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Special Edition - August 2010 - Hatteras/Heinegg Surnames


This is a very special edition.  Jennifer Sheppard has completed the Hatteras Island surnames from Paul Heinegg's renowned works at www.freeafricanamericans.com.  We've tried to highlight the portions that are particularly relevant to NC, but don't stop reading there, because this history of these families is often the history of migration for many families from VA to NC and beyond.  Thank you Jennifer for your efforts!!  This is a wonderful gift you've given us.

 

Here's a list of the Hatteras Island surnames (or similar) that are found among Paul's works:

Allen
Brooks
Clark
Davis
Evans
Gray
Howard
Jackson
Jarvis
Johnson
Jones

Lewis
McCoy
Meekins
Miller
Neal
Norton
Payne
Palmer
Price
Pugh
Reed

Russell
Simpson
Smith
Stewart
Taylor
Toulson
Wallace
Wells
White
Williams

 

ALLEN FAMILY

 

The Allen family of Virginia may have originated in Northampton or York County, Virginia, because several members were living in those counties in the early eighteenth century. They were

1        i. Jane, born say 1690.

ii. John1, born say 1703, a "negro" taxable in Edward Miflin's Northampton County, Virginia household in Ralph Pigot's list for 1721 [L.P. 1721-31].

iii. Elizabeth, born say 1706, a "Mulatto" tithable in William Stakes' Northampton County, Virginia household from 1724 to 1731 [L.P. 1721-31].

iv. Sarah, born say 1708, a tithable in Nathaniel Andress's Northampton County, Virginia household in 1725 [L.P. 1721-31]. Sarah was a "Mullattoe" who was charged in Accomack County court on 1 December 1730 with having a bastard child [Orders 1724-31, 217].

 1.    Jane Allen, born say 1690, was presented by the York County court on 16 November 1761 for failing to list herself as a tithable but discharged from paying levies at the next court on 21 December 1761 when she was described as a "poor old woman" [Judgments & Orders 1759-63, 298, 313]. She may have been the mother of

2        i. Joseph1, born say 1710.

ii. Samuel1, born about 1713, a "Mulatto" bound until the age of twenty-one, eleven years old on 2 September 1724 when he was listed in the inventory of the York County estate of Joseph Walker, Esq. [DOW 16, pt. 2, 329].

3        iii. Elizabeth, born say 1724.

4        iv. Sarah, born say 1730.

 2.    Joseph1 Allen, born say 1710, was presented by the York County court on 15 November 1735 for not listing his "Molatto" wife as a tithable [OW 18:237]. He purchased 100 acres in Isle of Wight County on the south side of the Nottoway River and east side of Whitewood Swamp on 21 January 1745/6 with William Bynum as witness [DB 7:292]. He sued Roger Brooks for trespass, assault and battery in Isle of Wight County court on 13 November 1747, but he died before the case came to trial. On 12 May 1748 Mary Allen petitioned the court for administration of his estate [Orders 1746-52, 62, 96, 97]. Purchasers at the 5 December 1751 sale of his estate included James Allen, Thomas Tabour (Taborn), Judy Tabour, late Allen, and John Byrd. The account of the estate, recorded on 15 May 1752, included slaves Ben and Kate in the possession of William Bynum who was guardian of the heirs and security for administration of the estate, and it included a payment of 2 pounds, 17 shillings to John Byrd for quitrents on 100 acres of land in 1749. Joseph Allen's daughter Mary Booth, "late Allen," signed (by mark) the estate appraisal [WB 5:391-2; 6:5]. Mary, her husband Lewis Booth, Judith Taborn, and Joseph Allen (by his guardian Lewis Booth) brought a chancery suit against William Bynum and William Allen on 11 July 1754, claiming that William had sold slaves belonging to the estate valued at 80 pounds [Orders 1749-54, 511; LVA Chancery file 1757-003]. Joseph's children were

i. Mary, born say 1728, wife of Lewis Booth.

ii. Judy1, born say 1730, married William Taborn in Northampton County, North Carolina, according to the Revolutionary War pension application of their son William [M804-2335, frame 0798]. See further the Taborn history.

iii. ?James, a buyer at the 5 December 1751 sale of the estate of Joseph Allen.

5        iv. Sarah2, born say 1733.

6        v. William1, born say 1735.

vi. Joseph2, born say 1736, an infant orphan of Joseph Allen ordered bound out as an apprentice by the court in Southampton County on 14 December 1749. On 14 July 1757 he brought a chancery suit in Southampton County against William Bynum, administrator of his father's estate. The suit was dismissed on 10 July 1761 due to Bynum's death [Orders 1749-54, 34; 1754-9, 363; 1759-63, 122]. On 6 August 1762 he was sued in Isle of Wight County by Benjamin Baker for a debt of 12 pounds which was charged to (his brother) William Allen who was his security [Orders 1759-63, 347, 505-6]. He left a 20 October 1764 Isle of Wight County will, proved 7 August 1766, leaving all his estate to his sister Sarah Allen who he named executor [WB 6:431]. When the will was proved, the court ordered the sheriff to summon Jesse Allen, brother and heir at law of Joseph Allen, to contest the will [Orders 1764-8, 267]. Perhaps the court meant William Allen.

 3.    Sarah1 Allen, born say 1730, was presented by the York County court on 16 November 1761 for failing to list herself as a tithable. The case was dismissed on 21 December 1761 when she paid her tax [Judgments & Orders 1759-63, 298, 312]. She may have been the mother of

i. Mary, born say 1748, taxable in Elizabeth River Parish, Norfolk County, in 1768 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1766-80, 80].

7        ii. Judy2, born say 1750.

8        iii. John3, born say 1755.

 4.    Elizabeth Allen, born say 1724, was living in York County on 19 August 1765 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Yorkhampton Parish to bind out her children "unless she shew good cause to the contrary" [Orders 1763-5, 450]. She was taxable in James City County on a free male tithable in 1806 and 1807 and head of a household of 2 female "Free Persons of Colour above 16 years" in 1813 [PPTL, 1800-15]. She may have been the mother of

9        i. John2, born about 1744.

10      ii. Mary, born say 1750.

11      iii. Martha/ Patty, born say 1760.

 5.    Sarah2 Allen, born say 1733, was living in Southampton County, Virginia, on 9 August 1750 when her son Arthur (no age or race mentioned) was bound apprentice [Orders 1749-54, 80]. She was the executor and only heir of her brother Joseph Allen's 20 October 1764 Southampton County will, proved 7 August 1766 [WB 6:431]. She was the mother of

12      i. Arthur1, born say 1749.

 6.    William1 Allen, born say 1735, was an infant orphan of Joseph Allen in September 1751 when the Southampton County court allowed his guardian William Bynum additional time to make a return of his estate to court. The sheriff reported that he had removed himself from the county or was avoiding a summons on 13 October 1757 when Henry Crafford obtained an attachment against his estate for 3 pounds, 17 shillings [Orders 1749-54, 167; 1754-9, 391]. He was living in Northampton County on 13 January 1759 when he sold by Southampton County deed 100 acres on the north side of the Meherrin River and east side of Whitewood Swamp (which was the land his father Joseph Allen purchased 21 January 1745/6) [DB 2:16-17]. He sued William Bynum, the executor of his father's estate, in a chancery case in Southampton County on 14 August 1760, saying he was of age and wanted his part of his father's estate. The court ordered the defendant to make an account of the estate and ordered a commission to make a final decree [Orders 1759-63, 59; LVA, chancery case 1761-008]. He was security for a debt (his brother) Joseph Allen owed Benjamin Baker of Isle of Wight County on 6 August 1762 [Orders 1759-63, 347, 505-6]. He was one of the "Black" members of the undated colonial muster roll of Captain James Fason's Northampton County, North Carolina Company [Troop Returns, 1-3]. He was taxable in Granville County in the list of Philip Pryor for 1767 with (his wife?) Ann Allen, Joseph Allen, and Mary Allen "Mollatoes" [Tax List 1767-1809]. He was called William Allen "Mulatto" in Granville County on 5 March 1770 when he bound his daughter Nancy as an apprentice to James Knott [Owen, Granville County Notes, vol.II]. His children were

i. Joseph3, born about 1755, a "Mullatto" taxable in William Allen's household in 1767, a twenty-two-year-old "mullatto" planter listed in the 1778 Granville County Militia Returns [Mil. TR 4-40 by The North Carolinian VI:726].

ii. Mary, a "Mullatto" taxable in William Allen's household in 1767.

iii. Nancy, born 5 July 1757, twelve years old on 5 July 1769, according to her indenture in Granville County court on 5 March 1770.

 7.    Judy2 Allen, born say 1750, was a "mulatto" living in Norfolk County on 16 July 1772 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Elizabeth River Parish to bind her daughter Jenny to Jacob Williams. She was called a "free negro" on 18 March 1774 when the court ordered her daughters Jenny and Betty bound to John Ransberg [Orders 1771-3, 92; 1773-5, 32]. She was the mother of

i. Jenny, born say 1770.

ii. Elizabeth, born say 1772.

 8.    John3 Allen, born say 1755, was a "Mulatto" shoemaker apprenticed for two years to John Muirhead of Norfolk County when he ran away on 10 June 1769 according to the 23 November 1769 issue of the Virginia Gazette [Headley, 18th Century Newspapers, 4]. He was called "a free man of mixed blood" in 1787 when the North Carolina General Assembly emancipated his "mulatto" wife Betty and their child Mary, who he had purchased [Clark, State Records, XXIV:930]. He died before December 1799 when (his brother?) Arthur Allen recorded the account of sales of his Northampton County, North Carolina estate [Gammon, Records of Estates, Northampton County, I:110]. His wife was probably the Betsy Allen who was head of a Northampton County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [NC:710]. His children were

i. Mary, born say 1780.

ii. ?Arthur2, married Patience Hawley, 14 January 1813 Northampton County bond, no bondsman named.

 9.    John2 Allen, born about 1744 in Williamsburg, registered in Petersburg on 16 July 1810: a brown Mulatto man, five feet eight 1/4 inches high, about sixty six years old, born free in Wmsburg. His wife Polly Jasper registered the same day: a light brown Mulatto woman, five feet one half inches high, fifty years old, born free in Chesterfield County, wife to John Allen [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 635-6]. They were the parents of

i. ?Sally, born about 1777, registered in Petersburg on 11 July 1810: a light brown Mulatto woman, five feet two inches high, thirty three years old, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 633].

ii. Eliza, born about 1777, registered in Petersburg on 25 August 1795: (daughter of John Allen a free Mulatto) a dark brown Mulatto girl, four feet eleven inches high, eighteen years old, & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 103].

iii. Jane, born about 1778, registered in Petersburg on 31 December 1794: a light brown, Mulatto woman, five feet three inches high, sixteen years old, daughter of John Allen, a free Mulatto, born free & raised in the neighborhood of Petersburg & by the request of her father registered [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 97]. She was head of a Petersburg household of 2 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:118b].

iv. ?Dicy, head of a Petersburg household of 1 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:118b].

v. ?Jerry, born about 1785, registered in Petersburg on 13 August 1806: a light brown Free Negro man, five feet six inches high, twenty one years old, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 392].

 10.    Mary Allen, born say 1750, was taxable on a horse and 4 cattle in James City County in 1782 [PPTL, 1782-99]. She may have been the mother of

i. Joseph4, born say 1771, taxable in James City County from 1792 to 1814: taxable on a horse in 1792 and 1793, taxable on 2 free male tithes from 1801 to 1804, called a "mulatto" in 1810 and 1813 [PPTL, 1782-99; 1800-15].

ii. Samuel2, Sr., born about 1773, registered in York County on 19 September 1831: 5 feet 3 1/2 inches high, tawny complexion, about 58 years of age, large eyebrows, high cheek bones, bony face...Born free [Free Negroes Register 1831-50, no. 289].

iii. James, born say 1784, a "Mulatto" taxable in James City County from 1805 to 1814 [PPTL, 1800-15].

 11.    Martha Allen, born say 1760, was head of a York County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:887]. She was taxable in York County on a free tithe and a horse from 1810 to 1812, head of a household of 2 "free Negro or mulattos over 16" in 1813 and taxable on a head of cattle in 1815 [PPTL, 1782-1841, frames 350, 373, 384, 419]. She was probably the mother of

i. Thomas, born about 1784, registered as a free Negro in York County on 18 October 1813: black fellow abt 29 yrs. of age, 5 feet 4-1/2 Inches high, long visage...Born free in the parish of Yorkhampton [Register of Free Negroes 1798-1831, no.72].

ii. William3, born about 1790, taxable in York County on his own tithe and a horse in 1814 [PPTL, 1788-1841, frames 402, 419]. He registered as a free Negro in York County on 21 February 1814: of dark complexion abt. 23 years of age, 5 feet four Inches high...large eyebrows & short hair. Born of a free woman [Register of Free Negroes 1798-1831, no. 76].

 12.    Arthur1 Allen, born say 1749, was ordered bound apprentice in Southampton County on 9 August 1750. He was living in Southampton County when he, John Byrd, Jr., Hardy Beal, Arthur Allen, Arthur Byrd and James Byrd were sued by Jesse Watkins in a case that was dismissed at their costs on 11 February 1773 [Orders 1768-72, 83; 1772-7, 107]. Arthur was head of a household of 2 "Black" persons 12-50 years old and 4 "Black" persons less than 12 or over 50 years old in Captain Dupree's District of Northampton County in 1786 for the North Carolina state census. He was head of a Northampton County household of 9 "other free" in 1790 [NC:74] and 10 in 1810 [NC:710]. He purchased 171 acres in Northampton County from Giles and Sarah Cook of Southampton County for 45 pounds on 24 November 1775 and purchased the same land from them eighteen years later on 26 March 1793 for the same price. Arthur and his wife Amy sold it soon afterwards to Nathaniel Edwards for 77 pounds by an undated deed proved June the same year [DB 6:100; 10:42, 48]. He died before 5 June 1815 when his estate was administered by William Hawley. His wife at that time, Esther, received one year's provisions on 8 June 1815 [Minutes 1813-21]. His children were

i. ?William2, born say 1780, married Elizabeth Booth, 12 December 1804 Nash County bond, William Pilgrim bondsman. William Allen was head of a Franklin County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [NC:825].

ii. ?Amy, head of a Northampton County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:212]. She had a bastardy suit against Anthony Wells on 7 June 1820 and against John Chavers (Chavis) on 6 June 1822 in the Northampton County court [Minutes 1817-21, 281; 1821-25, 110].

iii. Green, son of Arthur Allen and Esther Williams, born in Northampton County on 7 February 1807 and died on 7 August 1879 in Cass County, Michigan [Cass County Death Certificate], married Angelina Wade, daughter of John Wade, 14 October 1829 Northampton County bond, Anthony Deberry bondsman. Green Allen was head of a Northampton County household of 5 "free colored" in 1830.

 Three mixed-race Allen children were bound apprentices in Cumberland County, North Carolina, by order of the court in February 1764. They were

i. Rachel, born about 1754, a "Mullattoe Girl ten years old" in February 1764.

ii. Benjamin, born about 1756, an "orphan Mullattoe Boy".

iii. Juda3, born about 1760, an "Orphan Mullattoe Girl" [Minutes 1759-65, 102, 108].

 Other members of the Allen family were

i. Richard, (a white man) presented by the Westmoreland County, Virginia court on 29 March 1733 for living in adultery with Ann, a "Mulato woman." The presentment was dismissed because they had married in Maryland [Orders 1731-9, 75a]. She may have been the Ann Allen of Cople Parish, Westmoreland County, who was presented by the grand jury on 28 November 1738 for having a "Mulatto" child [Orders 1731-9, 296, 302].

ii. William, a "Mulatto" who acknowledged an indenture to Christian Allen in Henrico County court in February 1767 [Orders 1763-7, 676].

iii. William, a "milato" taxable in the household of James Hemphil in Rowan County, North Carolina, in 1768. "Jude a millata" was also taxable in Hemphil's household [NCGSJ VIII:40].

iv. Simon, head of a Frederick County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:595].

v. John, "free negro" head of a Fairfax County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [VA:232].

vi. Saunders, head of a Goochland County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:682].

vii. Exum, born about 1781, registered in Southampton County on 21 February 1804: age 23, bright mulatto, 5 feet 8 inches high, free Born [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, no. 302].


BROOKS FAMILY

 

1.    Richard1 Brooks, born about February 1661/2, was the white servant of Madam Elizabeth Reade on 10 February 1677/8 when the York County court adjudged him to be sixteen years of age and ordered him to serve his mistress until the age of twenty-four. He was probably the father of a "Mollatto boy named Dick" the son of "Black Betty" who were slaves which Madam Reade left to her son Robert Reade by her 10 February 1685/6 York County will [DOW 6:35; 7:257]. Richard was probably the father of

2        i. ?James1, born say 1679.

ii. Richard2, born say 1682, a "Malatto Man named Dick Brookes" who was willed by Robert Reade to his son Thomas Reade in 1712. His two free children by a white woman named Mary Hanson were listed in the 7 April inventory of Robert Reade's estate: "James & Richard Hanson indented Mulattoes" [DOW 14:241, 251-3]. Mary identified "Dick Broo_ a Malatto slave belonging to Robert Read" as the father of her illegitimate child when she appeared in court on 2 July 1706 [DOW 12:414, 424]. Richard Hanson may have been identical to the Richard Hanson whose suit for debt against John Cooper was dismissed by the Southampton County court at the defendant's costs on 13 August 1762 [Orders 1759-63, 233].

 2.    James1 Brooks, born say 1679, had property of (his son?) William Brooks valued at 3 pounds currency on 17 January 1731/2 when the York County court ordered an attachment on the property to pay a debt William owed John Byrd. The court called James the "slave" of John Buckner when Buckner was ordered to bring him into court [OW 17:256, 262]. On 13 June 1754 he (called James Brooks, Sr.) was one of fourteen heads of household who were sued in Southampton County court by William Bynum (informer) for failing to pay the discriminatory tax on free African American and Indian women. He died before 8 March 1759 when a writing purporting to be his last will was presented to the Southampton County court for proof but was ordered to be lodged in the office because James Brooks (Jr.) entered a caveat against it. On 13 March 1760 the court ruled that the will was not valid because at the time he made it, he was the slave of his son James Brooks, Jr. The court based its ruling on the York County bill of sale by which James Brooks, Jr., purchased his father from John Buckner on 9 March 1733/4; the deposition of Young Moreland who testified that James Brooks, Sr., "mullattoe," was once a slave of Major John Buckner of York County but was purchased by his son James Brooks in exchange for a "negroe" slave named David; and the deposition of Charles Hansford, Sr., of York County who testified that he knew a "mullattoe called Jemmy Brookes" who lived as a servant or slave with Mr. John Buckner of Yorktown but left those parts and was said to have been freed by his son [Orders 1749-54, 500, 512; 1754-9, 24-5, 34-5, 502; 1759-63, 24]. James was the father of

3        i. ?William1, born say 1705.

4        ii. James2, born say 1707.

5        iii. Mary, born say 1709.

 3.    William1 Brooks, born say 1705, was presented by the York County court on 20 November 1727 for failing to list his "Mulatto" sister Mary as a tithable. On 17 January 1731/2 John Byrd sued him in York County court for a three pound currency debt for which the sheriff attached his estate in the hands of (his father?) James Brooks [OW 16:489; 17:256, 262]. He received a patent for 190 acres on the south side of the Nottoway River in Isle of Wight County adjoining land of William Killygrew on 20 May 1742 [Patents 20:280]. He sued William Bittle in Isle of Wight County on 11 June 1747 [Orders 1746-52, 23, 24]. He was living in Southampton County on 13 June 1754 when he was one of fourteen heads of household who were sued by William Bynum (informer) for failing to pay the discriminatory tax on free African American and Indian women. The court dismissed the suit against him on 13 February 1755, perhaps due to his old age. On 11 August 1757 he was among the freeholders who were ordered to work on a road in Southampton County for which Joseph Delk was surveyor [Orders 1754-9, 25, 38, 372]. In Isle of Wight County he was sued by Charles Jones on 3 September 1761 and sued for 22 pounds, 19 shillings by Archibald Dunlop and David Ralston on 4 March 1762 [Orders 1759-63, 257, 283, 328, 330, 347]. He was witness to the Southampton County will of John Byrd, proved 12 April 1781 [WB 3:322]. On 14 October 1784 the court presented him for failing to list a tithable and exempted him from paying taxes on 12 May 1785 [Orders 1778-84, 513; 1784-9, 67]. He was taxable St. Luke's Parish, Southampton County, from 1782 to 1788: taxable on 4 horses and 16 cattle in 1782 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-92, frames 504, 515, 544, 559, 638, 656]. He was living in St. Luke's Parish when he made his 9 May 1788 Southampton County will, proved 9 October 1788. He gave ten pounds to his daughter Ann Dunkin, five pounds and half his plantation to his wife Hannah Swett during her lifetime, and the remainder to his son William Swett "begotten of the body of Hannah Swett" [WB 4:276]. Hannah Brooks was taxable on a horse from 1799 to 1812. Bill Hunt and his wife Lucy were living on her land in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1792-1806, frames 373, 407, 838; 1807-21, 47, 68, 166, 187, 287, 319]. Hannah's will was proved in Southampton County on 21 July 1817 [Minutes 1816-9, unpaged]. William was the father of

i. Ann Dunkin (Duncan), perhaps identical to Ann Brooks who was granted a patent in Isle of Wight County for 150 acres on the north side of the Meherrin River adjoining James Brooks' land near Brook's Branch on 1 April 1749 [Patents 28:543]. She was fined 500 pounds of tobacco in Southampton County on 13 February 1755 for failing to list herself as a tithable. She pled not guilty at first but changed her plea when both James Brooks, Jr., and James Brooks, Sr., were found guilty [Orders 1749-54, 501, 513; 1754-9, 25, 39]. She and William Brooks paid 5 shillings to the Southampton County estate of James Powell on 9 December 1773 [WB 3:88].

ii. ?Jesse1, born say 1740, sued in Southampton County for a debt of 7 pounds, 14 shillings which he owed Joseph Delk from 9 April 1767. He had left the county or was avoiding a summons on 8 March 1770 when the court attached his goods that were said to have been in the hands of (his father?) William Brooks [Orders 1768-72, 257, 276]. He was a "Mix Blood" taxable on himself and Daniel Dolvin in Bladen County, North Carolina, in 1774 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:123, 134].

iii. William Swett, probably identical to William S. Brooks who was taxable in Southampton County in 1789 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-9, frames 704, 754].

 4.    James2 Brooks, born say 1707, purchased his father from Major John Buckner by a 9 March 1733/4 York County bill of sale [Southampton County Orders 1759-63, 24]. He was called James Brooks, Jr., when he was granted 200 acres in Isle of Wight County on the north side of the Meherrin River by the side of Pine Pole Branch on 12 January 1746 [Patents 24:620]. He sued Richard Taylor, Jr., in Southampton County on 8 March 1753 for a 6 pound, 9 shilling debt. And on 11 January 1754 Richard Taylor, Jr., sued him for trespass, assault and battery. The case was dismissed on agreement of the parties. On 13 June 1754 he (called James Brooks, Jr.) was one of fourteen heads of household who were sued in Southampton County court by William Bynum (informer) for failing to pay the discriminatory tax on free African American and Indian women. Samuel Kindred testified against him. On 14 July 1757 he was ordered to pay William and Thomas Francis as witnesses for him in his suit against Hollowell Denson. He sued William Banks for 5 pounds, 5 shillings on 10 July 1761, sued Ann Banks on 11 September 1761, and on 10 December 1762 was fined 5 shillings for assaulting Ann Banks. He was sued by Thomas Tabor for trespass, assault and battery on 13 May 1762 and ordered to pay Tabor 20 shillings. His suit against James Byrd was dismissed on agreement between the parties on 9 September 1762 [Orders 1749-54, 333, 355, 500, 512; 1754-9, 24-5, 34-5, 40, 370; 1759-63, 128, 151, 219, 221, 234, 238, 272, 284]. He (signing) and his wife Martha sold 200 acres adjoining Brooks Branch and Sweathouse Swamp in Southampton County on 12 November 1761 [DB 3:98]. He was taxable in St. Luke's Parish, Southampton County, on a horse in 1786 and 2 horses from 1787 to 1797, taxable on John Brooks' tithe and 3 horses in 1794 and 1795 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-92, frames 586, 632, 655, 705, 755, 870; 1792-1806, frames 47, 74, 156, 184, 261]. By his 5 February 1798 Southampton County will he lent half his land on the east side of the county road to his wife Hannah during her lifetime, and gave the other half on the same side of the road to his grandson John Chavos, "commonly called John Brocks, son of Elizabeth Brocks." His land on the east side of the county road was to be sold by his daughter Sarah Reed who was executor of the will [WB 5:58]. Hannah Brooks was taxable in Southampton County on a horse from 1798 to 1800 [Personal Property Tax List 1792-1806, frames 261, 312, 373, 407]. She was head of a Southampton County household of 11 "other free" in 1810 [VA:88]. James was the father of

6        i. Elizabeth, born say 1730.

ii. Sarah, married John Reed and was mentioned in his 23 August 1790 Southampton County will [WB 4:395].

 5.    Mary Brooks, born say 1709, was a "Mulatto" tithable in York County on 20 November 1727. On 16 March 1740/1 she was presented by the court for having a bastard child on the information of Ellyson Armistead, one of the churchwardens of Yorkhampton Parish, and she confessed to the offense on 18 May 1741. John Cornelius was security for payment of her fine. She may have been the mother of John Brookes who was ordered bound apprentice to Thomas Dulaney of Charles Parish on 19 January 1746/7. The court made the indenture official when Richard Limas complained that Dulaney was harboring John Brookes. Limas had been presented for not listing his wife as a tithable, but when he appeared in that same session of the court he was ordered to pay the taxes for his sons [OW 16:489; W&I 19:12, 486-7]. Mary was probably the mother of

i. John1, born before 16 March 1740/1, living in Southampton County on 13 May 1762 when he and Ed Heathcock (Haithcock) were sued by Samuel Sands for debt. The sheriff reported that he was no longer an inhabitant of the county when he and John Reed were sued by John Wilkinson for 9 pounds, 17 shillings on 9 September 1762 [Orders 1759-63, 219, 239].

 6.    Elizabeth Brooks, born say 1730, sued John Brooks in a Southampton County chancery case on 14 May 1773 [Orders 1772-7, 181]. She was probably the common-law wife of a member of the Chavis family since her son was called "John Chavos commonly called John Brocks" in his grandfather's 1798 Southampton County will. Elizabeth may have been the Betty Brooks who was head of a Robeson County, North Carolina household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:48] and the Elizabeth Brooks who was head of a Duplin County household of 2 "other free" in 1800. Her children were

i. John Brooks, born say 1752, called John Brooks when he was taxable in Southampton County in 1789 and 1790, taxable on a horse in 1799 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-92, frames 707, 756; 1792-1806, frame 370].

 They were probably the ancestors of the Brooks family of North Carolina:

i. John2, born about 1758, a Revolutionary War pensioner [Clark, State Records of North Carolina, XXII:571], head of a Robeson County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [NC:367] and 7 in 1810 [NC:147]. He claimed to be ninety-five or ninety-six years old on 30 May 1853 when he applied for a pension for service in the Revolution and was still living in Robeson County on 22 March 1858 when he applied for (and received) bounty land [Pension File S-6732].

ii. John3/ Jack, born about 1772, a twelve-year-old "Mulatto boy" apprenticed to George Logan in New Hanover County on 9 January 1784.

iii. Solomon, born about 1774, a ten-year-old "Mulatto boy" bound apprentice to William Ewans in New Hanover County on 9 January 1784 [Minutes 1779-92, 116].

iv. James3, head of an Edgecombe County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [NC:715] and 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:117].

v. Major, born before 1776, head of an Orange County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:831] and 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:352].

vi. Mary2, born before 1776, head of a Hyde County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [NC:114] and 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:244].

vii. Jesse2, born before 1776, charged with begetting a bastard child by Polly Archer in Halifax County, North Carolina, on 20 February 1800 [Minutes 1799-1802, 96]. He was head of a Washington County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:790] and 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:405].

viii. Bartley, head of a Bertie County household of 2 "other free" and a 26-forty-five-year-old white woman in 1810 [NC:172].

Essex County

1.    Elizabeth Brooks, born say 1685, appeared in Essex County court on 22 January 1712/3 to bind her daughter Frances, "a Mulato Child," to Edward Hudson until the age of thirty-one [W&D 1711-4, 103]. She was the mother of

i. Frances, born say 1712.

Henrico County

1.    Penelopy Brooks, born say 1702, petitioned the Henrico County court in 1741 on behalf of her son William against Henry Royall. In January 1741/2 the court ordered Royall to discharge her son James Brooks [Orders 1737-46]. Her son William may have been identical to "Moll." William who was born in Henry Royall's house and bound to him by the churchwardens of Bristol Parish on 9 October 1724 [Chamberlayne, Register of Bristol Parish, 18-19]. Penelopy was the mother of

i. William, born say 1720.

ii. James, born say 1722.

 They may have been the ancestors of

i. John, born say 1758, taxable on a horse in Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County, in 1788 and 1789: taxable on 2 tithes in 1788 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1799, frames 149, 194; 1800-1813, frames].

2        ii. William, born say 1760.

 2.    William Brooks, born say 1760, was taxable in Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County, from 1788 to 1801: taxable on 2 tithes and a horse in 1789 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1799, frames 149, 194, 244, 292, 343, 383, 416, 446, 478, 512, 551, 586; 1800-1813, frames 24, 68]. Perhaps his widow was Mary Brock who was taxable in Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County, from 1802 to 1813: taxable on her unnamed son and a horse in 1803; called a "Mulatto" starting in 1805; taxable on a free male tithable in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-1813, frames 113, 155, 246, 291, 427, 472, 518, 560]. She was head of an Albemarle County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:186]. They may have been the parents of

i. William Brocks, born say 1786, taxable on a horse in Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County, from 1804 to 1810; called a "Mulatto" from 1806 to 1808 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-1813, frames 201, 292, 339, 382, 429]. He married Milly Tyree 5 January 1807 Albemarle County bond, with the consent of Jonathan Tyree. He was head of an Albemarle County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:187].

ii. John Brocks, born say 1789, a Mulatto" taxable in Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County, from 1807 to 1811 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-1813, frames 340, 382, 428, 472, 518]. He married Nancy Tyree, 6 January 1807 Albemarle County bond, William Brock bondsman. He was head of an Albemarle County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:186].

iii. Olly Brock, a "Mulatto" taxable in Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County, in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1799, frames; 1800-1813, frame 560].

 Other members of the Brooks family in Virginia were

i. William, "marriner," counted in the 1800 census for Alexandria, Virginia, with his wife Mary, "both Free Negroes," in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 4:55]

ii. Sam1, head of a Frederick County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:562].

iii. Sam2, head of a New Kent County household of 1 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:744].

iv. William, head of a Petersburg Town household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:119a].

CLARK FAMILY

 

1.    Judith Clarke, the servant of Joshua Slade of York Parish, York County, Virginia, confessed in court on 24 August 1694 that she committed the "sinn of fornication with a Negro" [DOW 10:3, 28]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. ____, husband of Mary who was named in the 19 September 1749 York County will of her mother Mary Roberts [W&I 20:163]. They may have been the parents of John Clarke, a "free Mulatto" who was living in York County on 19 May 1760 when the court ordered him bound by the churchwardens of Charles Parish to Merritt Moore [Judgments & Orders 1759-63, 143].

ii. James1, born say 1740, taxable with his wife in Bladen County, North Carolina, in 1768 ("Mulatoes") [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:5], head of a Marlboro County, South Carolina household 7 "other free" in 1800 [SC:59].

iii. Cooper, born say 1743, taxable with his wife in Bladen County, North Carolina, in 1768 ("Mulatoes") [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:5], head of a Marlboro County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [SC:59].

iv. Joseph, a "Mulato" taxable in Bladen County in 1770 and 1772 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:44, 94].

v. James2, head of Sumter County, South Carolina household of 11 "other free" in 1800 [SC:935], probably related to Azana Clark, head a Sumter County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [SC:215a], and Mary Clark, head of a Sumter household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [SC:215a]. He may have been identical to James Clark, Sr., who purchased 300 acres on the mouth of Cow Branch of Drowning Creek, Bladen County, North Carolina, jointly with John Stack on 30 September 1755. He assigned all his rights to the plantation he was living on to John Stack on 26 April 1757 [Philbeck, Bladen County Land Entries, no. 1058; Campbell, Bladen County Wills, 2].

2        vi. William1, born say 1755.

3        vii. William2, born about 1760.

viii. George1, born say 1762, married Levisay Evans, daughter of Hannah Evans, 13 May 1795 Amherst County bond, Leonard Clark security. He was taxable in Amherst County from 1783 to 1801. His estate was taxable on a horse in 1804 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1803, frames 23, 44, 97, 102, 166, 195, 225, 326, 393, 449, 515; 1804-23, frame 21]. He and William Clark purchased land on Mill and Porridge Creeks in Amherst County from Rawley Pinn on 18 March 1800 [DB I:161]. His widow Loisa Clark married Charles Johns of Bedford County by 10 October 1805 Amherst County bond, Lewis Martin security, Susannah Clark witness. Charles Johns was a "Blackman" taxable in Bedford County in 1800 and a "Negr." taxable on 2 tithes in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1800A, p.13].

4        ix. Fanny, born say 1763.

5        x. James3, born say 1764.

6        xi. John1, born say 1765.

xii. William3, born say 1770, a "Mulatto Boy" bound apprentice in Surry County on 28 June 1774 [Orders 1764-74, 451].

xiii. Thomas, born say 1773, married Hannah Ash, 30 June 1794 Southampton County bond, John Clark surety. He was head of a Northampton County, North Carolina household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [NC:431] and head of an Anson County household of 2 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:12].

xiv. Lemuel, born say 1774, taxable in Nottoway Parish, Southampton County, in 1797, a "Mulatto" taxable in 1799, a "free Negro" taxable on a horse from 1800 to 1812, taxable on 2 free male tithables in 1812 [Personal Property Tax List 1792-1806, frames 241, 343, 443, 478, 586, 658, 723, 762, 872; 1807-21, frames 11, 94, 132, 250], head of a Southampton County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:75]. He married Mary Williams, 29 January 1795 Isle of Wight bond, David Jones surety. In 1814 he brought a Southampton County chancery suit against Aaron Byrd and his wife over his wife Mary's part of the estate of her father John Williams [LVA Chancery file 1814-017].

xv. Wilson, taxable in Nottoway Parish, Southampton County, called a "Mulatto" in 1796, a "f.n." from 1804 to 1812 [Personal Property Tax List 1792-1806, frames 218, 724, 873; 1807-21, frames 11, 94, 133, 250].

xvi. John/ Jack, born about 1772, registered in Southampton County on 18 September 1798: age 26, yellow man, 5 feet 9 inches, free born [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, no. 123]. He was called John Clark, Jr., a "Mulatto" taxable in Nottoway Parish, Southampton County, in 1796, perhaps the John Clark, "free Negro," who was taxable there in 1800 [Personal Property Tax List 1792-1806, frames 218, 443].

xvii. Nancy, born say 1775, head of a Southampton County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:78].

xviiii. Edmond, a "Mulatto" ordered bound out by the churchwardens of St. Ann's Parish in Essex County on 20 January 1772 [Orders 1770-2, 226].

 2.    William1 Clark, born say 1755, was granted 72 acres on the head branches of Pedlar River in Amherst County on 20 July 1780 [Patents E, 1780-1, 282]. He was head of an Amherst County household of 7 whites (free persons) in 1783 [VA:48] and 8 in 1785 [VA:85]. On 3 May 1785 the Amherst County court ordered that he, George Clark and William Ampey work on the road from Irish Creek Gap to Mill Creek, and on 6 October 1789 he, Peter Hartless, George Clarke, Leonard Clark, James Clark and Joseph Ailstock were ordered to work on the road from Blue Ridge at Irish Creek Gap to the three forks of Pedlar River [Orders 1784-7, 131; 1787-90, 590]. He was taxable in Amherst County from 1782 to 1820: with "CM" after his name in 1800, "Blue Ridge" from 1801-3, a "man of color" in 1811, 1812, and 1815, a "Mulatto" in 1813, a planter over the age of 45 in a list of "Free Negroes & Mulattoes" in 1816 and 1818. He was taxable on 2 tithes in 1794, 3 from 1795-1798, 4 from 1799-1803, 3 from 1804-7, 4 from 1809-10, and 5 from 1811-12 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1803, frames 9, 23, 44, 54, 70, 97, 136, 195, 225, 257, 326, 347, 370, 393, 419, 450, 479; 1804-23, frames 21, 62, 103, 144, 165, 188, 209, 230, 253, 326, 403, 537, 551, 584]. He married (second?) Nancy Williams, spinster, 3 September 1794 Amherst County bond, Leonard Clark surety. He and George Clark purchased land in Amherst County on Mill and Porridge Creeks from Rawley Pinn for 100 pounds on 18 March 1800 [DB I:161]. He was head of an Amherst County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:258]. He may have been the father of

i. ?Leonard, born say 1772, taxable in Amherst County from 1791 to 1807 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1803, frames 225, 347, 370, 419, 450; 1804-23, frames 21, 63, 144]. He married Sally Williams, 12 March 1796 Amherst County bond, William Clarke Surety. He was head of a Rockingham County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:290].

ii. ?Jane, born say 1780, married Henry Heartless, 25 June 1798 Amherst County bond, William Clarke surety.

iii. ?John2, born say 1780, taxable in Amherst County from 1805 to 1815: called a "man of color" in 1811, 1812, 1815, a "Mulatto" in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1804-23, frames 62, 208, 230, 253, 326] and head of an Amherst County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:299]. He married Mary Hartless, and he and Mary Clark were among members of the Hartless family who sold land on Pedlar River on 8 August 1818. They were living in Ohio on 8 April 1823 when they sold an additional 141 acres on Pedlar River to Reuben Peters [DB R:39].

iv. Nancy, daughter of William Clark, married James Clark in Amherst County on 20 September 1809 [Marriage Register, 217].

v. ?William4, Jr., born say 1795, a "Mulatto" taxable in Amherst County in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1804-23, frame 253].

vi. ?George2, a "Mulatto" taxable in 1813, a "man of color" taxable in Amherst County in 1815 [Personal Property Tax List 1804-23, frame 326].

vii. ?Henry, a "man of color" taxable in Amherst County in 1815 [Personal Property Tax List 1804-23, frame 326].

 3.    William2 Clark, born about 1760, married Hannah Peters, 19 March 1785 Stafford County bond, William Peters surety [Madden, We Were Always Free, 195]. He was a "Mulatto" taxable in Culpeper County from 1797 to 1801 [PPTL 1782-1802, frames 640, 684, 818] and a "Free Mulatto" head of a Culpeper County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:18]. On 7 December 1816 he obtained "free papers" in Culpeper County which were recorded later in Ross County, Ohio: William Clerke, a Mulatto man, 50 or 60, 5'7", served in the Revolutionary War in 1780 and 1781...is a free man, who has a wife and several children, and wishes to visit his mother in law in Frederick Co., at Charles Carter's place. On 12 December 1816 Sally Peters, "a free woman of color," made oath in Rockingham County, Virginia, that Coleman, eighteen years old, and Nicholas, thirteen years old, were the sons of William and Hannah Clerk and were free born in Culpeper County [Turpin, Register of Black, Mulatto and Poor Persons, 20-21]. William (Sr.) was sixty-four years old on 22 August 1820 when he appeared in Culpeper County court to apply for a pension for his services in the Revolution. According to his pension records, he died on 8 December 1827 and his children were Willis Clark, William Clark, Kitty Madden (wife of Willis Madden), and Nicholas Clark [Madden, We Were Always Free, 191-199]. William and Hannah's children were 

i. Coleman, born about 1798 (perhaps the same person as Willis Clark).

ii. Kitty, born about 1800, registered as a "free Negro" in Culpeper County on 23 September 1822: a bright Mulatto Woman above the age of twenty one years five feet two inches high. She married Willis Madden [Madden, We Were Always Free, 64].

iii. William5, born about 1803.

iv. Nicholas.

 4.    Fanny Clark, born say 1760, was living in Cumberland County, Virginia, on 22 May 1780 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Littleton Parish to bind her "mulattoe" son Harry Clark to Tucker Baughan [Orders 1779-84, 118]. She was the mother of

i. Harry, born say 1779, a "Mo" taxable in Powhatan County from 1803 to 1814, probably married in 1813 when he was listed with 2 "free Negroes & Mulattos" over the age of 16 in 1813 [PPTL 1787-1825, frames 254, 293, 397, 437, 456].

ii. Peter, born say 1782, "mulatto" son of Fanny ordered bound to Tucker Baughan on 24 May 1784 [Orders 1784-6, 22].

 5.    James3 Clark, born say 1764, was head of an Amherst County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:298]. He and his wife Anny sold land to Henry Hartless by deed proved in Amherst County on 19 July 1802 [Orders 1801-2, 217]. He was taxable in Amherst County from 1789 to 1820: taxable on 2 tithables from 1803 to 1806, 1810 and 1811, 3 in 1812, called a "man of color" in 1811, 1812, and 1815, a "Mulatto" in 1813, in a list of "Free Mulattoes & Negroes with his unnamed son in 1814 and in 1816 when he was over the age of 45, living on his own plantation, and taxable on 3 tithables [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1803, frames 166, 225, 348, 419, 584; 1804-23, frames 21, 62, 103, 144, 165, 187, 209, 230, 252, 284, 326, 403, 503, 537, 549]. He married (second) Nancy Clark in Amherst County on 20 September 1809 [Marriage Register, 217]. He was the father of

i. Micajah, born say 1785, taxable in Amherst County from 1809 (called son of Jas.) a "man of color" in 1811, a "Mulatto" in 1813, in a list of "Free Mulattoes & Negroes in 1814 [Personal Property Tax List 1804-23, frames 209, 252, 284, 328, 403]. He married Sally Duncan, on 15 November 1809 in Amherst County with the consent of Sally's parents, Ambrose and Jane Ambrose [Marriage Register, 218, 240]. Ambrose was called Ambrose Evans when he was head of an Amherst County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:302]. Micajah was head of an Amherst County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:302]. He and Charles Evans were witnesses to the 7 May 1817 Amherst County marriage of Lydia Evans, daughter of Ambrose Evans, to John Gulliver [Marriage Register, 247].

ii. ?Nelson, born about 1793, applied to the Amherst County court in April 1851 for a certificate that he was a white man but registered as a "Free Negro" in Amherst County on 12 July 1860: brown complexion, 67 years of age, 5 feet 11 1/2 inches high, born in Bedford [Register of Free Negroes, no.339; McLeRoy, Strangers in Their Midst, 101, 136].

iii. ?Benjamin H., born about 1800, registered in Amherst County on 22 August 1822: a free man of colour aged twenty two years five feet eight inches high of a bright yellow complection grey eyes with a natural mark on his right cheek and was born free & by occupation a waterman [Register of Free Negroes, no. 10].

iv. ?James4, born about 1801, registered on 12 July 1860: dark brown complexion, 59 years of age ... born in Amherst [Register of Free Negroes, no.338].

 6.    John1 Clark, born say 1765, was a "Mulatto" taxable in Nottoway Parish, Southampton County, in 1796 [Personal Property Tax List 1792-1806, frame 218]. He was surety for the Southampton County marriage bond of (his brother?) Thomas Clark and Hannah Ash on 30 June 1794. He was head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [NC:12]. Perhaps his children were

i. Anthony, born about 1790, head of a Halifax County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:143] and 10 in 1830. He may have been the Anthony Clark who was head of a Richmond City, Wayne County, Indiana, household of 12 "free colored" in 1840.

ii. Reuben, born about 1809, described as a "child of color" when he was ordered bound out by the 20 May 1822 Halifax County court.

 Another Clark family:

1.    Rachel Clark, born say 1730, was a "Widow Woman" who was summoned by the Craven County, North Carolina court on 10 May 1759 to bring her children to the next court to have them bound apprentices [Minutes 1758-61, 28a]. She died before 10 October 1767 when Edward Franck of Craven County was ordered by the court to receive her "Molatto Orphans" in his care until they could be indentured by the next court [Minutes 1767-75, 52a]. Her children named in the court order were

i. Joseph, born say 1755.

ii. Moses, born say 1758.

iii. ?Mariah, head of a Craven County household of 2 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:77].


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