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Harry S. Truman Library & Museum
 500 W. US Hwy. 24. Independence MO 64050
 Phone: 816-268-8200 or 1-800-833-1225; Fax: 816-268-8295.
 truman.library@nara.gov
 http://www.trumanlibrary.org/

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 THE INDEPENDENCE EXAMINER, May 18, 1912

 Buckner is to have a new grain elevator. Frank P. Chiles has bought a tract of land between the C. J. Mann residence and the railroad track fronting on the rock road, and expects to build a large grain elevator and storage room.

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THE INDEPENDENCE EXAMINER, July 25, 1930 

THE NEW HOSPITAL IN INDEPENDENCE

(Abstract of information from the article) In 1930, Independence was trying to build a "modern hospital for the care of the sick and needy, the campaign for which has just been complete." To preserve the "Honor Roll" of contributors, a "Book of Remembrance" was created, that would include their names, and that would be placed in the cornerstone of the new building and also in a vault. If you had relatives living in Independence in 1930, read through the alphabetized list of donors printed on page 4 or the July 15, 1930 Examiner. Individuals were listed and business houses' employee donors were named. There are hundreds of names, including Harry S. Truman, members of the Waggoner family of the Bingham-Waggoner mansion and the Waggoner-Gates Mill, the Van Horn family, and many, many lesser known names.

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INDEPENDENCE SENTINEL, September 13, 1901

PRIMITIVE BAPTISTS

A few weeks ago an old church building in Independence was torn down. It had long ago been abandoned by its owners, the Primitive Baptists, sometimes known as "Hardshell" Baptists. When the old church was pulled down, several newspaper writers took occasion to say that the sect which once owned the building had entirely ceased to exist. That was quite an error. The Primitive Baptists have 2-3 churches in Jackson County. One of these may be seen about 3 miles from Independence, out on the Blue Springs road. It is known as the Pleasant Grove church and services are held there regularly once a month.

On "Saturday before the fourth Sunday" in this month, the Primitive Baptists will hold an association at Pleasant Grove church. The attendance will be large inasmuch as visiting brethren will be present from all over the state and from adjoining states. There are 4000? (1000?) Primitive Baptists in the State of Missouri. The little church out on the Blue Springs road is not the only Primitive Baptist Church in this county. They have a large church and a rather large congregation near Oak Grove. They also have a church a few miles northeast of Blue Springs known as Little Blue church.

The Primitive Baptists are called "Hardshell" Baptists because of their steadfastness of belief. They hold to the doctrine of foreordination and election, and to the final perseverance of the Saints. They do not believe in Sunday Schools and each church organization is independent of all others, even independent of the Association. The ministers are not especially educated for ministerial work.

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THE JACKSON COUNTY EXAMINER, January 24, 1902

THE INDEPENDENCE DIRECTORY

The Independence Directory, issued by C. J. Allis, Allen Stuart and J. G. V. Redmon will prove to be a valuable book to business men in Independence and Kansas City. It contains the names of the residents of Independence, business firms, streets, public buildings, city and county officials and of those served by the new free delivery routes from Independence, which will be in operation the first of next month. In the Independence Directory, proper, there are 3,000 names, which according to the usual methods of comput(at)ion would give Independence a population of 12,000. There are something over 1800 names in addition which includes the free delivery routes and those living on the lines of travel between Independence and Kansas City. It is the intention of the gentlemen issuing this directory to have one printed every year and this will make it possible for Independence to soon have a thoroughly reliable business directory. The book now offered for sale at $1.00 is remarkably accurate, considering the difficulties under which those who had it in charge were laboring

(Ed's note: A copy of the 1902 city directory would be worth lots more now. Does anyone know where one exits?)

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 THE JACKSON COUNTY EXAMINER, January 24, 1902

HOMES FOR BOYS WANTED We have on hand a very fine lot of boys and girls of all ages from 1-12 years of age. We are putting them out in carefully selected homes. They are placed on three months trial. All it costs to get one is the transportation. References required. For terms address Rev. C. C. Stahman, 810 Olive St., St. Louis, MO. State Superintendent of the Children's Home Society.

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Jackson County Examiner

THE JACKSON EXAMINER, June 8, 1900 Amos Ashcraft of Grain Valley was injured Tuesday morning and lost a foot. He attempted to board a moving train at the Chicago & Alton depot in this city and fell under the wheels. The injured foot was amputated by Drs. O'Daniel, Wherritt and Kinyoun.

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THE INDEPENDENCE EXAMINER, July 23, 1930

THE NEW COMMUNITY AT LAKE LOTAWANA

(Abstract of article) Milton Thompson of Lee's Summit and Lotawana was building the community we now know as Lake Lotawana. At that time, he was with the installation of the electric light and power plant, which was going to be at the south end of the lake, where a small water turbine would be installed near a fall of 45 feet. Mr. Thompson was also installing a backup plant "operated by an oil motor." He had 45 men at work fulltime, installing both light and sewer facilities. "About one hundred houses already have been built on this development and are occupied" with lots worth half a million dollars already sold. Some owners were planning to make their lake homes year-round homes.

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Town and Country Paper, 10/29/2002

 LAW'S LONG ARM GRABS WESTERN DAY VILLAINS

A term that we frequently hear in reference to the law is that it has a "long arm", meaning that lawmen were often effective in solving crimes and arresting criminals from far away. That "arm" was capable of snatching criminals from far away.That "arm" was capable of snatching criminals from the comfort of what they thought were safe havens from hundreds, and sometimes even thousands, of miles away. 

An army man, stationed in Arizona in the early 1890's Michael J. Quirk decided that he had spent enough of his life being ordered around and bullied by other men who he felt were not even his equal, let alone his supervisors. Quirk decided to leave his assigned post without the benefit of permission from the army.In the process, he stabbed and wounded his Sergeant when the man tried to stop him. The now frightened deserter took off, and quickly disappeared from sight, leaving the southwest for parts unknown.

He realized that he was no longer just a deserter, and would be able to enlist the aid of the law in it's search. For awhile, Quirk was successful in staying hidden, but the search did not stop, and in March of 1894 he was located, arrested and sent back to the army in Arizona for trial and punishment.It was not reported what eventually happened to Quirk, but we can be sure that the army punished him severely, most likely with a branding on the cheek for desertion, and several years at hard labor for the assault, at least for starters.

How far did Quirk's unsuccessful flight take him? Well, over 2000 miles, all the way to New York City! But, he was still found.Now, think about this. This man was not even able to hide himself in the enormous population of the country's largest city.

Another long distance capture, this one starting in California 30 years earlier than the one mentioned above, and ending up in Arizona, involved a robber named John Kelly.Kelly, originally from Indiana, was described in "The Weekly Arizonan" as about 30 years old, and tall and rawboned in appearance.

On August 17, 1864 Kelly robbed the store of a Mr. Meyers in San Francisco of several thousand dollars in watches, diamonds and jewelry. It took several years, but finally, in early 1870, the law located Kelly in Fort Prescott, Arizona, and took him into custody. But, Kelly had no intention of facing his accusers back in California.

One night, shortly after his arrest, Kelly broke out of the guardhouse and made a run for it. Being chased by armed men, the "former" prisoner leaped off a bluff into the darkness to make his escape. When the pursuing soldiers got to the bluff, they decided that it was "better to be safe than sorry" and did not take the same path to the bottom of the cliff that Kelly had followed. When they finally worked their way to the bottom, their former prisoner was nowhere to be found.It is unknown where Kelly ended up, but he never answered to the law for his 1864 robbery in California.

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KANSAS CITY STREETS IN 1879
(as listed in Ballenger & Hoye's Kansas City Street Directory)

The list begins with an explanation that "Streets running North and South are numbered from the river. Streets running at right angles with Main (Street) are numbered respectively east and west." The term "West Kansas" refers to the area now known as the West Bottoms, which is the western part of the city, bordering on Kansas City, KS. Many numbered streets have separate listings for their location in Kansas City, MO and their location in the West Kansas/West Bottoms area, so be sure to check both listings. Seperated are the list into named streets and numbered streets to make it more clear. According to this list, the farthest south street was 23rd Street; the farthest east was Joseph street, 14 blocks east of Main street.

For an article about earlier Kansas City, Missouri street names and how they changed see the Pioneer Wagon, Volume XV, No. 1

NAMED STREETS

Bank - between Broadway and Washington, 6th and 9th
Bell (West Kansas) - Sixth (street) west of Santa Fe, from 12th south to the city limits
Belvidere - between Pacific and Independence avenues, east from Troost avenue to Forest avenue
Bluff - from west end 4th south to 9th
Bridge avenue - Third street west of Main, from River south to 2nd
Broadway - Fourth street west of Main, from river south to limits

Campbell - Ninth street of Main, from river south to limits
Cedar - between Genessee and Wyoming, from Levee south to St. Louis avenue
Central - Third street west of Main, from 5th South to 17th
Charlotte - Seventh east of Main, from river south to limits
Cherry - Fifth east of Main, from river south to limits
Commercial Alley - First south of river, from Delaware east to Walnut

 Delaware - First west of Main, from river south to Junction, and from 9th south to limits
Dripps - Tenth west of Main, from 12th south to limits

East Levee - River front, from Main east to limits
Elm - From river southeast to Second, between Delaware and Wyandotte

Forest Avenue - Twelfth east of Main, from river south to limits
Francis - Between Gillis and Troost avenue, from 1st south to 3rd
Franklin - Commencing at 12th, running southwest to 17th
Freight - Commencing at Penn, corner of 14th and running northwest to Bluff Street Bridge
Front - First south of river, from Grand avenue east to limits

Genessee (West Kansas), fifth west of Santa Fe, from river south to limits
Gillis - Tenth east of Main from river south to Pacific
Grand Avenue - Second east of Main, from river south to limits

Harrison - Tenth east of Main, from river south to limits
Hickory (West Kansas) - Second west of Santa Fe, from river south to limits
Holly - Twelfth west of Main from 17th south to limits
Holmes - Seventh east of Main, from river south to limits

Independence Avenue - Seventh south of river, from Grand avenue east to limits

Jarboe - Eleventh west of Main, from 17th south to limits
Jefferson - Seventh west of Main, from 8th south to 17th
Joseph - Fourteenth east of Main, from 18th south to limits
Joy (West Kansas) - Ninth south of river, from Santa Fe west to Liberty

Kansas Avenue (West Kansas) - Eleventh south of the river, from Santa Fe west to Liberty.

Lafayette - Commencing at the corner of Mulkey and Dripps, running southwest to 17th.
Liberty (West Kansas) - Third west of Santa Fe, from river south to 20th
Locust - Fifth east of Main, from river south to limits
Lydia Avenue - Fourteenth east of Main, from levee south to limits
Lykins - Fourteenth south of river, from Washington avenue west to Summit

Madison Avenue - Ninth west of Main, from Mulkey south to limits
Main - running south through center of city from river to limits
May - Fourth west of Main, from 5th south to 9th
McGee - Third east of Main, from Independence avenue south to city limits
Missouri Avenue - Sixth south of river, from Delaware east to limits
Mulberry (West Kansas) - First west of Santa Fe, from river south to Kansas avenue
Mulkey - Thirteenth south of river, from Summit west to Dripps

Oak - Fourth east of Main, from river south to limits

Pacific - Seventh south of river, from Holmes east to Forest avenue
Penn - Sixth west of Main, from 5th South to limits

Santa Fe (West Kansas) - Bed of Kansas City, Ft. Scott and Gulf RR, from river south to 14th
Short - South from river to First, between Grand and Walnut
State (West Kansas) - Seventh west of Santa Fe, from river south to limits
St. Louis Avenue (West Kansas) - Third south of river, from Bluff west to limits
Summit - Eighth west of Main, from 12th south to limits

Tracy Avenue - Thirteenth east of Main, from Front south to limits
Troost Avenue - Eleventh east of Main, from river south to limits

Union Avenue (West Kansas) - Fourth west of river, from 6th southwest to Hickory

Walnut - First east of Main, from river south to limits
Washington - Fifth west of Main, from 6th south to 17th
West Levee - River front from Main west to limits
Woodland Avenue - East city limits, from Levee to south limits
Wyandotte - Third west of Main, from Levee south to 17th
Wyoming (West Kansas) - Fourth west of Santa Fe, from river south to limits

NUMBERED STREETS

Eighth (West Kansas) - First south of river, from Santa Fe to Hickory
Eighth - Eighth south of river, from Broadway east to limits
Eleventh (West Kansas) - Sixth south of river, from Santa Fe west to Hickory
Eleventh - Eleventh south of river, from Jefferson east to limits
Eighteenth (West Kansas) - Fifteenth south of river, from Liberty west to limits
Eighteenth - Eighteenth south of River, from Main east to limits
Fifth - Fifth south of river, from Bluff east t Forest avenue
Fifteenth - Fifteenth south of river, from Broadway east to Campbell
Fifteenth (West Kansas) - Twelfth south of river, from Hickory west to limits
First - Second south of river, from Walnut east to Troost avenue
Fourth - Fourth south of river, from Bluff east to Troost avenue
Fourteenth - Fourteenth south of river from Broadway east to Campbell
Fourteenth (West Kansas) - Tenth south of river, from Santa Fe west to limits
Ninth (West Kansas) - Second south of river, from Santa Fe west to limits
Nineteenth - Nineteenth south of river, from Main east to limits
Nineteenth (West Kansas) - 16th south of river, from Liberty west to limits
Ninth - Ninth south of river, from Bluff east to limits
Second - Second south of river, from Broadway east to Harrison
Seventh - Eight south of river, from Bluff east to limits
Seventh (West Kansas) - First south of river, from Wyoming west to limits
Seventeenth - Seventeenth south of river, from Main east to Campbell
Seventeenth (West Kansas) - Fourteenth south of river from Hickory west to limits
Sixteenth - Sixteenth South of river from Summit east to Campbell
Sixteenth (West Kansas) - Thirteenth south of river from Hickory west to limits
Sixth - Seventh south of river, from Bluff east to limits
Tenth - Tenth south of river, from Main east to limits, also from Delaware west to Jefferson
Tenth (West Kansas) - Fifth south of river, from Bluff west to Hickory
Third - Third south of river, from Broadway east to Troost avenue
Thirteenth - Thirteenth south of river, from Summit east to Campbell
Thirteenth (West Kansas) - Eighth south of river, from Santa Fe west to Liberty
Twelfth - Twelfth south of river, from Summit east to limits
Twelfth (West Kansas) - Seventh south of river from Bluff west to limits
Twentieth - Twentieth south of river, east and west from Main to limits
Twentieth (West Kansas) - Seventeenth south of river, from Liberty to Turkey Creek
Twenty-first - Twenty-first south of river, from Main east and west to limits
Twenty-first (West Kansas) - Eighteenth south of river, from Wyoming west to Turkey Creek
Twenty-second - Twenty-second south of river, from Main east and west to limits
Twenty-third - Twenty-third south of river, from Main east and west to limits

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 Jackson County, Missouri -

QuickFacts from the US Census Bureau 

Source:  http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/29/29095.html

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 Jackson County, MO
415 East 12th Street
County Courthouse
Kansas City, MO 64106-2706
Phone: (816) 881-3333
Fax: (816) 881-3133

County Populations
   1980         1990        2000  
  627,967      633,232     654,880  

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County Seat: Kansas City, Independence
Year Organized: 1826
Square Miles: 605

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Elected County Officials 

 Name   Position
  Katheryn Shields  --  County Executive
  Fred Arbanas  --  County Legislator, District 3
  Scott Burnett  --  County Legislator
  Rhonda Shoemaker  --  County Legislator, District 5
  Bob Spence  --  County Legislator, District 6
  Eugene Standifer  --  County Legislator - 2nd Dist.
  Robert Stringfield  --  Co Legislator At Large 1st Dist
  Dan Tarwater III  --  County Legislator, District 4
  Dennis Waits  --  County Legislator, District 3
  Jay Hayden  --  Deputy County Counselor
  Michael Sanders  --  Prosecuting Attorney
  Rebecca Wood  --  Public Administrator
  Tom Krahenbuhl  --  Zoning Coordinator
  Thomas Phillips  --  Sheriff
  Troy Thomas  --  Chief Financial Officer
  Mary Jo Spino  --  County Clerk
  Jaci MairsvCircuit Clerk-Court Administrator
  William Baker  --  Member Of Election Comm.
  Tammy Brown  --  Member Of Election Comm.
  Charles Dumsky  --  Member Of Election Comm.
  Dorothy Greene  --  Secretary Of Elections Comm.
  Sharon Spence  --  Member Of Election Comm.
  Joanna Mossie  --  Director Of Personel

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Jackson County, MO  -  Towns

Blue Springs
Buckner
Fort Osage
Grain Valley
Grandview
Greenwood
Independence
Kansas City (County Seat)
Lake Lotawana
Lake Tapawingo
Lake Winnebago
Lees Summit
Lees Summit Mpo
Levasy
Lone Jack
Martin City
Oak Grove
Raytown
Sibley
Sugar Creek
Unity Village

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  People QuickFacts Jackson County Missouri

 Population, 2004 estimate  660,095 5,754,618
 Population, percent change, April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2004  0.8% 2.8%
 Population, 2000  654,880 5,595,211
 Population, percent change, 1990 to 2000  3.4% 9.3%
 Persons under 5 years old, percent, 2000  7.0% 6.6%
 Persons under 18 years old, percent, 2000  25.8% 25.5%
 Persons 65 years old and over, percent, 2000  12.5% 13.5%
 Female persons, percent, 2000  51.8% 51.4%
 
 White persons, percent, 2000 (a) 70.1% 84.9%
 Black or African American persons, percent, 2000 (a) 23.3% 11.2%
 American Indian and Alaska Native persons, percent, 2000 (a) 0.5% 0.4%
 Asian persons, percent, 2000 (a) 1.3% 1.1%
 Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander, percent, 2000 (a) 0.2% 0.1%
 Persons reporting some other race, percent, 2000 (a) 2.4% 0.8%
 Persons reporting two or more races, percent, 2000  2.3% 1.5%
 White persons, not of Hispanic/Latino origin, percent, 2000  67.7% 83.8%
 Persons of Hispanic or Latino origin, percent, 2000 (b) 5.4% 2.1%
 
 Living in same house in 1995 and 2000', pct age 5+, 2000  52.0% 53.6%
 Foreign born persons, percent, 2000  4.3% 2.7%
 Language other than English spoken at home, pct age 5+, 2000  7.6% 5.1%
 High school graduates, percent of persons age 25+, 2000  83.4% 81.3%
 Bachelor's degree or higher, pct of persons age 25+, 2000  23.4% 21.6%
 Persons with a disability, age 5+, 2000  120,542 973,637
 Mean travel time to work (minutes), workers age 16+, 2000  23.6 23.8
 
 Housing units, 2002  295,560 2,503,187
 Homeownership rate, 2000  62.9% 70.3%
 Housing units in multi-unit structures, percent, 2000  27.3% 20.0%
 Median value of owner-occupied housing units, 2000  $85,000 $89,900
 
 Households, 2000  266,294 2,194,594
 Persons per household, 2000  2.42 2.48
 Median household income, 1999  $39,277 $37,934
 Per capita money income, 1999  $20,788 $19,936
 Persons below poverty, percent, 1999  11.9% 11.7%

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  Business QuickFacts Jackson County Missouri

 Private nonfarm establishments with paid employees, 2001  17,659 144,071
 Private nonfarm employment, 2001  374,329 2,404,489
 Private nonfarm employment, percent change 2000-2001  -0.5% 0.2%
 Nonemployer establishments, 2000  33,548 311,786
 Manufacturers shipments, 1997 ($1000)  8,984,696 93,115,478
 Retail sales, 1997 ($1000)  7,239,055 51,269,881
 Retail sales per capita, 1997  $11,066 $9,482
 Minority-owned firms, percent of total, 1997  11.1% 6.5%
 Women-owned firms, percent of total, 1997  25.0% 25.2%
 Housing units authorized by building permits, 2002  5,530 28,255
 Federal funds and grants, 2002 ($1000)  5,325,665 42,346,515

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  Geography QuickFacts Jackson County Missouri

 Land area, 2000 (square miles)  605 68,886
 Persons per square mile, 2000  1,082.7 81.2

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THE KANSAS CITY TIMES, JANUARY 26, 1873

 A decree of divorce was granted by the circuit court to Mrs. Susan A. Burnett from her husband, Thomas A. Burnett on the grounds of harsh and cruel treatment.

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KANSAS CITY EVENING MAIL, JANUARY 7, 1880

Micky Mack is happy, having received the lucrative position of chief lamp lighter.

D. R. Buffington was grated permission last evening to erect four frame stores, and commenced work this morning.

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BLUE SPRINGS

John W. DeAtney will move to his farm near Tarnsney next week.

Walter Wood of Lee's Summit visited friends and relatives here Tuesday.

D. C. Herrington transacted business at the county seat last Wednesday.

Ed Dyer of Grain Valley will live on the M. Huster farm near here this year.

We are glad to announce the health of Justice Robertson of this place is improving.

John Scholl of Independence made our town a visit during the first part of the week.

Mrs. W. P. Wood gave a dinner in honor of her father, Rev. Jackson's birthday last Tuesday.

E. D. Moore of the Bankers and Merchants Insurance Co., of Liberty, Missouri, was in our town Tuesday.

John Stanley, of this place, has sold his farming implements and stock preparatory to his going to Kansas to live.

George N--(name illegible) of Lone Jack has been successful in arranging for a lodge of the Modern Woodmem of America at this place.

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LEE'S SUMMIT

Ike Thompson was in Kansas City Wednesday

Harry Lewis of Kasas City spent Sunday here

Will Hogan left last week for his home in Chicago

Will Williamson of Kansas city, spent Sunday with home folks

Sam strother, of Kansas City, was here Sunday to see his best girl

Miss Loretta Short spent several days this week with friends at Little Blue

Mrs. George Campbell of Blue Springs is visiting her sister, Mrs. M. A. Rider

Henry Harris and wife, of Raytown, spent Sunday with her parents, Wm. Surick and wife.

Mrs. J. C. Lee and Mrs. Wilma Duncan held a pleasant reception on Thursday afternoon at the home of Mrs. Lee. They were assisted in receiving by Miss

Maggie Heame of Independence. About 50 invited guests were present and enjoyed a most pleasant afternoon. Delicate refereshments were served.

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 THE JACKSON EXAMINER NEWSPAPER MARCH 5, 1989
BUCKNER

Luther Simmons visited his brother in Kansas City this week 

The 13 year old son of Wm. Clark is quite ill with typhoid fever

The child of Mrs. Robert Hedrick, who has been quite low with pneumonia, is improving

The "gold fever" aided by the efforts of an organizer, is developing rapidly. A party of 9 will leave Buckner for the gold fields this month. The party consists of the following: Ernest Winfry, C. F. Winfry, ? Winfrey (no first name given) Winfry, Ed White, Sam Kent, Alma and Chas. Owen, Mer (Mort?) Smith, Oliver Winfry. They expect to locate on the upper part of Copper River.

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 LEE'S SUMMIT

J. M. Short was at Cockrell several days this week erecting a mounument for Elias Duncan. 

Geroge Ervin is spending several days here with his mother, Mrs. M. Bowers

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THE JACKSON EXAMINER NEWSPAPER, MARCH 19, 1898
BLUE MILLS

Mr. Sloan sowed oats this week

R. L. Twyman was in town Monday on business.

Mrs. Sale was badly burned on her arms last week.

The rain Monday night was of benefit to the wheat.

Mrs. Fenque of Buckner visited her friend, Mrs. Cook, this week

Harry Trabue Hisle returned to Kansas City Saturday where he is at work

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This page was last updated August 2, 2006.