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Henry County Missouri Biographies
WAD-WEL

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WADDILL, Alexander Nelson
Windsor Township
1883 History of Henry County Missouri, National Historical Co pg 599

Alexander N. Waddill was born in what is now Tebo Township, Henry County, Missouri, December 21, 1838, his parents being John S. and Sophia Waddill, nee Doak. They were both born near Jonesboro, in Washington County, Tennessee, the former on February 16, 1799, and their marriage occurred in that state January 6, 1831. To them were born four children - three sons and one daughter, and with the exception of one son, all are living: Samuel W. born December 5, 1831, died at Virginia City, Nevada, in 1878; Rebecca J., born March 13, 1835; Alexander N., as mentioned above, and James N., born May 1, 1843. In 1838 Mr. W. emigrated with his family to Henry County, Missouri, settling in Tebo Township, where he purchased something over 200 acres of land, and here they remained during life. Mrs. Waddill died June 27, 1843, and about four years thereafter, Mr. W. married Mary A. Pinkston, of this county. They had by this union four daughters and three sons, and of these, three daughters and two sons survive. Alexander N. received a good common schooling, which he supplemented by attending the seminary at Calhoun for one winter. In the spring of 1861 he took a trip to California, and in about eighteen months went to Nevada, where he remained for three years and a half. His father having died February 11, 1865, he returned home in the fall of the same year. In 1866 he purchased 100 acres of land on sections 25 and 26, with his residence on section 25, to which he subsequently added eighty-five acres. January 5, 1868, he married Miss Fannie Carter, of this county. They have three sons: Robert D., John C. and Alexander Thomas, and three daughters: Eliza J., Alice N. and May. Mr. Waddill is one of the thriving farmers of the county, and is quite an extensive stock raiser. In his political preferences he is Democratic.

WADE, Eli
Fields Creek Township
1883 History of Henry County Missouri, National Historical Co pg 689

Eli Wade. The subject of this sketch was born in Floyd County, Virginia, January 20, 1837, being the son of Owen and Lavina (Fliger) Floyd {corr. Wade}, natives of Virginia. Eli was the third of a family of twelve children. His youth was passed on the farm in Virginia, and he received a common school education, following farming until 1871, when he began working at wagon making and carpentering in Tennessee and Illinois. In 1872 he removed to Lafayette County, Missouri, giving his attention to farming two years, after which he worked at wagon making in Higginsville for three years. In 1876 he came to Henry County, Missouri, and remained in Clinton for one year. Since that time he has been occupied in farming. In March, 1880, he took charge of the county farm and has continued to manage it to the entire satisfaction of the citizens of the county. In 1861 he enlisted in Company D, Fifty-fourth Virginia Infantry, and was sergeant of his company. At Bentonville he was captured and taken to Point Lookout, where he was confined for three months. He is a member of the M. E. Church, South. Mr. Wade was married November 14, 1874, to Miss Bettie Albine, of Lafayette County, Missouri. They have two children: Laura and Herbie. They have lost one child, Edgar.

WAGNER, Frank
Deepwater Township
1919 History of Henry Co MO, Uel W. Lamkin, Historical Publishing Co pg 462

Frank Wagner, owner of a nicely improved farm of 106.66 acres of land in Deepwater township, south of Montrose, was born in Germany in 1846, near the Swiss boundary line, and he naturally belongs more to the Swiss nationality than to the German. He is a son of Frank and Catherine Wagner, who emigrated from their native country to America in 1852 and resided in Illinois for the next seven years. In the fall of 1859 the family located in Henry County, Missouri, and Frank Wagner, the father, followed his trade of carpenter and builder, and cabinet maker. He made his first home in Bogard township on a farm which he cultivated in addition to following his trade in various parts of the county. He located in Deepwater township in 1872 and purchased a tract of unimproved prairie land consisting of 160 acres. In the course of time he added another quarter section which, upon his death, was divided among his three sons, Frank, Joseph, and Jacob, who all live on adjoining farms at the Cross Roads south of Montrose. Frank Wagner, subject of this review, placed all of the improvements upon his land and has tilled his acreage successfully up to recent years or until his retirement from actual labor in the fields. Mr. Wagner was married in 1874 to Mary Schissler (born 1852, died 1891), a native of Deepwater township, and the daughter of David Schissler, a Henry County pioneer. Mr. Wagner has reared eight children out of ten born to this marriage: Kate, wife of Joseph Kaumans, living in Wyoming; Joseph, eldest of the family, lives in Kansas; Henry lives in Kansas; Mary, wife of William Hueser, who is tilling the home place, has seven children, Lenora, John, Ida, Loretta, Margaret, Bernard and Bertha; John lives at Rock Island, Illinois; Mrs. Annie Montague, resides at Grand Island, Nebraska; Mrs. Josephine Currie, lives at Rock Island, Illinois; Herman is a farmer in Deepwater township; Frank is deceased. Mr. Wagner is a Democrat. He is a member of the Montrose Catholic Church and is affiliated with the Knights of Columbus. His work here has been well done. He has reared a splendid family and accumulated a sufficient competence to care for his declining years, and has the honor of being one of the real old settlers of Henry County, and being universally respected and esteemed by all who know him.

WAGNER, Joseph
Walker Township
1883 History of Henry County Missouri, National Historical Co pg 726

Joseph Wagner was born on the Juniata River, in Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania, May 26, 1814, and is the eldest of a family of eight children, three of whom, beside himself are living. John T. Wagner, his father, was also a native of the Keystone State. His mother's maiden name was Elizabeth Cross, originally from Maryland. While quite young Joseph was taken to Licking County, Ohio, where he grew to maturity and on September 13, 1836, when in his twenty-third year, he was married to Miss Elizabeth Covey, born in Maryland. They rented a farm for ten years, when he settled in Union County, on land given him by his father. After living in that locality for nine years he returned to Licking County, and remained there until 1864, when he emigrated west and located in Green County, Iowa, where he made his home until 1869. Coming to Henry County in the spring of that year he settled where he now resides. The family has consisted of eight children: Martha Jane, the eldest, (wife of Samuel Carrier), and living at Rich Hill; Francis Marion, lives at Monroe, Wisconsin; James Monroe, married Mary M. Bailey, and is in Leadville, Colorado; Mary Ann is wife of Nathan Lake; Nancy Elizabeth is the wife of J. W. Bennett, at Rich Hill; Emily Eliza married David T. Owens; John Wesley married Elizabeth Harrison, and lives in Davis Township; the youngest, Samuel Cox, was recently married to Miss Marian Birge, and lives with his father. Mr. Wagner has been a justice of the peace for about six years, a position which he has filled with credit.

WALKER, Calvin Edward
Walker Township
1919 History of Henry Co MO, Uel W. Lamkin, Historical Publishing Co pg 604

Calvin Edward Walker - The late Calvin Edward Walker was born March 16, 1858, in Walker township, Henry County, the son of Calvin E. and Martha Walker. Calvin E. Walker was born in North Carolina and in the days when men were coming from the southern and eastern States to homestead Missouri land, Mr. Walker located in what is now Walker township, Henry County. The township was named in his honor, as he was the first homesteader that entered land upon the Government's list. His wife, Mrs. Martha Walker, was a native of North Carolina and she was the mother of eight children, who have made their homes in Henry County and have added to the moral and financial welfare of the county. Calvin Edward Walker gained his education upon the old homestead and in the meager schools of his day. While they were not advanced as far as our educational institutions of today, still they learned the three R's and the practical work of the farm to earn a livelihood. Mr. Walker married Emily Moore, August 1, 1880. She was born March 19, 1861, in Walker township, Henry County. Her parents were among the early settlers of the township and are now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Walker are the parents of six children, all living in Walker township with the exception of Earl, who is serving in the National Army in Camp Funston, Kansas. They are as follow: Lillie M., deceased; George, whose sketch appears in this volume; Earl, in the service of the United States; Calvin P., twin to Earl, at home; Charles C., Walker township; Addie M., wife of Claude Jenkins, Lucas, Missouri. C. Edward Walker passed away April 20, 1900, and since his demise Mrs. Walker has continued to operate the home farm with the help of her sons, who are filling the places of their respected father and grandfather in Walker township.

WALKER, George W.
Walker Township
1919 History of Henry Co MO, Uel W. Lamkin, Historical Publishing Co pg 603

George W. Walker - The descendants of Calvin E. Walker, the first homesteader of Walker township, are scattered all through that township, and George Walker, whose name introduces this review, is a member of this family and a descendant of this hardy pioneer. George Walker was born October 19, 1883, in Walker township, Henry County, the son of Calvin Edward Walker and Emma (Moore) Walker, both of whom are from representative families of Walker township, their birthplace. George Walker was united in marriage with Miss Pearl Steel in 1908, a native of Henry County and a member of one of the pioneer families of this county. She inherited ninety acres of land from her father's estate which she and her husband are now farming. To Mr. and Mrs. Walker have been born four children as follow: Lillie M., May O., Claude and Ralph. Mr. Walker carries on a general farming business and raises wheat and corn and also raises stock. In politics he is a Republican and one of Henry County's progressive and public spirited citizens. He takes a keen interest in local affairs. As a citizen of this county and State he stands ever ready to do his duty.

WALKER, Richard R.
Walker Township
1883 History of Henry County Missouri, National Historical Co pg 726

Richard R. Walker was born in Stokes, (now Forsyth) County, North Carolina, March 24, 1825. His parents, David Walker and Mary, nee Bennett, who were both natives of North Carolina, had eight children in their family, of whom Richard was the sixth. Only five of the number are now living and he is the only one in Missouri. In 1855, September 2, he was married in Stokes County, North Carolina, to Miss Melissa Ann Hart, who died just four years afterward, on September 2, 1855. In the September following his marriage he came to Missouri and settled in White Oak Township, Henry County, where he entered a forty acre tract of land, upon which he lived one season. Then he entered forty acres on Grandady Branch. He also preempted a tract on Deepwater, upon which he built a house. In 1860 Mr. Walker returned to North Carolina and remained four years, locating on his present place in the next year. His farm contains eighty acres, all improved. In 1874 he went to Texas, but stayed only two years. He is a carpenter by trade, and much of his time has been employed at work at this calling. At the spring election of 1882 Mr. W. was chosen a justice of the peace. He is a Republican in politics, and is a member of the M. E. Church. He has one son, James T.

WALKER, Robert W.
Walker Township
1883 History of Henry County Missouri, National Historical Co pg 727

Robert W. Walker was born in New Forsythe County, North Carolina, (at that time Stokes County), October 15, 1845, and was the son of Dr. William and Elizabeth B. (VanHoy) Walker, both natives of that state. The former was born in Stokes County, October 19, 1804, and his wife in November, 1809. His grandfather came from Ireland early in the last century. The family of VanHoys are of Holland descent, and the ancestors were probably contemporaries with the Knickerbockers of New York. William and Elizabeth were married October 19, 1828. Dr. Walker early began the practice of medicine, which he continued through life. He came to Missouri and to Henry County in the spring of 1852, in company with several other families, and located on Deepwater, where he entered about 500 acres of land and where he lived until his death which occurred February 12, 1881. On the 10th of the month the doctor was superintending the loading of some saw logs, and one falling upon him he sustained injuries which resulted in his death. He had been one of the county's most highly respected and influential men, and his death was seriously felt by hundreds whose good fortune it had been to know him. He was one of the pioneer physicians here, and his practice extended over a large scope of country. His soul was in the work, and when called upon to render professional services to suffering fellow beings, he never hesitated to comfort the distressed, though often without hope of pecuniary gain. He became a professor of religion when a young man, and was a member of the M. E. Church for upwards of forty years, but since 1865 he had been connected with the Cumberland Presbyterians, and lived a consistent Christian life. None were quicker to respond to charity's call, and to the stranger who approached his door the latch string was always on the outside. His wife, Elizabeth, survived him but a few months, dying on the 12th of the following September. Robert W. is the only son living, one, the second in the family, James H., dying in camp in 1862, at Georgetown, Pettis County, aged about thirty-one years. Four sisters are living: Flavia V., (wife of B. M. Wayne), Luzettie J. (wife of John C. Rice), Florina A., (wife of John R. Greenhalgh), and Candace O., (wife of John Anderson, of Pleasant Hill, Missouri.) Three sisters have died. The eldest of the family, Martha A., died in 1855, at the age of twenty-six, Mary E., in 1852, when eighteen years old, and Verlinda E., also in 1855, at fifteen years of age. Robert Walker was married October 15, 1868, at Knob Noster, to Miss Mary E. Smith, daughter of a pioneer of Johnson County. She died of consumption November 19, 1877, leaving three children: Demarius Otelia, Charles Edward and William Jesse. Two years after this, Mr. Walker was married on November 24, 1879, to Miss Paulina McMillan, who was born in Forsythe County, North Carolina, January 17, 1859. They have one child, living: Lora Leona, and recently buried a little boy, Robert Hamilton, who died November 13, 1882. Mr. Walker received such education as could be gained in the schools of the county, prior to the war, and having access to his father's library, he soon acquired a thirst for reading and became familiar with standard works. He has served the people in the capacity of justice for some time, having been elected and afterwards appointed. Himself, wife, and eldest daughter are connected with the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Mr. Walker lives on a part of the land which his father entered on his coming to the country.

WALKER, William H.
Windsor Township
1883 History of Henry County Missouri, National Historical Co pg 600

William H. Walker, the popular editor and publisher of the Windsor Review, is the son of Wyatt Walker, Esq., who was born in North Carolina, where he resided until 1856, in that year moving to Pittsylvania County, Virginia. There he remained until 1870, working at his trade of wagon making. In 1870 he settled in Henry County, Missouri, and here still resides, carrying on his former business. He is a member of the M. E. Church, South, and a local minister of that denomination. William H., the youngest of eight children of Wyatt and Pamelia Walker, was born in Yanceyville, North Carolina, March 25, 1855. His mother was a Gilchrist, of North Carolina, a name quite common in that section of the state. William received his education in the common schools of Virginia until sixteen years of age, when he entered a hardware store in Windsor, being employed for two years as clerk. His tastes inclining toward journalism, he entered the office of the Windsor Helmet as an apprentice, and when that paper was moved to Tuscumbia, Miller County, he followed its fortunes and remained in the office altogether about eighteen months. Leaving there he was employed on the various papers in Southwestern Missouri, until 1876, when he returned to Windsor and started the Windsor Review, a family paper devoted to the building up of the material industries of that section of Henry County. With this object in view, he has carefully avoided committing his paper to the support of any political organization. Owing to his ability as a writer and his practical sagacity as a business man, he has succeeded in building up a successful newspaper where older and more experienced journalists have failed. His paper has one of the largest circulation's of any in Southwest Missouri. Though holding aloof from party politics, Mr. Walker is outspoken and decided on all questions of general interest, and gives free expression to his judgment of public men and measures, and proves the independence of his journal. Politically, his personal affiliations are with the Democrats, but in his editorial capacity he knows no party, but advocates such measures and supports such candidates as in his honest judgment will advance the interests of the community at large. Though but a young man he has made an enviable reputation for himself at home, and is becoming favorably known abroad. Mr. Walker married Miss Lelia Smith, October, 15, 1882. She is the daughter of Dr. B. F. Smith and Adaline Smith nee Depp, of Windsor. The latter was a native of Missouri.

WALKLEY, Stephen
Clinton Township
1883 History of Henry County Missouri, National Historical Co pg 548

Stephen Walkley, section 4, was born in Genesee County, New York, July 4, 1817. He passed his younger days and was educated in that county, following agricultural pursuits as his occupation. In October, 1844, he removed to Dodge County, Wisconsin, where he was engaged in land speculating and farming. He made this his home till 1865, but during his residence there, in 1856, he came to Missouri, and purchased large tracts of land in several counties of this state. In 1865, he moved to Henry County, settling in Clinton, where he was occupied in the real estate business and money loaning till 1872. Then he located on one of his farms, and has since been actively devoted to farming. He lived on different estates in this county till 1879, when he moved to his present place. He here has 550 acres of well improved land, and also 120 acres of excellent land in St. Clair County. Mr. Walkley was married May 22, 1873, to Miss Mary E. Wilson, a native of Ohio. They have two children: William W. and Stephen A.

WALL, Eugene E.
Tebo Township
1919 History of Henry Co MO, Uel W. Lamkin, Historical Publishing Co pg 574

Eugene E. Wall - The day of the old time methods of tilling the soil in Missouri with its attendant waste and depletion of fertility and natural resources is fast passing. Intelligent methods of crop raising, conserving the richness of the soil and the application of scientific knowledge to crop production and the raising of live stock is taking the place of the former slipshod methods of hit and miss ways of farming. It has been ascertained that it costs less to produce live stock of the pure bred variety and to fatten them for the markets than to raise the former scrub cattle and hogs with which the Missouri farms were formerly stocked. Here and there in the different counties of the State a number of intelligent and highly progressive agriculturists and live stock men are taking the lead in this latest development in the science of animal husbandry. Where formerly the stockman gave little heed to the kind of cattle and hogs which he raised from year to year, there are now leaders who keep and produce only the best and purest bred stock which in turn is dispersed over the country among others who see the need of improving their herds, and a vast amount of good results. A leader in the production of fine livestock, and one of the most successful and widely known breeders in the State of Missouri is Eugene E. Wall of Tebo township, Henry County. Mr. Wall embarked in the pure bred live stock industry in 1895, and now maintains one of the most famous herds of registered Hereford cattle in the country. His Herefords have been exhibited throughout the country at various State fairs and the American Royal Stock Show at Kansas City. In the season of 1911, Mr. Wall sold a carload of cattle which brought the highest price on the Kansas City market, known up to that time, the cattle bringing $12.50 per hundred weight, a price of two dollars over and above the top market price. Again in 1912, he received $12.20 per hundred for a carload of cattle. Mr. Wall's herd leader, "Beau Merry" No.566449, was bred by Gudgell and Simpson, and the animal is valued at over $4,000. The fine cattle produced on the Wall farm are sold in many Western and Southern States, and he holds public sales which are attended by buyers from all sections of the country. Mr. Wall is also a breeder of Duroc Jersey hogs. Eugene E. Wall was born in Tebo township, June 26, 1860, the son of Julius F. and Bettie (Woolfolk) Wall, who were parents of two children: Eugene E., subject of this sketch; and Julius F., a druggist in Windsor. The father of these boys was killed on August 16, 1862, while participating in the Battle of Lone Jack, he having enlisted with the Confederate forces at the outbreak of the Civil War. He was born in North Carolina in 1830 and accompanied his parents to Henry County, Missouri, in 1836, the family settling on the farm now owned by Eugene E. Wall, of this review. The grandfather of Eugene E. Wall was Mason Wall, who was well known among the early pioneers of Henry County. On the 10th of August, 1862, about 100 boys of northern Henry and southern Johnson County met in an elm grove, about three miles southwest of where Leeton now stands. Doctor Warren was made captain of the company. The following day Julius F. Wall joined this company. This company joined the command of General Cockrell in the western part of Henry County and were sworn into the Confederate service in the afternoon of August 15th. This was about four miles west of Lone Jack, and in the night of the 15th they marched into Lone Jack, where the battle was fought on August 16. Julius F. Wall and a number of others of this county were killed in this battle and were buried by their comrades on the battlefield where they had fallen. After the war a monument was erected to mark the graves of the Confederate dead. Julius F. Wall's father, Mason Wall, was a native of North Carolina and fought in the War of 1812 and was made major. After the war he received a grant of land from the Government for his services. In 1836, Mason Wall came to Henry County. Mrs. Bettie (Woolfolk) Wall was born in Boone County, Missouri, and her parents, formerly from Kentucky, settled in Henry County, in 1856. After the death of Julius F. Wall, his widow married James H. Bass. Four children were born of this marriage: Mrs. Kate Carmichael, Holden, Missouri; Mrs. Sallie Hayden, widow, living at Pueblo, Colorado; Mrs. Ella Grinstead, deceased; Mrs. Bessie Rex, Drexel, Missouri. The mother of these children departed this life in 1900. After attending the district school and the Windsor public school, Eugene E. Wall studied for one year, 1876-1877, in Central College at Fayette, Missouri. From 1877 to 1881, he was engaged in the sheep business in western Texas. Returning to Windsor, he was connected with the furniture and undertaking business there until his marriage in 1883, at which time he purchased the old home place of the family and engaged in farming and live stock raising. Mr. Wall has prospered as he deserved and is owner of 720 acres of well improved farm land. March 7, 1883, Eugene E. Wall and Miss Anna Sutherland were united in marriage. Mrs. Anna Wall was born February 4, 1863, in Boone County, Missouri, the daughter of Logan and Margaret (Harris) Sutherland, natives of Kentucky, both of whom are descended from Colonial Revolutionary stock. To this marriage five children have been born: Charles S., a farmer in Tebo township; Julius F., a private in the National Army; Mrs. Helen Pigg, Windsor, Missouri, who with her mother, is a member of the daughters of the American Revolution; Logan and John W., at home with their parents. Mr. Wall is allied with the Democratic party, but confines his interest and activities in politics to voting. He and Mrs. Wall are members of the Baptist Church. Mr. Wall is affiliated with the American Hereford Breeders' Association and takes considerable interest in the affairs of this association.

WALL, James William
Shawnee Township
1883 History of Henry County Missouri, National Historical Co pg 674

James W. Wall, of the firm of Wall & Reynolds, merchants at Shawnee Mound, was born in Henry County, Missouri, September 22, 1851. His father, James Wall, was a native of North Carolina, and a son of William M. Wall, of the same state. His mother's maiden name was Mary J. Fewell, of North Carolina. The subject of this sketch was the oldest of a family of six children. His youth was spent on a farm in this county, and he attended for some time the common schools. Subsequently he followed farming here until 1876, when he was employed as salesman in a store in Calhoun. In the same year he engaged in merchandising at Burnett's store, in Johnson County, and continued the business there and at other places in the same county until 1880, when he returned to the farm and lived upon it till July, 1881, when he established himself in the grocery business at Calhoun, and in 1882 he started in business at Shawnee Mound, with S. M. Reynolds. They carry a large stock of general merchandise, and are enjoying a most remunerative trade. Mr. Wall also owns a fine farm of 160 acres, well improved, with good house, out buildings, etc. Besides this he possesses town property in Calhoun. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity. August 14, 1872, he married Miss Emma O. Avery, a daughter of Judge William Avery. Her death occurred January 7, 1875.

WALL, Martha J.
Tebo Township
1883 History of Henry County Missouri, National Historical Co pg 657

Mrs. Martha J. Wall, who at this time resides with her son-in-law, J. G. Callison, was born in Rockingham County, North Carolina, June 23, 1820, being the daughter of William M. and Elizabeth Wall, nee Walker, who were married May 11, 1816. They had four children, of whom Martha is the only one now living. His first wife dying in May, 1825; William Wall married July 31, 1827, Miss Sarah A. Fewell. He came to Henry County, Missouri, in 1838, located six miles north of Calhoun and became quite wealthy. He erected the first steam flouring mill west of St. Louis in 1841 or 1842, but during the war it was burned by order of General Pope. Mr. W. died August 2, 1865, at the age of seventy-two years. Martha J. Wall was married May 17, 1843, to Rev. Samuel D. Gilbert, and to them were born two children. A daughter, Sarah F., was born September 26, 1844, and subsequently became the wife of James H. Blackwell, she dying soon after her marriage. The son, William P., was born November 2, 1845; died May 3, 1857. Mr. Gilbert died September 13, 1847. On August 21, 1850, Mrs. G. married William J. Wall, and they had four children, two of whom survive, James R. and Hildred R. Mr. Wall departed this life August 19, 1873. Mrs. W. has been a member of the Sardis-Bethlehem Baptist Church for thirty years.

WALLACE, Oliver E.
Bogard Township
1883 History of Henry County Missouri, National Historical Co pg 697

Oliver E. Wallace, M.D., physician and surgeon, at Urich, was born in Johnson County, Missouri, February 19, 1857, being the son of George W. and Margaret (Given) Wallace; his father a native of Tennessee and his mother of Missouri. Oliver was the second of a family of three children - two sons and one daughter. He was reared as a farmer's boy attending the schools of the county and the Warrensburg Normal School. In 1878 he began the study of medicine with Dr. Samuel Day, of Pittsville, with whom be remained for about eighteen months. In 1879 he entered the Physiomedical College at Cincinnati, Ohio, graduating there in March, 1881. In April of that year he located at Urich, where he began the practice of medicine, which has since been constantly increasing. During the winter of 1881-82 he returned to Cincinnati where he lectured in the college from whence he graduated. The doctor is a member of the Baptist Church and also belongs to the I. O. O. F. fraternity. December 4, 1882, he married Miss Lillie Harris, a native of Illinois.

WALLAR, Charles M.
Windsor Township
1883 History of Henry County Missouri, National Historical Co pg 600

Charles M. Wallar, attorney at law, was born in Washington County, Ohio, September 9, 1854. Rev. James Lee Wallar, his father, now of Enfield, White County, Illinois, belongs to the southern Illinois Conference. He was born in Rutland, Vermont, November 25, 1819, and learned the stone cutting business in the marble quarries of that place. He then studied law and practiced for several years in Columbus, Ohio, and in Marietta. The practice of his profession was not preferable to him, so he abandoned it and entered the ministry of the M. E. Church. In 1861 he enlisted in Meigs County, Ohio, and raised 125 young men for three month's service, and was captain. At the close of this time he entered Company A, second West Virginia Cavalry, together with his company of young men. Captain W. was promoted to major, and participated in many severe battles under command of Colonel Paxton. After leaving the army he removed to Richland County, Illinois, joined the conference and engaged in preaching. He married Miss Fanny E. Gammard, and they had seven children, of whom four are now living. The subject of this sketch is the fourth son of the family. He received his education at McKendrie College, Lebanon, Illinois, and subsequently read law with Judge Bell, of Mt. Carmel, Illinois, and S. P. Wheeler, of Cairo, and was admitted to practice by the supreme court of Illinois July 4, 1876, only sixteen out of a class of forty-two being admitted. During this time he was obliged to teach school in order to study his profession. He commenced practicing in Newton, Illinois, in 1876, and in May, 1882, he located in Windsor, Missouri. Though a comparatively recent arrival here he has become one of the foremost citizens of the place, and is having a good practice. Mr. Wallar married Miss Laura C. Townsend January 27, 1878. She was the daughter of William S. Townsend, of Mt. Carmel, Illinois. They have one son, Charles B., born January 20, 1881. Politically he is a Democrat. He belongs to the M. E. Church, South.

WALLIS, J. R.
Clinton, Henry Co, MO
1919 History of Henry Co MO, Uel W. Lamkin, Historical Publishing Co pg 314

Dr. J. R. Wallis, a prominent physician and surgeon of Clinton, Missouri, was born at Marshfield, Missouri, January 18, 1860. He is a son of Dr. C. S. and Elizabeth (Hoover) Wallis. Dr. C. S. Wallis, the father, was a pioneer physician of Missouri and practiced his profession at Marshfield for over fifty years. He was a native of Columbia, Tennessee, and came to Missouri in 1844. He died in 1903, aged seventy-four years. His wife was a native of North Carolina. She departed this life in 1905, aged seventy-three years. They were the parents of ten children, six of whom are living as follow: Sarah Elizabeth, married Samuel N. Dickey, an attorney at law of Marshfield, Missouri; Dr. J. R., the subject of this sketch; Emma, is the widow of Emmet Ming and she now resides at San Antonio, Texas; Sophia, the widow of Harry Fyan, Marshfield, Missouri; Hattie, the wife of J. L. Pipkin, Marshfield, Missouri, and Dolly, the wife of W. H. McMahan, Marshfield, Missouri. Dr. J. R. Wallis received his preparatory education in the public schools of his native town, and entered the Washington University at St. Louis, Missouri, where he was graduated with a degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1883. He then entered the Bellevue Hospital Medical College, New York City, where he also was graduated with a degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1884. After practicing for one year in Marshfield, Missouri, he came to Henry County and located at La Due and after five years went to Montrose, where he was engaged in practice for fifteen years. In 1905 he removed to Clinton. Dr. Wallis' removal from La Due and Montrose by no means meant that he had given up his practice in that section of the county. He merely extended his field of operation, and since coming to Clinton he has continued to treat many of his old patients in the vicinity of La Due and Montrose. Dr. Wallis was united in marriage in 1884 with Miss Frances Ming of Washington, Missouri. She is a daughter of Judge James N. Ming and Jemima (Osborn) Ming, both of whom are now deceased. To Dr. and Mrs. Wallis has been born one child, Elizabeth, now the wife of James Parks, a well known attorney of Clinton, who is associated with his father, Peyton Parks, in the practice of his profession. Dr. Wallis belongs to a family notable for its great number of physicians. Not only his father, but two of his father's brothers were physicians, and a number of their sons, cousins of Dr. Wallis, are also physicians. Dr. Wallis has never ceased being a hard student of the science of his profession and has taken a number of post-graduate courses. He has done post-graduate work in the St. Louis Post-Graduate School of Medicine and has also taken a post-graduate course in the Polyclinic Medical School of New York City. He is a member of the County, State and American Medical Societies and the Southern Medical Society. He holds membership in the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and he is a member of the Methodist Church, South. He is a Democrat.

WALLY, Andrew
Deepwater Township
1919 History of Henry Co MO, Uel W. Lamkin, Historical Publishing Co pg 867

Andrew Wally was born in Switzerland, May 14, 1853, and is the son of Joseph and Bertha (Minch) Wally, both of whom were natives of the Canton of Graubunden, Switzerland, and immigrated to America in 1870. They first located in Michigan, where they joined their son Andrew, who had preceded them to this country. From Michigan they went to Illinois and in 1871 they came to Montrose, Missouri, where Joseph Wally followed his trade of stonemason and also engaged in farming. Recently he removed to his son's ranch in western Arkansas and is making his home there. He was born in 1827. Mrs. Joseph Walley was born in 1836 and died in 1911. They were parents of four children: Mrs. Margaret Negg, deceased; Mrs. Eve Herman died in Bates County, Missouri, April 18, 1918; Mrs. Mary Kloeppinger, Rockville, Missouri; and Andrew Wally, subject of this sketch. When he had attained the age of fifteen years, Andrew Wally left his native land in order to find fortune in America. He first located in Michigan, from there went to Illinois and in 1871 he arrived in Montrose. For a period of two years he was employed as section hand on the Missouri, Kansas & Texas railroad. For seven years he was engaged in the mercantile business in the employ of O. S. Johnson. In 1880 he embarked in business on his own account with a small stock of hardware goods and a small capital which represented his savings for the past seven years. The business grew constantly and in 1885, Mr. Wally found it necessary to erect a new building, now known as the Wally building, in order to adequately house his large stock of hardware and implements. Mr. Wally succeeded in building up one of the largest hardware concerns in Henry County and he continued to operate the business until his retirement from active business affairs in 1910. He is owner of a large and well-equipped ranch in Benton County, Arkansas, located six miles west of Gravette. Mr. and Mrs. Wally divide their time between the ranch and Montrose. They have a beautiful, modern home in Montrose, built of stucco and very attractive both inside and out. Mr. Wally was married in 1883 to Wilhelmina Beckman, who was born in 1858 at Stadfelt, Saxony, Germany, and is the daughter of Heinrich and Amelia (Reinhart) Beckman, the latter of whom died in her native country in 1864. Heinrich Beckman immigrated to America in 1872 and settled on a farm located fifteen miles from Washington, Missouri. He died on his farm. Mr. and Mrs. Wally have one son and a daughter: Joseph Henry, engaged in business in Kansas City, married Edna Regnier, and has two children, Joseph, Jr., aged five years, and Bettie, one year old; Minnie, wife of Wallace Carl Duewel, who is operating the Wally ranch in Arkansas. Mr. Wally was formerly a Republican but of late years has become an independent voter. He has filled all local offices in Montrose during his long business career in this city and was always found in the forefront of civic movements which were intended for the betterment of the community in general. He and Mrs. Wally are members of the Presbyterian Church. He is fraternally affiliated with the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Ancient Order of United Workmen, and is also a member of the Masonic Blue Lodge, and the Commandery.

WARD, Ernest
Big Creek Township
1919 History of Henry Co MO, Uel W. Lamkin, Historical Publishing Co pg 722

Ernest Ward, a well known and progressive farmer and stockman of Big Creek township, is a member of one of the worthy pioneer families of Henry County. He was born in Big Creek township April 5, 1881, and is a son of Lafayette and Melissa A. (Waugh) Ward. A more extensive sketch of the Ward family appears elsewhere in this volume. Lafayette and Melissa A. (Waugh) Ward are the parents of the following children: W. S., a sketch of whom appears in this volume; Charles E., deceased; O. L., lives in Montana; Oscar T., Big Creek township, and Ernest, the subject of this sketch. Ernest Ward was reared on the home farm and received his education in the public schools of Henry County. He began farming on his own account in Montana when he was eighteen years of age in partnership with his brother, O. L. Ward. He continued farming in Montana for two years, when he came home and assumed control and operation of the home place, to which he has since devoted his attention. The Ward farm is located two and one-half miles east of Blairstown and contains 185 acres of well improved and valuable land. The farm buildings are modern and commodious and the place is well adapted to stock raising. Mr. Ward is not only extensively engaged in general farming but raises high grade mules, horses, cattle and hogs, and is recognized as one of the successful stock raisers of Henry County. On December 20, 1908, Ernest Ward was united in marriage with Miss Edith Atkins, daughter of County Judge R. O. and Dora (Doak) Atkins of Johnson County. Judge Atkins was born in Pettis County, Missouri, and is a son of James Atkins, a native of Kentucky, who was born in 1828 and died at Blairstown, Missouri, in 1904. James Atkins married Elizabeth Elliott, also a native of Adair County, Kentucky, born November 21, 1832, and died May 20, 1912. James Atkins and his wife settled in Henry County near Windsor in 1850. About three years later they removed to Johnson County, Missouri. The remains of James Atkins and wife were buried at Blairstown. To Judge R. O. Atkins and wife were born the following children: John, who now resides on the home place in Big Creek township, Henry County; Edith, the wife of Ernest Ward, the subject of this sketch; Ethel, married Harry Salsbury, principal of the Blairstown public schools; Mary, who resides with her father in Johnson County; Jennings, George and William, residing at home. To Ernest Ward and wife have been born the following children: Alberta Lee, Charles Ray and Robert Harold. Mr. Ward is one of Henry County's substantial citizens and the Ward family is prominent in the community.

WARD, Oscar T.
Big Creek Township
1919 History of Henry Co MO, Uel W. Lamkin, Historical Publishing Co pg 724

Oscar T. Ward, a prominent farmer and stockman of Big Creek township, is a native of Henry County and was born in the township where he now resides March 13, 1879. He is a son of Lafayette and Melissa A. (Waugh) Ward. A more extensive history of the Ward family appears in connection with the sketch of W. S. Ward. To Lafayette and Melissa A. (Waugh) Ward were born the following children: W. S., a sketch of whom appears in this volume; Charles, who was accidentally killed while digging a well on the Oscar T. Ward place; O. L., who resides in Montana; Oscar T., the subject of this sketch, and Ernest, who resides on the home farm. Oscar T. Ward was reared in Big Creek township and received his education in the district schools of Henry County. He has made farming and stock raising his life work. He purchased his first piece of land, which consisted of seventy acres, in September, 1901, and has added to this place from time to time until he now owns one hundred fifty-six acres of valuable land, one hundred sixteen acres of which is in Big Creek township and forty acres in Chilhowee township, Johnson County, Missouri. The Ward farm is well improved with good fences and modern farm buildings. The place is well watered and suitable for stock raising as well as general farming. Mr. Ward raises mules, cattle and hogs quite extensively and is regarded as one of the highly successful farmers and stockmen of the community. December 22, 1901, Oscar T. Ward and Miss Alice Albin were united in marriage. She is a daughter of D. L. and Hattie Albin, and was born in Ross County, Ohio, November 22, 1881. The Albin family came to Missouri in 1882 when Mrs. Ward was about a year old. They located in Johnson County, Chilhowee township, where the parents now reside. Mrs. Ward was one of the following children born to her parents: Charles, Greenfield, Oklahoma; Alice, the wife of Oscar T. Ward, the subject of this sketch; Mrs. John Davis, Big Creek township; Mrs. Walter Doak, Greenfield, Oklahoma; Roy Albin, who resides in Big Creek township; Myrtle, deceased; Mrs. Howard Waugh, Big Creek township; Edith and Edna, twins; Edna married Fred Shiel, Greenfield, Oklahoma, and Edith resides at home with her parents, and Nadine, who also resides with her parents. To Oscar Ward and wife have been born the following children: Forest Fay, Irene, Elva Ruth and Orval L. Mr. Ward is a member of the Masonic Lodge at Blairstown and also the Modern Woodmen of America. He takes an active interest in local public affairs and for many years served as treasurer of the consolidated school district number one, resigning from that position in 1917. He and his wife are members of the Presbyterian Church at Blairstown. He is an elder and is now serving his second year as superintendent of the Sunday school. The Ward family are well known and prominent in the community.

WARD, W. S.
Big Creek Township
1919 History of Henry Co MO, Uel W. Lamkin, Historical Publishing Co pg 698

W. S. Ward, a well-to-do and progressive farmer and stockman of Big Creek township, is a native of Indiana. He was born in Boone County, February 19, 1868, and is a son of Lafayette and Malissa A. (Waugh) Ward, natives of Indiana. The Ward family came to Henry County in 1869, when W. S. was about one year old. They settled about two miles east of where Blairstown now stands. Here the father engaged in farming until the time of his death in 1882. His widow married Abraham Crites, who is now deceased, and she lives at Blairstown. To Lafayette and Malissa (Waugh) Ward, were born the following children: W. S., the subject of this sketch; Charles E., deceased; Omer, deceased; O. L., Salesville, Montana; O. T., Big Creek township; and Ernest, who resides on the home place in Big Creek township. W. S. Ward was reared on the home farm in Big Creek township and received his education in the rural schools of Henry County. He remained at home with his parents until he was twenty-two years of age. He then went to Johnson County, Missouri, where he was engaged in farming for four years, when he returned to Henry County and engaged in farming and stock raising in Big Creek township. He bought his present farm in 1902 and since then has added many improvements, making of it one of the attractive and valuable places of this township. Mr. Ward is a modern farmer and stockman, as the neat and well-kept appearance of his farm indicates. In 1889 W. S. Ward was united in marriage with Miss Katie R. Shelton, a daughter of C. D. and Emma (Ray) Shelton of Chilhowee, Johnson County, Missouri. Mrs. Ward was born in Illinois and her parents are also natives of that State. C. D. and Emma Ray Shelton are the parents of the following children: Katie R., the wife of W. S. Ward; James M., Kansas City, Missouri; W. A., Bozeman, Montana; Mrs. Mary Coe, Ft. Worth, Texas; C. N., Big Creek township; Mrs. Pearl Wright, Sedalia, Missouri; and Mrs. Alice Killingsworth, Walnut Grove, Missouri. To W. S. Ward and wife have been born the following children: Otto, born in 1890, enlisted in the United States Army September 20, 1917, and is now in the service in France, having gone there with the 88th Division in March, 1918; Francis P., born 1891, was educated in the Big Creek Consolidated High School and graduated at the University of Missouri. He then accepted a position as teacher of science in the high school at Litchfield, Illinois, for two years, filling the position of principal the last half of the second year. He entered the United States Army July 6, 1918, and is now stationed at the Central Officers' Training School, Camp Zachary Taylor, Louisville, Kentucky. Blanche, born 1895, a graduate of the Big Creek Consolidated High School, who resides at home with her parents. W. S. Ward is one of the substantial men of Big Creek township and all the members of the Ward family are prominent in Henry County.

WARE, Frank S.
Clinton Township
1883 History of Henry County Missouri, National Historical Co pg 548

Frank S. Ware is the popular collector of Henry County. The subject of this sketch was born in Woodford County, Kentucky, December 3, 1844. His father, H. P. Ware, and his mother, (formerly Eliza J. Watkins) were Kentuckians by birth, and were married in that state. They reared four children, of whom Frank was the second child. When he was eight years old the family went to Henry County, Tennessee, where they resided till 1858, then removing to Calhoun, Henry County, Missouri. At the age of sixteen years Frank was engaged as clerk with his uncle, then a merchant at Calhoun, and continued in that capacity till 1862, when he went to Sedalia, Missouri. He gave his attention to various branches of trade, and in 1870 he came to Clinton, Missouri, and in 1875 was appointed deputy collector of the county. After serving in that position for six years he was elected collector in 1881, and entered upon the duties of this office in March following, and in November, 1882, he was re-elected to the same office. Mr. Ware was married September 18, 1881, to Miss Jennie S. Salmon. They have one child, Louise. He is a member of the I. O. O. F. fraternity.

WATKINS, William G.
Clinton Township
1883 History of Henry County Missouri, National Historical Co pg 549

William G. Watkins, dealer in organs, sewing machines, etc., was born in Mason County, West Virginia, March 14, 1833. He was reared at his birth place and his early life was that of a farmer's boy. He came to Henry County in 1853 and for two years followed farming, then being engaged in manufacturing lumber and running a saw mill until the outbreak of the war. He was one of the first in Henry County to offer his services to the south, enlisting in Captain Owens' Company of Missouri State Guards. After serving six months he joined Shelby's command and was commissioned captain. He was authorized to recruit a company. and while operating in Saline County was arrested and taken to St. Louis and confined in prison, and afterwards tried by a military commission for being found within the lines of the regularly organized forces of the United States, and having in his possession and person commissions and pretended authority to recruit for the armies of the so called Confederate States, of which commissions the following are copies: CAMP HINDMAN, Mo., September 9, 1862. Captain W. G. Watkins is hereby authorized to recruit a company of cavalry for the army for three years, or during the war, to consist of eighty able bodied and well mounted men, and to furnish transportation and subsistence for the same, and to report to these headquarters whenever required. (Signed) J. V. Cockrell, Colonel Commanding C. S. A. Headquarters Jackman's Partisans, November 24 1862. Captain Watkins; Sir: - In pursuance of an order from Major General Hindman, commanding the trans-Mississippi district, and Col. Waldo P. Johnson, recruiting officer of the state of Missouri, you are hereby authorized to enlist and swear into service of the Confederate States for three years, or the war, one company of men to serve as cavalry and comprise a part of my independent regiment, now being raised to operate in the state of Missouri, and to report to these headquarters as soon as practicable. S. D. Jackman, Colonel Commanding. The commission having materially considered the evidence in the case, sentence the prisoner to be shot to death at such time and place as the general commanding the department may direct. The findings and sentence of the commission in this case was approved by the proper commanders and forwarded for the action of the president of the United States. The sentence has been approved and will be carried into effect September 23, 1864, at St. Louis, under the direction of the provost marshal general. He made his escape from the prison and thus thwarted the sentence of the military commission. He rejoined his command at Batesville, Arkansas. He continued in active service until the surrender, in 1865. He returned to Missouri and for one year was interested in farming and milling, then he came to Henry County, which has since been his home, excepting a period of five months in Texas. In 1876 the firm of Watkins Brothers embarked in the general merchandise business and continued therein until March, 1883. Mr. Watkins married Miss Mary H. Spencer, a native of North Carolina, in May, 1867.

WAUGH, James H.
Big Creek Township
1919 History of Henry Co MO, Uel W. Lamkin, Historical Publishing Co pg 408
Photos:    James Waugh    Gertrude Haines Waugh    Waugh Group
James H. Waugh, a leading farmer and influential citizen of Big Creek township, was born in Montgomery County, Indiana, February 27, 1866. He is a son of John W. and Julia A. (Hamilton) Waugh, natives of Indiana. The Waugh family trace their family history back to northern England to the year 1687, to John Waugh ,who was born in 1687 and died in 1781. His son, Joseph, was born in 1726 and died in 1819. Joseph's son, Joseph, Jr., was born in 1763 and died in 1849. He was a soldier in the Revolutionary War. His son, Milo, was born in 1804 and died in 1857. Milo was the father of John W., who was born in 1839 and died in 1910, and he moved from Ohio to Indiana. His son, James H., is the subject of this sketch. John Waugh, the first above mentioned, who was born in England in 1687, immigrated to America in 1718, landing at Boston. Later he lived for a time in Maine and then New Hampshire. In 1745 he moved from New Hampshire to Litchfield, Connecticut. John W. Waugh, the father of James H., came to Henry County, Missouri, in April, 1866, and located on section 17, Big Creek township, where he bought one hundred twenty acres of land. He was a prosperous farmer and stockman and at the time of his death was the owner of eight hundred forty acres. He died August 14, 1911. He was prominent in public affairs and at one time was candidate for county judge on the Republican ticket. His wife died May 22, 1885, and their remains are interred in the Carpenter Cemetery. John W. and Julia (Hamilton) Waugh were the parents of the following children: James H., the subject of this sketch; E. R., Blairstown, Missouri; Mary, now the wife of Dr. L. L. Smith, Urich, Missouri; R. H., Clarksville, Iowa; Jennie M., married Charles Crist and died at Chanute, Kansas, in 1910, and her remains are buried in Carpenter Cemetery; Walter S., on the home farm in Big Creek township; Minnie, married James Adair, Shawnee township, and Emma E., died in infancy. By a former marriage to Mary E. Henderson, the following children were born to John W. Waugh: William B., Baxter Springs, Kansas, and Martha, who married Ed Darr, and now resides at Blairstown, Missouri. John W. Waugh's first wife died June 28, 1864. James H. Waugh received his education in the district schools of Big Creek township, attending school at district number two. He remained at home with his parents until he was twenty-two years of age, when he engaged in farming on his own account in Big Creek township. In 1895 he bought one hundred forty-five acres of land one half mile south of Norris and since then he has added one hundred acres to his original purchase and now owns two hundred forty-five acres, which is one of the valuable farms in Big Creek township. The place is well improved, with a good farm residence and an ample supply of barns and other farm buildings. Mr. Waugh 'is a successful stockman and is an extensive feeder of both cattle and hogs, and his place is well equipped for stock raising and feeding purposes. He is of the type of agriculturist who follows farming not for a living, but as a business. Mr. Waugh was united in marriage March 28, 1888, to Miss Gertrude Haines of Macon County, Missouri. She is a daughter of Joshua and Minerva (Kinzer) Haines, natives of Ohio, the former of Highland County and the latter of Adams County. The Haines family came to Missouri in 1867 and settled in Macon County. The father died in 1871 and the mother afterwards returned to Ohio and was there married to Thomas Murphy, and they came to Johnson County, Missouri, in 1879, and the following year settled in Henry County. They now reside at Chilhowee, Missouri. To James H. and Gertrude (Haines) Waugh have been born the following children: Edward H., married Gertrude Albin and is now engaged in farming and stock raising near Norris, Missouri, has one child, Sylvia Daphney; John W., married Ursel Gilliam and lives near Norris, Missouri, has one child, Lyle Gilliam, and Jessie N., married James Hunter Merrill, Blairstown, Missouri. Mr. Merrill is now a private in the National Army. Mr. Waugh is a progressive citizen and is of the type of men who has contributed to make Henry County what it is today. Since coming to this county he has seen many changes and has many pleasant recollections of pioneer days. He has in his possession a picture of his first cabin home in Henry County, which he prizes very highly. He is one of the substantial men of Big Creek township whose citizenship means something to the community and county. He is a Republican. He is affiliated with Agricola Lodge No. 343 Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. He and Mrs. Waugh and the children are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

WAUGH, John W.
Big Creek Township
1883 History of Henry County Missouri, National Historical Co pg 709
Photos:    John W. Waugh
John W. Waugh, farmer and stock dealer, section 17, a successful and enterprising citizen of this locality, is a native of Montgomery County, Indiana, and was born December 13, 1839. His father, Milo Waugh, was born in Ross County, Ohio, and there grew to manhood and was married to Elizabeth Kiousa, of Fayette County, the same state. The family removed to Indiana in 1831, and were among the pioneers of Montgomery County. Milo Waugh entered land there, and improved a farm, living upon it until his death in June, 1859. They had a family of eleven children, six sons and five daughters, the subject of this sketch being the fifth child. His youth was spent on his father's farm, with common school advantages. and he was married in the county of his birth, July 19, 1860, to Miss Mary Henderson, of the same county, and a daughter of Alexander Henderson. She died in Indiana, June 28, 1864, leaving two children, William B., and Bartha (wife of Ed Dower). Mr. Waugh was married in Montgomery County, April 20, 1865, to Miss Julia A. Hamilton, who was also originally of Montgomery County, and a daughter of John Hamilton. There are six children by this marriage: James H., Ed R., Richard H., Mary E., Walter S., and Jennie May. After his marriage Mr. Waugh was engaged in farming in his native county until his removal to Missouri in 1866, when buying land, he located where he now resides. He has a fine farm of 550 acres, about 400 acres of which are in cultivation and pasture, upon which is a good two-story dwelling and outbuildings and a splendid orchard.

WAUGH, John Wesley
Big Creek Township
1919 History of Henry Co MO, Uel W. Lamkin, Historical Publishing Co pg 741

John Wesley Waugh, a progressive farmer of Big Creek township, is a native son of Henry County and is a descendant of pioneer ancestors. He is a son of James H., and Gertrude Payne (note: should be Haines) Waugh, the former a native of Indiana, and the latter of Illinois. James H. Waugh came to Henry County with his parents who were early settlers in this section of the State. To James H., and Gertrude (Payne) Waugh were born the following children, Howard, a farmer in Big Creek township; John W., the subject of this sketch, and Mrs. Jessie Merrill, who resides in Bogard township. John Wesley Waugh was reared in Henry County, and educated in the district school and the Norris High School. He now operates a farm of two hundred forty acres in Big Creek township, about one-half mile east of Norris, where he is extensively engaged in general farming and stock raising. Mr. Waugh was united in marriage October 29, 1913, to Miss Ursel L. Gilliam, a daughter of B. L. and Minnie (King) Gilliam of Big Creek township. Mr. and Mrs. B. L. Gilliam live on the old Gilliam homestead in Big Creek township. They are the parents of the following children: Ursel L., the wife of John W. Waugh; a son who died in infancy; and Mrs. Archie Waugh, who resides in Big Creek township. Mr. and Mrs. Waugh have one child, Lyle Gilliam Waugh. The Waugh family are well known and highly respected in Henry County. They rank among its leading citizens. Mr. and Mrs. Waugh are well known and stand high in the community.

WAUGH, Walter S.
Big Creek Township
1919 History of Henry Co MO, Uel W. Lamkin, Historical Publishing Co pg 710

Walter S. Waugh, a prominent farmer and stockman of Big Creek township, is a native son of Henry County and a descendant of a prominent pioneer family of Missouri. Mr. Waugh was born in Big Creek township on the place where he now resides March 23, 1877, and is a son of John W. and Julia A. (Hamilton) Waugh, natives of Indiana and pioneers of Henry County, Missouri. A more complete sketch of the Waugh family history appears in this volume in the sketch of James H. Waugh, a brother of the subject of this sketch. Walter S. Waugh was educated in the public schools of Henry County and was reared on the farm where he now resides. He has always been engaged in farming and stock raising and is one of the successful farmers and well known stockmen of Big Creek township. He purchased the home place in 1910. It is a splendid farm, containing 355 acres, situated two miles southwest of Norris. The place is well improved and is one of the attractive places in the township. The residence was destroyed by fire December 26, 1917. It was considered one of the finest residences in the western part of the county. Mr. Waugh is now building a residence that will be modern in every particular when completed. Mr. Waugh was united in marriage March 20, 1902, with Miss Jessie May Anderson, daughter of J. M. Anderson of Big Creek township, a sketch of whom appears in this volume. To Mr. and Mrs. Waugh have been born the following children: Thelma Agnes, John M., Claud A., Walter W., and Joe, who died in infancy. Mr. Waugh is one of the progressive and hustling representatives of Henry County's prosperous citizens.

WEAKLEY, A. H.
Fields Creek Township
1919 History of Henry Co MO, Uel W. Lamkin, Historical Publishing Co pg 734

A. H. Weakley, the present superintendent of the Henry County Home has earned the well-merited reputation of being one of Henry County's most efficient public officers. Mr. Weakley was born in Fairfield County, Ohio, in 1867, a son of Harrison and Martha (Messie) Weakley, both natives of Fairfield County, Ohio, and they now reside at Stoutsville, Ohio. They were the parents of the following children: A. H., the subject of this sketch; Effie; Arthur C.; Della and Edward, deceased; Mrs. Etta Lest, who resides in Pickaway County, Ohio; Mrs. Lydia Marks, Fairfield County, Ohio; and Lula Belle, deceased. A. H. Weakley was reared and educated in Fairfield County, Ohio, and in 1886 came to Henry County, Missouri. He settled at Deepwater, where he was successfully engaged in painting and paper hanging for twenty years. In 1911, he was appointed superintendent of the Henry County Home, which is one of the best conducted institutions of the kind in the State. Mr. Weakley possesses the faculty of not only making the place a real home for the unfortunate whose condition in life necessitate such institutions, but he also has been successful in conducting this institution with a minimum expense to the county. This is not because the inmates are not properly cared for and properly fed, for the reverse is quite true of the Henry County Home. Under Mr. Weakley's capable management he keeps the production of the home farm up to the highest state of efficiency. He raises from twenty to twenty-five head of hogs annually for the consumption of the home and also keeps a sufficient number of cows to furnish an ample supply of milk and butter, and every field of production is represented here. In 1917 he raised over four hundred chickens. Under his management the Home is as nearly self-sustaining as would seem possible, with from twenty to thirty inmates, which is about the usual number. Mr. Weakley was united in marriage in 1899 with Miss Inez McGinnis, a daughter of John McGinnis of Deepwater, Missouri; to this union was born the following children: Ray and Fay, twins; Ray is now a soldier in the United States Army, having enlisted in August, 1917, and is now with the American Expeditionary Forces in France; Fay, is a student in the Catholic Academy, at Clinton, Missouri; Clifford; Ruth; and Lula Belle, residing at home with their father. Mr. Weakley is a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and is one of the substantial men of Henry County.

WEBB, James
Shawnee Township
1883 History of Henry County Missouri, National Historical Co pg 674

James Webb, farmer and stock raiser, section 32, was born in the city of Baltimore, Maryland, May 25, 1821, and is a son of Samuel Webb, a weaver by occupation and a native of England, who emigrated to America in 1818. His mother's maiden name was Ellen Fletcher, and she was also born in England. James was reared and educated in his native city and there learned the trade of machinist, at which he worked in Baltimore till 1842. From that time till 1848, he followed the same occupation in Springfield, Pekin, and Beardstown, Illinois. Farming then received his attention till 1867, when he came to Henry County, Missouri, where he now owns a farm of 350 acres. May 27, 1845, Mr. W. was married to Miss Elizabeth Elam, a native of Illinois. They have nine children: Samuel A., Robert H., Francis A., Dora A., Mary E., Floda A., Mira T., Cora J., and Malissa K.

WEBSTER, James H.
Big Creek Township
1883 History of Henry County Missouri, National Historical Co pg 710

James H. Webster, farmer and stock raiser, section 19, a well known and prominent man of this township, is a native of Stokes County, North Carolina, and was born February 14, 1827. Pleasant Webster, his father, also originally from North Carolina, grew to manhood and was married in Stokes County to Miss Hester Foy, of that county. The subject of this sketch passed his youthful days in tilling the soil, and in his 19th year came to Missouri in the fall of 1845 and located in Henry County. Three years later, March 15, 1848, he was married to Miss Mary Jane Carpenter, of Kentucky, and a daughter of Wilson D. Carpenter, one of the pioneers of this county. She died February 4, 1864, and left four children living: P. W., Hester Ann (wife of J. Anderson), Sarah E. (wife of William Stanberry), and May C. Mr. Webster married his present wife, Mrs. Mary A. Lotspeich, widow of William Lotspeich and a daughter of Abraham Fisher, May 3, 1868. They have four children: Charles, Dora, Walter and Oscar. After his first marriage Mr. Webster located on Honey Creek, where he improved a farm and where he resided for seven years. He has since improved three other farms, and now owns 150 acres of land, with 110 acres fenced, upon which is a good house and a young orchard. He was elected justice of the peace for Big Creek Township and has since been re-elected, and has served continuously in that capacity for twelve years. Mr. and Mrs. Webster are members of the M. E. Church South. The former is connected with the Masonic fraternity.

WEBSTER, Pleasant R.
Big Creek Township
1883 History of Henry County Missouri, National Historical Co pg 710

Pleasant R. Webster, farmer and stock raiser section 5, is one of the pioneer settlers of Henry County. He was born in Rockingham County, North Carolina, in April, 1821, his parents being Richard and Betsy (Black) Webster, also natives of North Carolina. Pleasant R., grew to manhood in his native county, and spent his youth on a farm, enjoying fair opportunities for acquiring an education. He was married in Stokes County, North Carolina, to Miss Matilda J. Webster, of the same state. In 1854 Mr. Webster came west to Missouri and settled in Henry County, near Clinton, removing to his present farm in February, 1880. He has 120 acres of land under fence, and nearly all in cultivation. Mrs. Webster died July 28, 1880, leaving eleven children: Martin V.; Elizabeth, (wife of William H. Childis); Susan, (wife of Benjamin Childis); James R.; Hester J. (wife of Byron Dunham); Nancy J., (wife of John Newman); William, Siby, Everett Salina, Richard Lee, and Luther L. Mr. W. is a member of the Baptist Church.

WEHMEYER, John B.
Bogard Township
1919 History of Henry Co MO, Uel W. Lamkin, Historical Publishing Co pg 616
Photos:    John Wehmeyer     Mary Single Wehmeyer
John B. Wehmeyer, of Bogard township, is one of the successful farmers and stockmen and leading citizens of Bogard township, which has been his home for over half a century. He was born in Germany in 1838 and when four years of age (1842) was brought to this country by his parents, who settled in Warren County, Missouri. In 1867 John B. Wehmeyer came to Henry County and shortly afterwards bought his first land in Bogard township, which consisted of seventy acres, for which he paid seventeen dollars and ten cents per acre. He prospered and from time to time, as the opportunity presented itself, he acquired more land. His next purchase was one hundred sixty acres at ten dollars per acre, then eighty acres at nine dollars per acre, eighty acres more at nine dollars per acre, and forty-two acres at twenty dollars per acre. In recent years Mr. Wehmeyer has divided most of his land between his children, although he now owns one hundred ninety acres of some of the best land in Henry County. For a number of years he was extensively engaged in feeding cattle and was very successful in this branch of the stock business. He has also generally been engaged in stock raising and farming and is regarded as one of the successful men of the county. On March 6, 1867, Mr. Wehmeyer was united in marriage with Miss Mary Single, a native of England. She was the widow of Samuel Studley. To John B. Wehmeyer and Mary (Single) Studley Wehmeyer were born the following children: William H., a farmer in Bogard township, married Pearl Forsythe and the following children were born to this union, Mary, Ruth, John, Fred and Robert; George S. Wehmeyer, farmer in Bogard township, married Etta Schnorf, and the following children were born to them, Glen, Harmel, Wilbur and LeeRoy; Robert W. Wehmeyer, a farmer in Bogard township, married Jessie Schnorf and they have two children, Clarence and Chester; and Anna, married George Wisely and died in Texas, leaving two children, Ruth and Fred. On January 25, 1862, Mr. Wehmeyer enlisted in Company F, 3rd Missouri Cavalry and was engaged in the service until February 8, 1865, when he was honorably discharged. During the course of his military career, Mr. Wehmeyer participated in eighteen battles and skirmishes. The most of his service was in Missouri and Arkansas. He was a good soldier and always did his duty faithfully and well and earned a military record without a blot upon it. Mr. Wehmeyer is truly one of the pioneers not only of Henry County but of the state of Missouri. He was in the city of St. Louis before there were any street cars, and when a young man he clerked in a store in that city for twelve years. During his boyhood days in Warren County, Missouri, railroads were unheard of there and in fact there were none in the State when the Wehmeyer family settled here. Everett Single, a grandson of Mr. Wehmeyer, is now serving in the National Army in France. Mr. Wehmeyer was a member of the Grand Army of the Republic at Blairstown.

WEHMEYER, Robert Wallter
Bogard Township
1919 History of Henry Co MO, Uel W. Lamkin, Historical Publishing Co pg 778

Robert W. Wehmeyer, a well-known and progressive farmer and stockman of Bogard township, is a native of Henry County. He was born on his father's place in Bogard township in 1874, a son of J. B. and Mary Wehmeyer, a sketch of whom appears in this volume. Robert W. Wehmeyer was reared on the home place and attended the district school at Bee Branch and Brushy district in Bogard township. He remained at home with his parents until he was twenty-five years of age, when he engaged in the livery business at Blairstown. He conducted this business for three years, when he engaged in farming on his present place in Bogard township. He made all the improvements on his place. The first year that he moved here he built a residence and later erected a barn and in 1905 built a second barn. His place is well improved with all necessary buildings including a garage. Mr. Wehmeyer is one of the successful stock breeders of the county, making a specialty of Duroc Jersey hogs and Shorthorn cattle. He also raises quite a number of horses and mules. His place is not only well adapted for general farming, but is an ideal stock farm. Mr. Wehmeyer was married June 28, 1903, to Miss Jessie B. Schnorf, a daughter of J. H. and Isabelle (Schellers) Schnorf of Bogard township. Mrs. Wehmeyer's parents are both now deceased. The mother died in 1902 and the father in 1916 and their remains are interred in the Grant Cemetery. He was a Civil War veteran, having served in Company H, 93rd Ohio Infantry for three years during the Civil War. He was born in Warren County, Ohio, November 20, 1831. Mrs. Wehmeyer is one of the following children born to her parents: Ilda, who died at the age of sixteen; Maggie, deceased; James, lives in Kansas City, Missouri; John, lives in Cass County, Missouri; Alonzo, resides on the home place in Bogard township; Mrs. Etta Wehmeyer, and Jessie, the wife or Robert W. Wehmeyer, the subject of this sketch. To Robert W. Wehmeyer and wife have been born three children: Lottie Belle, died in infancy; Clarence S. and Chester Everet. Robert W. Wehmeyer and his family are well known and prominent in the community and he is one of Bogard township's most progressive citizens.

WEHMEYER, William H.
Bogard Township
1919 History of Henry Co MO, Uel W. Lamkin, Historical Publishing Co pg 624
Photos:    William Wehmeyer Family
William H. Wehmeyer, well known as a leading farmer and stockman and enterprising citizen of Bogard township, is a native son of Henry County and a descendant of pioneer parents. Mr. Wehmeyer was born in the township where he now resides in 1868, a son of J. B. and Mary (Studley) Wehmeyer, a sketch of whom appears in this volume. William H. Wehmeyer was reared on the home farm in Bogard township and educated in the public schools, attending school at the old Bee Branch school district in Bogard township. He began farming and stock raising in early life, which has been his life's work. In 1891 he bought one hundred sixty acres of land from Benjamin Coke. Since that time he has added three hundred forty acres to his original purchase and is now the owner of a splendid farm of five hundred acres. The place is well improved. The residence, a modern eleven room structure, is equipped with water, lighting plant and all other conveniences. Mr. Wehmeyer follows farming and stock raising on an extensive scale. He raises horses, cattle and hogs, specializing in Shropshire sheep and Duroc Jersey hogs. In December, 1892, William H. Wehmeyer was united in marriage with Miss Pearl Forsythe, the only daughter of Andrew G. and Nellie (Foreman) Forsythe, both of whom now reside at Creighton, Missouri. Andrew G. Forsythe was born in Stark County, Ohio, December 26, 1840. His parents were John F. and Anna (Thornburg) Forsythe. John F. Forsythe was a native of Tyrone County, Ireland, born in 1780. He immigrated to America when a youth, locating in Ohio. He was a soldier in the War of 1812. His wife, Anna (Thornburg) Forsythe, was a native of Ohio. Andrew G. Forsythe was reared in Ohio and educated in the public schools of that State. About the time he reached his majority the Civil War broke out and he enlisted in 1861 in Company H, 105th Illinois Infantry. He was mustered out of service after a long and honorable military career, June 17, 1865. He participated in the battle of Resaca, Kenesaw Mountain, Peach Tree Creek, Atlanta, Ezra Church and was with Sherman on his famous march to the sea. To William H. Wehmeyer and wife have been born the following children: Mary, married Roy Hunter; John, married Bonnie Farnsworth and lives on part of the home place; Ruth, Fred and Robert, at home with their parents. Mr. Wehmeyer takes a deep interest in the civic welfare of his township and county and has served as township treasurer for four years. He is progressive and public spirited and stands ever ready to co-operate with any project for the betterment of the community. He is a Republican.

WEIDEMEYER, John M.
Clinton Township
1883 History of Henry County Missouri, National Historical Co pg 550

John M. Weidemeyer of the firm of Weidemeyer & Son, dealers in dry goods and groceries, came originally from Charlottesville, Virginia, where he was born January 10, 1834. When two years old he was taken by his parents to New York City, where they lived for two years, then removing to Boonville, Missouri. After a residence there of two years, in 1840, they came to Osceola, Missouri, and there John M. was reared, receiving his education from the schools of Boonville, Missouri. His father, John F. Weidemeyer, a native of Virginia, was there brought up and married to Miss Lucinda Draffen, who was also born in that state. The former was at one time a prominent man in St. Clair County, Missouri, and for fourteen years was its treasurer. He is now a resident of Anderson County, Texas, and for the past fourteen years has been the treasurer of that county. Mrs. W. died in 1854. When not attending school the subject of this sketch was engaged as clerk in the store of his father, and in 1859, he became a partner in the business. In 1861, he organized a company of cavalry, and served with Colonel McGowen's Regiment Missouri State Guards, holding a commission as captain of his company. They disbanded in the fall of that year. He was commissioned captain of Company K, Sixth Missouri Regiment, and participated in the battles of Corinth, Mississippi, Pea Ridge, through Hord's campaign, Atlanta, and was paroled at Mobile, Alabama, in 1865. He then settled in Palestine, Texas, and gave his attention to the stock business a short time, when he was occupied in merchandising for brief periods in various cities. In August, 1869, he came to Clinton, Missouri, and embarked in the grocery business, the firm then being Yeater & Co. After doing business together for three years, Mr. W. purchased the stock and continued alone till his son became associated with him in June, 1881. Mr. Weidemeyer was married November 12, 1856, to Miss Lelia V. Coutchfield, of Missouri. They have eleven children: Mattie W., Charles F., William E., Lelia V., Anna M., Aggetha L., Mary E., John M., Jewell L., Gabriel. They are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

WELLS, John Allen
Bogard Township
1883 History of Henry County Missouri, National Historical Co pg 697

John A. Wells. The subject of this sketch resides on section 17, where he owns a fine farm of 280 acres, 180 of which are in cultivation and well improved. He is senior member of the firm of J. A. Wells & Son, merchants at Urich and Gunn City, and they carry a large stock of general merchandise and are enjoying an excellent trade at each place. Mr. Wells was born April 9, 1820, in Cumberland County, Kentucky, his parents being Joel and Martha (Allen) Wells, the former a native of Kentucky, and the latter of North Carolina. John A., the oldest in a family of ten children, was reared on his father's farm in Kentucky, and received his education in the subscription school. Upon arriving at manhood he became interested in farming, which he followed in Kentucky until 1851, when he removed to Henry County, Missouri. In 1859 he came to his present home. Mr. W. was in the Enrolled Missouri Militia and Home Guards during the late war. In 1866 he was elected county assessor of Henry County, and held the office for two years, and has also held the position of township clerk and assessor. December 13, 1849, he married Miss Molly A. Reed, a native of Kentucky. They are members of the Christian Church. They have one child, Thomas W., who was born in Christian County, Kentucky, September 16, 1850. One child died in infancy.

WELLS, Thomas J. Sr.
Windsor Township
1883 History of Henry County Missouri, National Historical Co pg 601

Thomas J. Wells, farmer and stock raiser, was born November 2, 1837, in Barren County, Kentucky, where he received a good English education. His father, Ahasuerus Wells, who was born in 1797, in Kentucky, married in 1818, Miss Nancy Fisher, who was born March 3, 1800, in the same state. They had eight children, of whom only two are living: John Burgess, and Thomas J. Mr. Wells died in 1837. Mrs. W. was married again in 1842, to William Courts, of Kentucky. By this union there were two sons (twins), William and Walter. Walter died in 1844, and William is now a resident of Pettis County. In 1843, they emigrated from Kentucky to Carroll County, Missouri, where Mr. Courts engaged in farming, remaining for one year. Then he removed to Cole County of the same state, but after one year came to Henry County, and was for two years occupied in tilling the soil. He died in 1847. About a year later his widow married James Black, of Polk County, Missouri. She died in 1863 at the age of sixty-three years, and Mr. Black died in 1877, aged one hundred and one years. He was one of the last of the veterans of 1776. It was in honor of him that Fort Black, of Revolutionary memory received its name, he being a colonel in the federal army of that period. T. J. Wells was married January 12, 1860, to Miss Nancy E. Richards, of Hickory County, Missouri. By this union there were eleven children, seven daughters and four sons: Julia A., Kittie E., Nancy A., Johnnie W., Ben. E., Minnie E., Felix H., Maggie H., Lulia A., Ettie E., and Thomas J. Jr. Five of these are dead. Kittie E. died August 18, 1863; Johnnie W. died June 18, 1866; Julia A. died May 13, 1877; Thomas J. died October 3, 1881, and Ettie E. died November 3, 1881. Mr. Wells came to Windsor, Henry County, Missouri, March 2, 1879, and there embarked in farming, since which time he has steadily pursued that branch of industry. Himself and wife are identified with the Baptist Church of Windsor. His political preferences are Democratic.

 

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