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SHIPS USED IN THE ROANOKE VOYAGES, 

1584-1590

 

Donated to website by 

Andy Powell Mayor of Bideford

 

 

 

 

 

1584-RECONNAISSANCE VOYAGE OF
PHILIP AMADAS AND ARTHUR BARLOWE

 

 

Two vessels described in Hakluyt's Principal Navigations as "barks well furnished with men and victuals. "

Names... Not listed/unknown at this time

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1585 - FIRST EXPEDITION OF SIR RICHARD GRENVILLE,
WHICH PLANTED THE LANE COLONY

 

 

Dorothy, "a small bark" (described as a pinnace in other accounts) owned by Ralegh and possibly captioned by Barlowe.

 

Elizabeth, a vessel of 50 tuns; Thomas Cavendish, Captain.

 

Lyon (Red Lyon) of Chichester, "a hundred tunnes or thereabouts"; George Raymond, Captain.

 

Roebuck, a flyboat of about 140 tuns; John Clarke, Captain.

 

Tyger, a ship of "seven score tun, " the admiral of the fleet; commanded by Sir Richard Grenville, with Simon Fernandez chief pilot and master. This was probably the Tyger originally built as a galleass in the mid-1540's and rebuilt in 1570 at “Byddeford”). Its tunnage is given variously as 140, 160, and 200.

 

Two pinnaces, 20-30 tuns each, names unknown, "for speedie services. " One was lost on the outbound leg, so Grenville's party built its replacement at Tallaboa Bay, Puerto Rico.

 

Prizes: Santa Maria de Vincente (300-400 tuns), Alonzo Cornieles, captain; a large frigate owned by Lorenzo de Vallejo; and a small frigate, used by Ralph Lane to carry salt dug at Cape Rojo, Puerto Rico.

 

 

1586 - SIR BERNARD DRAKE'S VOYAGE TO NEWFOUNDLAND

 

 

Golden Royal of Topsham (110 tuns), owned by Drake and Amyas Preston. Drake intended to lead Ralegh's second squadron to Virginia, but the Queen ordered him to Newfoundland instead--there to seize Spaniards and warn English fishermen not to take their catches to Spain. Drake met Lion and maybe Dorothy off Newfoundland, perhaps by prearrangement.

 

Good Companion, consort of Golden Royal.

 

Job (70 tons), owned by Ralegh; Andrew Fulforde, captain (from Bideford.) Job eventually limped into Brittany with a cargo of cedar, probably transferred from Lion.

 

Prizes: Lion of Viana, a Portuguese fishing vessel; four Brazilian vessels; a French ship bound from Guinea; and seventeen other fishing vessels taken off Newfoundland.

 

 

 

1586 - THE MAIN SHIPS IN SIR FRANCIS DRAKE'S FLEET,
WHICH EVACUATED THE LANE COLONY

 

 

Aid (200-250 tuns), the Queen's ship; Edward Wynter, captain.

 

Bark Bond (120-150 tuns); owned at least in part by John Hawkins, Treasurer of the Navy; Robert Crosse, captain.

 

Bark Bonner (about 150 tuns), apparently owned by William Hawkins; George Fortescue, captain (from Bideford.) This is the vessel that Drake offered Lane after a storm had dispersed much of the fleet.

 

Elizabeth Bonaventure (600 tuns), the Queen's ship and Drake's flagship. (Presumed captained by Drake as he does not appear elsewhere.)

 

Francis (70 tuns), owned by Drake and under the command of Captain Thomas Moore. Drake offered her to Lane, but she was driven out to sea by a storm.

 

Leicester, a 400-tun galleon captained by Francis Knollys.

 

Minion of Plymouth (100-200 tuns) probably owned by a consortium of Plymouth and Bristol merchants; Thomas Cely, captain; John Newsome, master.

 

Primrose (300 tuns), part-owned by John Hawkins and captained by Martin Frobisher; its journal is an important source of information about the voyage.

 

Sea Dragon (140 tuns), owned by Sir William Wynter, the Queen's Surveyor of Ships; Henry Whyte, captain. Evidently one of the vessels scattered by the storm that arose while the fleet rode at anchor off the Outer Banks. In any case, on her return, she required new anchors and cables.

 

Speedwell, a merchantman of 50-60 tuns; probably not the vessel of the same name that accompanied Mayflower in 1620. She returned to England after a storm separated her from the fleet.

 

Talbot, a bark of 150-200 tuns owned by George Talbot, Earl of Shrewsbury; [Walter?] Baily, captain (Possibly of Bideford;). This may have been one of the vessels scattered by the storm that arose while the fleet rode at anchor off the Outer Banks.

 

Thomas (Bark Hastings, Thomas Drake, Thomas of Plymouth), a vessel of 100-200 tuns owned by Sir Francis Drake; Thomas Drake, captain.

 

Tyger (200 tuns), under the command of Captain Christopher Carleill; not the Tyger of 1585.

 

White Lion (140-150 tuns), a private man-of-war owned by Charles Lord Howard of Effingham. Lord Admiral of England; James Erisey, captain. She lost an anchor and cable off the Outer Banks during Drake's attempt to render assistance to the Lane colony.

 

Eight pinnaces and a dozen or so other vessels of various kinds, including prizes.

 

 

1586 - RELIEF VOYAGES FOR THE LANE COLONY

two separate voyages

 

 

1. Name unknown: a supply ship of 100 tuns, owned and sent by Ralegh. She arrived after 19 June 1586, found Lane's settlement deserted, and soon left.

 

2. Names unknown: a fleet of two large vessels and four or five smaller ones commanded by Sir Richard Grenville. Grenville arrived shortly after Ralegh's supply ship had departed. He left a holding party of fifteen men with food for two years. This fleet is recorded as “going over the (Bideford) bar” in Adam Wyatt’s diary (Town Clerk of Barnstaple 1586 – 1607) and returning later.

 

Prizes: Brave (Peter) (possibly the ‘Brave’ of 1588 venture from Bideford led by John White); Julian of St. Brieuc (60 tuns), Peter Godbecin, master; Martin Johnson of Amsterdam, a flyboat; and a bark, name unknown, taken in the Azores.

 

 

1587 - THE VOYAGE TO PLANT
A SECOND COLONY IN VIRGINIA

 

 

Lyon (120 tuns); the admiral, captained by Governor John White, with Simon Fernandez as master and pilot. (‘Lyon’ is thought to have been sister ship to Grenville’s ‘Tyger’)

 

 A flyboat of 20 tuns, Edward Spicer, Master.

 

 A pinnace under the command of captain Edward Stafford.

 

 

1587 - SIR GEORGE CAREY'S EXPEDITION

 

 

Commander (2000 tuns), owned by Carey; William Irish, leader of the expedition, may have been her captain. Commander and two consorts left England before the squadron bearing the colonists and evidently called at Chesapeake Bay, the colonists' supposed destination, but found no evidence of English settlement. The exact relationship of Carey's expedition to White's has not been established.

 

Swallow, a bark of 70 tuns owned by Carey.

 

Gabriel, a pinnace of 30 tuns owned by Carey.

 

 

1588 - FIRST ATTEMPT BY GOVERNOR JOHN WHITE
TO RELIEVE THE ROANOKE COLONISTS

 

 

Brave: from “Byddeford”, a pinnace of 30-50 tuns commanded by Captain Arthur Facy; Pedro Diaz, pilot. (Diaz and Fernandez may have been resident in Bideford’s Portuguese district (Silver Street and Portobello terrace.)

 

Roe: from “Byddeford” a pinnace rated at around 25 tuns.

 

 

1590 - SECOND ATTEMPT BY GOVERNER JOHN WHITE
TO RELIEVE THE ROANOKE COLONISTS

 

 

Conclude, a pinnace of 20-30 tuns owned by Thomas Middleton and partners; Joseph Harris, captain; Hugh Harding, master; consort of Moonlight.

 

Hopewell (also known as the Harry and John), 140-160 tuns; Abraham Cocke, captain; Robert Hutton, master. Governor White booked passage on this vessel. White's account of the voyage suggests that the company barely tolerated presence even as a passenger with no real authority.

 

John Evangelist: a pinnace, captained by William Lane.

 

Little John (120 tuns), Christopher Newport, captain; Michael Geare, master.

 

Moonlight (formerly Mary Terlayne), 80 tuns; owned by William Sanderson, commanded by Captain Edward Spicer.

 

Two shallops lost under tow in the waters just off Plymouth.

 

Prizes: Buen Jesus of Seville (300-350 tuns), Trinidad (60 tuns), and two Spanish frigates (one of 10 tuns).

 

 

 


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