in 1896 and since that time his faith has never wavered.

He was exceedingly industrious, thrifty, frugal and honest, kind and sympathetic. He was stern, inflexible, moral and temperate. Those who knew him best had a high regard for his many noble qualities. The burial service was conducted by Rev J. Howard Thompson, pastor of the M.E. church of Ridgeway, Mo., at the grave in Yankee Ridge cemetery.

His family and friends will have the sympathy of all in their bereavement.

Note: The same information was printed in the May 3, 1916 edition of the Bethany Republican

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Subject: AMELIA (KINNAMON) STEWART
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican Clipper, Dec 22, 1948

Last rites were held Wednesday afternoon for Mrs Amelia Ann Kennamon Stewart, from the Wheeler funeral home and the body of this tired pilgrim, who had journeyed here on earth for over 90 years, was consigned to Mother Earth in Masonic cemetery, Eagleville. Mother Stewart was born near Bloomfield, Iowa. Her parents were Joseph and Ann Kinnamon, who with her two brothers and two sisters, preceded her in death. Her husband, Thomas Stewart, to whom she was united in marriage when a young girl, also preceded her in death many years ago; also five children of the 10 born to their union. Those surviving are Mrs Lillie Hunter, Mack's Creek, Mo.; Frank Stewart, Kimberly, Idaho; Mrs Edna Ballew, Eagleville; William H. Stewart, St Joseph; and Mrs Ina Harrison, Ridgeway. Many years of her long useful life was spent near Eagleville, where she was known as a Christian wife and mother. Modest, unassuming and humble. she ministered to her family, In early life she gave her heart to God and her faith never wavered. The Bible was a great comfort to her in her declining years, reading and pondering over it until her sight failed. The latter years of her life were filled with suffereing and she often expressed a wish to be called to her Eternal Home, therefore death came as a sweet release on Monday, Dec 13, at the age of 90 years, five months and eight days. The final rites were conducted by the Rev O. D. Hedges. Hymns were sung by Mrs Margaret Shroyer and Mrs Bessie Bartlett, with Mrs J. G. Hinkle accompanying. Those laying her to rest were grandsons, Worth Bender, Carlisle Harrison, Oliver, Harold and Glenn Stewart, and Ray Ballew. Those attending from a distance were Mrms William Stewart, Mrs Raymond Wagonblast, Glen Stewart, and Ray Ballew of St Joseph; Mrms Oliver Stewart, Mrms Harold Stewart and Ruby Ballew, Kansas City; Mrms Charles Hunter and Clayton Hunter, Humphrey, Mo. Others surviving besides the five children are 33 grandchildren, 55 great-grandchildren and two great-great-grandchildren.

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Subject: JOHN V. STEWART
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican Clipper, Aug 13, 1932

John V. Stewart was born in Van Buren county, Iowa, November 6, 1861 and departed this life at his home northwest of Brooklyn, July 31, 1932, at the age of 70 years, eight months, 24 days. He grew to manhood in the state where he was born, and at the age of 19 years he moved with his parents and brothers and sisters to Harrison county, Missouri, where he lived the raminder of his life. On April 8, 1902 he was united in marriage to Latitia Eckard. To this union three children were born, two sons and one daughter, one dying in infancy. He leaves to mourn his departure his devoted wife, his son Earl D., of the home, his daughter, Effie Stanton of Brooklyn, two brothers, Thomas of Canada and James of Sherwood, N.D., four sisters, Nancy Stewart and Rebecca Salmon (Solomon) of Hiawatha, Kan., Ida Geyer of Bethany and Hattie Smith of Martinsville; five grandchildren and a host of other relatives and friends. Uncle John, as he was called, was well known in and around Brooklyn and numbered his friends by his acquantances. Funeral services were conducted from the late home on Monday, August 1, at 2:00 p.m. in charge of the Rev Wm W. Stanley, pastor of the Ridgeway, Mo. Christian church. Interment was made in the Logsdon Cemetery.

Letitia C. Eckard, the youngest of a family of eight children, was born to William and Susannah Eckard north of Martinsville on September 25, 1878, and departed this life in Albany, Mo., October 3, 1973, at the age of 95 years and 8 days.

She had lived her entire life in Harrison County until the last three months when she was in the nursing home in Albany.

She was united in marriage April 8, 1902, to John V. Stewart. To this union three children were born: her son, Earl, her daughter, Effie, and a son, Ervin, who died in infancy.

She was converted and became a member of the Mt Olive Christian church, being baptized by Paul Mitchell on October 23, 1922, fifty-one years ago this month. She was a member of the Ridgeway Christian church at the time of her death.

She was preceded in death by her husband, a son-in-law, Joe Stanton, her parents, her seven brothers and sisters and one great-grandson, Jim Stewart.

She leaves to mourn her departure her son and wife, Mr and Mrs Earl Stewart of Ridgeway, her daughter and husband, Mr and Mrs Don Kirby of Eagleville, seven grandchildren, twenty great-grandchildren and six great-great-grandchildren, many nieces and nephews and a host of friends. She was always ready to welcome her children and grandchildren into her home and always enjoyed their company. She had accumulated a host of friends during her unusually long lifetime in this area.

Loving hands did all that was earthly possible, but the Lord released her from mortal trials by calling her to her eternal reward.

Final memorial services were conducted by Rev Paul Mitchell at the Boggess Chapel in Eagleville at 2:00 on Saturday, October 6. She was gently laid to rest in the Logsdon cemetery west of Brooklyn.

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Subject: EMALINE DALE WHISLER STONER
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: Ridgeway Journal, Jan 5, 1933

Emaline Dale was born in Wabash, Indiana, July 24, 1851, and departed this life December 27, 1932, being at the time of her death 81 years, 6 months and three days of age. She was the daughter of Flemmons and Abigail Dale. She was united in marriage to Joseph Whisler in 1872. To this union were born 7 children, five of whom survive her: Mrs. Burtha Combs of Dillinger, Wyoming, Omar Whisler of North Dakota, Aurther, Jesse and Mrs. Orpha Pontius, all of whom live in or near Ridgeway. Her husband and two daughters, Mrs. Olive Pontius and Mrs. Esta Ellington preceded her in death. Besides her children, she is survived by 18 grandchildren and 12 great grand-children, also a host of other relatives and friends. She was united in marriage to William Stoner in February, 1920. In January 1928 he also passed away.

Early in life she united with the Christian Church and throughout her life was a loyal and consistant Christian, always being a regular attendant at church whenever possible. As a mother she had no superior, devoting her life unselfishly to her children. Her last thoughts were of the daughter who was seriously ill and unable to be at her bedside, both daughters being prevented from attending the funeral by illness. As a neighbor and friend she will be sadly missed even though she far exceeded her three score years and ten.

"Do not live to make a living.
Rather live to make a life.
For the measure of succeeding,
Is your service in the strife.
All that you leave behind you
When your soul has crossed the bay
Is the good you've done to others,
As you tarried by the way."

Funeral services were held at the Ridgeway Christian Church, December 29th, at 2 o'clock, conducted by the pastor, Noel T. Adams and under the direction of the Ragan Undertaking Company. Interment was in the Ridgeway Cemetery.
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Subject: BESSIE LURA FORDYCE SWAIN
Submitter: Cheryl McCombs (cherylmccombs@comcast.net)
Source: Bethany Republic, July 1973

Bessie Lura Swain, daughter of Ida Frances Boyce and Charles Cameron Fordyce, was born May 16, 1879, in Harrison Co. and departed this life July 17, 1973, at the age of 94 years, 2 months and 1 day. She was a member of the Prairie Chapel church and attended as long as her health permitted. Bessie attended rural schools and studied during summer months. The youth were important in her life and she showed her love and interest in them by the many years she taught school at Babe Adams and Brick- Pullman schools. She was widely known for her active and cheerful ways. On April 10, 1904, she was united in marriage to Robert Durham Swain. Travel in her early years was by buggy or horse back. Her life was devoted to sharing and doing for others. Many nieces and nephews will remember "Aunt Bessie" for her many acts of kindness, consideration, and loyalty at all times. She was preceded in death by her husband; three brothers, Orey, Dan and Roy; and two sisters, Gertrude Smith and Lela Polley. Surviving are one brother, Ralph A. Fordyce; nieces, nephews, relatives and many friends. Services were held July 20, 1973, at Noble-Roberson Funeral Home and burial at Miriam Cem. Rev. Alvin Hillman of Kearney, Mo., officiated at the services. Pallbearers were nephews.

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Subject: MARIETTA MARGERUM SWIFT
Submitter: Phil Stewart (jjhist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper, June 17, 1942

Marietta Evaline Margerum, a daughter of Richard and Martha Jane Margerum, was born August 1, 1863 and passed away June 12, 1942 at her son Lee Swift's home near Hatfield, Mo., at the age of 78 years, 9 months and 26 days. She was the first child born in Red Oak, Ia., and her father built the second house in Red Oak.

She was united in marriage to Charles S. Swift in Shelby County, Ia. Jan 15, 1879. To this union three children were born, namely: Mrs W. C. Ball, King City, Mo., Owen Lee Swift, near Hatfield, Mo., and Mrs Walter Nida, St Joseph, Mo.

Mr and Mrs Swift came to King City, Mo. in August, 1888. Her husband preceded her in death eleven years ago. She was a member of the King City Baptist church. Mrs Swift went to her son's home last November for a visit and on Jan 12, 1942, she had a stroke which left her bedfast. She will be sadly missed by her children and all who know her.

She leaves two brothers, Lee Margerum of Blackwell, Okla, and Richard Margerum of Drexel, Mo, also seven grandchildren, nine great-grandchildren and five great-great-grandchildren.

The funeral was held Sunday at the Pentecostal church in Hatfield by Rev Jackson and burial in the Lincoln Center cemetery.

Those from a distance who attended the funeral were Mr and Mrs W. C. Ball, Mr and Mrs E. R. Ball and daughter,Velma, Clyde Swift, all of King City and Mr and Mrs Lee Franklin Swift and Mr and Mrs Walter Nida, St Joseph.

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Subject: ELIZABETH CLAIR SWITZER
Submitter: Phil Stewart (jjhist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican Clipper, Sep 23, 1943

Mrs W. G. Switzer

Mrs Elizabeth Clair Switzer, widow of W. G. Switzer, who died in 1934, passed away early Tuesday morning at her home in Bethany, where she had been critically ill for three weeks.

Funeral Services were held at 2:30 o'clock yesterday afternoon at the Wheeler funeral home, conducted by the Rev. Oris D. Hedges of Martinsville. Interment was in Miriam cemetery.

Pallbearers were Dr. J. G. E. Hinkle, Arthur King, Audrey Bowen, Ed Richardson, Floyd Frame and Charles S. Burg.

Mrs Switzer was born in Jacksonville, Ohio, January 29, 1857. She is survived by the following children: Dean and Wayne Switzer of Los Angeles, Calif., Mrs Myrtle Lanning of Iowa City, Iowa; Mrs Arthur King and Jerry Switzer of Kansas City; Mrs William Shields of Lewistown, Mont., and Mrs J. G. E. Hinkle and Glen and Earl Switzer of Bethany.

Mrms Switzer at one time operated a hotel at New Hampton and before that a rooming house in St Joseph.

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Subject: HARRY SWITZER
Submitter: Phil Stewart (jjhist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican Clipper, Date unknown

Harry Switzer, 75, Dies in a Bethany Hospital

Harry Switzer, 75, died Tuesday at a Bethany hospital following a brief illness. He was well known in Ridgeway where he had moved after retiring from farming southwest of Ridgeway.

Survivors include a brother, Ralph Switzer, Seaside, Oreg., four sisters, Mrs Cecil Miner, Kansas City, Mo., Mrs Edith Crossan, Rochester, Minn., Mrs Berniece Neff, Albany, Texas; and Mrs Leona Gage, Cheyenne, Wyoming.

Services will be held at 2:00 p.m. Friday at the Ridgeway Methodist church, with the Rev. Hubert Lowes officiating. Burial will be in the Ridgeway cemetery.

The body is at the Boggess mortuary, Ridgeway.

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Subject: WILLIAM G. SWITZER
Submitter: Phil Stewart (jjhist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican Clipper, Nove 14, 1934 (front page)

Wm. G. Switzer Dies In A Chair

A Pioneer Music Teacher - Recently Celebrated 60th Wedding Date

William G. Switzer, who with Mrs Switzer celebrated on Oct 9 the 60th anniversary of their marriage, died suddenly Friday afternoon in the garden at his home in the south part of Bethany. Mr Switzer was 81 years old.

He had been topping some turnips in the garden, while two boys, Victor L. Burgin and Leslie Gibson, played near. Seating himself in a chair in the garden, he asked the boys to shake some pears from a tree. This they began, but were called away. When Victor reached the home of his grandparents, Mr and Mrs Chet Partington, Mrs Martington asked who was sitting in the chair in the garden. Told it was Mr Switzer, she thought his attitude an unnatural one, and notified Miles Estep and A. R. Harrington of St Joseph, who was at the Estep home. They went to Mr Switzer and found him dead.

Mr Switzer was a pioneer music teacher, and at his funeral services Sunday afternoon at the Christian church, vocal music was by the Crawford male quartet of near Princeton, all his former pupils. They sang unaccompanied. The sermon was preached by the Rev E. P. Reed. Mrs H. C. Schoyer, Mrs Releigh Bartlett and Mrs W. M. Planck were flower bearers. Pallbearers were two sons, two sons-in-law and two grandsons - Gerald Switzer, Wayne Switzer, Dr. J. G. Hinkle, Arthur King, Laverne Hinkle, and Ross Lanning. Miss Eunice Lotz played the processional and recessional. Burial was at Miriam Cemetery.

For many years Mr Switzer was in the hotel business, and was so engaged at New Hampton for a long time. For 15 years he was a chior leader and Sunday school superintendent in one church.

Other than relatives, persons here to attend funeral services were Mr and Mrs W. N. Lindsey, Mrs Grace Todd, Ed Stapleton, and Mrs Ethel Rowland, all of Kansas City; Leroy Todd of St Joseph; Mr and Mrs Will Christian, Roy Hale and Hugh Hale, all of Atchison, Kan.; Mrs Fannie Carter, Mrs Florence Humphrey and Miss Cecil Carter, all of Pittsburg, Kan.; Mr and Mrs Roy Switzer, Mrs Eva McKee and son Max, Mr and Mrs Henry Green and son Lowell, all of Grand River, Iowa; Mr and Mrs George Crawford, Mr and Mrs Frank Crawford, Tom Crawford, Jim Dunn and Mr and Mrs Rarland, all of Princeton.

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Subject: BERNEICE FORDYCE TAYLOR
Submitter: Cheryl McCombs (cherylmccombs@comcast.net)
Source: Bethany Republican Clipper, Dec 16, 2005

Berneice Taylor, 92, of Columbus, Neb., died Sunday, Dec. 4, 2005 in Columbus, Neb. She was born Aug. 12, 1913 in her family home in Harrison County, Ridgeway, Mo., daughter of Orey Francis and Mabel E. (Baxter) Fordyce. Berneice devoted her life to raising a family and promoting education by teaching and volunteering. At retirement she carried on her mother's love of flowers and plants through the Texas Garden Clubs. On June 14, 1935, she married George C. Taylor. He preceded her in death on Mar. 22, 1984. She also was preceded in death by her parents; one sister Vivian Reidel; three brothers Homer, Charles and George Fordyce; and son-in-law Bill Gleason. Survivors include two daughters Lucy Gleason, Arvada, Colo., and Janet Sue Spaulding and husband Don, Columbus, Neb; son William Bryan Taylor and wife Kathy, Simpsonville, S. C.; nine grandchildren Donald Spaulding and wife Nadean, Bonnie Gleason, Peggy Zimmerman and husband Scott, Douglas Spaulding, Kathleen Makowski and husband Mike, Stephanie Gauger and husband Wayne, Molly Gleason, Drew Taylor and Leslie Taylor; and eight great grandchildren Matt, Elizabeth and Emily Spaulding, Sarah Gauger, Connor and Kayley Zimmerman, Cameron Makowski, and William Gleason. Funeral services were Friday, Dec. 9, 2005 at the Roberson Funeral Home, Bethany, Mo. Burial in Miriam Cemetery, Bethany, Mo. Memorials: Donor's Choice in care of the Roberson Funeral Home, P.O. Box 46, Bethany, Mo. 64424.

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Subject: AVIS LORRAIN (WHISLER) TEETER
Submitter: Phil Stewart (jjhist@grm.net)
Source: The Bethany Repulican Clipper, Mar 21, 1984

Avis Lorrain (Whisler) Teeter, 67, Cameron, died March 16 at a Bethany nursing home.

She was a former Mt Moriah resident and member of the Mt Moriah United Methodist church. She was a member of the Cainsville Chapter of the Order of Eastern Star No. 316.

She is survived by two sons, Tim Whisler, Maysville, and Dale Whisler, Princeton; one daughter, Mary Kirby, Kansas City, Mo.; three sisters, Marion Ellsworth, Cainsville, Betty Sparks, Kansas City, Becky Parsley, Prairie Village, Kan.; nine grandchildren, and four great-grandchildren.

Funeral services were March 18 at the Stoklasa Memorial Chapel, Cainsville, Rev J.B. Shew, officiating. Interment at Sharon Chapel cemetery, southwest of Mt Moriah. The family suggests memorial gifts to the American Heart Association.

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Subject: MRS. MINERVA C. THOMPSON
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican, Mar 2, 1904

Mrs. Minerva C. Thompson departed this life at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. J. A. Templeman, in Bethany, Mo., at 12 o'clock, a.m., Monday, February 29, 1904, aged 60 years, 7 months and 7 days.
Deceased was born in Darke County, Ohio, July 22, 1843. She was married to L. Thompson, in that state, and they removed to western Kansas and were among the early settlers, near Hutchinson. From there they went to Texas and spent a short time. In the year 1892 they came to Harrison County and for several years had lived in Bethany. The husband died about two years ago, since which time she had made her home with her affectionate daughter, who is her only living child. Her last illness was prolonged almost seven weeks, and was quite painful, though she bore it with Christian fortitude. She had been a devoted member of the Methodist church for many years. Her life was a constant song of praise. She had attained a deep spiritual experience and when death appoached, it had no terrors for her. She desired to depart and be with Christ, which is far better. Her knowledge of the scriptures was remarkable, and her clear insight into their teachings was unusual. A day before the end came, her pastor read and prayed with her, when she carefully followed him in every word and became estatic at every reference to the future. To her, the future was full of hope and glorious anticipation. All is well with the departed mother. May God comfort the dear afflicted daughter, who is called to mourn her death, and all remaining relatives.

The funeral took place from the residence, Tuesday, March 1, at 2 o'clock, p.m., conducted by her pastor, Rev. S. Carothers, assisted by Rev. W. J. Willis and Mr. Oren Oraland, attended by a large company of relatives and friends, after which her body was laid to rest in Miriam Cemetery beside that of her late husband.

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Subject: EFFIE SCOTT TILLEY
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican, Jan 24, 1907

Death of Effie Scott Tilley

Mrs Effie Tilley, wife of Fred Tilley, and daughter of James Scott and wife, was born March 13, 1882 on a farm near Bridgeport, and died at her home near Mitchellville, Thursday morning at 9 o'clock, January 17, 1907, aged 24 years, 10 months and 4 days.

Funeral services were held at the Mitchellville church, Friday, January 18, at 2:30 pm, conducted by the pastor Rev. Smiley, after which services the remains were taken to the Burris cemetery, followed by a large procession of relatives and friends.

In the death of the departed, society has lost a valuable member and the church has lost an active worker, as she was always willing and ready to assist in music and Sunday school work. She was organist for a number of years at the Bridgeport church. Though young in years, she was well and favorably known by many with whom she had associated in church, Sunday school and the district school which she attended, where on all occasions her sunny disposition was shown. Her death has cast a gloom over the community. The sympathy of all friends has gone out to the young husband and infant, as well as to the many relatives. Her married life was short yet a very happy one. She leaves to mourn her loss: husband, an infant child, father, mother, five sisters and one brother, all of whom were present at the funeral, excepting two sisters, Mrs Mary Reed of Vernon county, Missouri, and Mrs Sadie Cox of Bates county, Missouri, who could not be present; one brother died when three years of age. Death coming so suddenly, yet realizing her situation, she bade her husband goodbye and calmly passed away. Though she has passed to the Great Beyond, her kind and happy disposition will never be forgotten.

signed: A Friend who has known her from childhood up

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Subject: JAMES HENRY TURNER
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper, Apr 8, 1931


LIFE CRUSHED OUT BY HUGE LOGS THAT ROLL FROM HAULING WAGON

Death Comes Almost Instantly to James Turner, 69, Mt Moriah Man, In Sawmill Accident Monday

With his left hip and left shoulder broken, and with his chest crushed, James H. Turner, 69 years old, of Mt Moriah, was killed almost instantly Monday afternoon when several large logs rolled upon him from a wagon frame upon which he was riding.

The accident occurred a few miles west of Mt Moriah, where Turner was helping haul logs to a sawmill. He was driving a team of gentle mules at his work, and with help had loaded the logs and was starting with them toward the mill. They were not chained nor tied to the wagon frame.

A hundred yards away, Andrew Johnson of Mt Moriah was working in the timber. He heard a crash and looked back to see that Turner's team had stopped dead still, and that the load was upset with Turner tangled among the logs. By the time he reached Turner's side, the latter was dead. One huge log rested across his chest; one foot remained on the frame of the wagon.

An examination of the ground was made by Dr R. H. Beets, coroner, upon his arrival within about an hour after the accident. He said that marks of the wheels showed one of the front ones had struck a stump, mounted it, and then had slipped off again sharply. It was this shock, it is felt certain, which caused the wagon to pitch to one side and roll off the heavy green logs with which it was loaded. Dr Beets said it was hardly possible for Turner to have lived more than a minute. He made no outcry.

The accident occurred about a fourth of a mile from the sawmill, which is one owned by W. M. Dinsmore, Mt Moriah Justice of the Peace, who notified Dr Beets and asked him to make an official investigation of the circumstances surrounding it.

Knowing that the examination would plainly disclose an accident, Dinsmore and others had removed the body from among the logs before the coroner's arrival, but had not materially changed its position.

Dr Beets said he was given to understand that Turner was a man who had had much experience at logging in sawmill work. The coroner's notes showed that Mr Turner was married, and that besides his widow he is survived by one son and three daughters. The body was taken to Mt Moriah pending funeral arrangements.

[NOTE: James Henry Turner, son of Elijah and Mary (Mallett) Turner, was born in Warren County, Iowa on Aug 21, 1961. He married Charlotte Clementine Denison. James and Charlotte are buried at Goshen Cemetery in Mercer County, Missouri. ]

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Subject: CALLIE VANCE
Submitter: Robert W. Taylor (rtaylor@coin.org)
Source: Newspaper name and date unknown

Mrs. Callie Vance Dead Following a Long Illness

Mrs. Callie Vance, wife of Charles M. Vance, passed away Friday evening at the home of her daughter Mrs. Herbert Daniel, near McFall, where she had been cared for the last several months. She had long been a sufferer of a heart ailment.

Besides the husband she is survived by two daughters Mrs. Daniel and Mrs. Olin Meadows, and a son Basil of Washington. One daughter Mrs. T.M. Meadows is deceased.

Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at the Matkins church by Rev. H.G. Blomfield. Music was furnished by the church choir. Burial was in the Matkins cemetery.

Pallbearers: George Bartlett, Jr., Max Daniel, Kenneth Meadows, Woodrow Morris, Gerald Clark and Theodore Youngman. The flower bearers were five nieces.

S.M. Haas & Sons were in charge of arrangements.
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Subject: CLOE INGRAHAM (ROBBINS) VANCE
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHist@grm.net)
Source: Albany Weekly Ledger, Sep 21, 1888

Grandma Vance is at rest. She died September 17th, 1888, aged 86 years, 5 months and 17 days. Her maiden name was Robbins. She was born in Middlesex county, Massachusetts, moved to Anderson county, Ky., in 1820, was married to Wm Vance August 14th, 1826.

They were among the early settlers of Gentry county, and underwent all the privations incident to a pioneer life. Her husband died December 5, 1872, aged 82 years and 24 days. After his death she remained on the old home place near New Castle, where she had toiled so long with her dear husband to raise a large family of children. In 1858 she joined the church of Christ, and was a faithful member to the time of her death. The funeral was preached at 1 o'clock Wednesday, by J. H. Coffey, after which her remains were taken to the Jones Chapel and placed beside her husband to rest until the resurrection morn. "She hath done what she could" may truly be said of her.

NOTE: The family farm was northeast of McFall in Gentry County, and was almost directly adjacent the Gentry-Harrison county line. She and her husband are listed in census records for Gentry county, but much of the family lived in Harrison County. Jones Chapel Cemetery is less than a mile east of the "old Vance place".

Chloe Ingraham Robbins was the daughter of Charles and Nancy Robbins.

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Subject: ROBERT A. VARNER
Submitter: Judy Andres (jandres@cozadtel.net)

Source: Bedford Free Press, Jan 25, 1906 OBITUARY:

Robert A. Hannah born Pocahontas County, West Virginia February 2, 1831 died January 16, 1906. On December 28, 1874 married Virginia Burk. They farmed 9 miles east of Bedford, Iowa and 4 years later to Harrison County, Missouri. Mrs. Sue Snyder, Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Snyder and Mrs. Joseph Harvey attended.

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Subject: LOREE FORDYCE WALKER
Submitter: Cheryl McCombs (cherylmccombs@comcast.net)
Source: Bethany Republic, December 31, 1987/January 1988

Mrs. Loree (Fordyce) Walker, 69, Marshall, Mo., died Dec, 28 in a Marshall hospital. She was born in Bethany and attended Bethany High School. She was a member of the Marshall First Baptist Church. She was employed by C.W. Flowers Clothing Co. She is survived by her husband, William C. Walker, of the home; two daughters, Sandra Merciez, Nancy Walker, Kansas City; 2 grandchildren; three sisters, Vera Hollinger, Harris, Mo., Frances Criswell, Marshall, and Thelma Beals, Bethany, and two brothers, Goldman Fordyce, Bethany, and Calvin Fordyce, Kidder, Mo. Funeral services were Thursday, Dec. 31, at the Marshall First Baptist Church. Interment was at Sunset Memorial Gardens. Family suggests memorials to the American Diabetes Assn.

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Subject: FLORENCE MADDY WALTER
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Clipper, Jan 12, 1912
In Memoriam

Florence Maddy-Walter

Florence, daughter of G. B. and Mrs. Lovina Maddy, was born Feb. 6, 1883 in Harrison County, Mo., where she also was reared. On March 2, 1904 she was married to Joseph D. Walter, to which union three children were born, but one of whom, Orville, aged three and one half years, now lives.
Mr. and Mrs. Walter made their home in Missouri for about three years, then came to Utica, Kan., in 1906 and had made the vicinity of Utica their home since that time.

At the age of eighteen Miss Florence confessed her faith in Christ and was buried with her Lord in baptism by O. E. Oatman, and had maintained that confession all these years, with a consistent Christian life. She transferred her membership to the Utica Christian church in May 1910. For more than two years Mrs. Walter had suffered with tuberculosis, but she fought bravely until the last.

Through all her suffereing the extent of which is unknown and unknowable, she was the very embodiment of patience and kindness, and what may be said of her in her girlhood days remained true to the end. To know her was to love her.

She died at Utica, Kansas on the morning of Jan. 2, 1912, aged 28 years, 10 months and 27 days, leaving husband and little son, also parents, one sister and three brothers, with a host of friends to miss her.

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Subject: DAVID R. WALTON
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican, Dec 23, 1880

In Memoriam

David R. Walton

David R. Walton, late of Harrison County, Mo., and President of the County Minute Men, was born in Butler County, Ohio, on the 30th of March, 1818. He removed to Missouri in Sept, 1870, and died at his home in this county on the 18th of July, 1880.

At a meeting of the County Minute Men the following resolutions of respect were unanimously adopted:

First - That inasmuch as deceased was President of the Order, and that as a member of the same his character was unimpeachable, we by this act show to his sorrowing friends and relatives the respect we have for one whose character as a gentleman and a citizen was, in our estimation second to none.

Second - That we extend to the relatives of deceased our heartfelt sympathy in this, their hour of sorrow.

H. B. Christie
H. C. Tull
Joseph Whiteley

NOTE: David R. Walton was the son of John T. & Susan (Fox) Walton. He married Christina Walter in Montgomery County, Indiana on Oct 15, 1839. David Walton served in Co E of the 51st Illinois Infantry during the Civil War. David and Christina are buried at the Miriam Cemetery of Bethany (Harrison County).

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Subject: LUCINDA WATSON
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Clipper, June 11, 1919

Dead At Age of 95

A shadow of gloom and sadness passed over this community Tuesday morning June 3, when word came that Grandma Watson had just passed away.

Lucinda Watson was born June 27, 1824 in Brown County, Indiana. On January 6, 1842 she was married to Darius Watson. Eleven children were born to this union, two having preceded her to the great beyond. Those living are William H., Steven W., Mary A., Elizabeth J., Rachel E., Charity L., Amy A., Rebecca and Lavina B.

Mr. Watson died on July 22, 1872 in south Missouri where they lived at the time. About the year 1874, she with her children moved to Harrison County where she lived at the time of her death. She passed away at the home of her daughter, Elizabeth, at the age of 95 years, 11 months and 24 days.

Grandma Watson was possessed of a strong and loving heart. In spite of her age she so enjoyed the many birthday dinners that her friends would give her.

She will be sadly missed but we know she has gone to meet her God and where she will be free from intense suffering.

The remains were laid to rest in the Magee cemetery, June 4, where George Snipes spoke words of comfort to surviving ones.

Many beautiful floral offerings were sent by her many friends.

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Subject: FRANKLIN WEARY
Submitter: (Unknown--submitter, please contact Barbra MOHarris@Rootsweb.com)
Source: The Bethany Republican, Apr 3, 1902

Franklin Weary "a good and true man".

His friends were legion and none knew him but to love him. As a husband and father he was devoted, considerate, and kind; as a citizen, clean and firm in convictions as to the best good of the commonwealth; as a neighbor, always kind and obliging; as a Christian, pure of heart, loyal and liberal in the support of the church of his choice; and ever enlarging in Christ the ideal of his life."

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Subject: MRS. FRANKLIN WEARY (MOLLY GRIMM)
Submitter: (Unknown--submitter, please contact Barbra MOHarris@Rootsweb.com)
Source: The Bethany Repulican, Mar 13, 1902

Molly Grimm born in Union Co., PA 9/18/1829, died Jefferson Twp, Harrison Co., MO 3/8/1902, after brief illness of pleurisy, aged 73 years, 5 months and 18 days. Deceased was united in marriage to Philip Shafer in 1848. Four children were born to this union, two of whom, with the father, preceded her to the other shore, the other two children are Mrs. Sharp Winningham of Brooklyn, Harrison Co., and a married daughter living in Ohio.

In 1859 she was united in marriage to Franklin Weary. Four children were also born of this union, all of whom survive her: Dr. Franklin Grimm Weary of S. St. Joseph; Rev. Lewis Weary of Spickard, MO; Thornton Weary of St. Joseph, and Mrs. Charles J. Dopkins of Jefferson Twp, all of whom were present at the funeral. Converted and united with the Lutheran church at the age of 18 years, lived a consistent, christian life, and died in the triumph of a living faith with the name of Jesus on her lips. She was an affectionate companion and a loving mother, and as a neighbor and firend was loved and esteemed by all who knew her.

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Subject: FANNIE (DOWNEY) WELDEN
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: The Bethany Republican Clipper, Feb 8, 1956

Mrs Welden Dies Here; Old Blue Ridge Burial


Mrs Fannie Welden, 80, widow of James Welden, Gilman City, died early Saturday at a rest home in Bethany.

The Rev William Smith officiated at the funeral services Sunday at the Gilman City Baptist church, and burial was at Old Blue Ridge cemetery. Survivors include two step-daughters, Mrs Gertie Woltz of St Joseph and Mrs Dawn Tedlock of Gallatin; and two sisters, Mrs Emma Clinkenbeard of St Joseph and Mrs Allie Robertson of Bethany.

Obituary, Bethany Republican Clipper, Feb 15, 1956

Fannie Elizabeth (Downey) Welden, daughter of Charles W. and Martha Downey, was born Oct 24, 1875 in Daviess county, Missouri, and departed from this life Feb 4, 1956, at the age of 80 years, three months and 10 days. She was one of a family of nine children, and her life in almost its entirety had been spent in and near her birthplace.On Feb 3, 1904, she was united in marriage to James M. Welden, and to this union one son was born, who passed away in infancy. Her husband preceded her in death, having passed away on Jan 2, 1941.

One sister and five brothers have preceded her in death.

She is survived by two sisters, Mrs Bessie Robertson, of Bethany, Mo., and Mrs Emma Clinkenbeard of St Joseph, Mo., also two stepdaughters, Mrs Dawn Tedlock of Gallatin, Mo. And Mrs Gertrude Woltz of St Joseph, Mo.; several nieces and nephews, other relatives and many friends. For a number of years she had been an active member of the Baptist church in Gilman City, and held her church in high esteem, enjoying always her part in its activities.

She was a fine neighbor and had friends numbered by her acquaintances. She remained very active about her home and in her club and until her last serious illness prided herself in being self-reliant.

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Subject: CHARLES K. WHISLER
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper, Feb 28, 2007

Charles K. Whisler, 83, Rapiid City, S.D. (formerly of Ridgeway, MO) died peacefully at his home Friday, Feb 23, 2007.

Charley was born at home in Ridgeway, MO on April 7, 1923, to Ina Vay (Finegan) and Jesse Whisler. "Charles Keith", as he was always known to his family, was the second of five children born to Ina, a school teacher, and Jesse, a mail carrier.

Charley graduated from Ridgeway High School in 1941, and attended the University of Missouri at Columbia for one and a half years before entering the Army in Feb 1943. He was commissioned as a second lieutenant on June 14, 1945. Following service in England, Germany and France, after the end of World War II he returned to and graduated from the University of Missouri in Feb 1948.

Charley married Dorothy Morrison on May 15, 1955, in Bowman, N.D., and they have lived in Rapid City since their marriage.

Whisler Bearing Company, founded by Charley in 1956, celebrated 50 years of business and Charley's "retirement" on Friday, June 23, 2006. Charley returned to work the following Monday, and continued to work until November of this past year. Under his leadership, during the years, Whisler Bearing opened stores in five locations.

During his more than 57 years in Rapid City, Charley was always active in serving his community through leadership in many civic organizations. Charley was a longtime member of the First Baptist Church, serving as a deacon, church moderator, Sunday School teacher, lay minister, and on various committees. His faith in Jesus Christ, unshakeable to the end, directed and defined his life.

For recreation Charley loved to snow ski, water ski, boat, and collect classic convertibles. For the past 16 years, Charley and Dorothy enjoyed winters in Lake Havasu City, Arizona in their motorhome. Last year, at age 82, Charley rode his waverunner on the Colorado River over 1,000 miles. Charley was outgoing and it can truly be said that "no matter where he went, he knew no strangers." Charley's optimistic and positive attitude, giving nature and willingness to always lend a hand in any situation, will continue to be an inspiration to all who knew and loved him.

He is survived by his wife, Dorothy Whisler, Rapid City; daughter, Barbara (Sebastian) Troia, of Omaha, Neb.; daughter, Janet (Michael) Williams, of Highlands Ranch, Colo.; son, Jeffrey Whisler, of Colorado Springs, Colo.; son, Brian (Jill) Whisler of Woodbury, Minn.; two brothers, Robert Whisler of Lincoln City, Ore., and James (Betty) Whisler of Conroe, Texas; sister, Betty Tanner of Willmar, Minn., and numerous nieces and nephews. Charley was preceded in death by his parents and his sister, Kathryn Collier.

Services for Charley will be held at the First Baptist Church, 707 Patrick Street, Rapid City, Feb 28, at 10:30 a.m. Burial will follow in Ft Collins, Colorado.

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Subject: JOSEPH WHISLER
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: Decatur County Journal, Iowa, June 1, 1899

Joseph Whisler was born in Wayne County, Indiana, March 29, 1841, and died at his home near Ridgeway, Missouri, May 24, 1899, aged 58 years, 2 months and 4 days.

When four years of age he removed with his parents to Tipton County, Indiana and there underwent the hardships of a pioneer life. He was raised by Christian parents, his father being one of the early preachers.

He was the sixth of a family of twelve children, seven of whom, with the father and mother, have preceded him to the spirit world. The youngest brother, Silas Whisler, of Leon, Iowa, was present at his death.

When seventeen years of age he united with the Christian Church and has ever since lived a devoted Christian life. He served his country in the Civil War, having enlisted when twenty-one years of age.

He was married to Mrs. Emeline Reynolds, September 5, 1871, to this union were born seven children, all of whom are living and were present at the funeral. All were at his bedside when he closed his eyes to earthly scenes, except the two oldest daughters, Mrs. Bertha Combs and Mrs. Olive Pontius of Howell County, Missouri, they having arrived a few hours after his death.

In 1875, he moved from Indiana to Decatur County, Iowa, where he resided for eighteen years and then moved to Harrison County, Missouri, where he resided until his death.

He has been a great sufferer for many years but has always born his afflictions with faith, courage and patience unfailing.

His was a quiet, humble, unobtrusive life-teaching more by example than by profession, yet his heart was ever flowing with charity. Being an affectionate husband, a loving father and an exemplary Christian, his loss is most keenly felt in home and community.

The funeral services were held at the house on Thursday at 10 a.m. The remains were then taken to the Ridgeway Cemetery and tenderly laid to rest.

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Subject: JUNE BERTHA, JOSEPH WILLIAM, and HARLAND RAY WHISLER
Submitted by: Phil Stewart (JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Clipper, Feb 26, 1919

Passed To The Great Beyond

On Monday and Wednesday, February 10 and 12, all that was mortal of Mrs. C. O. Whisler and two sons, Harland Ray and Joseph William Whisler, passed away and their gentle spirits took their flight to that higher world of which we know so little and which it seems so difficult to make real to mortal minds.
They had been suffering from the dreaded malady, influenza, and all that loving hands could do was done, but no medical skill could avail to check the hand of the destroyer.
Mrs. Whisler departed this life Monday at 2:30 p.m.; Ray passed away at 1:30 p.m., and Joseph at 10:30 p.m. Wednesday.
Three more bright stars have disappeared from this earthly vision to beam with dazzling splendor of eternal rest. They will be missed, three chairs will be vacant that can not be occupied again.
To the father, husband and loved ones, we would say, your sky is hung by heavy black cloud curtains; your vision is overcast with the gloom of sorrow and every sound that strikes your ear has in it a cadence of despair. Without the presence of those loved ones that have gone before the world seems empty and cheerless to you, and in hour heart there is a dreary, dismal aching void. The consolation that is vouchsafed you is the realization of the fact that your loved ones are at peace, and that they have heard the words from the Father's lips, "Well done, thou good and faithful servants, enter thou into the joys of the Lord." Your consolation is found in the consideration of the fact that your dear ones are in heaven. The poor worn forms will nevermore be racked with agony and pain. Suffering is at an end, and it will be only a little while until you will cross the dark river and join your loved ones among the host of saved on that other shore, where the weary are at rest.
Some 1900 years ago, our Master and Lord said to the broken-hearted sisters of Lazarus: "I am the resurrection and the life; he that believeth in me, tho he were dead, yet shall he live; and whosoever liveth and believeth in me shall never die," In a time like this we find comfort in these words. They are to us a bright light shining through the black cloud of death.
June Bertha Stoner Whisler, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Stoner, was born in Harrison County, May 29, 1885, and died at her home northeast of Ridgeway, February 12, 1919, age 33 years, 8 months and 11 days. She was married to C. O. Whisler, March 29, 1903, and to this union four children were born - Joseph, Ray, Russel and Thelma.
Sister Whisler leaves a father, husband and two children, brothers and sisters, besides a host of relatives and friends to mourn her departure. She was a member of the Ridgeway Christian church and lived true to her faith.
Harland Ray Whisler, second son of Mr. and Mrs. C. O. Whisler, was born April 13, 1906, and died February 12, 1919. He leaves a father, sister, and brother, besides a host of relatives and friends to mourn their loss.
Joseph William Whisler, the eldest child of Mr. and Mrs. C. O. Whisler, was born in Harrison County, Mo., March 27, 1904, and died February 12, 1919. Joseph also leaves his father, sister and brother to mourn his departure, besides a host of relatives and friends.
May the comfort wherewith we are all comforted of God be Brother Whisler's and the two surviving children, Russel and Thelma.
Funeral services were conducted by Rev A. L. Alexander, their pastor, at Ridgeway, and the remains were laid to rest in the beautiful Ridgeway Cemetery.

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Subject: STEWART A. WHISLER
Submitted by: Phil Stewart JJHist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper, Dec 17, 1969

STEWART WHISLER DIES IN HOSPITAL

Former Employed at SCS Office Here - Services to Be Friday in Cainsville

Stewart A. Whisler, 58, died Tuesday at a Bethany hospital.

He had been employed in work unit offices of the Soil Conservation Service for approximately 20 years. He worked in the Bethany office several years before transferring to the office at Ellington, Mo.

Mr Whisler had been ill for several months and recently had been living on the farm home east of Ridgeway.

He is survived by his wife, Grace of the farm home; a daughter, Mrs Mary Elizabeth Kirby, Grandview, Mo,; two sons, Dale Whisler, Mt Moriah, and Timothy Whisler, Oregon, Mo.; two stepchildren, Mrs Delano St John, Lee's Summit, Mo., and Donald Corbin, Cherry Point, NC; his mother, Mrs Amy Whisler, Princeton; three sisters, Mrs Dorothy Peugh, Florida City, Fla., Mrs Verea Stoner, Ridgeway, and Mrs Shirley Barritt, Princeton; three brothers, Virgil Whisler, Rantool, Ill., Vernon Whisler, St Joseph,and Russell Whisler, Trenton; and 12 grandchildren.

Services will be at 1 p.m. Friday at Stoklasa chapel in Cainsville, with the Rev James Schuby officiating. Burial will be in Ridgeway Cemetery. The body is at Stoklasa mortuary at Cainsville.

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Subject: VERNON E. WHISLER
Submitter: Phil Stewart (jjhist@grm.net)
Source: Ridgeway Memorial Chapel funeral handout

Vernon E. Whisler (1922-2009)

Vernon E. Whisler died peacefully on August 8, 2009. He was born May 3, 1922 in Grand Forks, North Dakota and grew up on a farm outside Mt. Moriah, Missouri. He graduated from Mt. Moriah High School in 1939 and the University of Missouri, Columbia, with a B. S. in Agriculture in 1949 and a B. S. in Engineering in 1961. He served in the U. S. Navy during World War II, 1942-1946 and again during the Korean War, 1951-1953.

Vernon worked for the University of Missouri Extension Division as a Farm Management Specialist and County Agent for 11 years. He started in the banking business in 1962 at Farmers State Bank, Princeton, Missouri. From 1965-1978 he was the Senior Vice President of Agricultural Lending for the American National Bank in St Joseph, Mo., which covered four states; MO., IA., KS, and Nebraska. In 1978 he served as President of the Chillicothe State Bank. From 1979-1985 he was President of the Lamoni State Bank, and from 1983-1985 he was President of the Citizens Bank of Winigan, Missouri.

In addition, Vernon served on several agricultural committees and advisory councils and taught agricultural credit for the Missouri Bankers Agricultural Credit School and for the American Institute of Banking.

Vernon retired in 1985 and served on the Board of Directors for eleven years in northwest Missouri area banks and served as trustee of the Jackson Memorial Community Trust. During retirement Vernon also researched the family genealogy, rebuilt antique telephones, collected carnival glass, traveled and spent time with his family.

Vernon was preceded in death by his loving wife of 59 years, Mildred; his parents, Arthur and Amy Whisler, and 6 brothers and sisters: Stewart, Dorothy, Verea, Shirley, Virgil and Russell. Vernon is survived by his two children, Richard (Sandy) Whisler of Lake Mills, Wisconsin; and Peggy Fridell of Higginsville, Mo.; 7 grandchildren, Amanda Whisler, Tyler Vandezande, Laura (Richard) Beddingfield, Nathan Bokay, Mara (Kyle) Pierce, Jonathan Bokay, and Sam Whisler; and one great-grandchild, Logan Vandezande.

A memorial service for Vernon Whisler was held at the Ridgeway Methodist Church in Ridgeway, Missouri on Saturday, September 5, 2009.

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Subject: ANDREW WHITE
Submitter: Gayle McCotter (gmc1953@worldfront.com)
Source: The Bethany Democrat, Thurs., Aug. 10, 1905

Andrew White Dead

Andrew White, one of the old settlers of Harrison Co. died at the home of his son, Warren, in Wilsonville, Kansas, August 2nd. He came here at an early day from Ohio and settled near Mitchellville, where he lived until about 1885, and since that time he has made his home with his sons. For thirteen years he lived with his son William B. near Coffey, but about seven years ago he went to Kansas and since that time has lived with his son Warren. The body was brought to Coffey last Thursday and buried at the Burris cemetery Friday. The funeral services were held at the Mitchellville Church conducted by Rev. Mitchell.
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Subject: ANDREW WHITE
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican, Aug 17, 1905

Andrew White was born in Stokes County, North Carolina, May 19, 1817, and departed this life in Norton County, Kansas Aug 2, 1905, aged 88 years, two months and thireen days. He moved from Jackson County, Ohio to Missouri in 1858 and lived in Harrison County until about seven years ago when he went to make his home with his son in Kansas where he died. He was married in Ohio in 1839 to Naomi Joyce. To this union were born fourteen children, ten of whom are living, four having preceded him to the spirit world. The wife also died in 1883. Uncle Andrew had many friends and acquaintances who join the bereaved in the loss of one whom they have known so long. He was a very sensitive man yet honest and upright as a citizen and a father; he had many commendable traits of character. The body was shipped from Kansas to Coffey, Missouri and then conveyed to the Mitchellville Cemetery where it was lowered into the grave surrounded by many friends who had assembled to sympathize with the bereaved. The funeral was conducted by the writer who spoke a few words of condolence as the last tribute of honor to the aged father.

Z. Mitchell

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Subject: MAURICE WHITE
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper, Jan 20, 2006

Maurice E. White, 89, of Kansas City, Mo. (formerly of Bethany, Mo.) died Friday, Jan 13, 2006 at his home.

He was a beloved husband of 65 years to Dorothy, cherished father to Philip and Elizabeth, adored granddad to Brandee, Garrett, Natalie and Marshall, respected brother to Lela Wave (deceased), Aileen, Bonnie, Mary, Jerry and Boyd (deceased), admired father-in-law to Kathy, and revered brother-in-law to Doris.

Born on Nov 15, 1916 to Bess and Roy White in Blythedale, Mo. He graduated from high school a year early through his love and dedication for learning, which he continued throughout his life.

He started White Auto Supply in 1935 with his parents and continued this entrepreneurial endeaver for 50 years, resulting in eight locations and a wholesale distributorship, Lincoln Sales Company. Being very concerned and involved in his community, Maurice served on the Board of Noll Memorial Hospital, Red Cross, First Christian Church, Bethany Community Gym, Bethany Trust Company and other organizations.

Maurice served his country proudly as a Navigator in the Army Air Corp in World War II. He was a prisoner of war for 13 months in Germany. Maurice had incredible character and led a life of dignity and harmony. He loved to laugh and had a quick wit and dry sense of humor which lives on in those around him. He is sadly missed, greatly admired and will always be remembered and loved by his family.

Funeral services were Monday, Jan 16, 2006 at the Roberson Funeral Home, Bethany, Mo. Burial with military rites was at the Miriam Cemetery, Bethany, Missouri. Memorials may be made to the American Red Cross in care of the Roberson Funeral Home of Bethany.

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Subject: LAURA MATILDA WHITTINGTON
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper, June 9, 1910

Obituary:

Laura Matilda Whittington, wife of Howell Whittington, was born June 2nd, 1866 and departed this life May 31st, 1910, aged 41 years, 11 months and 25 days. She was the eldest daughter of Joseph and Barbara Gay. She was united in marriage to Howell Whittington July 27, 1880. and to this union seven children were born, five of whom preceded her in death. The other two, Clara and Clyde, are left with the devoted husband. Besides these she leaves an aged father and mother and four sisters.
She united with the M. P. church when young and has always lived a devoted Christian life. Sister Whittington took great delight in going to church and Sunday School when her health would permit her to do so, and when she no longer had these privileges she was reading her Bible, proving that part where the Saviour said "Learn of me".
The funeral services were held in the Goshen Church by the writer and interment made in the nearby cemetery.
T. C. Snipes

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Subject: ELIZA GRENAWALT WILCOXSON
Submitter: Denell Burks (DB1776-vacaville@comcast.ent)
Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper, 1940

IN EXPRESSION OF OUR LOVE
For
Eliza Grenawalt Wilcoxson
March 20, 1853 - January 7, 1940

"Mother! Naught on earth is more beautiful than the pure, unselfish, devoted love of the Christian mother, who has ever been honored by prophet, poet, sage, by Holy Writ and all good men."

One can instantly recognize in these clever words the ideal tribute for mother, which was written by Anne E. Martin and given first place out of the many submitted. What words could voice a more pleasingly written truth in seeking an appropriate expression of the boundless love of the mother for whom we write these lines? Not one word could be dispensed with, and a volume would express no more. However, we wish to add the following verse, which to the writer who loved her so well, comes so descriptive of Aunt Liza's life:

"She was just the kind of a mother
We've need for every day
As children and as grownups
About our work or play.
The night was never so dark,
Or so dreary was the day,
But that she made it brighter
In her own dear way.

She never made a public prayer,
Nor did she make a speech,
But kindly words were always hers,
And broken hearts did reach;
And we who knew her best,
Will ne'er forget the days
She walked the quiet pathway
In her own dear way.

She led her children gently;
She'd not so much to say;
But showed them daily how to walk
In her own dear way.
And as the years wore on and on,
Twas plainer day by day
To know the path she tried to walk
Was our own Savior's way."

What can be more beautiful than when a life of 86 years comes to a close, and we can say she followed in the steps of the Savior. While we know the companion by whose side she walked for so many years, the children and other loved ones miss her presence from the old home where she loved, toiled and taught, yet what loving memories they have to cherish!

We all come to the place where we feel the poignancy of an absent one. If Aunt Liza could speak to them today she would say, "Carry on; have faith. Carry the banner of courage. Death is not the end." Then rather than allowing her going to sadden us, let us try and make it touch our hearts anew with gentleness and tender consideration, flooding our lives with memories of her kindness.

Mary Eliza, daughter of Isaac and Mary Bunt Grenawalt, was born in Jefferson County, Iowa, March 20, 1853. She was one of a family of nine {hand-written change to 10 in original newspaper article} children. Her sisters and brothers were Rachel (Mrs. Amos Coen), Rebecca, John, Elza, Mitchell, Frank, William Henry and Charles, who with the parents preceded her in death.

This pioneer family came to Harrison County in 1855, settling on a farm in Colfax township, near the state line, now occupied by a great grandson Everett Wilcoxson. Death occurred Jan 7 at the age of 86 years, nine months and 17 days. It was on their farm their four children Hary, Jennie (Mrs. Volney Leigh, deceased), Charles, and Harve were born and grew to maturity.

For almost 66 years she travelled side by side with her companion, "sharing each other's joys." and now she is gone, how lonely the old home, without her loving presence.

Her final illness was of short duration, making it possible to be about the home until a week before the summons came. Even on New Year's day she enjoyed their annual family gathering, although realizing it might be the last one. It is with sadness our thoughts turn to the companion. If we try to offer comfort, we can think of no other lines more fitting than the following by Edgar A. Guest, entitled "The Lonely Man":

I wish I could think of something comforting to say.
I wish I felt that words of mine could take his grief away.
He is so sad and lonely and the pain is all so plain,
It seems useless now to tell him
That he'll some day smile again.
They've been 65 years together!
Now he is sitting there alone
And everywhere he turns to look,
He sees her shadow thrown.

I can think of things to tell him
When I'm going to pay a call
Some pretty speech to cheer him;
But to meet him in the room
Where they always stood together
When their friends came to the door,
And to see him there without her
Makes me hesitate once more;
For I fancy that he called her
When he heard the doorbell ring;
Since that always was his habit--
And to habit man will cling.

They may put away her pictures!
What's the sense of doing that
When before him every minute
Is the chair in which she sat?
They changed the rooms a little--
Made them different than they were--
But everything about them
Is reminding him of her!
Sixty-five years they lived together!
Oh I cannot say it yet!
He would think I'd lost my senses
Would I urge him to forget.

Funeral service were held from the M. E. Church of Eagleville Jan. 9, conducted by Elder Charles Harper of Lamoni. Beautiful songs were rendered by a quartet from Otterbein church, of which she had been a member many years. Pallbearers were grandsons Everett, Darl, Cleone, LaVerne and Milo Wilcoxson and Ben Laswell. Burial was in Masonic cemetery, where many of her kindred line in their last long sleep.

Author: A close friend of the family, Myrtle Richardson.

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Subject: ALPHEUS A. WILLIAMS
Submitted by: Phil Stewart(JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican, Mar 2, 1904

Alpheus A. Williams died at his home in Bethany, Mo, February 25, 1904, aged 73 years, 2 months and 4 days.

Deceased was born in St Lawrence County, NY in 1830, and was married to Charlotte A. Freeman of Wollcott, Wayne County, NY., August 18, 1850 and moved from New York to McClain County, Illinois in 1857, and after residing there 18 months came to Harrison county, Mo., where he had since resided, except the time he was in the army, until the time of his death.

A. A. Williams enlisted in Co G, 6th Regt., in 1862 and served until the close of the war. His record was "a good and true soldier, always ready for duty," and he was much esteemed by his comrades. He was a member of T. D. Neal Post No 121, G.A.R. in which he held official positions, and was a Past Post Commander at the time of his death.

Mr. Williams was a good citizen and was always found on the moral side of all questions, affecting the welfare of the community in which he lived. He was one of the Justices of the Peace of Bethany township for many years and was an alderman of the City of Bethany at the time of his death. In all of his official relations, he was always held in high esteem by those with whom he associated, and was ever recognized as a moral, honest and upright citizen. He was the father of nine children, four of whom with his beloved wife, survive him and were at his bedside at the time of his death. His children now living are Mrs. Dora E. Small of Fairfax, Mo., L. E. Williams of Bethany, Mo., Mrs. Effie Noll of Gilman, Mo., and A. A. Williams, Jr., also of Gilman.
Funeral services were held at his late residence Friday, February 26, 1904, conducted by Rev. W. F. Kennedy of Gilman, assisted by the members of the Post of which he was a member, who conducted the services in a very impressive manner at Miriam Cemetery, where his body was laid to rest, to await the Resurrection Morn.

Truly a good citizen, neighbor and friend has gone, and he will be missed by his comrades and friends, but most of all by his aged wife who has been in feeble health for years, and whom he so tenderly cared for.

The widow and children have the sympathy of the community, friends and all who knew him.

J. W. K.

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Subject: PLEASANT WISHON
Submitter: Joyce (wishon@adelphia.net)
Source: The Cainsville News, April 23, 1925

PLEASANT WISHON CALLED

Pleasant Wishon was born in Jefferson County,Ill. April 28 1846, and passed away at the home of his son, John F., in Cainsville, Mo., April 16, 1925, thus nearing the age of 79 years.

On May 12, 1869, he was united in marriage to Miss Ella Cooper, and to this union two sons were born - John F., of Cainsville, Mo., and James N., of Portland, Oregon.

He enlisted in the Union army leaving Cainsville March 1st, 1862, and marched to Pittsburg Landing, arriving there May 5th, a march of 36 days. His first engagement was the battle of Shiloh in which he was taken prisoner. He remained a prisoner 9 months when he was exchanged. He re-enlisted and served throughout the war. He was in the parade at Washington at the close of the war and was mustered out at Washington. He served his country well.

He united with Christ about 20 years ago uniting with the Christian Church at Bethany and continued in that fellowhsip until his death. It is said that all ministers enjoyed the fellowship in his home.

He leaves to mourn his death, his aged companion, the two sons above mentioned, three sisters, Mrs. Anna Booth, of Cainsville, Mo., Mrs. Mary Wyatt of Onawa, Iowa, and Mrs. Margaret Rutledge of Fordland, Mo. He also left 1 brother, Henry Wishon, of Cainsville, Mo., 2 granddaughters, one of whom resides at Portland, Oreg., and the other Mrs. Vera Tinney, of Mendon, Mo., 5 grand-sons, and 1 granddaughter, other relatives and a host of friends.

Funeral services were held at the home of his son, John F., Friday, April 17th at 2:00 p.m., conducted by Geo. L. Kearns, minister of the Cainsville Christian Church, assisted by T. H. Wiles, pastor of the Cainsville Baptist Church, after which he was laid to rest in Fairview Cemetery to await the dawn of the Resurrection Day. W. J. Burrows, T. H. Wiles, and Mrs. H. T. Rogers, Mrs. Minnie Oden, and Miss Bonibel Burrows sang some of the old time songs.

A delegation representing the Knights of Pythias Lodge at Bethany of which the deceased had long been a member, had charge of the service at the grave and with tender, loving words laid away their comrade assisted by a few of the old Boys in Blue. The American flag was draped over the casket which held the form which had so bravely and valiently shielded and protected it and upheld its principles to save the Union. And he lived to see the day when the American flag was ruler supreme above all nations, and as he rests in the silent city of the dead the principles of that unstained banner will continue to triumph o'er land and sea and his own glorious country. The farewell words were spoken from Job 14:14. The scripture read was Romans 12: 1-2.

CARD OF THANKS - We desire to tender our heartfelt thanks to all who assisted us during the last illness and at the funeral and burial of our dear companion and father. Mrs. Pleasant Wishon and Family.

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Subject: ABRAHAM WOODERSON
Submitted by: Phil Stewart(JJHist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper, Dec 14, 1938

ABRAHAM WOODERSON, 65, DIES ON FARM WHERE BORN

After an illness of about a year during most of which time he had been bedfast, Abraham Wooderson, 65 years old, died Saturday night at his home about 10 miles east of Bethany on the Mt Moriah road.

Mr Wooderson died on the farm where he was born. A son of Mr and Mrs James Wooderson, he was a member of a family old in Harrison county, and himself was widely known.

Surviving in his immediate family are his wife, Mrs Lesta Wooderson, a daughter, Mrs Owen VanVelkinburg, St Joseph, and two sons, Reed Wooderson, Des Moines, Ia., and Ward Wooderson, Mt Moriah.

Funeral services were Monday afternoon at Sharon chapel, the Rev Harlie Power of Mt Moriah officiating. Burial was at Sharon chapel cemetery. Pallbearers, his nephews, were Joseph Dill, Gerald Arney, Clell Wooderson, Carl Wooderson, Earl Wooderson and Ray Wooderson.

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Subject: ALICE GERTRUDE WOODERSON
Submitted by: Phil Stewart(JJHist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper, Jul 26, 1939

Alice Gertrude, the third child and second daughter of William and Sarah Wooderson, was born May 25, 1864. She was one of a family of eight children - three daughters and five brothers - all of whom grew up at the old farmstead in the Sharon chapel neighborhood.

The life of her home circle was an unusually long and happy one; but like all things earthly, that circle had to be broken.

Her father was the first to enter the Great Beyond, August 20, 1899; her mother joined him June 27, 1925. They were followed by Charlie, Sept 25, 1926; Eliza, on Thanksgiving day, 1934; George, April 28, 1936; and Albert, March 11, 1937. Now, Alice, on July 17, 1939, has added one more to that growing circle beyond, leaving Jennie of Bethany, Edward of Spickard, and Frank of Mt Moriah to finish their work on the shore of time.

She is also survived by several nieces and nephews, many cousins, one precious aunt - Mrs Larkin Wooderson of Mt Moriah - and many, many friends.

The life of Alice Wooderson needs no eulogy among the people who have known her through the years. That life is an open book the pages of which it is a joy to scan, filled as they are with beautiful memories. She was of a strong religious nature, having embraced Christianity at the age of 16 years. Unwavering and steadfast from that time on she has been a true soldier of "The Old Rugged Cross" of which we sing. She wouldn't like to be called a "model Christian." Not at all. Yet, to many folk she was just that. Again and again has the writer heard it remarked, "I would like to be a Christian if I could be of the type exemplified by Alice Wooderson." This in substance, if not the exact wording. Who can ever forget the power of her beautiful prayers, or the moving sincerity of her testimony in the little church she loved so well! That voice is stilled forever, but the eloquence of it will live on while memory lasts. Given but one word by which to describe ther character of Alice Wooderson, the writer would choose the word: DEVOTION. Devotion to the cause of the Christ she loved with her whole heart; devotion to the interests and welfare of the different members of her family; her untiring devotion to her aged mother stands out in shining gold, even to this day.

There was nothing sluggish in her nature. She was always up and doing. Always ready and anxious to serve the needs of those about her.

Strange to the human understanding it is, that one so noble, one so imbued with good will as was Alice Wooderson, should be called upon to suffer an affliction, the consciousness of which would have been unbearable; that her beautiful mind, "like sweet bells jangled out of tune," would refuse to serve her in the tasks she loved so well to do; that she, in turn, must receive the devotion it had been her wont to give. But she was spared the pain of this consiousness, and never realized the care and devotion that has been given her by her faithful sister and husband, Mr and Mrs Emmett Sallee, and her niece and husband, Mr and Mrs Claude McQuerry, in whose home she has lived in recent years.

Three weeks ago she was taken to the state hospital at St Joseph, in the hope that change would prove beneficial. But that was not to be. On Friday, the 14th, she was taken worse and passed away on Monday morning.

We must not grieve. It is as she, herself, would have it. Rather, should we rejoice that she has found newness of life in a world where mortal affliction can not touch her. A world where, some day, that old home circle will be complete and unbroken.

Funeral rites were held at Sharon chapel July 18. The Rev William Pollock delivered a fitting and beautiful sermon, his theme being "The Webb of Life." He compared it with the fabric of the weaver's loom, which by use of shuttle and threads, patterns are woven, the beauty of which can be seen, only, when it is complete and viewed on the reverse side. As a text he used Gal. 7-22 and part of 23: "But the fruit of the spirit is love, joy, peace, long suffering, gentleness, goodness, faith, meekness, temperance." These he said, were the threads she had richly used in weaving a pattern of life, beautiful on both sides. A pattern ever to be prized as an inspriation along life's pathway.

Her favorite songs, "Rock of Ages", "In The Garden", "Going Down The Valley", "The Home of the Soul". were rendered by Mrs Lola Ingham, Helen Parker, Hennie Fordyce, Pearl Thomas, Jay Thomas, Robert Ballard, Duwayne Parker, all of Prairie Chapel, assisted by S. M. Haas.

Lovely floral offerings were borne by Mildred Nickerson, Marylin Nickerson, Mary Belle Propst, Olive Elaine Sanders, Wyvonne Sanders and Carol Elaine Price.

Her little body was carried to the last resting place by Dr Cecil Propst, Walter Dowell, Clayton Nickerson, Claude McQuarry, Jesse Sanders and Clifford Wiley.

There, in sight of the place where she first opened her eyes on this world, beside her father and mother, close by the church that knew her well, she was tenderly given back to earth.

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Subject: MARIAH LOUISA WOODERSON
Submitted by: Phil Stewart(JJHist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper, Nov 22, 1944

Mariah Louisa Wooderson, daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth (Stoner) Chambers , was born in Cole county, Michigan, May 1, 1857, and died Oct 26, at the home of her daughter and husband, Mrms Lee Planck, near Mt Moriah, at the age of 87 years, five months and 26 days.

In 1859, when she was two years old, her family moved from Michigan to Harrison county, Missouri, settling near Mt Moriah which continued to be her home for more than 85 years.

Her immediate family consisted of four daughters, Mary, Matilda, Mariah and Malinda; and one son, Abner, who died in early childhood. Her three sisters preceded her in death by many years, and of her husband's large family, she is the last to go.

While she remained with us the older generation seemed never quite gone. Her splendid memory and her radiant recollections kept it ever near. How we loved to hear her descriptions of past events! So vivid, so glowing - the years seemed, almost, to live over again! Now that she, too, has crossed over, the golden link is broken. She took with her something we can't define. There is a lonesomeness we definitely feel, but can not describe. And even a generation of upwards of a century seems but a short time.

Borne in upon us are Whittier's lines: "Our Father's God, from out whose hands the centuries fall like grains of sand."

And again, Carlyle's words: "In a little while we will all be there, and our mother's bosom will screen us all."

Yes, Aunt Mariah's passing marks the passing of a generation. They are all gone now; all gone. Looking to the Silent Shore "no voice is heard, no sign is made, no step is on the conscious floor." yet, they have left behind them a trail of light to guide our feet as we follow on.

On Aug 27, 1873, she was married to Larkin Adamson Wooderson. On a farm in the northwest corner of Fox Creek township they established their home where they reared a family of nine children - four daughters and five sons, all of whom are living. The daughters are Mrs Ida Downey, Mt Moriah; Mrs Matilda Shaw, Osceola, Iowa; Mrs Alma Planck, Ridgeway; Mrs Birtie Fitzpatrick, Leon, Iowa. The sons are Thomas J., Mt Moriah; Ira, State hospital, Kie Building, Ark., Lee H., Mill Grove; Alvah, Ridgeway; Delbert, Cuero, Texas. There are 28 grandchildren and 12 great-grandchildren. In service are three grandsons, Delbert and Harley, overseas, and Cecil; all sons of Alvah and Cleo Wooderson. Also in service are five great-grandsons; Ray and Herman, sons of Earl and Eva Provins; Russell and Harold, sons of Art and Elsie Wright; Garvin, son of Verda Gillespie. Our dear Darryl, whose life was lost in service overseas, was her great-nephew, son of Bert and Flossie Wooderson. The late lovable Vilas Downey was her grandson, son of John and Ida Downey. Leith Stevens, in service overseas, is her great-nephew, son of Andrew and Bessie Stevens. So, comes to a close a full and complete life which, through her large family, has contributed nobly to our country's very life.

How she longed for the end of this war! Can we not take comfort that God has lifted her from the heartache and the sorrow of it all? Freed her from the suffering that pressed so heavily upon her?

She had every kindness that could possibly be given. No babe in arms could have had more loving, tender and constant care than Aunt Mariah's. She said, "They are just as good to me as they can be. There is nothing they wouldn't do." She spoke of the visits of her pastor and his good wife, the Rev and Mrs W. W. Whyte; of their sessions of prayer together. Her mind was at peace. She said, "I am ready and waiting to go."

Funeral services, held at Sharon chapel Sunday, Oct 29, at 2:00 p.m., were conducted by the Rev W. W. Whyte, who spoke from Rev 21-2. The loads of beautiful flowers were borne by Verda Gillespie, Edith Scott, Iris Spence, Marjorie Martin, Maude Gay, Doris Weathers, Lois Phillips, Florence Wooderson, and Marjorie Wooderson. Burial was at Sharon cemetery. Her precious body was carried to its last resting place and laid beside that of her husband, who preceded her in death by 31 years, by Ted Gay, Garvin Weathers, Virgil Hamilton, Dean Scott, Max Wooderson and Russell Wooderson.

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Subject: ROSETTA MAY STANLEY WOODERSON
Submitted by: Phil Stewart(JJHIST@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Clipper, Jan 27, 1937

In Loving Memory of Mrs Thomas J. Wooderson

Rosetta May, daughter of Hiram and Mary Stanley, was born in Mercer County, Missouri May 23, 1875.

Her father having died in her early girlhood, her mother, left with three young children of whom she was the eldest, was later united in marriage with John W. Wooderson and came to the Sharon community where Rosetta has lived through the intervening years.

On January 11, 1899 she was united in marriage with Thomas J. Wooderson, eldest son of Larkin and Marta Wooderson. To them were born three sons: Walter, Alton, and Russell.

A short time ago she was taken with a stomach ailment which did not appear serious, but later pneumonia developed and though all possible was done to save her, death on swift wings carried her away on the morning of January 16, leaving the whole community shocked with grief.

Not one among us could be more sorely missed. 'What shall we do now?' How can we carry on the Farm Club without Rosetta?' ...these are questions her neighbors and fellow club members ask each other.

The story of her life can not be written, nor spoken in words. For in lay in the sweet spirit of helpfulness in which she walked among us, always doing good where ever her capable hands found need. In sickness, in death, in every kind of sorrow or trouble, in the social neighborhood gatherings - always there was need for the help she was ever ready and willing to give. In her home life she was devotion herself. Here she poured out the full measure of her strength for those she loved.

In early life she was converted and joined the church at Sharon Chapel. Through the years her life was consistent in the practice of Christian virtue in humility and self-effacement.

She is survived by her husband, her son Walter and wife Burnese of Kirksville, Alton of the home, Russell and wife Florence of near Mt Moriah; two granddaughters, Rosemary and Colleen, daughters of Walter and Burness; mother-in-law Mrs. Maria Wooderson; brother, Oscar and wife Mary and daughters, Osawatomie, Kansas; Mrs. Anna Middleton of Gilman City; aunt Mrs. Nancy Stanley and daughter of Princeton; step-sisters Mrs. Henry Delf of Hunter, N.D. and Mrs. E. W. Lamb; other relatives whose names are not available and a host of friends whose hearts are one in this sorrowing hour - first in thought for the bereaved family, and then for their own loss in the death of this precious woman. So much a part of the life around her, she was so necessary a part of that life, it is hard to realize that she will be seen no more in the old places she used to fill. But we know that she is gone.

Funeral services were held at Sharon Chapel at 2:00 p.m. January 19, conducted by the Rev. Hartie Power who spoke from the text: 'For we know that if our earthly house of this tabernacle were dissolved, we have a building of God, a house not made with hands in the heavens.'

The songs, 'Going Down the Valley', 'In the Garden' and 'No Disappointment In Heaven' were sung by Mrs. Cole Rhea, Miss Docia Harper and Ed Norton. Flower girls were Misses Mildred and Dorothy Wooderson, Mrs. Irene (Wiley) Foster, Mrs. Grace McMillen and Mrs. Elsie McQuerry. Interment was in the Sharon churchyard cemetery.

Those attending from a distance were Mrms. Thomas Shaw, Osceola, IA, Mrs. Jincy Dyer, Osceola, IA, Mrms. John Downey, Odell, Ia, Mrms. Wilfred Fitzpatrick and daughter of near Osceola, IA, Mrms. Oscar Stanley and daughter, Osawatomie, Kans, Mrms. James Russell and sons, Osawatomie, Kan, Mrms. William Middleton, Filman City, Mrms. Bert Sires and Mr. Taft and son and daughter of Princeton.

Mrs. E. W. Lamb


Card of Thanks

We thank every one who gave us assistance and comfort
during the sickness and at the death of our wife and mother.
Also for the beautiful flora offerings

Thomas J. Wooderson
Alton Wooderson
Mrms. Walter Wooderson
Mrms. Russell Wooderson

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Subject: WARD, JEWELL, and JAMES WOODERSON
Submitted by: Phil Stewart(JJHist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican-Clipper, Feb 19, 1969

Death Notice: Ward, Jewell and James Wooderson, Harrison Co

Mt Moriah News

Word was received here Saturday of the tragic death of Mr and Mrs Ward Wooderson and son James, of Kansas City, who were all killed in an automobile accident in the city. The bodies are at the Noble-Roberson mortuary in Bethany. The Woodersons formerly lived south of Mt Moriah and are survived by three sons and a daughter living in the western states. Mrs Wooderson is survived by her father Lee Hamilton; two sisters, Mrs Marjorie Cooper and Mrs Betty Whitaker of Bethany. Ward leaves a brother, Reid Wooderson of Des Moines.

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Subject: MARY CHAMBERS WOODWARD
Submitter: Barbra Chambers (MOHarris-Admin@Rootsweb.com)
Source: Unknown

Forever with the Lord

Died. At the old homestead 1 1/2 miles southeast of Cainsville, Mo., on Friday, Dec. 31, 1897, Mrs. Mary (Aunt Polly) Woodard, wife of Ralph (Uncle Ralph) Woodward. Her death was not unexpected. Indeed it is marvelous how she has lived and endured the pain and suffering that she has gone through during the last 5 years. Her patience seemed almost superhuman, and this coupled with her complete resignation to the will of Him who orders all things well. Surely, surely, she ate of that food of which the world knows not.

The deceased was born in Decatur County, Ind., Aug. 1, 1826, and was one of 13 children born to John and Elizabeth Chambers, 7 daughters and 6 sons. She is the last of the girls and but 2 of the boys remain on this side of Time's River, viz.: John Q. Chambers of Cainsville, and Joseph Chambers of Mt. Moriah.

She with her husband united with the Cainsville Baptist Church October 1848 by letter. We have known them intimately for 35 years and over 30 as brother and sister in Christ, and we are free to confess taken all in all, and every relation of life, we have never known their equals. Humble, patient, persevering, charitable (beyond their means), steadfast and unmovable, always abounding in the work of the Lord. Loyal to Christ and liberal in His cause. Faithful under all circmstances, their lives and council have been a wonderful help to me.

They were married in Indiana, Nov. 20, 1844. Seven children were the fruit of this union, 4 sons and 3 daughers, 6 of whom are left to mourn as only children can, a fond and affectionate mother. One son lives at Lamoor, Cal., and the rest are here.

The services were held Jan. 2, 1898 at the old homestead, on account of the enfeebled condition of "Uncle Ralph". The Lesson was taken from Rev. xxii 1-7 and 10-22. Text, Rev. xxii 4-5.

There were no dry eyes, for all who know this couple love them. They are types of character seldom seen and are vanishing from among the children of men. A review of her life, her trials and triumphs, would fill columns of your paper. The good we do lives after us. Death touches only the body. The spirit becomes disengaged, ascends, and shines with additional splendor because separated from its clayey tenement. Types determine every structure in this physical world. Taking Christ's risen body we know all that we need to know of the material and spiritual body and of heaven, which is a place. Here we have 1st the State, there Christ and if it were "far better" for the Apostle so it must be of all His Saints. Death cannot and does not separate us from the love of God, and we shall know and be known, indeed.

It were a double grief if the true hearted,
Who loved us, here, should on the other shore
Remember us no more.
Sad, sad the thought weren't otherwise.


The body was laid to rest in the old Zoar cemetery to await the resurrection of the Just. May God bless and comfort the sorrowing ones and especially the aged companion is our heart's sincere prayer, for Jesus sake.

J. H. Burrows

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Subject: EARNEST "BUNT" WRIGHT
Submitter: Connie Guldner (cguldner@pmma.org)
Source: Bethany Republican Clipper, May 14, 1975

Earnest "Bunt" Wright, son of Grant and Jane Kinnison-Wright was born in Harrison County August 19, 1910 and departed this life Feb. 28, 1975 at the age of 64 years, 6 months and 9 days.

He was preceded in death by his father, mother and three sisters.

On September 4, 1940, he was united in marriage to Maud Hall and to this union two sons were born, Gary and Lonnie. Survivors are his wife, Maud, and two sons, a daughter-in-law, Connie; four grandchildren, Brian, Tammie, Stacy Lonnette and David, which he loved very dearly; three sisters, Mrs. May McLain, Mt. Moriah, MO, Alma Little, Rapid City, SD, Blanch Souders, Jamesport, MO; two brothers, Amos of Everest, KS and Art of Bethany, MO; and a host of nieces, nephews and friends. He became a member of the Mt. Moriah Methodist Church early in his life.

To know Bunt was to love him He was of a kind, generous nature. He was happiest when he had his family and friends with him. He was a patient sufferer and truly appreciated every kindness given him. He was a good husband, father and neighbor, always willing to lend a hand.

Funeral services were held at Stoklasa Funeral Home Monday, March 3 at 2 p.m. A large crowd of sorrowing relatives and friends paid their respects to his memory. They received comfort from a sermon by Rev. Max Haggard.

Burial was in Lloyd Cemetery in Mt. Moriah, MO. Songs were by Mr. and Mrs. Bill Dinsmore, Mrs. Dale Hamilton accompanied them.

Pallbearers were Kenneth Hamilton, Floyd Marsh, Philip Preston, Carl Foster, Kenneth Rice and James Robertson.
Note: The pallbearers were all coworkers from the Mo. State Highway Dept.

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Subject: CORDIA CLARK YOUNGMAN
Submitter: Robert W. Taylor (rtaylor@coin.org)
Source: The Bethany Harrison County Times, 13 January 1955, page 3, column 3:

Mrs. J. Youngman
Died Jan. 8 in California; Rites Today at 2:00 P.M. at Matkins Church
Two Sisters Live Here

Mrs. Jake Youngman, 76, the former Cordia Clark and a sister of Mrs. W.C. Cole and Mrs. Fred Cooper of Bethany, died last Saturday at the home of her daughter Mrs. Herman Chipp (Irene) in El Monte, Calif. She was born near Bethany and had lived in the Matkins community until moving to California with Mr. Youngman about eight years ago. The body was sent by plane to Kansas City and was met Tuesday by the W.G. Noble & Son ambulance and brought to the Noble funeral home in New Hampton. Funeral services will be conducted at 2:00 p.m. today (Thursday)at the Matkins church.

Surviving are her husband, two daughters Mrs. Chipp and Mrs. Jack Payne (Kathleen) and a son Theodore, all of California. Also surviving, besides the two sisters mentioned, is another sister Mrs. Walter Francisco of Colorado Springs, Colo., and two brothers Ben Clark of Hamilton, Mo., and Jesse of Nevada. Mrs. Youngman was an aunt of Mrs. Lowell Welden of Bethany.

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Subject: CORDIA CLARK YOUNGMAN
Submitter: Robert W. Taylor (rtaylor@coin.org)
Source: The Bethany Republican-Cipper, 12 January 1955, p 1, col 4:

Mrs. J. Youngman Rites Tomorrow at Matkins

Funeral services will be held at 2:00 o'clock Thursday at Matkins for Mrs. Cordia Youngman, 76, wife of Jacob Youngman, who died Saturday at El Monte, Calf., in the home of a daughter, Mrs. Herman Chipp. She had been ill for some time.

Mr. and Mrs. Youngman went to El Monte perhaps eight years or more ago.

Another daughter, Mrs. Jack Payne, and a son, Theodore Youngmam, also reside there.

Sisters and brothers are Mrs. W.C. Cole and Mrs. Fred Cooper of Bethany, Mrs. Lillie Francisco of Colorado Springs, Colo., Bennie Clark of Hamilton, and Jesse Clark of near Nevada.

Burial will be at Matkins.

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Subject: MARY MAY YOUNGS
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Republican, May 3, 1893
Obituary - Mary May Youngs

Died, April 23rd, 1893, Mary May Youngs, aged 18 years, 4 months and 23 days. She was the only daughter of Sarah and John Youngs. May was the star of the home, always a kind and loving child. Her teachers and school-mates loved her very dearly, she was so thoughtful of them and unselfish. She leaves a father, mother, 3 brothers, and a host of friends to mourn her loss, but our loss is her eternal gain. She has been ailing for some time but only bed-fast for a short time and bore her sufferings patiently. Ah! little did we think the last time we saw her we would be called on to perform these last sad rites. She was laid to rest in the Hatten graveyard Monday, April 24th. Kind parents and loved ones, let us pause and think, "We are all standing on the brink of eternity. Are we ready?"

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Subject: EDNA YORK ZERBE
Submitter: Phil Stewart (JJHist@grm.net)
Source: Bethany Clipper, Jan 5, 1912
Death of Mrs L. A. Zerbe

After a long illness of consumption, Mrs. Edna York-Zerbe, wife of Len A. Zerbe, died at her home in this city, just as the old year was passing away, Sunday night, Dec 31, 1911. She was born in Harrison County Sept 12, 1887, and was aged at the time of her death 24 years, 3 months and 19 days. She was converted at Martinsville, MO., during the winter of 1901 and united with the Christian church, of which she remained a faithful member until death.

She was married to L. A. Zerbe Jan. 23, 1909, since which time they have made their home in Bethany.

Mrs. Zerbe was naturally of a sunny, hopeful disposition and the cheerful fortitude with which she bore her sufferings, was often remarked upon by those who were acquainted with the conditions. She was a lover of music and though realizing her condition, was ever cheerful, and she loved to have the home brightened by music. She was a true unselfish wife, daughter and sister. She is survived by her husband, father, three brothers and two sisters, who have the sympathy of all our people in their loss.

Funeral services were held from the residence, Bethany, Tuesday afternoon, Jan 2, at 2:30 o'clock, conducted by Rev. John Young, and the remains laid to rest in Miriam Cemetery.

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Subject: MABEL MCLAIN ZWEIMILLER
Submitter: Connie Guldner (cguldner@pmma.org)
Source: Bethany Republican Clipper, May 17, 1989

Mabel McLain Zweimiller, 87, Kansas City, died Friday, May 12. She was formerly from the Cainsville area.

Mrs. Zweimller was born November 14, 1901 in Mercer County. She was a member of the Order of Eastern Star, Kansas City Chapter, and Friendly Assemly of God Church, Kansas City.

She leaves two brothers, Noel McLain, Cainsville; Ted McLain, Blythedale; two sisters, Roma Butler, Laurie, MO and Marguerite Cordle, Kansas City, and several neices and nephews.

Funeral services were Monday May 15 at Stoklasas Memorial Chapel, Cainsville, with Rev. J. Ernest Radford officiating. Burial was at Zoar Cemetery, Cainsville.

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