Armstrong Missouri Herald - 1896

usgenweb missouri


Pictorial and Biographical Edition
Armstrong Missouri Herald
R. S. Walton, Publisher
Commemorative of Fifth Anniversary
(under present management)
JUNE, 1896
(In criticizing this special edition of the Herald, please bear in mind that it was published in a town of only 500 inhabitants)

These transcriptions of the commemorative issue of the Armstrong Missouri Herald published in June, 1896, were generously donated to the Howard County MOGenWeb project by Betty Collier (bcollier@mcmsys.com). It was an extremely large undertaking. Thanks Betty!. Betty writes, "This is copied from the outer cover of the publication. For those of you who have ancestry in the Prairie township of Howard County, it has some good information. And for others, it is an interesting history of a time long gone. I have recently gained access to this book, and would like to share the contents with you."


Locational sketches:
HOWARD COUNTY, MISSOURI | ARMSTRONG | BURTON | ROANOKE | STEINMETZ | YATES

Biographical Sketches:
REV. JOHN T. BACON | R. J. BAGBY, M. D. | DAVID BAGBY | W. F. BEACH | MRS. IMOGENE BLAKELY | D. J. BRIGGS | R. P. BRIGGS | J. H. COLLINS | STEPHEN W. CRESON | CAPT. ALEX DENNY | ALEX DENNY, JR. | CLIFTON E. DENNY | J. M. DENNY, JR. | J. M. DENNY, SR. | JAMES HUMPHREY DENNY | JOHN A. DENNY | JOHN A. DENNY, JR. | REV. J. S. DINGLE | A. W. EVANS | THEO. F. EVANS | JAS. A. FARRIS | J. B. FUGATE | T. E. GATES | CYRUS A. GORGAS | P.B. GORGAS | DAVID T. GREEN | P. W. GREEN | REV. N. B. GREEN | REV. J. A. GREENING | DR. W. C. HARVEY | JAS. L. HAWKINSON | DR. W. O. HAWKINSON | DR. J. Y. HUME | REUBEN B. HUME | PROF. C. W. KIRBY | W. BURCH KIRBY | PAUL A. KLAYDER | JUDGE J. C. LEE | L. W. MALONE | SQUIRE J. H. MARKLAND | PROF. LEVI MARKLAND | JUDGE MATTHEW MARKLAND | MATTHEW MARKLAND JR. | W. L. MARKLAND | J. B. MARTIN | THOMAS C. PATTERSON | ANDREW JACKSON PAYTON | PROF. WALKER S. PEMBERTON | ANDREW PETERSON | JOHN E. PRESTON | AUNT BETSY ROBB | PROF. WM. ROBERTSON | JAMES B. SHORES | D. D. SMOTHERS | PROF. J. S. SNODDY | B. FRANK SNYDER | ALVIN P. SPOTTS | D. K. SPOTTS | HON. LON V. STEPHENS | JOHN T. STOCKER | H. C. TAYLOR | J. T. TERRILL | Dr. W. S. THOMPSON | I. M. TURNAGE | JOHN W. VILEY | DR. J. M. WALKER | W. W. WALKER | J. J. WALKUP | J. M. WALKUP | R. S. WALTON | MRS. M. C. WOODS | C. S. YANCEY | STEPHEN B. YANCEY | DR. R. S. YANCEY | STEPHEN B. YANCEY


ARMSTRONG
A Few Facts Concerning The Enterprising Town In Which The Herald Is Published

Armstrong until the year 1878 was a nonentity on the geographical map of Howard county; and, in all probability, would have remained so for years to come, and the beautiful undulating site on which the town is now situated would have rested undisturbed from the hum and drum in the busy marts of magnificent railroad line, beginning at Chicago, and passing through this section of the country, and terminating at Kansas City. Previous to the year of '78 there was no town in northern Howard except grand old Roanoke, venerable with nearly a half century of years. Three miles south of Roanoke the roads forked; one road leading to the Capitol City, the other road being the old plank road, leading to Glasgow. Just at the forks of the Glasgow and Fayette roads was located the old toll gate house, with was near the site where W. W. Weir now resides. As soon as the road was built and a depot erected the town was named in honor of W. A. Armstrong, one of the directors of the road. The ground on which the town is located originally belonged to Pressley Halley, Sr., an old and highly respected pioneer citizen, who came to this township in 1821. He owned an entire section of land, a part of which he gave to he son, George, upon whose land most of the town that lies west of the railroad is located. In the first and original survey for a town plot made in the spring of 1878 twenty acres were laid off in town lots. But, in a few years, the rapid increase in population and the great demand for business and resident lots, a new survey was made, and eighty acres more were added to the old town plot. The town is laid in parallel streets, running due east and west, north and south.

P. A. Wooley built the first business house, David Mileham the first hotel, and Samuel Prather was the first postmaster.

Armstrong is geographically twelve miles from Fayette, the county seat, ten from Glasgow, three from Roanoke, and eleven from Higbee, a mining town in Randolph county where the Chicago and Alton railroad crosses the Missouri, Kansas & Texas railroad.

Armstrong is the "Queen City" of Prairie township, and is situated in the north-western portion of the grand old county of Howard, the "Mother of Counties". It is surrounded for miles by the finest, richest and most productive agricultural farming lands in the county; and it is doubtful if it can be excelled by any other portion of the state of equal area. The town has at present a population of about 550, and is rapidly increasing.

Its business is represented by two first class strictly dry goods, clothing and notion stores, three drug stores, five grocery stores, one harness store, one lumber yard, two hardware stores, one tin shop, one livery stable, one jewelry shop, one furniture store, one meat market, two barber shops, two millinery shops, two blacksmith shops, three hotels, one bank and one four-story brick flouring mill with a capacity of fifty barrels out put per day. Also, in addition to the above, it has an elegant opera hall, where the pleasure-seekers may now and then enjoy the risibles in their esthetic natures from witnessing the most popular plays of the stage.

The morale of our citizens are well looked after by the respective church denominations, viz; Missionary Baptist, Methodist Episcopal, South, Cumberland Presbyterian and Christian. The Methodist brethren have recently erected a beautiful brick edifice with all the modern improvements in the new addition in the western part of the city. The Baptists are preparing to build an elegant church this spring, while the Presbyterians and Christians are contemplating building in the near future.

Armstrong is justly proud of her educational institution, the public school. The building is a large two-story brick with three rooms. The curriculum embraces the higher branches taught in our high grade schools, which enables the student, who so desires, to prepare himself for a more liberal education and gives him an opportunity to enter the State University fully equipped to obtain a higher attainment in the sciences and arts.

The elegant and magnificent farm residences that are adjacent and contiguous to the commerce of Armstrong require special mention. On every road which leads from town for miles on miles as you travel over the beautiful, undulating, alluvial slopes your eye is ravished as you behold in view the grand and stately farm mansions and stupendous granaries filled and groaning with the fruits of the soil; the fine blue grass pastures are covered with thousands of cattle, horses and mules of high grade soil; the fine blue grass pastures are covered with thousands of cattle, horses and mules of high grade grazing upon the luxuriant and succulent grass, all of which are mute sentinels of the indisputable fertility of the soil, the industry of the husbandman, and wealth of the township.

In the last few years Armstrong has taken rank as one of the best and largest shipping points on the Chicago & Alton railroad between Kansas City and St. Louis. Especially is this true in reference to wheat and live stock. For the past two years the shipment of poultry has been an enormous factor as a wealth producer to the farmer. The income from the poultry business in the county for the past year is believed to have been in excess of the wheat crop in value.

The following car load shipments were made from Armstrong during the year 1895: Wheat, 83 cars; hogs, 69 cars; cattle, 38 cars; sheep, 23 cars; flour, 10 cars; horses and mules, 7 cars; live poultry, 5 cars; general, 3 cars; emigrant outfits, 2 cars; oats, 2 cars; apples, 1 car; lumber, 1 car. Total, 244 cars. The Alton receives from local freight at this place from $1,000 to $2,200 per month.

EARLY SETTLERS OF PRAIRIE TOWNSHIP

The first persons to locate in Prairie township were SILAS ENYART, WILLIAM HARVEY, MURPHY BESS and JOHN TITUS. These came in the year 1817. PRESSLEY, WILLIAM AND FRANK HALLEY, STEPHEN, JOHN AND WILLIAM GREEN and WESLEY, ASA and GEORGE THOMPSON came in 1821. From 1819 to 1825 came Th. sturdy pioneer settlers - MORRISES, WILLIAMS, FOSTERS, MARKLAND, ROBBS, WOODS, YANCEYS, DENNYS, CROSSES, GREENS, SNODDYS, LEES, HARVEYS, FORDS, WARFORDS, SNYDERS, HACKLEYS and JOHN L. CLEVELAND and uncle of President Cleveland, who resided on the SAMUEL STEINMETZ farm until the war, when he removed to Texas. These sturdy and stalwart pioneer sires of the present generation who left their pleasant and comfortable homes in Kentucky and Virginia, and came west to an almost uninhabited country, and felled the forest trees, and tilled the virgin soil until it was made to bloom and blossom as the rose; and today the off-springs of these noble men are enjoying the fruits of their forefathers labors.

back to the index

R. S. WALTON, the editor of this paper, was born on a farm on mile north of Armstrong in Howard County, October 9, 1869. His parents died and left him an orphan at the age of eight years. He was raised from this age by his grandparents, the late Rev. J. W. Terrill and wife, well known to many of the HERALD readers. He received a public school education at the old Franklin school, and at the Roanoke Public School. He was a student of the Roanoke Public School during the four years which G. N. Ratliff taught the school. He was a student of William Jewell College, Liberty, MO., for three terms; but, owing to limited means, had to quit school before his college education was completed. After leaving William Jewell College he took a course in C. W. Robbins' Business College at Sedalia. He taught the Armstrong Public School in 1889-1890. He was united in marriage to Miss Cassie Preston November 17, 1890. April 10, 1891, he bought the Herald office and since that time has devoted his time to getting out a strictly local paper - one that would be a credit to the town and to the good people that pay for it with pleasure from year to year. Our heart is set on publishing a good local paper - one that pleases the people - and, if this is accomplished, we shall consider our work well done. He cast his first vote for President in November 1892, and was appointed postmaster of Armstrong May 8, 1893.

back to the index

ROANOKE

One of The Historical Towns of North Missouri, And is Surrounded By a Rich Section of Farming Country Roanoke was originally settled by Virginians, who were great admirers of that eccentric, but talented man, John Randolph, of Roanoke, and named the new town after his elegant country seat, Roanoke. The town was laid out in 1834, two years before Glasgow, and eleven years after establishing the county seat at Fayette. The town is situated in the northern part of the county, and not far from where the counties of Randolph and Chariton corner with Howard. When the citizens desired to form a municipal corporation for the government of the town - from the fact, that owing to the close proximity of Chariton and Randolph counties lines, and, also as a part of the town was in each county - they found that before they could properly serve papers on a criminal in Howard he would escape to one of the adjoining counties, and thus be beyond the jurisdiction of the town authorities; they sought and overcame this legal dilemma by getting the State Legislature to pass a special act granting the said town authorities co-equal jurisdiction in Chariton and Randolph counties with that of Howard to the limit of corporation. This special act is still in full force and effect, having been enacted nearly sixty years ago.

Roanoke, before the war, was probably the most thriving business town in the county, taking into consideration its size. Its business men drew trade from three counties, often extending as far as thirty to forty miles. It was the great center for tobacco raisers, who always found a market, and liberal prices paid by the purchasers. Roanoke is situated three miles north of Armstrong on the western extremity of Foster Prairie. The country surrounding the town for many miles in every direction is as rich and productive as you will find in the most favored and fertile region in the far-famed blue grass counties in Kentucky. The town still commands a good trade although many other new towns have, mushroom like, sprung up on every side, curtailing her once stupendous strides in the marts of trade; yet the old veteran as she is, moves on quietly, yet majestically, in the even tenor as days of yore. Roanoke business transactions are represented by two dry goods stores, four grocery stores, three drug stores, one hardware and implement store, one hotel, one meat shop, one barber shop, one blacksmith shop and three churches. Also one conveniently arranged opera hall, built by contributions from enterprising and public-spirited citizens. With all the glory and iridescent halo which hovers over and around the grand old town of Roanoke, there is nothing that will add more imperishable fame to her venerable name than that of her far-famed public school. The crowning glory of American institutions is the public school system. Nothing else among American institutions is so intensely American. They are the colleges of democracy, and, if this government is to remain a republic, governed by statesmen, it must be from the public school they must be graduated. The amount of practical knowledge that the masses receive is important beyond measure, and forms the chief factor in material prosperity. Few towns of the size of Roanoke can boast of having a public school which has been so successfully conducted for such a long term of years. From the Roanoke public school a number of men, who today are known in the world of letters on two continents, laid the foundation stones of present attainments in the old school room at Roanoke. Roanoke's historic old school house was destroyed by fire last January. A handsome new structure is now being erected, with modern improvements.

back to the index

YATES

A Thriving Little Town Six Miles East of Armstrong, on The Chicago and Alton Railroad

Yates, like Armstrong, is a result of the Chicago & Alton railroad, as there was no such a town until the railroad of 1878. There are now two flourishing stores at Yates that carry a general line of merchandise. These two stores are owned by S. W. CRESON, whose biography appears in this edition, and J. P. HAMMETT. Mr. Creson has identified with the place ever since it had a name. Mr. Hammett just built a new brick store there last summer. Dr. J. W. WINN, and enterprising young physician, has just opened up a neat drug store in the place. J. A. DURNILL is the village blacksmith, and is doing a good business.

Yates is surrounded by a rich and fertile section of farming country, and the owners of these fine farms are a liberal-hearted people, and are all patrons of the Herald. The Yates merchants advertise in the Herald, and the farmers about the town are all subscribers; hence we claim that this thriving little town belongs to the Herald’s field of labor.

There is also a good church building at Yates; and, we are told that a livery stable and hotel will be erected before the year of ‘96 draws to a close.

back to the index

JOHN E. PRESTON, typo of the Herald office was born at Huntsville, Mo., May 17th, 1876. He has been at work in the Herald office for the past two years, and has been a faithful and efficient employee. He is a young man of the most exempliary habits, is energetic, and a good thinker. If energy and good qualities count for anything John will make his mark in the world.

back to the index

PAUL A. KLAYDER, foreman of the Herald office, was born at Paterson, New Jersey, January 2, 1877. He came with his father to Glasgow, MO., in 1886. He first learned to set type in the Missourian office at Glasgow. He has been working in the Herald office since January 1, 1892. He has made a faithful employee, ever looking after the business of the office as if it was his own. He is energetic, upright and honest, and is a first-class all-around printer. He is a young man with no bad habits, and there is certainly a bright future in store for him, if true merit will win.

back to the index

W. BURCH KIRBY, son of the late A. J. KIRBY, was born in Howard county in 1874. Burch now resides on a farm with his mother 5 miles south-east of Armstrong. He is a farmer and stock trader and knows how to make a good trade. He is an enthusiastic member of the Royal Tribe of Joseph Lodge. Burch is full of life and energy, and bids fair to become one of the leading men of his community. The future life of the great republic depends largely upon this class of energetic young men.

back to the index

STEINMETZ

The first station to the west on the Chicago and Alton railroad is Steinmetz. This place was named in honor of the late Samuel Steinmetz, whose residence was but a short distance from the depot.

There is but one store at Steinmetz, and that is owned by J. M. Walkup, who is also postmaster, or rather deputy postmaster. C. Maupin, a prosperous farmer, was appointed postmaster, but turned the office over to Mr. Walkup.

back to the index

BURTON

Ten miles east of Armstrong is the town of Burton, which has been on the map ever since the building of the great Missouri, Kansas & Texas railroad system.

Nearly every farmer between Armstrong and Burton is a subscriber to the HERALD, and they are always prompt in paying the printer.

Dr. J. B. Scott has been the representative business man of Burton for years and has made a fortune. J. O. Winn, who is now a prominent merchant of Fayette, was for several years engaged in business in the town.

back to the index

JUDGE MATTHEW MARKLAND, was one of the pioneer citizens of Prairie township, being born on the old Markland homestead, one mile east of town, March 11, 1820, and died April 24, 1896, being 76 years of age. He was a member of the Methodist church for 66 years, 31 years a member of the Masonic lodge, was 10 years Justice of the Peace of Prairie township and was 12 years Judge of the Howard county court. He was twice married. Eleven children and his second wife survive him, all of whom reside in the vicinity of Armstrong except one. He was ever a public spirited citizen.

back to the index

REV. J. A. GREENING, pastor of the M. E. Church, South, was born in Madison county, Illinois, 1848. He was married June 24, 1873, to Miss Hester Vollintine. He has five children living, three boys and two girls. Rev Greening came to Missouri in 1819, and has resided in the state since that time with the exception of five years that he spent in Texas with his family for the benefit of his wife's health. He was educated in the public schools of Illinois and at Central College, Fayette, Mo. Rev. Greening has been pastor of the Armstrong Methodist church since September last. He is now pastor of the Armstrong, Roanoke, Oak Grove and Washington churches. He is a fluent speaker and a faithful worker in the Master's cause. He is a man that mixes with the people, and is well liked by the members of all the churches.

back to the index

J. J. WALKUP, the subject of this sketch, is one of the best-known men in Howard county. He was born in Howard county, October 28, 1834. His parents came to Howard county from Kentucky in 1830. In 1860 Mr. Walkup removed to Davis county, Iowa, where he resided until the spring of 1876. Mr. Walkup married Miss Isabel Hardy, of Davis county, Iowa, September 7, 1864. They now have five children living (one boy and four girls) and three dead. Mr Walkup's father died when he was quite young, leaving his mother with six small children to raise. There was a debt on the farm, and it is now the pride of Mr. Walkup's life to know that he and his brothers labored faithfully and cancelled this debt and helped their mother to get along in the world. Mr. Walkup now owns a beautiful home two miles west of Armstrong, a cut of which you will find in this volume. He has a fine farm of 614 acres and besides this he has given 640 acres of land to his children. Mr. Walkup has been steward in the Methodist church for twenty-five years and is now one of the leading members of the Armstrong church. He contributed $800 to the building of the new church. He was for fifteen years vice-president of the Davis County, Iowa, Bank and has been president of the Farmer's Bank of Armstrong ever since it was organized. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity. Mr. Walkup enjoys the respect and confidence of his fellow men. He is liberal-hearted, and has made a success in life, financially.

back to the index

Dr. W. S. THOMPSON, son of J. W. Thompson, was born in Howard county, October 12, 1865. The doctor was educated at Central College, Fayette, MO., graduating from that institution, June, 1887. He then taught school at Harrisburg one term. The next fall he entered the Missouri Medical College, St. Louis, MO., where he graduated in March, 1890. In April 1890 he located at Armstrong for the practice of medicine, and has by close attention to business built up a large and lucrative practice. As a physician he enjoys an excellent reputation as a skillful and successful practitioner. The doctor also runs a drug store in connection with his practice and his trade extends over a large scope of territory and is continually on the increase. The doctor may well be classed as one of Armstrong's most successful business men. He still lives a bachelor's life and is considered a "good catch" for any young lady.

back to the index

PROF. LEVI MARKLAND, son of the late Judge Markland was born in this county April 30th, 1862. He was raised on the farm, and there trained to work as only boys do that are raised to manhood in the rural districts. He was educated at the Roanoke public school during the time that Prof. Powell was principal of the school, during which time so many excellent students were turned out of this far-famed old school. After completing the course at the this school he began teaching and has taught school very successfully for nine terms, and now ranks at the top with the best teachers of the county. He is a partner in the firm of Spotts and Markland, lumber and hardware merchants, of this city. Prof. Markland owns a beautiful cottage home in the west addition, a cut of which is printed in this volume. Prof. Markland is a member of the Masonic fraternity also of the Knights of Phthias and A.O.U.W. Lodges. He is a progressive young man, solid to the core, and is made of the material that constitutes an honorable, upright citizen. He was married March 27th 1890 to Miss PRICE HARRIS, of this county. They have two children, one boy and one girl. Mr. Markland is a democrat of the Jeffersonian type.

back to the index

ALVIN P. SPOTTS, lumber and hardware merchant, of the firm of Spotts & Markland, is the son of D. K. SPOTTS, and was born in Howard county June 5, 1857. Mr. Spotts was engaged in the mercantile business at Burton from 1879 to 1883. December 10, 1881, he was married to Miss MATTIE HARRIS, daughter of T. B. HARRIS, a wealthy farmer of near Burton. Mr. Spotts has four children, all boys. In January, 1883, Mr. Spotts removed to Armstrong, and since that time has been engaged in the lumber and hardware business at this place. Mr. Spotts is a rustling businessman, and the firm of Spotts & Markland commands the trade of a large scope of territory. Mr. Spotts has been one of Armstrong's most progressive and leading business men ever since he came to the town, and he is ever ready to lend a helping hand to all enterprises that are beneficial to the town.

back to the index

CLIFTON E. DENNY, the subject of this sketch was born on a farm in Howard county, January 24, 1842, and was the son of JAMES M. DENNY, a native of Kentucky. Mr. Denny was educated in the public schools and at Mr. Pleasant College, Huntsville, Mo. On the 15th day of October 1865 he was united in marriage to Miss Mary B. Enyart, daughter of Humphrey Enyart, one of the pioneer citizens of Howard county. He has a beautiful home, a cut of which you will find in this volume. His residence sets back some 200 yards from the road, and in the front is one of the prettiest lawns in the state. This beautiful blue grass lawn is decorated with shrubbery, pine trees and large forest trees, and we doubt if there is a prettier country home in the county. Mr. Denny is a prominent member of the C. P. church, an enthusiastic member of the Masonic fraternity, and is one of Howard county's most substantial and influential citizens.

back to the index

JOHN A. DENNY, son of JAMES M. DENNY, was born in Howard county, November 11, 1838. He was united in marriage April 3rd to Miss ANNIE WALDEN. Mr. Denny has four children, two boys and two girls, Misses EMMA and LULA. Mr. Denney is a farmer, and one of the best farmers in the county. He takes pride in improving his farm and keeps it looking nicely. His residence is off from the road some half mile. A cut of his residence can be seen on a previous page. Mr. Denny's home is surrounded by a magnificent grove of forest trees, the land gradually sloping and forming a beautiful picture. Mr. Denny has a fine farm of 460 acres; which he has cultivated to an advange and has made good money farming. Mr. Denny has a nice home and a most interesting family. A more liberal-hearted man and a better citizen you will not find in Howard county than J. A. Denny. He is one of the leading members of the Cumberland Presbyterian church.

back to the index

D. K. SPOTTS, can be truly classed as one of the pioneer citizens of Prairie township. He was born in Augusta City, Virginia, May 9th, 1826. He removed with his parents ot Howard county in 1835. May 27, 1856 he was united in marriage to MARGARET A. PRATHER. They have four boys and three girls. His oldest son, EUGENE, is in the dry goods business at Des Moines, Iowa; E. R. SPOTTS is practicing law at Houston, Texas; DR. B. M. SPOTTS is practicing medicine a Blackburn. A. P. SPOTTS is in the lumber business in this city. Mr. Spotts has engaged in farming all his life and still owns a farm. Along with tilling the soil, Mr. Spotts has made quite a success of the insurance business, and is now agent for several companies. Two years ago Mr. Spotts removed to Armstrog, where he now resides. He has been a steward in the Methodist church for many years. Mr. Spotts isa public spirited man and is always ready to lend a helping hand to public enterprises.

[Note from Betty Collier: If I "know" something I consider useful, I will add the information. The article by Mr. Walton said Mary A. Prather, wife of D. K. Spotts. She was Margaret, not Mary, so I changed the name. Daughter of James E. Walkup and Arretta Marksberry, she married Philip Prather (1). No children were born of this marriage. D.K. Spotts was her second husband. Margaret was also sister of J. J. Walkup, who's sketch also appears in this series.]

back to the index

DR. J. Y. HUME, physician and surgeon, is a son of Reuben Y. Hume, a pioneer citizen of this county. Dr. Hume was born November 13th, 1851. The Hume family came from Kentucky to Missouri in 1844. The doctor was educated at Central College, Fayette, Mo. 1874 he began the study of medicine under Dr. F. M. SCROGGIN. He prosecuted his studies with diligence for two years and then entered the St. Louis Medical Colliege and graduated from this institution with honor in March 1879. The doctor was one of the first settlers in Armstrong. He located here in March, 1879 to practice his profession. He has established a wide reputation as a skillful and successful physician. The Doctor was for several years associated with J. B. FUGATE in the drug business, but his practice increased so that he disposed of his interest to his partner, so that he would have nothing to look after but his practice. The Doctor has an elegantly fitted up office and a splendid home with 10 acres of ground right in the heart of town. The doctor was married to Miss FANNIE WALKER, November 13, 1879. They have two children, one boy and one girl. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity and the A.O.U.W. He was appointed on the board of Medical Pension examiners of Howard county under the present administration.

back to the index

DR. J. M. WALKER, on of Howard county's most highly respected and influential citizens, like many of Missouri's best citizens, is a native of Kentucky, having been born in Mercy county, Ky., August 25, 1824. He came with his father, Dr. W. W. WALKER, to Missouri when but a small boy. His father located in Boone county, but remained there only two years, and them removed to Randolph county. Dr. Walker was given a good public school education and studied medicine in his father's office. In 1848 he took a course in the Louisville, KY., Medical College. Coming home from school he practiced medicine with his father. In 1855, being desirous of acquiring further knowledge that would help him in his profession, he took a regular course at a St. Louis medical college and graduated with high honors. He then practiced medicine until 1860, and was very successful. In order to retire from practice he purchased a fine farm of 320 acres, 4 miles south-west of Armstrong, and removed to it, where he has since resided. the doctor has a beautiful country home, and he takes pleasure and pride in keeping it well improved. Dr. Walker was married to Miss SUSAN V. JAMES March 31, 1850. They have three children, Mrs. J. Y. HUME, W. W. WALKER, assistant cashier of the Farmers' Bank of Armstrong, and R. W. WALKER. Dr. Walker is one of the directors of the Farmer's Bank of Armstrong, and is also a member of the Mason lodge. The doctor and his wife are two of the leading members of the Armstrong Christian church. Dr. Walker has been a life long Democrat, and is now a strictly sound money Democrat and an admirer of Grover Cleveland. The doctor has accumulated a comfortable fortune, and is amply prepared to spend his declining years at leisure. The doctor now owns four good farms.

back to the index

REV. J. S. DINGLE, The subject of this sketch, was born at Palmyra, Mo., November 11, 1848. He was educated at LaGrange College and at Greenville, South Carolina. During his life he has resided in Missouri, Kentucky and South Carolina. May 31, 1876, he was married to Miss KATIE McCONNELL, who a few years ago, passed over the river of death to the haven of rest beyond. He has two children, one boy and one girl. Rev. Dingle is now pastor of the Sturgeon, Roanoke and Pleasant Grove churches. Rev. Dingle is a pleasant, affable gentleman, and to know him is to be his friend. He is a man of deep thought, and presents the gospel truths in a way that no one can mistake their meaning. He has been pastor of the Roanoke Baptist church for several years, and is held in the highest esteem by his congregation and all that know him.

back to the index

J. M. DENNY, JR., son of the late HUMPHREY DENNY, was born in Randolph county, February 24, 1862. Mr. Denny was reared to manhood on the farm, and was given a good public school education. Five years ago he decided to quit the farm and engage in the mercantile business. In March, 1891, he bought a half interest in W. L. Markland's dry goods store. One year later he sold his interest in the store and bought an interest in the City Livery Stable, and has been engaged in the livery business since that time. He was united in marriage October 25, 1893, to Miss LILLIE OLIVER, of Huntsville. They have one child, a girl. Mr. Denny is a member of the firm of Payton & Denny, liverymen. These gentlemen have two large livery barns, a number of nice substantial rigs, and are very popular with the public. J. M. Denny is a most excellent young man, and his friends are limited only to his acquaintances. He is a member of the Masonic and Knights of Phthias lodges. He has good residence property, a cut of which can be seen in this work.

back to the index

DAVID T. GREEN, farmer and school teacher, is the son of STEPHEN GREEN, and was born in this county March 20, 1868. He was educated in the public schools of this county and at the State University, Lexington, KY. He also took a course in C. W. Robbins' Business College, Sedalia. David has taught school four terms, and has been employed to teach the Payne school, near town the coming term. He is a Scottish Rite Mason, having had the degrees conferred upon him at Lexington, Ky., and Cincinnati, Ohio. He is also a member of Phantom Lodge, K. of P., Lexington, Ky. He was united in marriage October 30, 1895, to Miss LULA PATTERSON, of Salisbury, Mo. David is an energetic, enterprising and progressive young man.

back to the index

B. FRANK SNYDER, one of Prairie township's most substantial farmers, was born in Madison county, Virginia, November 14, 1819. He came to Howard county with his parents when 14 years of age, and has since made his home in this county. Mr. Snyder's father was a soldier in the war of 1812. Mr Snyder followed coopering until 1851. Mr. Snyder has made a success in life financially. He now owns 865 acres of as fine land as there is in the state. 480 acres of his land is near Marceline, Mo. He also owns residence property in Marshall. He was united in marriage March 4, 1863, to Miss MARY F. WARFORD. He has but one child, Mrs. D. A. PIERCE. Mr. Snyder is a member of the Masonic lodge, also of the I.O.O.F. Mr Snyder's residence is located 2 miles north of Armstrong. A cut of his residence can be seen in this edition.

back to the index

REV. N. B. GREEN was born in Howard county, near Armstrong, January 14, 1869. Mr. Green is not a resident of Armstrong at present, but is an Armstrong boy, and for this reason he is represented in this special edition. Rev. Green returned home about six months ago from the Baptist Theological Seminary at Louisville, Ky., and was not here but a few weeks until he was called to the pastorate of the Higbee, Midway and McMullen churches. He is making quite a favorable impression in his ministerial work; and there is a bright future in store for him. God speed him in his work for the Master.

back to the index

JOHN A. DENNY, JR., son of the late HUMPHREY DENNY, was born in Randolph Co., near Mt. Airy, May 26, 1873. He was given a public school education, and then attended Missouri Valley College, Marshall, Mo., two years. He is a graduate of the Spaulding Commercial College, of Kansas City. Mr. Denny, after leaving school, decided that farming was the surest way of making money, if not the quickest; so he purchased a fine farm of 200 acres near Mt. Airy. The farm is well improved. John is a young man of splendid habits, and with the start he has in early life will accumulate a fortune in after years if properly handled, and this is what he will do.

back to the index

J. B. FUGATE, druggist, was born in Schuyler county, Mo., February 9, 1849. He was educated at Lancaster, Mo., and also attended school at Glasgow one term. He removed with his parents to Howard county in 1866. J. B. Fugate, like many other self-made men, got a start in life by teaching school. He taught school for several years, and was very successful. Not being satisfied with school teaching, he decided to go into business; and picked Armstrong as the point of location. Sixteen years ago he removed to Armstrong and carried on the drug business in partnership with Dr. J. Y. HUME until two years ago, when he purchased the store. Mr. Fugate is a careful and attentive business man and you will always find him at his post of duty. He now has a brick store building 70x20 feet and a handsomely fitted up drug store and he commands a big trade. Mr. Fugate also owns a splendid residence property, a cut of which can be seen on next page. He is vice-president of the Farmer's Bank. He is a leading member and worker in the Masonic Lodge of this place. Mr. Fugate was married to Miss ANNA E. HAMILTON, daughter of T. M. HAMILTON of Chariton county, November 8th, 1882. They have two children, one boy and one girl.

back to the index

P. W. GREEN, tonsorial artist, son of the late ANCEL GREEN, was born in Howard county, near Armstrong, September 26, 1872. Not being content to work on the farm he decided to learn to be a barber. He begun working for A. M. SHEARS, of this place. After mastering the art sufficiently to hold a chair, he left Armstrong and worked at various towns in Missouri, Kansas and Texas. He returned to Armstrong in May, 1895, and purchased the barber shop of BYRON SHEARS, and has since been conducting the shop on a successful basis, having made money out of the business. He has just fitted his shop up with elegant new furniture, and now his shop will compare favorably with the shops in much larger towns than Armstrong. A cut of the shop can be seen in this edition. Mr. Green attends strictly to business, has few superiors as a tonsorial artist, and is always attentive to the wants of his patrons. He was married June 26, 1895, to Miss LIZZIE MANUEL, of Huntsville. They have one child, a girl.

back to the index

THOMAS C. PATTERSON, son of the late RICE PATTERSON, was born in Howard county one mile west of Roanoke, December 21, 1843. Mr. Patterson is at present engaged in farming and stock raising and the stock breeding industry. He owns a large and fertile farm one half mile west of Roanoke, being very convenient to the town. His farm is located in both Howard and Randolph counties, his residence is located just over the line in Randolph county. Mr. Patterson has for several years been engaged in the stockbreeding industry and has always kept a good class of stock. He has been quite a successful agriculturalist. He has ever manifested great interest in educational affairs, and was director of the Roanoke public school for several years. His two oldest daughters, NEOLA and GRACIE, were educated at Stephens College, Columbia, Mo. Mr. Patterson has been a deacon in the Roanoke Baptist church for a number of years, and is one of the main pillars of that church. He is truly one of the most substantial liberal hearted and best citizens the community affords. He has always been a staunch friend of the HERALD. He was united in marriage March 16th, 1869 to Miss LAURA B. PATTERSON. They have four children, three girls and one boy.

back to the index

JAMES B. SHORES, the subject of this sketch, was born on the farm where he now resides, 4 miles southeast of Armstrong, April 17, 1846, and hence has lived for 50 years on the old Shores homestead. He was married April 3, 1873, to Miss LAURA CLOYD. October 12, 1882, he was married to Miss MARY E. FINNELL. They have two children, one boy and one girl. Mr. Shores was given a good public school education, and has improved his education during life by reading the best books and current literature. Mr. Shores is a steward in the Methodist church, and has for many years been one of the stand-bys of the Washington Methodist church. He is a man of excellent business judgement, and is one of the best citizens the county affords. Mr. Shores is president of the Howard County Mutual Fire Insurance Company, and has discharged the duties of that office in a most efficient manner. He has been urged many times by friends to become a candidate for public office, but has always refused to permit his name to go before the people.

back to the index

PROF. WALKER S. PEMBERTON, son of WM. PEMBERTON, was born in Howard county July 21, 1872. He was reared on a farm, and was given a public school education at Armstrong. After graduating from the Armstrong Public School he took a course at the Kirksville State Normal. He has taught the Liberty Public School three terms in succession, and has been employed to teach the school again next term. Walker is a young man with a most promising future before him. He is ambitious and energetic, and believes in keeping up with the times. Walker has made a success as a teacher.

back to the index

H. C. TAYLOR, the subject of this sketch, was born near Clarence, Shelby county, Mo., October 14, 1859. He is the son of the late REUBEN TAYLOR. He removed with his parents to near Roanoke, Mo., in 1866. Mr. Taylor was educated at the Roanoke Public School during the time that "TUCK" POWELL was principal of the school. He is also a graduate of the Gem City Business College, Quincy, Ill., having graduated from that school in 1887. He begun teaching school the same year, and the success he had teaching is attested to by the fact that he taught school eight years at the same place. Mr. Taylor is at present engaged in farming, and he also makes a specialty of breeding Poland China hogs. He has been engaged in the breeding of throughbred Poland China hogs for the past ten years, and, in fact, is the oldest breeder in Howard county. Mr. Taylor has splendid judgement as to what constitutes a strictly first-class individual. He can look at a hog and tell you the points of merit and demerit in a moment. He has during the past 10 years purchased hogs from the best herds in adjoining states, going on the principle that the best hogs are the cheapest, no matter how high the price; and now Mr. Taylor has a herd of Poland Chinas in which are blended the blood of all the choicest strains of the Poland China breed. Mr. Taylor has, by courteous treatment of his customers and keeping nothing but the highest grade of hogs, built up a business that extends over all the adjoining states, and his business is on the increase each succeeding season. Mr. Taylor is now recognized as one of the leading hog men of Missouri. Mrs. Taylor is now raising high grade poultry, and is building up quite a successful business. She made a number of shipments of fine fowls this year to Texas and other states. Mr. Taylor owns a fine farm and a magnificent home two miles west of Roanoke. A cut of his residence, which is of modern architecture, can be seen on the previous page. He also has a fine barn, wind-mill, stock scales, and all the improvements necessary on a well regulated farm. He is an up-to-date farmer in every particular. He was married September 9th, 1885 to Miss LAURA BELLE WILCOXSON, daughter of G. H. WILCOSXON, a wealthy farmer of near Fayette. They have one boy 9 years-old and one boy died at the age of ten months. Mr. Taylor has been deacon in the Christian church and a public school director for more than ten years and is still holding these positions. Mr. Taylor is a man of enterprise, progress, push and is the printer's friend, in fact a true friend to humanity. Mr. Taylor has one big advantage in the Poland China hog business. He is conveniently located with reference to three of the great railroad systems of the United States: The Wabash, at Salisbury, the M. K. & T. at Higbee and the Alton at Armstrong, making it convenient for him to ship from either of these points.

back to the index

PROF. C. W. KIRBY was born in Howard county December 27, 1855. He educated himself for a school teacher, which profession he has followed with success and with much satisfaction to himself. He has taught school ever since he started out in life for himself with the exception of four years that he was telegraph operator at Wellington, Lafayette county, Mo. In the spring of 1887 he decided to give up his position at Wellington and again teach school; and since that time he has been constantly in the harness, teaching and training the youths of Howard county. He was married November 3, 1878, to Miss CARRIE RYLE, of Randolph county; but who has long since passed over the river of death. Prof. Kirby has, for the past two years, taught the Public School at Hilldale, this county, and the patrons are so well pleased with his work that he has been employed a third term at that place. Prof. Kirby is a progressive teacher, and keeps up with the times. He is now recognized as one of Howard county's leading educators.

back to the index

JOHN W. VILEY, the subject of this sketch, was born in Randolph county March 5, 1836, and was reared to manhood in that county; which continued to be his place of residence until 1882, when he removed to Roanoke, Howard county. Mr. Viley was a few years ago one of the largest land owners in the township; but, wishing to retire from farming on such a large scale, he sold several hundred acres of his land. Prior to these sales he owned about 1200 acres of as fine land as there was in the county. He still retains a very fine farm of 450 acres, two miles northeast of Armstrong. he also owns splendid residence property and a good store building in Roanoke, a cut of which is presented in this issue. Mr. Viley has during his life been a very extensive stock dealer, having bought and sold vast quantities of live stock: but in late years he has retired from the business. He is a stockholder in the Farmers' Bank of Armstrong. Mr. Viley has great sympathy for mankind, and is liberal with the means with which he is himself so abundantly blessed. For charitable purposes he is one among the first to respond with a liberal donation. Mr. Viley has many warm friends, and is a most excellent citizen in every respect.

back to the index

C. S. YANCEY, farmer and stock dealer, was born in Howard county September 8, 1820. He was born on the old Yancey homestead, one mile and a half north-west of Armstrong, and was son of the late LEIGHTON YANCEY. Mr. Yancey has during his life been engaged in farming, stock raising and stock trading, and has been one of the most extensive and successful dealers in the county. For many years he has bought and sold large herds of cattle and hogs, and has always had a big lot of cattle and hogs fattening on his farm all seasons of the year. C. S. Yancey has in all probability bought and sold more cattle than any man in Howard county. He owns a fine farm of 860 acres just north of town, some of his land adjoining the corporate limits of the town. He owns a magnificent country home one mile north of Armstrong. You can go over all Missouri and you will find but few country homes that equals this one for beauty of surroundings. A cut of Mr. Yancey's home can be seen in this volume. He is a stock-holder in the Farmers bank of Armstrong. He was married August 11th, 1857 to Miss ROZZIE YANCEY. They now have a most interesting family of nine children, 5 boys and 4 girls. Mr. Yancey has ever taken great interest in educational affairs, having sent his children to the public school and to the best colleges in the state. Mr. Yancey has been one of the leading members of the Cumberland Presbyterian church for many years. C. S. Yancey ranks at the top among Howard county's best citizens.

back to the index

DR. W. C. HARVEY, physician and merchant, is a native of Howard county and one of the county's pioneer citizens. He was born in this township August 8, 1825. His father, JOHN HARVEY, was a native of Virginia, but was reared to manhood in Kentucky and came to this county in 1817. The doctor was educated in the public schools of the county. He taught school two years and in 1846 begun the study of medicine. He attended the Transylvania Medical College, of Lexington, Ky., graduating with high honors in the spring of 1848. He practiced his profession for a short time in Linn county, but in the winter of 1848 located at Roanoke, where he has from that time continued the practice of his profession. In connection with his practice the doctor has run a drug and grocery store, and has always commanded the trade of a large scope of territory; and, in addition to this, he has been one of the most extensive stock traders and dealers in the state. For many years there has been but few weeks passed but what the doctor has shipped out from one to half a dozen cars of live stock through his agents. For several years the doctor put up large quantities of tobacco at the old Roanoke factory, and gave employment to many laborers each year. He has also engaged extensively in farming, and now owns 850 acres of fine land in the vicinity of Roanoke. There is probably not a man in Howard county to-day that has transacted as much business during his life as has Dr. W. C. Harvey, of Roanoke; and at the same time he has practiced his profession in a skillful manner, and has established a wide reputation as a most successful practitioner. Dr. Harvey has been of incalculable value to the town of Roanoke by the volume of business that he has brought to the town. He is a member of the Masonic lodge and the Methodist church. He was married September 16, 1842, to Miss LEAH A. BLAKEY. They have two daughters living. It can be truly said of Dr. Harvey that he has been a blessing to mankind.

back to the index

STEPHEN B. YANCEY was born on a farm one mile north of Armstrong August 17, 1864. He is the oldest son of C. S. YANCEY. He was educated at the Roanoke Public School and the Missouri State University. After leaving school he farmed for a year or so, and in the fall of 1889 he and his brother, L. B. YANCEY, and the PHELPS boys, of Roanoke, built a brick store west of the Farmers' Bank in this place, and opened up a dry goods and furniture store. There they have carried on a successful business. Not having room sufficient Mr. Yancey, the subject of this sketch, built another large two-story brick store on the opposite side of the street and removed the dry goods department of the business to that building. Three years later Yancey Bros. bought out the interest of Phelps Bros., and from that time up till May 15, 1896, run the business. On May 15 they sold their stock of goods and store building to IRVIN & FINDLEY, of Illinois. Mr. Yancey has been one of Armstrong's most progressive merchants, always taking the lead in public enterprises. He is an elder in the Cumberland Presbyterian church and a member of the Knights of Pythias lodge, and is a good worker in that order. He is yet classed as one of the handsome bachelors of the town.

back to the index

JAMES HUMPHREY DENNY, son of C. E. DENNY, was born four miles west of Armstrong, in Howard county Dec. 23rd, 1870. He was educated at Pritchett Institute, Glasgow, Mo., and Missouri State University, graduating in the law department. He was admitted to the bar in Howard county for the practice of law in 1892, and has since practiced his profession at Glasgow, this county. He is now a member of the firm of SHACKELFORD & DENNY, lawyers, Glasgow, Mo., his father-in-law, the Hon. THOS. SHACKELFORD, being the other member of the firm. Mr. Denny is the Democratic nominee for Prosecuting Attorney, having received the nomination by a majority of 440 votes over one of the best attorneys in the county. He is a young man of ability and is high minded, and has the best of habits. He is very popular with the people, and has as many warm personal friends as any young man in the county. He was married November 21, 1894, to Miss MAUD SHACKELFORD, the accomplished daughter of the Hon. Thos. Shackelford, of Glasgow. They have one child, a boy.

back to the index

CAPT. ALEX DENNY was born in Howard county, Mo., June 17, 1826, and has since lived continuously in the same and adjacent neighborhood in which he was born, except for one year he served as a soldier in the Mexican war and seven years in California during the gold excitement, emigrating in 1849 and returning home in 1856. While in California he was engaged in mining, teaming and selling goods with fair success. He was raised on a farm. He went to school in winter and worked on the farm in summer; received a fair education for that day and time, and taught school in early manhood. Capt. Denny was married to Miss MARY A. SNODDY January 22, 1857, and nine children were born to them, four sons and five daughters, eight of whom are still living. He has resided since marriage near Roanoke, where he has seven or eight hundred acres of fine well improved land. He was engaged for several years in the mercantile business at Roanoke in connection with farming. He is now interested in the banking business; is president of the Bank of Marshall, Marshall, Saline county, MO. Mr. Denny was during the Civil war a Union man, and was captain of Company F., 46th Regiment, E.M.M., and was stationed at Glasgow, Roanoke and New Franklin at different times during the war. He has been a member of and ruling elder in the Roanoke congregation of the Cumberland Presbyterian church for over thirty years. In this issue we print a cut of Capt. Denny's beautiful country home, located in the suburbs of Roanoke. His residence is located 200 years or more back from the public road and the ground gradually slopes to the road, and is covered with a luxuriant growth of blue grass and shade trees, making a very pretty picture and a model country home. Capt. Denny is a high-minded christian gentleman, and is a true friend to all mankind. He has been one of HERALD'S staunchest friends and supporters. He is liberal with his means, and is one of the wealthiest citizens in Howard county. The lives of such noble men as Capt. Denny are a blessing to the world.

back to the index

DR. R. S. YANCEY is a son of C. S. YANCEY and was born one mile north of Armstrong July 21, 1873. He was educated at the Armstrong Public School and at Missouri Valley College, Marshall, Mo. He has been a student of the Missouri Medical College, St. Louis, Mo., for two years and will graduate from that school next March. Mr. Yancey is a close student, and is studying his profession with great diligence. He has spent two vacations with Dr. Yancey, Chief Surgeon of the M. K. & T. Hospital at Sedalia, and there gained much practical knowledge and experience that will be of untold value to him when he leaves school and enters upon the practice of his profession. Dr. Yancey is a model young man, has no bad habits, and there is certainly a bright future for him.

back to the index

R. P. BRIGGS, grain dealer, was born in Pike county, Mo., February 25th, 1827. In 1841 he came to Howard county and has resided here since that time with the exception of four years. In 1850 Mr. Briggs crossed the plains to California, at which time the people were so greatly excited over the rich discoveries of gold in that state. He returned from California next year by way of the Isthmus of Panama. The ship on which he sailed from San Francisco to Panama was carried by the stong winds out into the ocean and for three long months the passengers were out of sight of land and came near starving to death. Mr. Briggs was married to Miss MARY A. THORP, September 15th, 1853. They resided two years in Andrew County and then moved over into Leavenworth County, Kansas in 1855, being one of the first settlers after the state was admitted into the Union. They removed to Howard county next year where they have since resided. Mr. Briggs owns one of the best residences in town and has four acres of land, which makes it very desirable and valuable property. Mr. Briggs has been engaged in the grain business since he removed to Armstrong, he also buys ties for the Alton R.R. Co. Mr. Briggs buys and ships many carloads of wheat each year. He has 5 boys and 4 girls, all of whom are living. D. J. BRIGGS is engaged in the milling business in Armstrong, W. J. BRIGGS is an entensive driy goods dealer at Lancaster, MO., R. P. BRIGGS, Jr., is in the drug business at Hot Springs, Arkansas. Mr. Briggs is a member of the Baptist church and the Masonic order and is one of Armstrong's most influential citizens.

back to the index

D. D. SMOTHERS, farmer and breeder of thoroughbred Chester White hogs, was born in Davis county, Iowa, June 24, 1847. When but seventeen years of age he shouldered a musket and went to the army, and fought bravely for the lost cause, making a gallant soldier. In 1868 he went to California, where he remained four years, returning to Randolph county, where he married Miss ELLA HICKS November 26, 1873. He engaged in farming, and for six years farmed on rented land. Then he purchased a farm of 210 acres, located four miles north west of Armstrong. Mr. Smothers started out in life with no capital save that of his nerve, ambition and industry, which he has applied along with good management, and has succeeded in accumulating a good farm of 210 acres, a splendid residence, which he just built two years ago, and a cut of which can be seen in this edition. He also has his farm well improved and plenty of good stock on hand. Mr. Smothers farms on strictly business principles, and has thus made a success where others would have in all probability made a failure. Mr. Smothers' home is but a short distance from the Oak Grove Methodist church, of which he is a leading member. In the year of 1891 Mr. Smothers begun the raising of thoroughbred Chester White hogs, and has been very successful in this industry. He has from time to time bought many fine hogs, at fancy prices, in other states to improve his herd, until now he has blended in his herd the blood of the best families of the Chester White breed of hogs. Mr. Smothers has established a good trade on his fine hogs, and his trade is increasing and extending over more territory each year. During the year he ships hogs, to all the adjoining states. Mr. Smothers is now vice-president of the Missouri Swine Breeders Association. Mr. Smothers also raises fancy poultry of the best breeds. Mr. Smothers is a good friend to the printer and always patronizes home. Such men are beneficial to any community. On the farm that Mr. Smothers now owns there was quite a little battle fought during the late war.

back to the index

J. M. DENNY, SR., was born in Howard county, Mo., May 3rd, 1829, and can be classed as one of the pioneer citizens of the township. In 1850 Mr. Denny crossed the plains to California where he remained two years digging gold. Returning home to Howard county with his savings he purchased 35 acres of land two miles south-west of Armstrong near where he was born. From time to time he has purchased more land until at the present time he owns a good farm of 1200 acres, with the best of improvements. He has a beautiful country home, a cut of which can be seen on a previous page. For the past 20 years Mr. Denny has been farming and stock-raising in partnership with DAVID BAGBY, and they have been very successful. Besides owning a fine farm of 1200 acres Mr. Denny is a stock-holder in the Bank of Marshall, and also has several thousand dollars drawing interest. Good management and close attention to his business has been the secret of Mr. Denny's success. Mr. Denny is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian church and contributes liberally to the support of the church and all charitable purposes. He always contributes of his means to the needy.

back to the index

STEPHEN W. CRESON, dealer in general merchandise, Yates, Mo., was born in Howard county January 27, 1853. His father T. H. CRESON was a native of North Carolina. Mr. Creson was educated at the Kirksville Normal, and was for several years one of the most successful teachers in Howard county. He began teaching in 1874, which profession he followed continuously until 1884, when he selected to run the general merchandise store at Yates owned by the Farmers' Co-operative Association. A year or so later he purchased store, and has since conducted the business. Mr. Creson has had wonderful success in his business career. He has by his honest dealings with his fellow men commanded the trade of a large scope of country, and has made a comfortable fortune. He now has one of the most complete general merchandise stores to be found in the state. He is also a stockholder and director of the Higbee Savings Bank. Ever since Mr. Creson located in Yates he has transacted a vast amount of business, buying everything the farmer had to sell and keeping in stock all the goods the farmer wished to buy. He has also been agent for Uncle Sam and the Alton railroad company for twelve years. Mr. Creson is a strickly self-made man, having started out in life a poor boy. He was married in 1877 to Miss SUSIE E. ROBB. Mr. Creson has been greatly assisted by his wife in his store, she having excellent business tact and judgment. They have one child, Miss BERTHA, who is being educated at Hardin College, Mexico, Mo. The noble lives of such men as S. W. Creson are a blessing to all humanity.

back to the index

JAS. L. HAWKINSON, druggist, Roanoke, Mo., ws born December 25th, 1865, at Roanoke, Howard County. He was educated in the Roanoke public school. Mr. Hawkinson has been in the drug business since 1883 and has established a reputation as a competent druggist. He and his brother Dr. Hawkinson, purchased the Wayland brick store building on west main street in Roanoke, two years ago, and had it remodeled and then opened up as drug store. They have a good assortment of drugs, and druggists' sundries, and enjoy a good trade. Mr. Hawkinson has been deputy constable of Prairie township for six years, and has discharged the duties of the office in a fearless and impartial manner. He is a staunch Democrat and one of the leading politicians of the township. He was elected Central Committeeman for Prairie township at the recent primary. He was married to Miss BETTIE WICKES IN 1889. They have two children, one boy and one girl.

back to the index

W. W. WALKER, assistant cashier of the Farmers' Bank of Armstrong, was born on a farm in Howard county October 4, 1863. He is a son of Dr. J. M. WALKER, one of the wealthiest and most influential citizens of the county. W. W. Walker was given a good public school education. He accepted the position of book-keeper in the Farmers' Bank September 2, 1889, and was elected assistant cashier the following January, which position he holds at the present time. As book-keeper and assistant cashier of the Farmers' Bank Mr. Walker has discharged his duties in a faithful and efficient manner; and, in recognition of his valuable service, the stock-holders have from time to time increased his salary. Mr. Walker is a careful book-keeper and keeps his books in a neat and correct condition. The State bank examiner found his books to tally to a cent. Mr. Walker owns a neat cottage in the west addition with four acres of land. He was married June 22nd, 1892 to Miss MABLE BROWN, daughter of Mr. & Mrs. G. C. BROWN. They have two children, both boys. Mr. Walker was once elected mayor of Armstrong. He is one of Armstrong's most enterprising young men. He is a stock-holder in the Farmers' Bank.

back to the index

STEPHEN B. YANCEY, cashier, of the Farmers Bank of Armstrong, was born at Springfield, Mo., Oct., 11th, 1844. He removed to Randolph county in 1859 and was educated at the Mt. Pleasant College, Huntsville, Mo., graduating from that institution. He was married to Miss LOGAN VILEY, October 7th, 1867. They have three children, two boys and one girl. His eldest son C. E. YANCEY married Miss ROY BELL, of Liberty, Mo., and they reside near Liberty. Mr. Yancey has always taken interest in educational affairs, and has given his children the advantages of the best schools and colleges. He has for years been one of the leading members of the Roanoke Baptist church, and contributes liberally of his means for the support of the church. Mr. Yancey was elected cashier of the Farmers Bank, of Armstrong in February 1889, when the bank was organized. So well have the stock-holders of the bank been pleased with the safe and conservative manner in which he has conducted the business affairs of the bank, that he has been re-employed from year to year to succeed himself. The business of the bank has increased from year to year under his management, and now the bank is recognized as one of the solid financial institutions of the county. Mr. Yancey resided on a fine farm of 385 acres one mile east of Roanoke, until he removed to Armstrong to take charge fo the bank. Mr. Yancey owns a nice residence in Armstrong, a cut of which can be see on a succeeding page. He secured one of the best building sites in the town and has five acres in the lot. Mr. Yancey is also a stock-holder in the bank of which he is cashier. He has always ranked at the top as one of the leading and influential men of his community.

back to the index

REV. JOHN T. BACON, was born near Cuba, Crawford county, MO., and was raised on a farm to manhood. He has been a student of Missouri Valley College for the past six years and graduated from that institution, May 27, 1896. He was for five years pastor of the C. P. Church of this place. He has worked and paid his own way through college, which is very commendable. He is at present pastor of the Higbee, Madison, and Holliday C.P. Churches. He is a member of the Masonic and Knights of Pythias Lodges. Rev. Bacon is one of Missouri's bright young men, he is ambitious and industrious, is at home in the pulpit; is a fluent speaker. Rev Bacon has many warm friends in Armstrong that wish for him a successful career in the ministry.

back to the index

DAVID BAGBY, farmer and stock raiser, was born at Trenton, Grundy Co., October 2, 1858. he came with his father, the late Capt. JOHN BAGBY, to Roanoke in 1864. He was educated in the public schools of the county. When but 12 years of age Mr. Bagby begun working for C. E. DENNY. Four years later he begun farming in partnership with J. M. DENNY, Sr., and has been farming in partnership with him since that time. Mr. Bagby has a farm of about 200 acres one mile south-west of Armstrong, and Mr. Denny owns 1200 acres. Mr. Bagby superintends the work on this big farm and attends to all the business. Mr. Denny knowing him to be an honest, honorable, upright man has trusted him with a vast amount of business outside of his farming interest. March 9th, 1882 he was married to Miss CORA UNDERWOOD. David Bagby is a staunch Democrat, and is recognized as one of the leading and most influential politicians of Howard county. He has never held an office, but has often been urged by his friends to become a candidate. Go where you will you will find but few better men, if any, than David Bagby. He is one of the leading spirits in all events of public importance in this community, and a more liberal hearted men does not draw the breath of life. Would that the world was made up of such men. He has been a deacon in the Christian church for the past 10 years.

back to the index

R. J. BAGBY, M. D., physician and druggist, was born in this county September 11, 1832. The early youth of the Doctor was spent on the farm. He attended the public schools and when 18 years old he entered the Fayette High School. He taught school one year and then begun reading medicine under Dr. P. B. CHIDES, remaining with him one year and the following year he studied medicine under Dr. T. J. BLAKE. In 1854 he attended the St. Louis Medical College. After the college term of 1855 he returned to Roanoke and begun the practice of medicine, where he has remained since that time with the exception of two years, one of which he practiced medicine in Chariton county and the other in the winter of 1862-63, when he attended the St. Louis Medical College graduating in March. The life of Dr. R. J. Bagby has been closely connected with the town of Roanoke for the past half century. For the past quarter of a century Dr. Bagby has been recognized as one of the most successful practitioners of the county, and has had a busy life following his profession. Dr. Bagby in connection with his practice has for years kept a first class drug and book store. In the drug store he has been ably assisted by his sons, and for the past ten years by WM. BAGBY, who is a competent druggist, and who is quite popular with the public. The Doctor has a large and well selected stock of drugs, medicines, show case goods, school books and in fact anything to be found in a well regulated drug store. He has always commanded a wide and lucrative trade. Dr. Bagby has been a friend to educational interests and has given his children the advantages of the best schools and colleges. The Doctor owns a beautiful home in Roanoke and is surrounded with all the comforts of life.

back to the index

J. B. MARTIN, the subject of this sketch was born in Howard County, March 16th, 1849 and has resided in this county all his life with the exception of four years he spent with his parents in Audrain and Bates Counties returning with them to Howard county in 1863. He was married February 22nd, 1877 to Miss SUSAN A. GREEN. Up till two years ago Mr. Martin was engaged in farming and stock-breeding industry, and was successful. In 1891 he sold his farm and removed to Armstrong and purchased a stock breeding stables at this place. Two years ago he disposed of his stock and for one year run a livery stable. Since selling out his livery business he has been clerking for J. B. FUGATE, the druggist. Mr. Martin owns a good residence and a store building in Armstrong. He is a member of the Methodist church and the Knights of Pythias Lodge. Mr. Martin is a liberal hearted, whole-souled gentleman and has many warm friends.

back to the index

L. W. MALONE, proprietor of the City Meat Market was born in Randolph county MO., January 31, 1856. He was married January 27, 1881, to Miss ALICE E. HISLE. Four children have blessed their union. three boys and one girl. For fifteen years Mr. Malone was engaged in the butcher business at Huntsville prior to the time he removed to Armstrong. About fifteen months ago he purchased R. N. FLEMING'S Meat Market at this place and removed with his family to Armstrong. Since Mr. Malone took charge of the shop he has run a strictly first-class butcher shop, keeping in stock at all times fresh meats of various kinds to supply the wants of his customers. Mr. Malone thoroughly understands the butcher business, and strives at all times to please his customers. He has been quite successful in Armstrong, due largely to his energy, push and enterprise, and the HERALD bespeaks for him continued prosperity. Mr. Malone is a hustle for business. Every day in the year you can buy choice fresh meats of all kinds at Malone's Meat Market.

back to the index

CYRUS A. GORGAS, hardware merchant, was born in Bellefonte, Penn., February 1, 1855. Mr. Gorgas is a tinner and plumber by trade and has worked at his trade in towns in Ohio, Iowa, Colorado, Kansas and Pennsylvania. March 1st, 1895, Mr. Gorgas came to Armstrong and purchased the tin shop and hardware store of REESE & STUDEBAKER. A few months prior to that time he came here and looked over the field and decided that it was a good place to build up a trade in his line of business, and consequently made the purchase. C. A. Gorgas and P. B. Gorgas, whose portraits you see on this page constitute the firm of Gorgas Bros., hardware merchants, tinners and plumbers. These gentlemen have been in Armstrong but a few months over a year and have succeeded in building up a large and lucrative trade, and they are extending their trade over more territory each succeeding month. They have an elegantly fitted up hardware store, one that would compare favorably with stores in towns of 10,000 inhabitants. A cut of an interior view of their store is presented on this page. Gorgas Bros. are live, energetic, up-to-date, hustling, enterprising business men. Just the kind of men it takes to build up a town. Any town could take pride in having such business men within its domain. These gentlemen are courteous and accommodating, and are well liked by the people. The HERALD bespeaks for this firm, increased trade and prosperity in the future. C. A. Gorgas was married in 1878 in Clayton county, Iowa, to Miss MATTIE E. MAHONEY. They have one daughter, Miss JENNIE, a most charming young lady. Mr. Gorgas was chief engineer of the fire department while a resident of Elkader, Iowa, and Huron, S. D. He was elected Mayor of Armstrong at the last election and has discharged the duties of the office in a manner satisfactory to all.

back to the index

P.B. GORGAS, the subject of this sketch was born at Hickesville, Ohio, April 30, 1861. He lived at Hickesville up to the time he came to Armstrong about one year ago, with the exception of three years he was in Pennsylvania at the towns of Bellefonte and Emporium, engaged in the confectionery business. He came to Armstrong the third of last April and has since been a partner with his brother in the hardware business, which fact we made mention of in the preceding article,. Mr. Gorgas is a thorough business man and besides he takes much interest in all social events and is quite a favorite at the social gatherings of the young people; being a good vocalist and performs on a number of musical instruments. He is a member of the Methodist church. We are pleased to have such a class of true hearted young men as Mr. Gorgas locate in our town. Such young men will always find a hearty welcome here.

back to the index

PROF. WM. ROBERTSON, the subject of this sketch, is the son of ANDREW J. and C. F. ROBERTSON, Nee CAROLINE DAVIS. Prof. Robertson's grand-parents on both sides were Virginians. Prof. Robertson was born and raised near Roanoke and was educated at the Roanoke public school. After completing his public school education he took a course at the Kirksville State Normal. He went to school with the sole object in view of making a teacher of himself. While at the Kirksville Normal he taught in the training school for teachers, and there gained experience that has been of much value to him in his school work. The methods taught at the Normal training school are the very best. Since leaving the Normal, Prof. Robertson has taught school two years at the Sugar Grove School near Moberly in Randolph county. He taught a successful school both terms, and was offered the school for a third term at a higher salary; but refused to accept it. Prof. Robertson has been employed to teach the Roanoke public school for the term of 1896-97. Prof. Wm. Robertson was a school mate of the writer, and we have ever known him to be an honest, upright boy with exempliary habits; he is industrious and full of energy and ambition and bids fair to be one of Missouri's foremost educators. May success ever attend his efforts.

back to the index

MRS. M. C. WOODS and Mrs. MARY SELLERS, whose portraits you see on this page, constitute the firm of Woods and Sellers, milliners and mantua-makers. Mrs. Woods came to Armstrong in the fall of 1885 and opened up a millinery store and during the past ten years has conducted a successful business. In March 1894 her millinery store and residence was destroyed by fire. Mrs. Woods then purchased a store building of A. P. SPOTTS and removed it to her lot on Main street. In March of this year Mrs. Woods sold out a half interest in her store to Mrs. Mary Sellers and now these ladies are running a dress-making department in connection with their store. These ladies have their store neatly arranged. They carry in stock the latest styles in millinery of all kinds, pattern hats that are perfectly lovely, ribbons, notions, etc. If you want the latest styles in millinery or a dress cut and fit in a manner that will please you, call on these ladies. They are sure to please you both as to quality of goods purchased and the price. They are always glad to welcome you to their store whether you wish to make a purchase or not.

back to the index

DR. W. O. HAWKINSON, physician and surgeon, Roanoke, Mo., was born in Roanoke in 1863. He was educated at the Roanoke public school, After completing his public school education he begun reading medicine under Dr. W. C. HARVEY, and at the same time clerking for Dr. Harvey in his drug store. He then took a course at the Missouri Medical College at St. Louis, graduating in 1884. He then located at Roanoke for the practice of his profession. From year to year the Doctor's practice has increased, until the present time he has about all the practice he can find time to attend to. The Doctor has been very successful in the practice of his profession, and he is now recognized as one of the skillful practitioners of North Howard. Dr. Hawkinson is also interested in the drug business with his brother JAS. L. HAWKINSON. Dr. Hawkinson keeps up with the times by constant study and by reading the best Medical Journals. He was married in 1885 to Miss JENNIE WICKES. They have two children, one boy and one girl.

back to the index

HON. LON V. STEPHENS, the subject of this sketch was elected Treasurer of the State of Missouri in 1892 on the Democratic ticket. So well he discharged the duties of that office that he has won the confidence of not only the people of his own state, but the great financiers of the United States. Mr. Stephens is looked upon as one of the ablest financiers in the United States. Mr. Stephens is a national banker, yet he has taken sides with the people on the financial question and the "Silver Nuggets" that he published each week in the Boonville Advertiser and that were copied by the Democratic press all over the state of Missouri and other states, has greatly aided the free coinage advocates in winning their victory in many of the states. Mr. Stephens is a candidate for the Democratic nominee for Governor and there is but little doubt but what he will be nominated, and if nominated the HERALD predicts for him and the party a grand victory. Mr. Stephens has many warm personal friends here in Armstrong, who would not only like to see him governor, but also president of the United States.

back to the index

W. L. MARKLAND, dry good merchant, was born in Howard county near Armstrong February, 18th, 1847. He is the son of the late Judge Markland. He was reared to manhood n the farm and was given a good public school education enabling him to teach school. He taught school for nine years and was one of the most successful teachers in the county. In the spring of 1880 he quit teaching school and came to Armstrong and went into the dry goods and grocery business. FUGATE & HUME, are the only business men in town that came here prior to Mr. Markland. In fact he has been identified with the town ever since it was a town. He has been a progressive, enterprising man, and greatly aided in building up Armstrong. Since he removed to Armstrong he has built six residences and one large brick store building. Mr. Markland is a self-made man having started out in the world quite young on his own hook. He has by industry and close attention to business accumulated considerable property. He owns a fine farm of 90 acres and well improved, just one mile east of town upon which he resides, also a large brick store building in Armstrong, the opera house and a half-interest in the big dry goods store of MARKLAND & HARVEY. W. L. Markland has ever been one of Armstrong's leading business men. He is a trustee of the Methodist church and a member of the A.O.U.W. and Knights of Pythias Lodge. He was married to Miss SARAH EMBREE, August 29th, 1867, who died in 1869. In 1872 he was married to Miss MATTIE GILLIAM of Saline county. They have four boys and three girls.

back to the index

D. J. BRIGGS, son of R. P. BRIGGS, was born in Andrew county November 1st, 1854. He was brought by his parents to Howard county the following year where he has since resided. Mr. Briggs was reared to manhood on his father's farm and was educated in the public schools. After completing his public school education he taught school. He then entered the State University as a law student, graduating in the law department in 1881. He then took a course at the St. Louis law school. After leaving school he located at Fayette and was admitted to the bar for the practice of law. He was married September 25th, 1899 to Miss SALLIE HOWARD of this county. They have two children, one boy and one girl. In 1891 he purchased his father's farm and two hears later traded it for property in Armstrong. He now owns the large brick mill, a cut of which you can see on the preceding page. This mill is well equipped with the best of modern machinery and cost about $12,000. He has good residence property a cut of which is printed on the preceding page; there are also five acres of land in the lot on which Mr. Briggs' residence is located, making it one of the most desirable homes in town. He has 20 acres within the corporate limits, just north of the main business part of town, that is valuable, it being the most sightly place adjoining the town for residences. D. J. Briggs is an industrious and progressive citizen. He is a member of the Baptist church and the A.O.U.W. Lodge.

back to the index

JUDGE J. C. LEE, the subject of this sketch can be truly classed as one of Howard county's pioneer citizens. He was born on the old Lee homestead 2 miles west of Armstrong only a short distance from where he now resides, January 31st, 1829. He was reared to manhood on the farm, and educated in the public school. In 1854 he went to California where he married Miss ELIZABETH BAKER who preceded him to the grave. He was married a second time to Miss REBECCA PAINTER. Three children blessed his first union and two boys and two girls his second. During the war Judge Lee served in the Confederate army and made a brave and true soldier. After the war was over he removed to Howard county and purchased the farm on which he now resides. For several years he was justice of the peace of Prairie township. In 1882 he was elected Judge of the Western District of Howard county on the Democratic ticket. he took the oath of office January 1st, 1883. He was re-elected in 1884. In 1886 he was elected Presiding Judge of Howard county which office he held for 8 years. He made an honest, faithful officer and was truly a servant of the people. Judge Lee owns a good farm west of Armstrong. He is one of the leading members of and a deacon in the Christian church.

back to the index

AUNT BETSY ROBB, who is 97 years old, was born before the first President of the United States died, but as she was only a little over a month old at the time of his death, of course cannot remember anything of him except what she had heard people say who knew him personally and well. Ever since 1819, Mrs. Betsy Robb has lived in Burton township, Howard county. Mrs. Robb's maiden name was Bettie Morris and she was born in Jessamine county, KY., Nov., 1799. She came to Missouri with her parents, Mr. & Mrs. NATHANIEL MORRIS, who settled in Howard county in 1819. In 1821, Miss Morris was married to MICHAEL ROBB, who died in 1840. Mrs. Robb was the mother of 8 children and has out lived them all.

back to the index

THEO. F. EVANS was born in Howard county June 18th, 1860. He is a son of JESSE EVANS, one of Prairie township's honored and substantial citizens. Mr. Evans has lived in Howard county all his life except a short time he spent in DeKalb county. He was married to Miss LULA BRIGGS, daughter of R. P. BRIGGS, October 28th, 1885. Their union has been blessed by three children 2 boys and one girl. He owns a well-improved farm 2 miles north-east of Armstrong, in one of the finest farming sections of the township. Mr. Evans is a present engaged in farming and the raising of thorough-bred Poland China hogs. He is a good judge of a hog and knows how to care for hogs and raise them. He buys the best strains of the P. C. breed. Mr. Evans has been in the business but a few years and has succeeded in building up a nice trade on his throrogh-bred stock. Mr. Evans is a member of the Baptist church and is one of Howard county's solid, substantial young men.

back to the index

JAS. A. FARRIS, farmer, was born in Wythe county, Virginia in 1858. In 1877 he removed to Kentucky and the spring of 1880 he came to Howard county, Mo. When he came to Missouri he was a poor man, but had the energy, nerve, ambition and determination to get a start in the world. He hired to R. Y. HUME and worked for him two years. In 1882 he married LAURA ROCK, daughter of the late JOHN W. ROCK. Three boys and one girl have blessed their union. In 1883 he purchased the farm known as the Farris farm, and now owned by LEON FIFE. Mr. Farris by hard work and good management made money and in March of 1892 he decided that he wanted more land, so he sold his farm and bought 350 acres of land 1 mile west of Roanoke, known as the Harve Patterson farm, paying for it $10,500. It is one of the best farms in the county. A cut of Mr. Farris' residence can be seen in this edition. Mr. Farris is truly a self-made man, having worked his way up in the world. He is a member of the Baptist church and A.O.U.W. Lodge.

back to the index

JOHN T. STOCKER, farmer and breeder of Short Horn Cattle, was born in Madison county, Ky., in 1852. Mr. Stocker was reared to manhood on a farm in the blue grass state and was given a public school education. In 1875 he was married to Miss ISABELLE PERKINS. Their union has been blessed with eight children, six boys and two girls. In 1882 Mr. Stocker emigrated from his native state to Missouri and purchased a farm near Chariton church. In 1892 he sold that farm and purchased what is known as the Rice Patterson farm one mile and a half west of Roanoke containing 337 acres. In recent years Mr. Stocker has been raising thoroughbred Short Horn cattle and has been quite successful, finding a ready sale for all the thoroughbreds he has to dispose of. On a previous page you will see a cut of a group of Short Horn cattle raised by him. One of the steers you see in the group weighed 1,725 pounds at a three year old. Mr. Stocker is a progressive farmer, and has great faith in Missouri's future. He also believes in advertising the many advantages of our great state.

back to the index

W. F. BEACH was born in Louden county, Virginia, December 23rd, 1850. He came with his parents to Monroe county in 1857. Ten years later the family removed to Howard county, where Mr. Beach has since made his home. He was married to Miss ARRETTA MARKLAND, December 8th, 1872. Their union was blessed by five children, 2 boys and 3 girls. Mrs. Beach died one year ago. Mr. Beach has been road overseer of the Armstrong district for the past twelve years, and the excellent condition of the roads at the present time attest the fact that no better man could be secured for the place. Mr. Beach has been director of the Armstrong public school for 10 years and has ever manifested deep interest in the welfare of the school. He is now president of the school board. Mr. Beach owns a well improved farm of 179 acres one mile south-east of Armstrong, which property he has accumulated by the sweat of his own brow. Mr. Beach is a member of the Methodist church, the A.O.U.W. Lodge and a good citizen.

back to the index

J. T. TERRILL, farmer, was born in Howard county one mile north of Armstrong, January 5th, 1854. He is a son of the late Rev. J. W. TERRILL. He was raised to manhood on the Terrill homestead on which he now resides. When the war broke out in 1861 he went with his parents to Texas, returning with them to Missouri in 1866 after the war was over. He was educated in the public schools and at Mount Pleasant College, Huntsville, Mo. He was married January 18th, 1887 to Miss LENIE EVANS, of Moberly, Mo. They have six children, 3 boys and three girls. Since returning home from Texas Mr. Terrill has resided in Howard county with the exception of 3 years that he farmed successfully in Chariton county, six miles north of Salisbury. He owns an extra good farm of 155 acres 1 mile north of Armstrong, and is in good circumstances financially. He was elected director of the Armstrong public school in April, 1895. Mr. Terrill takes great interest in educational affairs and one of his chief objects in life is to give his children a good education. He is a member of the Baptist church and the Royal Tribe of Joseph Lodge. Mr. Terrill is a man that attends strictly to his own affairs and is well liked by his fellowman.

back to the index

ANDREW JACKSON PAYTON, was born in Randolph county, December 21st, 1851. He removed with his parents to near Glasgow, just over the line in Chariton county when but a small boy and spent most of his life at that place. He was educated at Glasgow. He was married to Miss J. A. MADDOX, October 18th, 1883. They have one child, Roland a bright boy of 12 years of age. Mr. Payton was elected township collector in Chariton county in 1884 and held the office two years. He purchased and removed to the farm now owned by JOHN THURMAN 3 miles west of Armstrong. Five years ago he purchased the livery stable at this place of J. K. TWYMAN and now owns a half interest in the livery business of PAYTON & DENNY. Mr. Payton has a neat cottage home in the west addition, which is well imporoved in every respect. Payton & Denny have two large livery barns in Armstrong. Mr. Payton is a staunch Democrat and is one of the leading politicians of North Howard. He is a member of the I.O.O.F. Lodge and is a member of and deacon in the Christian church at this place. Mr. Payton is a thorough business man and can always be found at his post of duty.

back to the index

SQUIRE J. H. MARKLAND, groceryman and farmer, was born in Howard county, March 20th, 1851. He is a son of the late Judge MATTHEW MARKLAND. Mr. Markland was raised on his father's farm near town and was educated in the public schools. He has been a farmer all his life up to the first of last January when he bought a half interest in the large grocery concern of Markland Bros. Mr. Markland still resides on his farm near Armstrong, coming to town each day to work at the store. He owns a good residence in Armstrong. He was elected Justice of the Peace in 1894 and has discharged the duties of his office in a manner satisfactory to his constituents. He is a staunch free silver Democrat. He is a member of the Presbyterian church and is solicitor for the American Benevolent Association. Mr. Markland has many warm personal friends and is a most excellent citizen. The grocery business of Markland Bros. will be referred to in the next article. Mr. Markland was married to Miss MARCELLA McCORMACK, of Saline county, October 5th, 1880. They have five children 2 boys and 3 girls.

back to the index

PROF. J. S. SNODDY was born near Armstrong in Howard County, Mo., where he spend his boyhood days. He made use of such opportunities as were afforded him in the country schools, and at the age of nineteen taught his first school at Boonsbouough, Mo. He graduated at the Missouri State University, June 1893. After teaching two years, he returned to the University and was placed in charge of the library. He remained there until Junly 1887, then went to Kansas City where he worked for a short time with the Kansas City Times. The Board of Education, at Westport, a suburb of Kansas City, at that time being in need of a superintendent, offered the position to Professor Snoddy. He accepted the position and remained there until June 1890 when he resigned in order to make a visit to the "Old World". He visited England, France and Belgium, but spent most of his time in Germany. Immediately after his return to America, he was offered a position in the Education Institute, a German school, in Kansas City where he taught for two years. Since that time, Prof. Snoddy has been endeavoring to specialize his work in teaching. He has chosen English language and literature for his specialty. He spent the summer of 1893 studying Old English at Harvard University and the winter of '93-'94 at the University of Chicago pursuing the same line of work. For the past two years, he has charge of the department of English at Woodson Institute, Richmond, Missouri where he is offering a course of work in English and American literature that is second to none in the state except that which is offered at the State University.

back to the index

MATTHEW MARKLAND JR., was born near Armstrong, Howard county, Mo., December 2nd, 1864. He is also a son of Judge MATTHEW MARKLAND and was reared to manhood on his father's farm and was educated at the Armstrong and Roanoke public schools. In 1884 Mr. Markland came to Armstrong and went into the dry goods and grocery business with his brother W. L. MARKLAND and has been a merchant of the town since that time making twelve years in all. He has been very successful. He is at present a member of the firm of Markland Bros. grocery merchants, he and his brother 'Squire J. H. MARKLAND constitute the firm. They have a magnificent store room 22x80 feet filled with a complete stock of choice family groceries, queensware, chinaware, woodenware, etc. Their store would be a credit to a town ten times the size of Armstrong. They have the best location in the town and command a big trade. Markland Bros., are enterprising business men and you will be treated in a courteous manner at their store. Matthew Markland Jr., has been traveling for the Rowell Glove Co., of Johnston, New York, for the past two years, and has made a most successful salesman, and now commands a good salary. He is one of Armstrong's most enterprising young business men. He is a member of the Knights of Pythias and A.O.U.W. Lodges. He was married to Miss BERTHA EVANS, daughter of A. W. EVANS, March 27th, 1890. They have two children one boy and one girl.

back to the index

T. E. GATES, the youngest child of DANIEL GATES who came from Madison Co., Ky., was one of the earliest settlers of this part of the state. Two and one half miles north of Fayette, Howard county, where he always lived and raised a large family until he was called to his long and peaceful rest. Two girls, Mrs. LEVI ALVERSON, Mrs. JAS. FELAND and the above are living. At the age of 18 he begun teaching school which he followed 13 years. Was in the late war, Company C, 2nd Regiment, 3 division. Gen. JOHN CLARK Co., under Gen. STERLING PRICE. Was in the noted 3 days battle of Pea Ridge, Arkansas; getting through receiving only a slight wound. In 1864 he went to Madison county, Kentucky and was married the following year. Two children blessed his union. In May 1880 his companion passed from earth away, leaving him with two little girls. In June following he came to and located at Armstrong being one of its earliest settlers and business men. He has been engaged in the furniture and undertakers business. In April 1882 he was married to Miss LUCIE COOPER of Saline county. Mr. Gates has been here to witness the growth of Armstrong from a few houses to its present size. The Lord has blessed and crowned his efforts with success. Mr. Gates is a member of and deacon in the Christian church and one of the charter members of the Armstrong A.O.U.W. Lodge. Mr. Gates has a large furniture store occupying two store buildings.

back to the index

I. M. TURNAGE, pastor of the Baptist Church, was born in Ray county, MO., April 20 1858. He was left an orphan by the death of his father when 6 years old. Raised on the farm with a large family of children. Advantages for education were not the best, therefore (except one term) his early education was secured in the country and village school of his native county. The subject of this sketch belongs to a family remarkable for the number of preachers. The Paternal Grand Sire and three of his sons were ministers, two uncles also on the Maternal side with two brothers and several cousins are now or have been engaged in preaching the Gospel. Under the influence of pious ancestors and a Christian mother young Turnage in early life embraced the religion of Christ and united with the Regular Baptist church and began the study of the Bible. He began preaching at the age of 24 and was ordained to the full work of the Gospel ministry December 1884. He was married to Miss ANNIE EDGAR Oct., 28, 1879. Six children were born of this marriage. Only two of which (a boy and a girl) are living. After preaching for churches in Ray county 3 years Rev. Turnage resigned his charges and removed with his family to Armstrong, reaching here January 18, 1888. He began preaching for churches in Howard and Randolph counties, of the Old School Baptist denomination. In the fall of 1890 he removed to Sturgeon, and the following spring united with the Baptist church of that place and became the pastor of the church. He returned to Armstrong Stepember 1891 and resides here at present. Rev. Turnage was instrumental in building the Armstrong high school, taking a leading part with others. He purchased the land and made the west addition to Armstrong. Improved three pieces of residence property in Armstrong. Last year repaired the Baptist churches at Chariton and Friendship. He now has in course of erection a new Baptist church at this place that will cost $3,500. He has been unanimously called five times to the pastorate of the Armstrong Baptist church and four times at Chariton and Friendship. He has been pastor of a number of other churches. During the past four years he has given all his time to the work of the ministry. He has held and assisted in a number of revivals with neighboring pastors. Under his charge the membership of the various churches have steadily increased. He is a fluent, forcible speaker and is a most excellent citizen in every respect. He owns one of the best pieces of residence property in Armstrong, a cut of which is printed in this edition.

back to the index

A. W. EVANS, stock and grain dealer, was born in Howard county near Armstrong in April 1841. He remained on the farm until 17 years of age when he entered the Mt. Pleasant College at Huntsville, MO., where he was educated, In 1864 he went to Atchison, Kansas and was engaged in the grocery business at that place for 2 years. In 1866 he returned from Kansas to Missouri and located at Glasgow, where for two years he was engaged in the tobacco and grain business, with LEWIS Bros. From Glasgow he went to St. Louis and for 14 years dealt exclusively in grain, and during that time transacted a vast amount of business. His health failing him he decided to leave St. Louis and locate in the country. Having a kindly feeling for his native county he purchased a farm one mile south of town where he resided until two years ago, when he sold that farm to D. C. WALKER and removed to Armstrong. Mr. Evans still owns a farm one mile and a half south of town. In 1869 he was married to Miss ELLA HARRIS at Glasgow, the union of this couple has been blessed with five children, 3 boys and 2 girls. His oldest boy is now at Los Angeles, California. He oldest daughter married Prof. W.C. ROOKER,and is now residing at San Antonio, Texas. Mr. Evans' life has been a most active one, and there is probably not a man in Armstrong that has transacted as much business as Mr. Evans during his life. He is at present engaged in buying and shipping to the markets stock and grain. He is a member of the Baptist church. For three years he has been superintendent of the Armstrong Union Sunday school, and the school has flourished under his charge. Mr. Evans is a man of much influence in the community for the good, and is a useful citizen.

back to the index

ANDREW PETERSON, the plasterer and brick mason, was born at Stockholm, Sweden; and when four years old his parents decided to remove to the United States. When the vessel upon which they sailed had been out at sea but a few days that dread disease of Asiatic cholera became prevalent on board, and Mr. Peterson's father was one of the first to die. He says he remembers very distinctly how they wrapped his father up in cloth and threw him overboard, although he was but four years old. 189 of the passengers on board the vessel died before it landed. The vessel was quarantined at New York City, and there a sister of Mr. Peterson took sick and died with the typhoid fever. His mother with the remainder of the family located in Chicago, where she afterwards married. He came to Missouri in 1863, and in 1872 was married to MARY ELIZABETH BLAKE. Ten children have blessed their union. Mr. Peterson owns a good farm north of Roanoke, which he has cultivated by hired hands while he works at his trade. When he was but a small boy he had wealthy relatives that tried to get him to come back to Sweden, and make his home with them and inherit their fortune; but he refused to leave America. Mr. Peterson from his boyhood has had to make his own way in the world, and is a strictly self-made man. Mr. Peterson owns one of the best fruit farms in Chariton county. He is a good citizen in every respect. His is a good workman, and gets all the work he can do. He is a member of the Armstrong A.O.U.W. Lodge.

back to the index

J. M. WALKUP, merchant, Steinmetz, MO., was born in Howard county, Mo., in 1850. Mr. Walkup was reared to manhood on a farm near Armstrong. He was educated in the public schools and at the Troy Normal School in Iowa. He went to Iowa in 1872 where he made his home until three years later he returned to Missouri. Mr. Walkup taught school for three years. He was married to Miss LIZZIE McMAINS, of Iowa in 1876. They have three boys and three girls. After returning to Missouri Mr. Walkup bought a farm near Washington church. In 1893 he sold his farm and opened up a store in Steinmetz. He carries in stock a general line of merchandise and commands a good trade. He has the only store at that place and it is quite a convenience to the good people of the Steinmetz vicinity. Mr. Walkup is deputy postmaster at Steinmetz. He is a member of the A.O.U.W. Lodge and the Methodist church of this place.

back to the index

REUBEN B. HUME was born in Howard county, Mo., four miles north-west of Armstrong, July 10th, 1864. He is a son of R. Y. Hume, one of the pioneer and wealthy citizens of the county. Mr. Hume was married September 4th, 1895 to Miss NANNIE DENNY, and accomplished young lady of Randolph county. Mr. Hume is engaged in farming and stock raising and he owns one of the best improved farms in the county. Mr. Hume is a member of the Masonic Lodge. He was elected Master of the Armstrong Lodge one year ago and has made the Lodge a most excellent officer. He is one of the best posted Masons in the state; being able to fill any office in the lodge without the aid of the ritual.

back to the index

J. H. COLLINS, blacksmith, was born in Howard county, Mo., February 22nd, 1863, one mile south of Armstrong. He has made his home here with the exception of two years that he spent in the western states, Nevada, Utah, Colorado, California, Arizona and New Mexico and also Old Mexico, working at this trade and seeing the country. Returning home he remained here a short time and then took a trip down into Texas and the Indian Territory where he remained one year working at his trade. Returning home two years ago, he went into the blacksmith and implement business with G. F. SNODDY, and they command a big trade. Mr. Collins is a first class workman and is very popular with the young people, especially the ladies.

back to the index

ALEX DENNY, JR., was born in Howard county, MO., Dec. 23, 1873. He is a son of C. E. DENNY, one of the wealthy citizens of north Howard. He was educated at Prichett Institute, Glasgow. Alex has many warm personal friends and is very popular with his associates. He has talent for music and is a member of the Armstrong Mandolin club, which he was instrumental in organizing. He owns a fine farm of 100 acres four miles west of Armstrong. Mr. Denny is an energetic young man and starts out in life with a promising future.

back to the index

MRS. IMOGENE BLAKELY, millinery, was born in Lincoln county, Mo. She removed to Armstrong in 1890 and in the spring of 1891 opened up a millinery store at this place. She has been very successful and each succeeding season has added to her stock of goods different novelties. She now has a neat store room on main street and has a complete stock of millinery, ribbons, notions and novelties of various kinds. Mrs. Blakely is a lady of fine business ability and has succeeded in building up a good trade since locating here. Up to date styles in millinery always on hand at Mrs. Imo Blakely's.

back to the index

HOWARD COUNTY, MISSOURI

Under an act of the General Assembly, approved January 13, 1816, the county of Howard was created, being formed from the counties of St. Louis and St. Charles.

Thus it will be seen that eighty years have passed since the county came into existence, and wonderful have been the changes, and mighty have been the events, revolutions, discoveries and inventions that have occurred within this time. Not since God "formed the earth and world" and tossed them from the hollow of his hand have so many great things been accomplished in eighty years previous. Reflections on these can not fail to arouse wonder and awaken thankfulness that God has appointed us the place we occupy in the eternal chain of events. In the last eighty years Tennyson, Browning, Byrant and Longfellow have sung; the matchless Webster, the eloquent Clay, the logical Calhoun have since reached the culmination of their powers and passed from earth; Macaulay, Thier and Froude have written the great histories of the world; Spurgeon, Beecher and Moody have enforced with most persuasive eloquence the duties of morality and religion; Carlyle, Emerson, Mill and Spencer have startled the world in their speculations in philosophy; the center of population has travelled more than three hundred miles west and a majority of the states have been added to the glorious constellation on the blue field of our flag; great cities have been created; gold discovered in California; the great Civil War, the bloodiest in all annals of time, has been fought; the telephone and railroad, together with the wonderful discoveries of electricity, have been added to the list of most important inventions.

Howard county, at the time of its organization, was an empire within itself. In order that the reader may have a more definite idea of the area of the county we will state that beginning with Boone it ran west as far as Jackson, crossing the river and running south as far as Barton, its northern boundary taking in all north of the river, including ten counties in the state of Iowa, representing an area of 22,000 square miles, being one-third as large as the entire state, and larger than Vermont, Delaware, Rhode Island and Massachusetts combined. By an act of the Legislature February 16, 1825, the county was reduced to its present limits, 465 square acres. In 1821 the seven townships were organized by the name they bear at present expect Burton, which was afterwards formed from parts of Prairie, Richmond and Boone Femme townships.

The first permanent settlement was made in Boone's Lick township, on land owned at present by W. N. MARSHALL, by Col. BENJAMIN COOPER in the year 1810.

The first Circuit Court was held in Cole's Fort July 8, 1816. DAVID BARTON, Judge; NICHOLAS BURCKHARTT, Sheriff, and GRAY BYNUM, clerk.

The first deed was recorded April 13, 1816, from JOSEPH MARIE to ASA MORGAN.

The first marriage was JUDIAH OSMON to ROSELLA BUSBY. No orange blossoms figured in the above nuptials. An old-fashioned log cabin jig, with hominy and 'possum pie served as the repast. Marriages in those primitive days were the result of love. There was not only a union of hands, but a union of hearts. The pioneer maiden made a faithful wife, and the sturdy backwoodsman the true and trusted husband.

"From that day forth in peace and joyous bliss
They lived together long without debate;
Nor private jars, nor spite of enemies,
Could shake the safe assurance of this state."

The first regular term of the County Court was held February 26, 1821. Although it was organized in the fall of 1816, but it was known as an independent tribunal until the year 1821. The Court was held at Old Franklin. The Judges were H. V. BINGHAM, D. R. DRAKE and THOMAS CONWAY, with HAMPTON L. BOONE as clerk.

The first newspaper was issued April 23, 1819, by PATTON & HOLLIDAY at Franklin under the name of Missouri Intelligencer.

The first steamboat that ever attempted the navigation of the Missouri river was the Independence, which arrived at Franklin May 28, 1819; Capt. JOHN NELSON commanding.

The first election that was held in the county occurred in 1819 to select delegates to Congress, and the second was held in 1820 to select five delegates to a convention to frame a state constitution.

Howard county mostly consists of timber lands with a few upland and bottom prairies. The river frontage on the west and south is thirty-four miles. The river bluffs on the western border are steep and perpendicular, while on the southern they are more gentle. The southern portion of the county is not so hilly as some other districts. The northern part of the county sustains a growth of timber similiar to that lying south; but the face of the country is not so hilly and, in fact, the slopes are more gentle.

The county aside from the river is well-watered, having the Moniteau, Bonne Femme, Salt Fork, Hurricane, Doxey's Fork and other small streams flowing southward to the river. Springs are abundant all over the county, and several which possess medicinal virtue. Coal is found in every township, and in most every section of land in the county in great abundance, and of superior quality. In fact, Howard county seems to be adapted by nature to possess all the requirements and necessaries that man desires and can obtain by labor and industry.

If it was possible to give the full history of Howard county and all the stirring events social, political and otherwise which have transpired within her domain it would make volumes, whose reading would be more interesting and fascinating than any other portion of the state, for, in truth, the early history of Howard county was the history of the forty-eight counties which were formed from her original boundary, which have since given her the proud and honorable title of the "Mother of Counties."

The following are the exports of Howard county during the year 1895: Cattle, 4,263 head; horses and mules, 859 head; hogs, 22,082 head; sheep, 3,620; mixed live stock, 13 cars; wheat, 173,730 bushels; corn, 17,037 bushels; oats, 1,250 bushels; flour, 17,015 barrels; ship stuff 210,000 pounds; hays 540 bales; tobacco, 101,060 pounds; potatoes, 16,200 bushels; seed, 500 bushels; nuts, 60 bushels; apples, 19,713 bushels; fruits and vegetables, 432,000 pounds; nursery stock, 30,000 pounds; wool, 3,173 pounds; fish, 705 pounds; tallow, 1,833 pounds; butter, 2,677 pounds; eggs, 64,440 dozen; poultry, 150,326 pounds; feathers 897 pounds; hides, 35,579 pounds; cooperage, 7 cars; cross ties, 13,600; lumber, 80,000 feet; small fruits, 196 crates.

R. S. Walton
1896

back to the index


Send comments to sbarger@uark.edu, Howard County MOGenWeb Coordinator

Back to Howard County, MOGenWeb

usgenweb missouri

2001 by Sherryl Barger for the Howard County MOGenWeb Project

This page last updated on January 5, 2001.