The Rolla Herald Obits

1918

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Miss Della Adams

3 Jan 1918

It was sad news to many friends in Rolla to hear of the death of Miss Della Adams, which occurred Friday afternoon, December 26th, 1917.

Miss Della Amanda Adams was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. S. N. Adams of this city. She was born at Petersville, Ill., April 29th, 1895, making her at the time of death 22 years 7 months and 29 days old. She came with her parents to Rolla several years ago. She graduated from Rolla High School and during the past two years she has been stenographer at the real estate office of B. H. Rucker.

Miss Adams was a young lady of highest character, faithful and unassuming.

Rev. C. R. Wilson, of the Presbyterian Church, conducted funeral services from the family residence on Saturday and interment took place at Rolla Cemetery.

Mr. Freund
3 Jan 1918

Mr. Freund was a brother of Mrs. Wm. Heller of this city. The funeral was held Tuesday in St. Louis. Mr. & Mrs. Heller of this city attended the funeral.

MRS. J. M. COFFMAN
10 Jan 1918

Mrs. Rosaline Coffman, relict of the late Hon. J. M. Coffman, of this county, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. W. J. Mitchell, in this city, on January 3rd, 1918, in the 68th year of her age.

Mrs. Coffman was formerly Miss Rosaline Crews. She was born at the Meramec Spring on March 12, 1850, before Phelps County was organized as a county. On October 17, 1869, she was united in marriage with Mr. James M. Coffman, of this county. Eleven children were born to this union, nine of whom survive: George E. Coffman of Oklahoma City, Okla.; Mrs. W. J. Mitchell of Rolla; Mrs. J. L. Pickles of Duluth, Minn.; Albert Coffman of Hartford, Conn.; Frank Coffman of St. Louis; Mrs. K. F. Strobach of St. James; R. B. Coffman and Harry Coffman of Chicago. All of the children were present at the funeral except Albert.

Mrs. Coffman was of one of the pioneer families in this section of Missouri. Her husband preceded her to the grave in 1916. She was a member of the Christian Church and was held in high regard by a large circle of friends.

Funeral services were conducted by Rev. J. Ross Miller of the Christian Church at the Presbyterian Church on Saturday morning January 5th and her remains were conveyed to St. James and laid to rest by the side of her husband

J. C. RIGSBY
17 Jan 1918

Dixon Pilot, Jan 12

We are informed that J. C. Rigsby, father of Mrs. W. M. Branson of this city, died suddenly at his home near Hooker this morning.

Mr. Rigsby had been in poor health for some time, and was taking medicine regularly. He went out to his barn early and fed his horses, as was his custom, we are told. On returning to the house he spoke of feeling ill, and asked Mrs. Rigsby to get him a dose of medicine. While she was preparing the medicine Mr. Rigsby died.

G. W. RAY
17 Jan 1918

A letter received by Mr. C. S. Montgomery of this city from his half-sister, Mrs. Annie Ray, announced that her husband, G. W. (Wash) Ray died at their home in Salt Lake City, Utah, on the night of January 1st, 1918. He would have been 65 years old had he lived until January 12th. He is survived by his wife and four children, all of whom were present.

Funeral services were conducted from Immanuel Baptist Church in Salt Lake and interment took place at the City cemetery.

G.W. Ray was born and reared in Phelps county. His home was north of Rolla. He is survived by brothers and sisters and other relatives in this county.

GEORGE W. GRAYSON
24 Jan 1918

Phelps county Record.
George W. Grayson was born in Phelps County, Missouri, March 5, 1846; and died January 6, 1918, being at the time of his death, 71 years, 10 months and 1 day old.

Mr. Grayson is survived by his wife, six children, thirty-six grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren, besides a host of friends, who will greatly miss him now that he has gone to the better world.

Funeral services were held at the home of his son, Ed Grayson, six miles south of Newburg, Tuesday/

The services were in charge of Bro. Stephen Mihlfeld. Interment was made in the Allen cemetery.

HARRY MERRELL
31 Jan 1918

Harry Merrell, age nineteen, son of John Merrell and wife near Vessie, died January 19, 1918. He was buried the following Sunday afternoon at Mt. Zion grave yard. The funeral was conducted by Rev. Eveland, of the Methodist Church. Besides his parents he leaves two sisters and three brothers to mourn his loss. He was the grandson of Ira T. Phillips, of Rolla. He was employed by the street car company in St. Louis. He will be greatly missed by his many friends.

CHARLES N. COFFMAN
7 Feb 1918

The San Juan, Colorado, Prospector
The death of Charles N. Coffman occurred during the early morning hours of last Friday, January 12, 1918, at his home in this city, the Hobson residence on Spruce Street. He had been very low for several days from an attack of typhoid pneumonia, from which complications he was unable to rally.

The funeral was held from the family residence Saturday afternoon, the services being in charge of Rev. John White, of the Presbyterian Church. The casket was banked high with flowers, the offerings of many friends.

Charles Newton Coffman was the son of M. Newton Coffman and Mary Houston Coffman and was born at St. James, Missouri, April 16, 1875, being aged 42 years, 9 months, and 2 days at time of death. His childhood and young manhood were spent in Missouri where he took up the trade of millwright and mastered it.

On March 7, 1897, he was united in marriage to Alice B. Harris, at Yancy Mills, Missouri. To this union three children were born, Floyd Newton, who died in infancy, Agnes Florine, and Marguerite, who with their mother survive.

The deceased came to Colorado in April, 1909; locating at Monte Vista later moving to Creede. The family moved from Creede to Del Norte three years ago. He united with the Bellview, MO Christian Church when just a boy, and when he came west continued to hold his membership in the old home church.

Charles Coffman was a loyal citizen to his country and state, a faithful friend and social neighbor. The tasks which came to him he did well and a master in plying his trade. As a husband he was loving and kind. Home and family to him were the lode stars of life, and for them he labored consistently and faithfully. Besides the wife and daughters, there are to mourn his death, one brother, S. H. Coffman, of Newburg, MO, and one sister, Mrs. L. A. Hobson of Del Norte, who is spending the winter in Denver, also a half brother, A. P. Freeman of St. James, MO.

MRS. HATTIE COLVIN
7 Feb 1918

Mrs. Hattie Colvin, aunt of Landon C. Smith and Sterling M. Smith, died at her home at Dandridge, Tenn., January 19th, 1918. She was over 80 years old. Mrs. Colvin was prominent in D.A.R., circles in Tennessee.

MRS. BENJAMIN BERRIAN
7 Feb 1918

Mrs. Benjamin Berrian died in this city January 28, 1918, in the 88th year of her age. Mrs. Berrian was one of the old citizens of Rolla. Her husband preceded her to the grave about twenty years ago. For the last few years she has made her home with Mr. and Mrs. Charles Thompson. Funeral services were conducted by Rev. C. B. Hamby, of the Methodist Church, of which deceased was a member, and interment took place at the Rolla cemetery.

MRS. MARY AUGUSTA LEAVITT
7 Feb 1918

Mrs. Mary Augusta Leavitt, beloved wife of Clifford Leavitt, died at her home in this city January 30, 1918. Besides her husband she is survived by seven children, also her father, one brother, two half brothers, and one half sister. Mrs. Leavitt was in the thirty-fourth year of her age.

W. R. RICHEY
7 Feb 1918

W. R. Richey died at his home in this city, February 3rd, 1918, in the 30th year of his age. He is survived by his wife and two children. Funeral services were conducted Monday morning from the home, by Rev. C. L. Parker, of the Union Mission, and interment took place at Rolla cemetery.

B. C. HAWKINS
14 Feb 1918

St. James Journal
B. C. Hawkins, a former citizen of St. James, but who has resided in Greenfield, Ill., for some time, was kicked by a horse on Monday of last week, and died the following Friday. The remains were brought out to Rolla and interment took place in the Hawkins cemetery.

Mr. Hawkins has a great number of relatives and friends who mourn his untimely death. He leaves a mother, Mrs. Peter Bassett, sisters, Mrs. D. B. Branson, of Bland, Mrs. Geo. Terrill and Etta Bassett; brothers, W. A. Hawkins, of Rolla and Peter Hawkins. He also leaves a wife and two daughters.

Another obit for B. C. Hawkins.
B. C. Hawkins, who died February 1st, at Springfield, Ill., as a result of being kicked by a horse, was buried at St. James on Sunday, February 3rd. Besides being survived by his wife and two children, he is also survived by his mother, Mrs. Peter Francis and sister, Mrs. Robert Bassett, of St. James and sisters, Mrs. D. S. Branson of Bland, and Mrs. Frances Terrill, of High Gate, and brothers, W. A. Hawkins, of Rolla and Perry Hawkins, of Granite City, Ill.

MRS. VIRGINIA ILLINSKI
14 Feb 1918

Mrs. Virginia Illinski, died at Anna, Ill., Monday, February 11th, 1918. She is survived by one son, A. X. Illinski, president of the New Mexico School of Mines and one daughter, Mrs. J. L. Shakleford, of Nashville, Tenn. Mrs. Illinski is also survived by her sisters Mrs. Annie McK. Southgate, Misses Margaret E. and Laura A. Black, and brother, Robert H. Black of Rolla. B. H. Rucker and Mrs. Rucker, a niece of the deceased, attended the funeral, which was held Wednesday at East St. Louis.

MRS. JENNIE WILLIAMS
14 Feb 1918

Mrs. Jennie Williams died at her home at Ashville, North Carolina, on December 11th, 1917. Mrs. Williams was formerly Miss Jennie Warmouth, of Rolla. She was married to Dr. Williams in 1863, who was at that time Assistant-Surgeon of the 5th Mo. Cavalry. Dr. Williams, in advising us of his wife’s death, expressed the hope to visit Rolla some time in the near future.

W. J. BENNETT
21 Feb 1918

W. J. Bennett died at his home at Salem, Mo. February 14, 1918. He is survived by his wife, who is a daughter of Judge L. B. Woodside. The deceased stood very high in his hometown of Salem, and he enjoyed the respect and good will of a large circle of friends. He was a prominent worker in the Methodist Church, and prominent in Masonic circles.

Mr. Bennett was a member of the Rolla Commandery, No. 59, Knights Templar.

Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon from the Methodist Church in Salem, all ministers of Salem uniting in the service. The funeral was one of the largest ever held in Salem. Following the services at the church, the remains were taken in charge by Salem Lodge of Masons, and with Knight Templar escort, and conveyed to Salem cemetery, where they were buried according to the rites and ceremonies of the Masonic order.

Those attending the funeral from Rolla were: M. F. Faulkner, Prof. E. G. Harris, Prof. H. S. Dickerson, B. F. Culbertson, B. W. Humphrey, E. J. Ueltzen, W. J. Kilgore, of Rolla Commandery and C. O. Reinoehl, of Rolla.

J. E. BURGESS
21 Feb 1918

Dent County Post
Joseph Edward Burgess was born in Delaware County, Ohio, Nov. 10, 1841, and passed to his eternal reward at his home near Anutt, Mo. Feb. 9, 1918, aged 76 years, 2 months and 29 days. Bro. Burgess was converted when a young man, and joined the Corinth Baptist Church, and afterward changed to the Macedonian Church in Dixon Association. He had been a Baptist and active Christian for 50 years. At the time of his death he was a member of the Rolla Baptist Church, to which he has been a consistent member for 15 years.

At the beginning of the Civil War Bro. Burgess enlisted under the U. S. flag, and served in the Union army until disabled by sickness. By his going a home is broken, a good conscientious neighbor and citizen has departed. He leaves to mourn his demise a loving companion, one adopted daughter, one brother, and many relatives and friends. In the loss of our loved one we mourn not as those who have no hope. “Blessed are the dead that die in the Lord.”

Funeral services at Anutt Sunday, Feb. 10, conducted by Eld. R. W. Callahan, and interment made in Victor cemetery.

ENOCK (BUD) LIGHT
28 Feb 1918

Enock (Bud) Light died at his home in this city Friday, Feb. 22, 1918, in the 71st year of his age. He has lived in and around Rolla all his life. He is survived by his wife and three children: Mrs. Fred Mahoney and Miss Louisa Light of Tulare, Calif. and Roy Light of Rolla.

Funeral services were conducted by Rev. C. L. Parker, of the Union Mission on Saturday and his remains were buried in the Light grave yard 3 miles north of Rolla.

MRS. LIZZIE K. SMITH
28 Feb 1918

Mrs. Lizzie K. Smith relict of Judge G. W. Smith, of this county died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. E. C. Morse, in Rolla, Tuesday, Feb. 26th 1918, in the 83rd year of her age. She is survived by her only daughter, Mrs. E. C. Morse.

Funeral services were conducted Wednesday from the Baptist Church, by Rev. A. B. Carson, and interment took place in Rolla Cemetery.

JUDGE CHARLES C. BLAND
7 Mar 1918

Judge Charles C. Bland, Rolla’s most distinguished citizen, died at St. Anthony’s Hospital in St. Louis Tuesday, March 5th, 1918. He was just past 81 years old. His remains will be brought to Rolla today (Thursday) arriving here at 5:25 o’clock P.M., where they will be taken to the Masonic Temple to be in state.

Funeral services will be held from the Methodist Church at 2 o’clock P.M., Friday, after which the remains will be taken in charge by the Masonic fraternity for interment.

Mayor David E. Cowan hereby calls upon all banks business houses and schools to close their doors Friday between 1:30 P.M. and 3:30 P.M., as a tribute of respect to the memory of our deceased distinguished citizen, Judge Charles C. Bland.

The banks have ordered their doors closed and the School board has also made an order closing the schools during the funeral.

MRS. MARY WEISENBACH
7 Mar 1918

Mrs. Mary Weisenbach died at her home in this city Monday, March 4, 1918. She had been sick but a few days.

The deceased was formerly Miss Mary Anna Simily. She was born at Pittsburgh, Pa., February 19, 1848. On September 12th, 1867, she was united in marriage in Cincinnati, Ohio, with John B. Weisenbach. The young couple came to Rolla in 1868. Mrs. Weisenbach is survived by three children: Mrs. J. E. Kirkham, of Ames, Iowa; John T. Weisenbach of Albuquerque, New Mexico; and Mrs. G. W. Thompson, of Springfield, Mo.

Mrs. Thompson was the only one to be with her mother before her death. Mrs. Kirkham and daughter, Miss Georgena, arrived Tuesday. John Weisenbach was unable to get here.

Mrs. Weisenbach was a splendid character and a devout Christian. She was a member of the Catholic Church, and true to its faith.

Funeral services were conducted from the Catholic Church Wednesday morning, Rev. Father P. B. O’Loughlin officiating. Interment took place at Rolla Cemetery.

ROBERT FREDERICK B. PERRY
7 Mar 1918

H. B. Perry, of this city, received the sad intelligence last week of the death of his father, Mr. Robert Frederick Barker Perry, which occurred at Brighton, England, February 2, 1918.

Besides his son, H.B. Perry, of this city, Mr. Perry is survived by his wife, a son and four daughters, one of whom is Mrs. George Clough Clark of Phoenix, Arizona.

MAY CHAMBERS
7 Mar 1918

May Chambers, infant daughter of Mr. & Mrs. James Chambers, age one year and 10 months, died Feb. 27, 1918. Funeral services were conducted by Rev. E. L. Parker. The remains were laid to rest Feb. 28, in Macedonia cemetery.

INA AUGUSTA LEAVITT
14 Mar 1918

Ina Augusta Leavitt, age one month and six days, infant daughter of Clifford Leavitt, died March 5th. The mother died a few weeks ago. The funeral services were conducted at the home of Matilda Gaddy, the mother of Mr. Leavitt, by Rev. C. L. Parker. The remains were laid to rest in Rolla cemetery.

TRUEMAN McEUEN
21 March 1918

March 6, 1918, Trueman McEuen, at the home of his brother in law Edward B. Merrell, in St. Louis. He was 28 years old at the time of his death. His remains were brought to Rolla and taken to the Peck cemetery near Vida, and buried. Rev. Hanby held the funeral service. Trueman was a Christian boy. His parents preceded him to the grave a few years ago. He leaves two brothers, Oliver and Conner and three sisters, Mrs. Alice Merrell, Mrs. Dora Cole and Mrs. Etta Thible.

MABEL RUEH
21 March 1918

Mabel Rueh, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. August F. Rueh, of Rolla, aged 13 died in St. Louis last Saturday. The funeral services, which were held in the Methodist Church of Rolla, of which she was a member, were clothed with an atmosphere of peace and tenderness, which was touching. The young girl whose form lay in the white coffin covered with beautiful flowers, loving tributes to her memory had so mingled with those of her Sunday school class that we could not realize she had gone to her reward. Little Mabel had won the love of many in her brief life by her gentle and kindly character. The choir sang especially appropriate numbers. The pastor, Rev. Claude S. Hanby, who is a devout lover of children, spoke tenderly and earnestly. His text was taken from Isaiah 40:11. The Shepherd who carries the lambs in his arms was so presented that the thought of the little one in the arms of Jesus brought a sense of comfort and consolation. One’s grief, though natural, seemed almost selfish in the light of the better life appointed for her whom we loved.

The pupils of the eighth grade, of which she had been one, attended in a body, accompanied by their teacher, Miss Annie Lepper, and Prof. S. P. Bardley. Six of the girls acted as pall bearers. Quietly and reverently the people passed from the church which had held almost a capacity congregation on this occasion.

MRS. SARAH BROOKSHIRE
4 Apr 1918

Mrs. Sarah Brookshire, wife of the late Nathan Brookshire, departed this life at St. Anthony’s Hospital, St. Louis, March 31st, 1918, aged 62 years, 4 months, and 3 days. She had been sick since Wednesday, March 27th, and underwent an operation at St. Anthony’s which resulted in her death.

Mrs. Brookshire was a daughter of the late J. H. and Ann Mitchell. She was born November 28th, 1855 in Cleveland, Ohio, but removed with her family to Missouri in 1859. She became established in the Methodist faith about thirty years ago and held her membership in the Fairview Church of Phelps county. She was married to Mr. Nathan Brookshire who preceded her to the great beyond seven years ago. She was a devoted wife, a lovable unostentatious, self-sacrificing character, revered by her family and respected by all who had the good fortune to know her.

There remain to mourn her departure one sister, Mrs. John Hunter, and three brothers, C. H., G. E. and W. J. Mitchell.

Funeral services from the Methodist Church in this city Tuesday afternoon by Rev. J. Ross Miller of the Christian Church, and interment took place at Rolla cemetery.

JOSEPH R. OWEN
18 Apr 1918

Joseph R. Owen died at a hospital in Granite City, Ill., Thursday, April 14th 1918. His remains were brought to Rolla, where funeral services were held last Sunday afternoon from the home of his sister, Mrs. Ida M. Shaver, Rev. J. Ross Miller, of the Christian Church, officiated, and interment took place at Rolla Cemetery.

Joseph Owen was born at Owen’s Mill in Osage county, MO., May 24, 1873. He was the son of the late F.C.W. Owen and wife. When a boy he came with his parents to Rolla and here he lived until about 14 years ago. In 1901 he was united in marriage with May Beard of Texas County. She died in 1904, shortly after which Mr. Owen went to St. Louis to live. He was a painter by trade and followed his profession until his death.

He is survived by three sisters, Mrs. Harry Davies, Mrs. Ida M. Shaver, and Mrs. Harry R. McCaw, all of Rolla, and two brothers, Dr. W. C. Owen, of St. Louis, and Jess Owen, of Rolla. All were present at his funeral

MILDRED FREDA DENISON
18 April 1918

Little Mildred Freda, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Denison, born March 2, 1916, and died March 7, 1918, being at the time of her death 2 years and 15 days.

But yet we are confident that children are a part of the kingdom, and that there is not a spot or blemish on their character.

Little Mildred was a sweet rose of two years and fifteen days, only blossomed to die. She had sweetened the home of her two sisters, Ethel and Nellie. But the rose that was so sweet has withered and died, while home and friends are sad and lonely, heavier has one more precious jewel...

CAPT. R. A. COLLYER
25 Apr 1918

Capt. R. A. Collyer died Tuesday morning, April 23, 1918. He was 84 years and 11 days old. Capt. Collyer, who in recent years made his home with Clarence Fulton, east of Rolla, has resided in and around Rolla since the Civil War. He was born in Boston, Mass. He was a veteran of the Civil War, fought on the Union side. Capt. Collyer was well known among our people and respected by all.

Funeral services were conducted Wednesday, and interment took place at the Roach cemetery west of Rolla.

JOHN KELLY
2 May 1918

John Kelly died at St. John’s Hospital in Springfield, Mo., Sunday morning, April 28, 1918. Mr. Kelly owned the building on Pine Street in this city, occupied by A. M. Light with a pool hall. Funeral services were conducted Wednesday. Mr. and Mrs. N. A. Kinney attended the funeral.

MOTHER OF MRS. C. F. WILSON
9 May 1918

Rev. and Mrs. C. F. Wilson and daughters, Misses Julia and Lucille Wilson, returned to Rolla Sunday from Carlinville, Ill., where they attended the funeral of Mrs. Wilson’s mother. She was past 80 years old.

MRS. S. W. KILGORE
9 May 1918

Mrs. S. W. Kilgore died at her home in this city Monday. She was 50 years of age. Mrs. Kilgore was formerly Miss Belle Sanford. She was born in this county. Besides her husband, she is survived by six children, also a sister, Miss Roxie Sanford, of St. Louis. All were present at the funeral, except her daughter, Mrs. David Fishler, of St. Louis, and her son, Sanford Kilgore, who is in the National Aviation Service at San Antonio, Texas. Mrs. Kilgore was a member of the Christian Church, and she also held membership in the Royal Neighbors.

Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon from the residence, Rev. C. S. Hanby, of the Methodist Church officiating, after which the remains were taken in charge by the Royal Neighbors, and interment took place at Rolla cemetery.

MRS. J. F. NARBER
9 May 1918

Mrs. J. F. Narber died at her home southeast of Rolla Monday, May 6, 1918. She was in the 66th year of her age. She is survived by her husband and one son.

Funeral services were held Wednesday from the Episcopal Church, of which she was a member, by Rev. H. Nelson Tragitt. Interment took place at Rolla cemetery. Many friends sympathize with the bereaved relatives.

CATHERINE GERTRUDE STORR
16 May 1918

Mrs. Catherine Gertrude Storr died at her home near Sands, Mo., May 2, 1918, aged 75 years, 1 month and 4 days.

Mrs. Storr was born at Albany, New York, March 28, 1843. She married William Storr in 1861. He preceded her to the grave 17 years ago. Mrs. Storr is survived by two children W. F. and A. E. Storr, also four grandchildren.

The deceased has resided in Phelps county ever since 1872.

MRS. D. W. MALCOLM
30 May 1918

Mrs. Sophia Malcolm relict of D. W. Malcolm passed away at her home in this city Thursday evening May 23, 1918. In her death a lovable and much loved character is gone.

Miss Sophia Irene Taylor was born at Plymouth, Indiana, March 30th, 1842, making her at the time of her death 76 years of age. At the age of 6 years she was left an orphan. She was shortly afterwards adopted by Judge W. G. Pomeroy. She came with her adopted parents and settled first at Steelville, in about 1855. Afterwards they moved to Rolla. Here she met Mr. D. W. Malcolm, then cashier of the National Bank of Rolla, and in April 1874, they were united in marriage. Mr. Malcolm died in May 1898.

For years the Malcolm home was one of the child social centers in our city. Mrs. Malcolm enjoyed society, and her home ever manifested a delightful hospitality. She was generous and kind to all. She was a faithful member of the Episcopal Church, and was one of the chief organizers of the church in Rolla. On account of illness and poor health, Mrs. Malcolm has not been able to participate in affairs, but her friends still clung to her and loved her. Her loss is mourned by many.

Funeral services were conducted by Rev. H. Nelson Tragitt, Rector of the Episcopal Church in this city, Saturday afternoon and interment took lace at Rolla cemetery. The pall bearers were Edwin Long, B. H. Rucker, E. J. Koch, Charles L. Woods, P. H. McGregor and J. M. Bowen.

Out of town relatives present at the funeral were Mr. and Mrs. John A. Carels, of Chicago; Mr. and Mrs. Earl A. Seay, and child of Salem, Mo.; Mrs. Will Redford, of Warrensburg, Mo.; Mrs. Maude Woodruff, of Steelville, Mo.; and Mrs. Stella Coree, of Sapulpa, Okla.

LEMUEL C. MORGAN
6 Jun 1918

Lemuel C. Morgan died at his home in this city Sunday afternoon, June 2, 1918. He was 76 years, 11 months, and 1 week old.

Mr. Morgan was born in Medina county, Ohio, June 6, 1841. When a small boy he went with his parents to Wisconsin, where he grew to manhood. When the Civil War broke out he enlisted in Co. I, 22nd Wisconsin Volunteers. His company was engaged in many battles, among them Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge, Gettysburg and the Atlanta campaign. Immediately after the war he came to Rolla, where he met and married Miss Augusta Dearborn, in March, 1867. To this union six children were born, four of whom with the mother survive. The children are: Mrs. H. A. Featherman, of Phillipsburg, Mont.; Mrs. J. P. Campbell, Doniphan, Mo; J. H. Morgan, Lyons, Kansas; and R. D. Morgan of Temple, Texas.

All were present, including Mrs. J. H. Morgan and children, and Mrs. Campbell’s son, Jack Campbell, to attend the funeral. He is also survived by an only sister, Mrs. H. E. See, of Anutt, Mo., who was present at the funeral.

Mr. Morgan was a member of the Methodist Church and was an ardent worshiper in that faith. He was one of the old and highly respected citizens.

Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon from the Methodist Church, Rev. C. B. Hanby officiating, and interment took place at Rolla cemetery.

GEORGE STEWART
6 June 1918

George Stewart died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. M. Ingebo at Veblen, South Dakota, Tuesday, May 28th, 1918. He was about 61 years old.

George Stewart was the son of Chas. Stewart and wife. He was reared and educated near Edgar Springs. He united i9n marriage with Miss Bettie Lamar and to this union one daughter, Mrs. M. Ingebo, was born. His wife preceded him to the grave many years ago. Mr. Stewart was a member of Spring Creek Lodge of Masons, and during his life at Edgar Springs was one of the active members of the lodge. Following the death of his wife he went to Veblen, South Dakota and made his home with his daughter.

Funeral services were held at Veblen, and his remains were shipped to Rolla, arriving here Friday. They were accompanied by his daughter and her husband. Hon. Robert Lamar and Kirby Lamar, of Houston, Mo., brothers-in-law of the deceased, and Mrs. Kirby Lamar met the remains at Rolla. Rolla Lodge of Masons took charge of the remains and went with them to Smith’s cemetery, near Edgar Springs and with E. J. Koch acting as Worshipful Master, they were laid to rest according to the rites and ceremonies of the Masonic order. Mrs. R. E. Bradford, of Shannon county, a sister-in-law of the deceased, and many friends of the Edgar Springs neighborhood, were present at the funeral.

Those present from Rolla were David E. Cowan, E. J. Koch, Floy W. Webb, A. S. Niles, W. J. Kilgore, J. F. Ayers, Charles L. Woods and J. A. Watson.

MRS. MARGARET ANN BRADFORD
6 June 1918

Mrs. Margaret Ann Bradford died at the home of her son, John D. Bradford, Monday, May 27th, 1918. She was one of the old and highly respected citizens of this part of Missouri.

Mrs. Bradford was formerly Miss Margaret Ann Lenox, daughter of Elder David Lenox and wife, who were among the pioneer settlers of this section of Missouri. She was born near Lake Spring, Mo., February 14, 1831, making her at the time of her death 87 years, 3 months, and 18 days old. She was one of twelve children. She united in marriage with John D. Bradford of near Spring Creek. Four children were born to this union, only one, John D. Bradford, of Lake Spring survives. Her husband died in 1861. She is survived by two brothers, D. T. Lenox, of Lake Spring, and J. M. Lenox of Eram, Okla. and two sisters Mrs. Emma LeSueur, of Erain, Okla., and Mrs. Mary J. Pemberton. of Saganaw, Texas. All were present at her funeral except Mrs. Pemberton. She is also survived by nine grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. She was a devout member of the Primitive Baptist Church, the faith of her father.

"Aunt Sis" as her relatives were pleased to call her, has had many experiences, and has endured many hardships. During the Civil War she was under the constant surveillance of the officers of the Federal Army. The border warfare made it particularly hard on the people along the border. She was always fearless and heroic. On one occasion immediately after the war, she rode horse back by herself from Pana, Ill., to her home here in Missouri. She was wonderfully well posted on affairs of her time, and it was most interesting to listen to her tales.

Funeral services were held at the home of her son Tuesday afternoon. There was scripture reading and a prayer by W. L. Bradford, of Edgar Springs and her remains were laid to rest in the Lake Spring cemetery.

MRS. ELIZABETH HEFLIN
13 June 1918
Mrs. Elizabeth Heflin departed this life at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Max Funke, five miles southeast of Rolla, on Sunday, June 2, 1918. She was 77 years old.

Funeral services were conducted by Rev. J. H. Reed, and interment took place at Beaver cemetery. Mrs. Heflin is survived by her daughters, Mrs. Funke and Mrs. Geo. Damm, and a number of relatives. Many friends sympathize with the family in their bereavement.

MRS. ELLEN DeBAUERNFIEND
13 June 1918

Mrs. Ellen deBauernfiend died at the home of her sister, Mrs. A. P. Petraglio, in west Rolla on Tuesday, June 11, 1918. She was 65 years and 12 days old.

Mrs. deBauerfiend has been a sufferer for several years, but only within the past few days did her case become serious. She was born in Phelps county, Mo., May 30, 1853. On April 8, 1991, she united in marriage with Vincent deBauerfiend, of this county.

Funeral services will be held this (Thursday) afternoon, June 13, 1918, at 2:30 o’clock, from the residence of her sister, Mrs. A. P. Petraglio, by Rev. J. Ross Miller, of the Christian Church. Interment will take place in Rolla cemetery.

EARNEST R. STRAWHUN
20 June 1918
Phelps County Record
Earnest R. Strawhun age 25 miscellaneous repair man at the Frisco round house, met his death about 8:10 o’clock Wednesday evening when he was caught under the wheels of an engine tender while working under the engine in the pit at the roundhouse.

JOHN W. COOPER
20 June 1918

John W. Cooper died at his home in this city Friday, June 14, 1918. He was 62 years, 4 months and 20 days old.

Mr. Cooper was born and reared in Phelps county. He has served the people of Phelps County several terms as sheriff, and made an excellent officer. At the time of his death he was justice of the peace of Rolla township.

Mr. Cooper was united in marriage with Miss Brown, daughter of the late John Brown, of near Flat. He is survived by his wife and three children.

Funeral services were conducted Saturday by Rev. J. Ross Miller, of the Christian Church, and interment took place at Rolla cemetery.

T. C. ALVERSON
27 June 1918

T. C. Alverson, a former citizen of this county, died at his home at Rogers, Ark., Sunday, June 23, 1918. He was in his 77th year. His remains were brought to St. James arriving there Tuesday afternoon where funeral services were conducted and interment took place at Masonic cemetery.

Mr. Alverson is survived by his two sons, H. W. of St. James and John C. of Rolla, and one daughter Mrs. Homer Harris, of Rogers, Arkansas.

MRS. FELICIA DELLALOYE
27 June 1918

Mrs. Felicia Dellaloye died at the home of her son, August Dellaloye, Monday night, June 24, 1918. She was 85 years, 3 months and 19 days old. She has resided in this country many years.

DANIEL DEVINE
27 June 1918

Daniel Devine, one of the old and highly respected citizens of Phelps county, died at his home east of Rolla Sunday, June 23, 1918. He was 87 years old.

Daniel Devine, "Uncle Dan" as he was familiarly called, was born in Ireland. He came to America 65 years ago. He united in marriage at Hinsdale, New Hampshire, with Miss Josephine Cunningham. To this union nine children were born, six of whom survive. They are Miss Mary Devine, of this county, Dan Devine, St. Louis; Mrs. E. A. Hershfield, San Antonio, Texas; and Edward Devine, of Havana, Cuba. All were present at the time of his death except Edward and Mrs. Hirshfield.

Mr. Devine came to Phelps County 52 years ago and here he and his family have resided ever since. He was a faithful member of the Catholic Church. He was a good citizen, honest and conscientious.

Funeral services will be held next Sunday and interment will take place at Rolla cemetery.

JULIA ANN DENISON
27 June 1918

Died, June 18, 1918, at 12:30 o'clock a.m., from a complication of diseases, Julia Ann Denison, aged 48 years, 9 months, and 18 days. The deceased lived the greater part of her life with and was cared for throughout, by her sister, Mrs. Jane Lanning, from whose home funeral services were conducted by Rev. H. A. Young. Burial took place at Beulah cemetery. A large number of sympathizing friends and relatives being in attendance.

PLEASANT HAZZARD
4 July 1918

Pleasant Hazzard was found dead at the old Hazzard home, about six miles northwest of Rolla, in Miller township, last Sunday afternoon.

Hazzard was last seen alive at J. C. Harvey’s Wednesday afternoon, and he was expected to return to work Thursday. His failure to return, and no one having seen him anywhere, excited the curiosity of the neighbors. Sunday afternoon Frank Walker, Wm. McCourtney and Claude Colvin went to the Hazzard home and found him dead on the stairway of the home.

Dr. W. S. Smith, coroner, went to the scene Sunday afternoon and conducted an inquest, and the jury returned a verdict of death as a suicide.

It was the opinion of the jury that Hazzard had gone up the steps a few steps and rested the gun on the floor below him, placed the muzzle against his head and used an old poker to push the trigger and fire it. The gun and the poker were found against his body on the stairway.

PRIVATE MILFORD R. COLLEY
11 July 1918

Private Milford Raymond Colley, of the U.S. Marine Corps was killed in action between June 2nd and 10th. This sad news was received by Mr. C. H. Colley and wife, parents of the young hero, at Waynesville, Mo., on July 2nd.

Milford Colley was born at Waynesville, May 7, 1902, making him a little over 16 years old at the time of his death. He enlisted in the U. S. Marine Corps in April, 1917. He has been in France since last October. He is the first Pulaski county youth to fall in battle.

Young Colley met his death in the great battle when the American Marines held in check the German drive, and at the same time drove the dastardly whelps back. We hope we know that young Colley’s death will be fully avenged. Milford Colley is a nephew of W. F. Houk of Newburg.

He died in glory. His death is mourned by America.

MRS. WALTER HOPKINS
11 July 1918

The remains of Mrs. Walter Hopkins arrived at Newburg Monday and were taken to the Mill Creek cemetery, where services were conducted and interment took place.

The deceased died last Thursday at Kingfisher, Texas. Her remains were accompanied to Newburg by her husband .

Mr. Hopkins is a son of J. M. Hopkins of Newburg.

BERTIE MILLER
18 July 1918

Bertie Miller was born in Lincoln, Nebraska, May 5, 1885. Her education was received in the Lincoln schools. Her vocation for several years was that of a school and music teacher. She was married in May, 1913, to Walter E. Hopkins, in Kansas City, Mo. During the last four years Mrs. Hopkins was an invalid. She died at her home in Kingsville, Texas, July 4, 1918. Her remains, accompanied by her husband, were brought to Newburg, where the funeral services were conducted by Rev. Requs, at the home of J. M. Hopkins, Monday, July 8. Interment took place in the Mill Creek cemetery. The deceased beside her husband, leaves one sister who resides in Nebraska. Mrs. Hopkins was a consistent Christian, and ____ her suffering, she was brave and cheerful until the last. The floral offerings from Kingsville were a beautiful manifestation of the love and esteem of her friends and neighbors.

WILLIAM THOMPSON FULLER
18 Jul 1918

William Thompson Fuller, oldest son of Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Fuller, died at his home in Paris, Texas, July 15, 1918. He was born in Ontario county, N. Y., March 25, 1857, removed to Phelps County, Mo., in 1865 with his parents, and was at the time of his death 61 years, 5 months, and 20 days old. March 26, 1885, he was married to Miss Eva Schultz. To this union one daughter was born, Mrs. Walter S. Rinck, of Newburg. On August 8, 1889, he was married to Miss Lillie Holman, of Chester, Arkansas. To this union seven children were born: Jennie Wright, of El Paso, Texas; Charles of Camp Travis, San Antonio, Texas; Dean somewhere in France; Frank, Howard, Ruth and Veda of Paris, Texas. Besides his wife and children, he leaves to mourn his death an aged mother, 4 sisters, Mrs. C. W. Kennedy, Mrs. J. P. Wilson, Mrs. A. F. Johnson, and Mrs. J. A. Hurst, 1 brother, F. A. Fuller, a host of nieces and nephews and friends.

Mr. and Mrs. W. Rinck, Harry and Ivan Fuller, departed Monday to attend the funeral.

MISS MARY DUNHAM
25 July 1918

Miss Mary Dunham died at the home of her niece, Mrs. T. M. Hanrahan, in this city Monday night, July 22, 1918. She was in the 87th year of her age.

She is survived by one sister, Miss Nancy Dunham and her niece, Mrs. Hanrahan, and the following nephews: J. R. Dunham, Isaac and Francis Dunham. Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at Edgar Springs.

MRS. JANE GREGG
8 Aug 1918

Mrs. Bardsley, of St. Louis, came out this week to attend the funeral of her mother, Mrs. Jane Gregg, of Norman. Her sister, Miss Belle Gregg accompanied her home.

CHARLES FREDERICK SEASE
8 Aug 1918

Charles Frederick Sease, who had been suffering from Brights disease, answered the summons of the death messenger at about noon last Tuesday, July 30, at his beautiful home in this city.

Mr. Sease as practically all our readers know, was one of our best citizens-a genial, whole-souled man, who always stood out strongly for the best interests of this community, and was in the forefront of every progressive movement. His departure is the taking out of a substantial cog of the wheel of community progress-a great net loss to Dixon and vicinity.

Mr. Sease was born December 28, 1867, being 50 years, 7 months and 2 days old.

In compliance with his repeated request, Mr. Sease’s body was cremated.

Funeral services were conducted from the residence at three o’clock Thursday afternoon by Rev. H. W. Bostwick. The large concourse of sorrowing relatives and friends, a number of whom came from a distance, and the great profusion of beautiful flowers was mute testimony of the high esteem in which our deceased townsman was held.

At the close of the service at the home the members of the Masonic Lodge, of which Mr. Sease was an honored member, took charge and conducted the burial service under the rites of Free Masonry, interment being in the Dixon cemetery.

The above was taken from the Dixon Pilot of August 1, 1918.

Mr. Sease was well known in Rolla, and many friends here mourn his loss. He was a brother of August Sease and Mrs. Caroline Strobach, of this city.

MICHAEL SULLIVAN
8 August 1918

Michael Sullivan, for years an engineer on the Frisco Railroad, died at a hospital in St. Louis Saturday. His remains were brought to his home at Newburg Sunday and on Monday funeral services were held at the Catholic Church in Rolla, Rev. Father Lynch officiating. Following the services at the church his remains were taken to Rolla cemetery for interment. “Mike” as he was familiarly known, has been in poor health for the past year. He had many friends who mourn his loss. He is survived by two sisters: Mrs. M. A. Hutcheson, of Newburg; and Mrs. Morris Moore of Valley Park, both of whom, together with Mr. and Mrs. S. O. Manning and Mr. and Mrs. O. L. Bear, Mrs. Walter Boyd and Pat Lyons, of Springfield; Mr. and Mrs. Joe Hynes, Mr. Corrigan, Mrs. Will Donahoe and Will Robineau, of St. Louis, and Miss Annie Hutcheson, of Newburg, also Mrs. Amanda Rogers, Mrs. Jordan, Mrs. P. D. Hawkins, Mrs. R. E. Breuer, and Miss Ruth Todd, were present at the funeral.

MRS. P. H. DICKERSON
15 Aug 1918

Mrs. P. H. Dickerson died at the home of her son, Robert Dickerson, in Salem, Mo., Thursday, August 8th, 1918. Her remains were brought to Rolla Saturday afternoon and buried by the side of her husband at Rolla cemetery. Rev. A. P. Vaughan pastor of the Presbyterian Church, of Salem, conducted the services.

Mrs. Dickerson formerly lived at Rolla, when her husband had charge of the Baltimore Hotel. After his death she returned to Salem and made her home with her son.

Mrs. Dickerson is survived by her son, Robert B. Dickerson, of Salem and daughter, Mrs. Joseph Morris, of St. Louis. Mrs. Morris was unable to attend the funeral, Mrs. Dickerson is also survived by four sisters, three of whom attended the funeral, Mrs. Dunnigan and Mrs. Willis, of Joplin, and Mrs. Clifford, of St. Louis. Mr. Clifford was also present, as was also Mrs. W. W. Young, a niece, and her husband and son, Jack Young.

MRS. B. N. HUDGENS
15 August 1918

The Phelps County Record of last week contained the following item:
Mrs. B. N. Hudgens, who went to St. Louis hospital a few days ago to undergo an operation for a tumorous growth in her side, failed to rally from the effects of the ordeal and died Tuesday afternoon. The body was brought to Newburg Wednesday and the funeral will be held Friday.”

E. S. BRAMEL
22 Aug 1918
Phelps County Record
E. S. Bramel died at his home in Newburg at two o’clock this (Thursday) morning, after an illness of over two months. His passing away did not come unexpectedly to his family, as his death had been expected momentarily, almost, for the past month.

Mr. Bramel was the manager of the Newburg telephone system, and the electric plant, and was looked upon as one of our little city’s most progressive citizens.

ED CRUTS
29 Aug 1918

Ed Cruts, of near Cadmus, in Maries county, died at his home early Saturday morning, August 24, 1918, as a result of injuries received by being thrown from a young horse the day before. It was breaking when it threw him. His foot hung in the stirrup, and he was dragged about 50 yards before being released.

Mr. Cruts is survived by his wife and two children. He is also survived by his parents, Chas. Cruts and wife, and several brothers and sisters.

Funeral services were held Sunday and interment took place at the Tennyson grave yard.

HENRY WAGNER
29 Aug 1918

Henry Wagner died at his home in Salem, Mo., last Saturday, August 24th, 1918, in the 40th year of his age.

Mr. Wagner was born March 1st, 1829, near Basil, Switzerland, about 35 miles from the Rhine. He came to America and located in St. Louis in 1844. He removed to Highland, Ill., the same year, and resided there until 1861, when he came to Missouri and enlisted on July 1st 1861, in Co. D, First Missouri Cavalry, and served three years during the Civil War. He was in the battles of Pea Ridge and Prairie Grove, and also many other battles. After the war was over he again enlisted on Feb. 9th, 1865, in Co. A, 2d Regiment of United States Veterans Volunteers, and served for one year, being discharged Feb. 8, 1866, at Hartford, Conn. In 1873 he moved to Phelps county, Mo., and resided here after that until about three years ago, when he moved with his family to Salem, Mo.

Mr. Wagner is survived by two sons and three daughters, Fritz Wagner and Mrs. B. F. Culbertson, of Rolla, Edward Wagner, of St. Louis, and Lola and Stella Wagner, of Salem, Mo.

Funeral services were conducted at Salem Wednesday and his remains were laid to rest in Salem cemetery. Those attending the funeral from Rolla were Mrs. B. F. Culbertson, and Miss Carrie Wagner.

MRS. JENNIE HAPPEL
5 Sep 1918

Mrs. Jennie Happel died at her home near Seaton, in this county, on Monday night, Sept. 2nd, 1918. She was about 75 years old. Her husband Peter Happel, preceded her to the grave about twenty years ago.

"Aunt Jennie" as she was known is survived by her seven children and many friends. She was a good Christian character.

Funeral services were held Wednesday, and interment took place at the Morrison cemetery.

HENRY BLACK
19 Sep 1918

Mr. Henry Black died at his home in Greenwood, St. Louis, on Sunday Sept. 8. Funeral services were held the following Tuesday and interment took place at Kirkwood cemetery. Mr. Black is survived by his wife and three daughters, Misses Cora, Amy and Mary Black, and son, Samuel Black, who is now in France.

Mr. Black is also survived by his sisters, Misses Margaret and Laura Black and Mrs. W. W. Southgate, and Thomas Black of Montezuma, Colo.. The funeral was attended by Robt. Black and Mr. and Mrs. B. H. Rucker.

WM. C. SIMPSON
26 Sep 1918

St. James, Mo., September 26.-
Wm. C. Simpson died at the Soldier’s Home here last night, aged 108 years. He served with Abraham Lincoln’s company during the Black Hawk war, served during the Mexican war in the Third Illinois Infantry, and was mustered out at New Orleans. He was born in Bucks county, Pennsylvania and had been an inmate of the home for fourteen years. He leaves no known relatives.

MRS. ANNA CARRIGAN
26 Sep 1918

Mrs. Anna Carrigan, widow of Patrick Carrigan, of old Knobview, in Crawford County, just over the line of Phelps county, who died 18 years ago, departed this life at the Sister’s Hospital in Bellville, Ill., last Thursday, in her 83rd year. Burial was in the Catholic cemetery at St. James, Mo., Saturday, after services in the St. James Catholic Church. In the absence of Father Leone, Solemn Requiem Mass was sung by Father Lynch. Father O’Loughlin assisted the choir, and read prayers at the grave side, as he had known the family nearly 40 years. Nine children of the pioneer couple are living, and all except one, were present. They are: Frank, John, Tom, Charlie, and Matt. Carrigan, all Frisco R.R. men, four being conductors; and Mrs. Beckham, Mrs. Roach, Mrs. Lynch and Mrs. Jason. A large number were present, and deep sympathy was shown. R. L. P.

J. M. COLLIFLOWER
26 Sep 1918

The Standard, published at La Grange, Ind., in its issue of Sept. 20, 1918, contained an account of the death of J. H. Colliflower, which occurred at his home at Sturgis, Mich., Friday, Sept. 18, 1918. He was in his 67th year.

Mr. Colliflower conducted a tailoring business in Rolla several years ago.

MRS. LYDIA GUFFEY
3 Oct 1918

Mrs. Lydia Guffey died in St. Louis, on Sept. 25th, 1918. Her remains were brought to Rolla and conveyed to Macedonia, where Rev. C. L. Parker, of the Rolla Union Mission, conducted funeral services, and interment took place at the Macedonia cemetery. The deceased is survived by her husband and two children. Also her father, five sisters, and three brothers survive.

VIRGIL ROBERTS
3 Oct 1918

Virgil Roberts, who was enlisted in the U. S. Navy, died in Boston, Mass. last week. His remains were brought to Rolla, arriving here Friday afternoon, at which time funeral services were conducted by Rev. A. Ross Miller, and interment took place at Rolla cemetery. The Rolla Home Guards officiated as an escort to the remains and accompanied same to the cemetery.

Virgil Roberts was the son of J. W. Roberts, of Osceola, Mo., and a nephew of Mrs. Felix Petraglio, of Rolla. He was a grandson of Hon. P. C. Roberts, who was a representative from Phelps County back in the 80s.

Besides his father the deceased is survived by his brothers, Tom and Harry Roberts, and a sister, Mrs. Robertson and Miss Grace Roberts.

ALEXANDER PETERSON
3 Oct 1918

Alexander Peterson died at the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers at Danville, Ill., Saturday, Sept. 28, 1918.

Mr. Peterson was born at Springfield, Ohio, March 29, 1832, making him at the time of his death in the 87th year of his age. He served four years in the Civil War. After that he and his family moved to Phelps County, and here he has made his home until the last year, when he entered the home at Danville, Ill. His wife preceded him to the grave twenty-six years ago. He is survived by seven children: Will and Andrew, of St. Louis; Harry Peterson, of Springfield, Mo.; Robert Peterson, of Joplin, Mo.; Alfred Peterson, of Coffeyville, Kansas; Chas. Peterson, of Rolla; and Mrs. Jos. Plasket, of Indianapolis, Ind.

Harry and Robert and Andrew Peterson and wife, and Chas. Peterson and family were the only members of the family present at the funeral.

Mr. Peterson’s remains were brought to Rolla, arriving here Sunday afternoon. Funeral services were conducted from the residence of Chas. Peterson by Rev. C. L. Parker, of the Union Mission and interment took place Monday at Rolla cemetery.

MRS. EVA DAWSON
10 Oct 1918

Mrs. Eva Dawson, beloved wife of Ed Dawson, died in Oklahoma September 23rd, 1918. She was 23 years old. Mrs. Dawson is survived by her husband and one child. Also her father and mother, four sisters and one brother survives.

Her remains were brought to Rolla and conveyed to Smith’s cemetery near Edgar Springs, where funeral services were conducted by Rev. C. L. Parker, of the Rolla Union Mission.

MISS LOU ALLIE CARNEY
10 Oct 1918

Miss Lou Allie Edna Carney died at the home of her parents, W. F. Carney and wife, north of Rolla, on Monday, October 7, 1918. She was in the 23rd year of her age. She had been a sufferer for some time.

Funeral services were conducted by Rev. C. S. Hanby, of the Rolla Methodist Church at the Spring Creek Church, and interment took place in the church cemetery.

JOHN A. TILLOTT
10 Oct 1918

John A. Tillott died at St. Anthony’s Hospital in St. Louis Wednesday morning, Oct. 2, 1918. Mr. Tillott was taken to St. Louis on Tuesday and was operated on for appendicitis that evening. He rallied from the operation, but on Wednesday morning he succumbed. He was the son of John Tillott and wife of near Lecoma. He was about twenty-five years old. Mr. Tillott was united in marriage with Miss Schmiedede, who with one child survive.

His remains were brought to Rolla Thursday afternoon and taken to his home near Lecoma. Funeral services were held on Friday and interment took place at the Rhea cemetery.

CADET ROY R. SMITH
17 Oct 1918

Buckeye Valley News
The funeral services of Roy Rothwell Smith, son of Rev. and Mrs. T. M. Smith, recently pastor of the Baptist Church at Palo Verde, but now of Chandler, was held in Phoenix Tuesday afternoon, September 21st. The attendance was said by some to be the largest they had ever seen in the west.

The young man was killed in an airplane accident at Kelly Field No. 2, San Antonio, Texas, September 10th, while performing training duties in the air.

After having successfully performed several difficult feats in what is called Immelman turns, sometimes called kickbacks or dodging turns, something seemed to go wrong with the machine. He had just reached the end of his sector, and was banking the machine so as to turn back on his course when it refused to go upward, but began to nose dip, and developed a tail spin.

Downward from an altitude of 3500 feet dropped the plane. Thirteen times Roy attempted to turn the machine upward or for a glide onward, but without success. It quickly crashed to the earth at an angle nose downward.

Roy was pinned in the wreckage. Some part of the machine struck him on the left temple, fracturing the skull and rendering him instantly unconscious. Observers had seen the young aviator falling, and an ambulance was on the spot, where the plane fell almost by the time it struck the earth, and took the wounded boy to the hospital, where an operation was performed to relieve the brain pressure, but hemorrhage had started in the brain, and it was seen that he could not now recover. The accident occurred at 12:45 p.m. and life passed out at 9:05 p.m. the same day.

Roy’s parents were wired at once when the accident occurred, and they took a train as soon as possible for San Antonio, hoping to reach their wounded son before his death, but they were intercepted by a message at Maricopa stating that he was dead.

They wired the body to be shipped to Phoenix for burial and returned to prepare for the funeral service and mourn the loss of a precious son, on whom they had doted twenty-three years of affection and preparation for life’s work. But Roy Smith was a good Christian boy, and prepared to die, a great consolation to his parents and friends. He gave his life for his country; who could give more.

The body was thoroughly embalmed by the Government, and prepared for burial. It was shipped to Phoenix with an attendant comrade who saw him fall, and who had been his college mate. On arriving at Phoenix Sunday morning the body was conveyed to Moore & McMillan undertaking parlors and held until Tuesday, for the arrival of Miss Ethel McFarlane, of Crocker, Mo., to whom he was engaged to be married, and who had been his faithful fiance for several years.

The funeral services were held at the First Baptist Church of Phoenix, conducted by the Pastor Dr. Geo. M. Lehigh, together with several ministerial friends of Pastor Smith. It was a most beautiful and impressive service. The floral offerings were elaborate. One piece, a shield, with U. S. A., and the aviator’s emblem of wings in white, was the gift of Roy’s comrades at Kelly Field. Another large one, that of a flag of flowers encircled by a field of green, was an expression of friendship to the family by the Palo Verde Baptist Church and Improvement Club. Another a pillow design with the name “Roy” by the parents. There was a lovely one made with native flowers and foliage from the Chandler Church. There were others too numerous to mention. Also a large flag by the Government draped the casket.

The burial was a beautiful lot in Greenwood cemetery. A large number of friends from Palo Verde and Chandler were in attendance. Cadet Milo Overless, a college mate of Roy was sent with the body by the government as attendant, and remained until after the services. Members of the Phoenix Home Guard acted as pall bearers and military attendant.

Thus ended the life and career of one who sacrificed himself for his country and liberty for the world.

JOSEPH L. KELLY
17 Oct 1918

Joseph L. Kelly, one of Rolla’s oldest citizens, died at his home in this city Friday, Oct. 11, 1918, age 76 years, 6 months and 5 days.

Mr. Kelly was born at Jonesboro, Ark. He afterwards moved to Missouri. When the Civil War came on he enlisted in the 32nd Regiment, Missouri Infantry Volunteers in 1862. He served until September 1st, 1864, at which time he received a gunshot wound through the left lung at Jonesboro, Georgia. In the Company with him were the late Gov. A. J. Seay, Judge C. C. Bland and James M. Hoggett. Mr. Kelly held the rank of Sergeant of this Company.

In 1861 Mr. Kelly united in marriage with Miss Martha J. Dykes, of Rolla and here they have made their home ever since. Twelve children were born, four of whom with their mother survival. They are: W. I. Kelly, Mrs. Mary A. Jett, Mrs. W. F. Dykes, of Rolla and Jos. E. Kelly of Benonine, Texas, all of whom were present except the last named son who could not get here. Mr. Kelly was a member of the Methodist Church. He was a good business man, and strictly honest in all of his dealings.

Funeral services were held Saturday afternoon by Rev. C. S. Hanby, and interment took place at the Rolla cemetery.

LIEUT. NIORMAN L. OHNSORG
17 Oct 1918

News was received in Rolla that Norman L. Ohnsorg had died at Nashville, Tenn., Oct. 11, 1918. He was a First Lieutenant of the Ordnance Department of the U. S. Government.

Norman Ohnsorg was a son of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Ohnsorg, who resided in Rolla a number of years, but who now reside in St. Louis. He attended the School of Mines, and graduated as a Mining Engineer in the class of 1910. He was a member of Rolla Lodge of Masons.

His remains were brought to DeSoto, Mo., for interment. The funeral services were in charge of the Masonic order.

JOSEPH AARON
17 Oct 1918

In the death of Joseph Aaron which occurred at his home about three miles and a half west of Rolla on Wednesday, October 9th, 1918, one of Phelps County’s oldest citizens has passed away.

Joseph Aaron was born February 9, 1838, in Boone County, Kentucky, making him at the time of his death 80 years and 8 months old. He was united in marriage with Miss Mary Jarrett, and to this union seven children were born, three of whom survive. They are: J. D. Aaron of Dixon, Mo., Wm. Aaron, of Patmos, Ark., and Mrs. J. P. Turner, west of Rolla. His wife died many years ago. About ten years ago Mr. Aaron united in marriage a second time, this time to Mrs. Amelia Mitchell, of Rolla, who survives him.

Mr. Aaron had lived for over fifty years at the place he died. He served as a Federal Home Guard during the Civil War, under Gen. Franz Sigel. For years “Uncle Joe” was a familiar figure around Rolla. He was a staunch democrat, and took a great interest in public affairs. For the past six years he has been in very poor health, during which time he has been confined to his home.

ROBERT R. DICKERSON
24 Oct 1918

Robert R. Dickerson, of this city, received work last Thursday that his nephew, Robert R. Dickerson, Jr., son of John Dickerson and wife, had died of influenza at an army camp in St. Louis that day. The remains of the young man were taken to his home at Tina, Mo., for interment.

CARL BONEBRAKE
24 Oct 1918

Carl Bonebrake, who left here with Young McNeill for Starkville, Miss., September 17, to enter the University in Uncle Sam’s service, died in that city yesterday of influenza and pneumonia.--Salem Monitor, October 10, 1918

The remains of Carl Bonebrake were brought to Rolla last Friday. He was a son of Oscar Bonebrake, of near Lecoma. Interment took place at Lenox.

PROF. CHARLES E. RODGERS
24 Oct 1918

Prof. Charles E. Rodgers was a victim of the influenza epidemic. As a result of this malady, which merged into pneumonia. Prof. Rodgers died at his home in this city Friday evening. He is survived by his wife.

Charles Elmer Rodgers was born in Des Moines, Iowa, forty years ago. He came to Missouri twenty-five years ago, and engaged in the mining business in the Joplin district. He united in marriage with Miss Alice Moffett, of Seneca, Mo. Mr. Rodgers was a very successful mining man, and was regarded as an expert ground man in mining.

When the School of Mines was taken over last June by the U. S. Government to train men in mining, trench digging and explosives for war work, Mr. Rodgers, on account of his expert knowledge in this line, was called here from his home in Webb City to give instruction in this particular line. His services were highly satisfactory, and he was held in high regard by all who knew him. His is the only death in connection with the School of Mines resulting from the influenza epidemic.

Mr. Rodgers was a member of the Knights and Ladies of Security, and a prominent member of the Brotherhood of Elks. Besides his wife he is survived by his father, a Civil War veteran, now in the Federal Soldiers Home in Kansas, and two brothers and two sisters. A brother-in-law, Mr. R. G. Kirwan, of Webb City, arrived in Rolla Friday, and was here during the last hours of the deceased.

The remains were shipped to Webb City Saturday night for interment.

JOHN WEIDEMAN
24 Oct 1918

The remains of John Weideman, a victim of influenza, were brought to Rolla last Wednesday, where funeral services were conducted from the undertaking parlors of H. R. McCaw by Rev. C. L. Parker, of the Union Mission, and interment took place at Rolla cemetery.

John Weideman was a son of Mr. and Mrs. George Weideman, of near Rolla. At the time of his death, which occurred on Sunday, Oct. 13, 1918, he was 21 years and 11 months old. He was at Camp Funston military training camp. He was a member of the 19th Company, 164th Depot Brigade. His remains were accompanied to Rolla by Sergeant W. W. Shores, of the regular army. Sergeant Shores reported that Private Weideman was an excellent soldier, and was always ready to perform any duty assigned to him. On arrival at Rolla the remains were met by the Home Guards, who also served as a military escort during the funeral service and burial.

LOLA WHITSON BROOKSHIRE
31 Oct 1918

Lola Whitson Brookshire was born in Kentucky Oct. 3, 1875, and died at her home in Beulah, Mo., Oct. 3, 1918, at the age of 43 years. Spanish influenza was the immediate cause of death. When Lola was a child the family came to Missouri, settling near Edgar Springs, at which place she spent the greater part of her girlhood. On December 25, 1894, she became united in marriage to Travis G. Brookshire. To this union four daughters were born. They are Virginia (now Mrs. Jos. Jaszorawski) Rachel, Lillian and Madge. Husband, children, four sisters and three brothers survive.

Such is the brief summary of a life. To the casual reader it is sufficient. But not to us who were the associates, friends and neighbors of Lola Brookshire.

Over our community a shadow hangs. A gaping vacancy is here. A sweet life has passed out. Only a memory remains to remind us of a dear neighbor, a good woman. Only yesterday, it seems, she was one of us, taking part in our little affairs: working, chatting, laughing with us...

ROYDEN PUGH RINKER
31 Oct. 1918

The Exponent, published at Culpepper, VA., in its issue of Oct. 17, 1918, contains an account of the death of Royden Pugh Rinker, who died in Baltimore, Maryland, on Oct. 8, 1918. Mrs. Rinker at the time was very ill.

Mr. and Mrs. Rinker resided in Rolla several years ago, at which time Mr. Rinker was an assistant geologist at the State Geological Survey. Besides his wife he is survived by his little son, Roy Rinker, Jr.

MRS. K. M. CORSE
31 Oct 1918

In a note from Mrs. J. G. Lewers she advises us that her sister-in-law, Mrs. K. M. Corse, died at her home in Oklahoma City, Okla., on Tuesday, Oct. 21, 1918.

Mrs. Corse was a victim of the influenza and was sick only four days. She was 27 years old. She is survived by her husband, Kenneth Corse and two little daughters, one 8 years old and the other 2 1/2 years old.

Kenneth Corse, who was a former Rolla boy has many friends here who sympathize with him in his breavement.

RICHARD KOCH
31 Oct 1918

Richard Koch died at his home in St. Louis Monday night. He was 26 years of age. He is the youngest son of Mrs. Julius Koch. He was born in Rolla. He is survived by his wife and two children, Richard and Maxine. His mother and two sisters, Mrs. D. W. Francis and Miss Blanch Koch, and two brothers, Julius and Eugene Koch, also survive.

His remains will be brought back to Rolla Friday, where funeral services will be conducted and interment will take place at Rolla cemetery.

MRS. HARDIN SANDS
31 Oct 1918

Mrs. Hardin Sands died at her home near Sands Friday, Oct. 25, 1918.

Mrs. Sands was formerly Miss Myrtle Wing. She was born in St. Louis Oct 5, 1898, making her at the time of her death 20 years and 20 days old. She came with her parents to Phelps county four years ago. On Dec. 24, 1917, she united in marriage with Mr. Sands. Besides her husband she is survived by her parents, a sister and a brother, and many friends who mourn her loss.

Funeral services were conducted by Rev. J. Alonzo Morse, pastor of the Rolla Baptist Church, Saturday afternoon, and interment took place at the cemetery near Sands.

WILLIAM ESTES HUME
7 Nov 1918

William Estes Hume was born near Mexico, Mo., Audrain county, January 17, 1860, and died at his home in Rolla, Mo., Friday, November 1, 1918. Age 58 years, 9 months and 14 days.

Mr. Hume’s death came as a great shock to the family, his being sick only a few hours. His death being due to neuralgia, which shifted to the heart causing death instantly.

On January 1, 1890 he was married to Susan Mahala Crumm. To this union were born six children, one son and five daughters: John Jackson, Margaret Nancy, Mary Katheryn, Will Emma, Mattie Lee, and Maude, who with their mother survive, and were present at the funeral.

He united with the Christian Church at Anutt, Mo., about 15 years ago; after moving to Rolla transferred his membership to the Rolla Christian Church. He was a great lover of the church, and his home. He was a member of the Modern Woodmen.

Funeral services were conducted by the Rev. Turner from the Methodist Church, Lake Springs, Mo., Sunday, Nov. 3rd, at 2 p.m. Interment in the Lake Springs cemetery.

The floral offerings were many and beautiful. He leaves to mourn his going, besides his wife and children, two sisters, Mrs. George See, of Portland, Oregon; and Mrs. G. D. Porter, of Illiad, Mont., and a host of relatives and friends.

MRS. MARY C. HOGAN
7 Nov 1918

The remains of Mrs. Mary C. Hogan were brought to Rolla from Mt. Vernon, Mo., Sunday, and buried beside her husband in Rolla cemetery.

Mrs. Hogan was born in Philadelphia. She came to Missouri in early childhood, and for several years was a resident of Rolla. For the past 22 years she has resided with her son at Mt. Vernon.

SAMUEL BRIDGEMAN ROWE
14 Nov 1918

Samuel Bridgeman Rowe was born in Ste. Genevieve county, Missouri, on the 13th day of August 1844. He was the son of William and Nancy Rowe, who were born at Cornwall, England. The deceased grew to manhood in his native county. Before he was twenty years old, to-wit: on August 4, 1864, he was enrolled in the military service of the United States and mustered in as a private in Company B, forty-seventy Missouri Volunteer Infantry. Shortly after enlistment he became a quarter-master sergeant and on Nov. 29th, 1864, he was commissioned as First Lieutenant and Regimental Quarter-master. He was in the battle of Pilot Knob, Missouri. He was mustered out of service with an honorable discharge on April 7, 1865. After the Civil War, Dr. Rowe took quite an interest in organizing the Grand Army of the Republic, and was an active member of Henry Wilson Post, G.A.R. of Rolla. He was commissioned by the National organization as an Aide-de-camp.

On his return to civil life Dr. Rowe engaged in the drug business, and conducted a drug store at DeSoto, Mo. In 1866, on March 15th, he united in marriage with Miss Mary CD. Hutchings, of Caledonia, Mo., and to this union four daughters were born: Mrs. M. F. Faulkner and Miss Roberta Rowe, Rolla, MO.; Mrs. Wallace Brennan and Mrs. Vital W. Garesche, St. Louis, all of whom, with their mother survive. Dr. Rowe is also survived by two grandchildren: Lt. Rowe A. Garesche, of the Aerial Observation Corps Hempstead, L. I., New York, and Mrs. Henry F. Bisbee, of Portsmouth, Va.

In 1875 Dr. Rowe sold his drug business at DeSoto, and he and his family moved to Rolla, where he bought and conducted a drug store. Later he attended the Missouri Medical College (now Washington University) in St. Louis, from which he graduated with the degree of M. D. in 1881. A few years later he took a post graduate course at this college. Since his graduation he has practiced his profession in Rolla, except for the years intervening between 1893 and 1900, when he and his family resided in St. Louis, where he owned and conducted a drug store, and practiced his profession. Upon returning to Rolla in 1900 he resumed his practice and continued same up to his death, which occurred at the Baptist Sanitarium in St. Louis Thursday, Nov. 7th, 1918, making him at the time of his death 74 years, 2 months and 25 days old.

Dr. Rowe was one of the sturdy and substantial citizens of Rolla. In religion he was a Methodist. In politics he was a Republican. In citizenship he was a gentleman of fine instincts, and stood for what he believed to be right. He was intensely honest, and scrupulous in all of his dealings. He was a Mason, and served as Worshipful Master of Rolla Lodge two terms, in 1878-79, and in 1881-82. He at one time was a Royal Arch Mason and served as High Priest of Rolla Chapter of Eastern Star.

Dr. Rowe was chairman of the Medical Advisory Board of Phelps County under the Selective Service law, and he was also Assistant Medical Examiner for the Phelps County. In this latter capacity he gave a great deal of his time. He took a deep interest in the war against Germany and followed it in detail every day.

Dr. Rowe’s remains were brought to Rolla last Thursday night, and were taken to his home. Funeral services were conducted at 1:30 Sunday afternoon from the Methodist Church by Rev. C. S. Hanby, assisted by Rev. L. C. Sappenfield. Following the service at the church the remains were taken in charge by Rolla Lodge of Masons, of which he was an old and faithful member, and with E. J. Koch...remains were laid to rest in Rolla cemetery.

The active pallbearers were: Edwin Long, J. G. Campbell, J. A. Spilman, B. H. Rucker, L. E. Garrett, Dr. E. W. Walker, Charles L. Woods, and S. M. Smith. The following were honorary pallbearers: Robert McCaw, William Heller, Chas. M. Knapp, W. J. Kilgore, R. R. Dickerson, P. H. McGregor, Geo. R. Dean, J. B. Scott, Dr. A. L. McRae, E. G. Harris, J. M. Williams, W. H. Ary, and Dr. A. B. Northern. The floral offerings were many and very beautiful. The church was unable to hold the large attendance and the funeral cortege was very long. In the death of Dr. Rowe Rolla has lost one of her most highly esteemed citizens.

There were present at the funeral all four daughters, Wallace W. Brennan, and Mrs. Mollie W. Huyette, of St. Louis.

WILLIAM PACE
14 Nov 1918

William Pace, for over 20 years a member of the St. Louis police force, died at his home in St. Louis Tuesday, Nov. 12, 1918

William Pace was the son of Mrs. Columbus Pace of this county. He united in marriage with Miss Minnie Hale, of near St. James, who with seven children survive. He is also survived by his sisters, Mrs. E. J. Ueltzen and Mrs. Stephen Dean, of this county, and Mrs. T. M. Smith, of Arizona.

Funeral services will be held at St. James this (Thursday) afternoon, under the auspices of St. James Lodge of Masons.

CLARENCE McD. MITCHELL
14 Nov 1918

Clarence McDonald Mitchell died Nov. 7, 1918, at Camp Taylor, Ky. He was a member of Battery C., 67th Field Artillery.

Don Mitchell, as he was usually called, was the son of Mr. and Mrs. G. E. Mitchell, of southeast of Rolla. He was born April 7th, 1900, making him 18 years and 7 months old. He enlisted in the service last June. He was a fine young man, and was very popular in this his home.

His remains, accompanied by Corporal Brunswick, arrived at Rolla last Friday. Funeral services were conducted Sunday afternoon by Rev. J. Ross Miller, of the Christian Church. The pallbearers were selected from the Rolla Home Guards. The deceased is survived by his parents, six brothers and two sisters and many friends who mourn his loss.

MISS MAE DULIN
14 Nov 1918

Miss Mae Dulin died at McLean’s Sanitarium in St. Louis Friday, Nov. 1, 1918. She was the only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. R. S. Dulin, of Portland, Oregon. Mrs. Dulin will be remembered by Rolla friends as Miss Minnie Goodman. Miss Dulin, who was about twenty years of age, had been taking treatment at the hospital, when she became the victim of influenza, which developed into pneumonia. The funeral was held in St. Louis on Wednesday. She was a cousin of Rex Faulkner and brothers and Frank Kauffman, of this city.

CHARLES T. STROBACH
21 Nov 1918

Charles Strobach is dead. After a lingering illness covering the past five years, which grew worse during the past year, he surrrendered to the grim monster Monday evening, Nov. 18th, 1918. He was 53 years, 7 months and 10 days old. We cannot refrain from mentioning at this point that in the death of Mr. Strobach, Rolla has lost one of the most active, engeretic and progressive citizens that Rolla ever had. He was one of our foremost citizens. Whatever we wish to point to with civic pride, whatever advancement the city has made during the past twenty years, will call to mind his work as Mayor, and his determination to push Rolla to the front. Whatever task he undertook, he put his heart into it, and with indomitable will forced success.

Charles Theodore Strobach was born in Rolla on the 8th day of April, 1865. Before he attained his majority he was bookkeeper for E. J. Morris, hardware dealer in this city. He later entered the U. S. Railway mail service, which vocation he followed for fourteen years. In about 1901 he and his brother, F. A. Strobach, took over their father’s business. They added to this by putting in a soft drink bottling works, and also added a coal and wood yard. A few years ago Mr. Strobach bought the interest of his brother, and at the time of his death he was sole owner of the business. And in his business career he was always strictly business.

On December 7th, 1887, Mr. Strobach was united in marriage with Miss Harriett Maupin of Union, Mo. To this union three children were born: two of whom, Sergeant Richard M. Strobach, of the Quartermaster Corps, American Expeditionary Forces in France, and Mrs. Rulif M. Martin, of this city, with their mother survive. He is also survived by his sisters, Mrs. J. M. Diehl and Mrs. Minna Welch, of Rolla, and Mrs. John C. Cox, of Miami, Oklahoma, and brothers, Oscar G. Strobach, of St Louis, and Ferdinand A. Strobach, of Rolla, all of whom are present to attend his funeral.

It was in his civic life that Chas. T. Strobach was best known. In about 1898 he was elected as Alderman from the First Ward in this city. In 1903 he was elected Mayor and served two terms and he was elected Mayor for the third term in 1909. When first elected Mayor he and the Board of Aldermen serving with him, at once began the ordering of better sidewalks and seeing to it that they were built. It was in this capacity as executive that he won the name of being a real Mayor. Many wholesome laws were enacted into the laws and ordinances of Rolla, and Mayor Strobach saw to it that they were obeyed and enforced. In 1909, just after the water and sewerage system had been installed, Mr. Strobach was re-elected Mayor and he helped in making up all the rates and too great pride in bringing the city water, light and power systems to their highest efficency. It was during this term as Mayor that the Pine Street paving was done.

His record as Mayor is not merely made in the proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, but every day many of the things that we are proud of in our city, many of the things that we point to with pride, as evidence of our being an up-to-date people, date back to the time when Mr. Strobach was Mayor.

Mr. Strobach was a member of the Episcopal Church, and for many years he has served upon the vestry of the church. He was a member of the Masonic bodies of this city, and also Eminent Commander of Rolla Commandery of Knights Templar. He was also a member of the 32d degree, Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite Masons and a member of Mystic Shrine. As a man he was honorable and fair in all his dealings to his friends he was loyal and true.

MRS. ANASTASIA SMITH
21 Nov 1918

Mrs. Anastasia Smith, relict of James L. Smith, passed away at her home in this city, Monday afternoon, November 18, 1918.

Mrs. Smith was formerly Miss Anastasia Rayle. She was born at Boonville, Mo., on July 11th, 1842, making her at the time of her death 76 years, 4 months, and 7 days old. On a visit to her sister, Mrs. Duncan, in Rolla in 1866 she met Mr. James L. Smith, who she afterwards married on November 20, 1867. To this union ten children were born of whom six sons survive. They are: William H. Smith, Baird, Texas; Joseph S., Bland, and Frank, of Rolla; Wes Smith of Houston, Mo.; and Allan Smith of Miami, Okla. All of them were present at her funeral. Mr. James L. Smith died in 1890.

The deceased is survived by fourteen grandchildren, also by three sisters: Mrs. Virginia Crockett of Price, Utah; Mrs. Martha Duncan of Seymour, Mo.; and Mrs. Mary Parker of Dill, Oklahoma.

Mrs. Smith was a faithful member of the Baptist Church. She was a devoted mother, and all of her children fairly worshipped her. Her hime life was ideal and she was loved by of her neighbors and a large circle of friends.

Funeral services were held from the Baptist Church by Rev. J. Alonzo Morse, Wednesday afternoon, after which Rolla Chapter of the Order of the Eastern Star, of which she was an old and faithful member, took charge and laid her remains to rest in Rolla cemetery, according to the ceremonies of that order.

WILLIAM WHITLEY
21 Nov 1918

William Whitley, a former resident of Rolla, MO., died at the home of his mother in Jacksonville, Fla., Nov 12, 1918. He has been in poor health for a number of years, but had been able to work in the ship yards during the past summer. About two weeks before his death his health began to fail, and he rapidly grew worse until the end came. He leaves a father, mother; two sisters and a brother, besides a host of friends to mourn his loss. He was a young man of kindly disposition, and had always lived a good life, and as the end approached he told his mother he was not afraid to go. He had many friends in Rolla, as well as in Jacksonville, who loved him, and who will be saddened by his early departure. He was a member of the Brotherhood of American Yeoman of Rolla, Mo. The funeral services were conducted at the home, and also at the chapel of W. C. Cooper, the Rev. C. B. Wetherell, pastor of the 23rd St. M. E. Church in Jacksonville, officiating. The floral offerings were beautiful. Interment was made in ...

GILMORE LIVESAY
28 Nov 1918

Gilmore Livesay died as a result of influenza at his home at Tulsa, Okla. last Saturday, Nov. 23, 1918. His remains were brought to Rolla, arriving here Monday morning, where funeral services were conducted by Rev. J. Ross Miller, of the Christian Church, assisted by Rev. C. S. Hanby, from the Methodist Church, and interment took place in the Livesay lot at Rolla cemetery.

Lewis Gilmore Livesay, son of the late Lewis A. Livesay and Mrs. Rose B. Livesay, was born in Rolla August 8th, 1889. He was educated and reared in this city. As a boy he at one time worked in the Herald office, and the writer is pleased to say that he was sober, industrious and conscientious. He was highly honorable and worthy of any and every trust. After graduating from the Rolla High School he held a clerkship under Hon. Robert Lamar, who was then congressman from this district. Upon his return from Washingtom he engaged in the real estate business at Houston, Mo., and later at Springfield. From Springfield he went to Tulsa, Okla. where he worked for a large law firm, and just a year ago he was admitted to the bar to practice law. We understand that he was beginning to make good headway in his profession.

When only 14 years old he united with the Christian Church, and we believe he has lived up to that faith. On December 21, 1913, he united in marriage with Miss Iva Gertrude Haston, of Springfield, Mo., who with a little son Richard Eugene, survive. He is also survived by his mother and one brother, Richard Livesay, of Denver, Colorado, and a sister, Mrs. H. M. Herndon, of Tulsa, Okla., all of whom were present at his funeral. Other relatives attending the funeral were Mr. H. M. Herndon, Tulsa, Okla.; Mrs. W. C. Burns and daughter, Mrs. W. H. Dickey, and Mrs. Perry Elder, of St. Louis; Mrs. M. E. Cavett, Carlinville, Ill.; Mrs. C. G. Ewers, Springfield, Mo.; Mrs. Hester Renick and son, Earl Renick and Mrs. H. J. Davidson, of Newburg; Mrs. Frank Christeson and Mrs. A. W. Buchard, of Waynesville.

MISS VERA E. CLARK
28 Nov 1918

Mr. and Mrs. Robert R. Dickerson received the sad intelligence Monday of the death of their niece, Miss Vera E. Clark, who died as a victim of influenza, followed by pneumonia, at her home at Victor, Colorado. The young lady was just eighteen years old. She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. F. Clark.

B. H. DOSENBACH
21 Nov 1918

News was received in Rolla Tuesday that B. H. Dosenbach, M.S.M. ‘10 had died that morning at Butte, Mont. Mr. Dosenbach was Metallurgical Engineer for the Butte and Superior Copper Co. He registered as a student at M.S.M. from St. Louis. His death resulted from an attack of influenza, followed by pneumonia.

CHARLES E. ARTHUR
5 Dec 1918

Saturday’s daily papers reported that Charles E. Arthur had been killed in action in France. Charles Arthur was the son of George Arthur and wife, of near Flat, in this county.

MISS LILLIAN CLARK
5 Dec 1918

A telegram was received by Geo. W. Clark last Thursday, Thanksgiving Day, announcing the death of his sister, Miss Lillian Clark, who died that day at Hutchison, Kansas. Miss Clark was en route from her home at Galesburg, Ill., to California, where she intended to spend the winter. She stopped off at Hutchison to visit relatives, when she was taken sick. Miss Clark has often visited her brother’s family in Rolla, and her many friends will read this sad news with sincere regret.

VIRGIL FAULKNER
12 Dec 1918

Virgil Faulkner was killed in action in France October 24th, 1918. A telegram was received from the War Department by Rex Faulkner last Friday night announcing this sad news. Virgil is the first and only Rolla boy to be reported as being killed to date. He left Rolla April 26th, 1918, for Camp Funston. After four weeks training he was sent across, arriving in England within seven weeks after he left Rolla. He was a member of Co. E, 354th Infantry, 89th Divison. Those who have been reading the accounts of the battle, have watched with deepest interest the fighting of the 89th Division, because most of the Missouri boys were members of this Divison. Its gallant and heroic service on the battle front will ever thrill the readers of American history with pride and patrotic fervor. It was in this Division that our young friend served, and all of us who knew him so well, know that he died facing the foe, and that he fulfilled his part nobly and anxiously for his home, his country and his God. Rolla citizens--all of Rolla--mourns his loss.

Virgil A. Faulkner was born in Rolla March 9th, 1896. He was the second son of Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Faulkner. His mother passed to the great beyond several years ago. He grew up and has always lived in Rolla. Before entering the service of his country he clerked in the drug store of his uncle, Millard F. Faulkner. He is survived by his brothers, Rex, Guy, and Neal Faulkner, of this city.

His remains lie buried in France. His life he sacrificed for the cause of humanity, and although three thousand miles of ocean lie between us and him, still will his memory be revered, and the people of this, his home town, bow their heads in mourning for his untimely but noble death.

EARL ALVIN HINES
12 Dec 1918

Earl Alvin Hines died in St. Louis December 5th, 1918, as a result of influenza. His remains were brought to Rolla last Saturday, where funeral services were conducted by Rev. C. F. Wilson, and interment took place at Rolla cemetery.

The deceased was the son of Mr. and Mrs. M. A. Hines, of near Dillon. The family moved to this county in February 1917. He graduated from Rolla High School last June. He is held in high regard by his many friends.

E. E. McCAIN
12 Dec 1918

The casualty list of Nov. 30 contained the name of Bugler Edgar E. McCain, ex-’18, of Monroe City, Mo. McCain attended M.S.M. for two years, and will be remembered by many for his sunny smile and congenial disposition. The casualty list stated that he died from wounds.

RAY STECK
19 Dec 1918

Ray Steck, 10 year old son of John Steck and wife, died at the home of his parents Tuesday, Dec. 17th, 1918. Funeral services were held from the home Wednesday afternoon, and interment took place at the Alverson cemetery.

MRS. JANIE LEWIS
19 Dec 1918

Mrs. Janie Lewis died in St. Louis last Friday, Dec. 13th, 1918. Her remains were brought to Rolla, where funeral services were conducted by Rev. C. L. Parker, of the Union Mission, on Sunday, and interment took place at Roach cemetery, west of Rolla. Mrs. Lewis was a daughter of Mrs. Frank Scott of this city, and many friends will mourn her loss.

MRS. GRANVILLE ALLEN
19 Dec 1918

Mrs. Granville Allen died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Warren Leach, near Centralia, Mo., on Saturday, December 14th, 1918. Her remains were taken to St. Louis, where funeral services were conducted and interment took place Monday afternoon. She was in the 84th year of her age.

For many years Mrs. Allen made her home in Rolla. She had a beautiful Christian character, and was loved and revered by a large circle of friends in this city. Her death is mourned by many. Her husband, Granville Allen, for years Circuit Clerk, County Collector and County Treasurer of this county, passed to the great beyond several years ago. She is survived by her daughter, Mrs. Warren Leach, of Centralia, Mo., and her son Charles L. Allen, Assistant Cashier of the Mechanics-American National Bank, of St. Louis.

Miss Mary Allen and Joseph H. Smith, of this city attended the funeral.

We are in receipt of the following contribution:
Mrs. Allen was born in Lewisburg, Penn., Sept. 2, 1835. Her father, Dr. Ludwig, was one of the founders of the University of Lewisburg, in 1843, now Bucknell University. In 1859 she came with her mother and brother to Missouri. In 1863, on Oct 6, she was united in marriage with Mr. Granville Allen, and at the time of his death, in 1912, they had been married 49 years. For two years they lived in St. Louis County. In 1865 they moved to Rolla, where they resided until Mr. Allen’s death, since which time she has made her home with her son, Chas. L. Allen, in St. Louis. She was a charter member of the Rolla Baptist Church. Her greatest happiness was doing something for others.

Dr. William C. Bitting, pastor of the Second Baptist Church, conducted the funeral service at the home of her son. Interment took place in the family lot at Valhalla cemetery.

MRS. HERBERT SLOAN
26 Dec 1918

Word was received in Rolla Tuesday noon announcing that Mrs. Herbert Sloan (nee Martha Singleton) had died that morning at her home in Kansas City.

Mrs. Sloan was the third daughter of Mrs. J. M. Singleton and the late Dr. J. M. Singleton, of Kansas City. She is survived by her husband and little son. Also her mother and two sisters, Mrs. Charles E. McRae and Miss Roby Singleton, of Kansas City, and Dr. J. M. Singleton, of New York, and Charles Singleton, with the army in France, survive.

The deceased was well known in Rolla. She was a most lovable character, and many friends mourn her loss.

K. C. FRASER
26 Dec 1918

Missouri Miner
Word has been received here that Keith Colt Fraser, M.S.M. ‘10 has died with the “flu.” He and his wife had gone to Iowa to spend the Thanksgiving holidays with his wife’s folks, and on their return to Oklahoma Mr. Fraser took sick and died.

While Fraser was here at school he was one of the best liked students, because he was foremost in all school activities. Upon graduation from M.S.M. he went to Bartlesville, Okla., and it was here that he became assistant superintendent of Bartlesville Zinc Co. His wife is a Rolla girl, formerly Miss Leona Garretson, and it is to her that the Miner and all of Fraser’s friends wish to express sympathy.

MRS. A. J. WEBBER
26 Dec 1918

The following appeared in the death notices of the St. Louis papers Sunday:
WEBBER--At her home, Galatia, Ill., Mrs. A. J. Webber, December 21, 1918, of heart diseqse, mother of Henry Webber, Mrs. Hary Burns, and our dear grandmother, and aunt of W. E. Webber, of St. Louis.

Funeral Monday, 1:30 p.m., Galatia, Ill.
Mrs. Webber was the daughter of John Webber and wife, the first settlers of Rolla. She was a child when Rolla was adopted as the county seat of Phelps county. Her home was here for years. She united in marriage with Mr. A. J. Webber, of Galatia, Ill. They were among the wealiest people of Galatia. Mr. Webber died several years ago. Mrs. Webber generally made a visit to Phelps county about every two or three years to visit her brother, A. F. Webber, who now resides near Newburg. She also visited other relatives in this county, and in and around Rolla.

EVERETTE M. JENKINS
26 Dec 1918

Word was received last week that Everette M. Jenkins was killed in action in France October 24. He was drafted during the summer from Cleveland, Mo. Private Jenkins is a brother of Mrs. Henry Burton, northeast of Rolla, and a nephew of Mrs. B. F. Carroll, east of Rolla. He leaves to mourn his loss, a father, mother, five brothers, two sisters, besides many uncles, aunts, cousins and friends.


Mary Hudson