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“HISTORY OF SALINE COUNTY MISSOURI”
Biographies

Arrow Rock Township
Pages 535 - 556 - 580
Submitted by Vicki Piper July 2004

Post Offices: Arrow Rock, Marshall, Napton
Please use your search and find for specific names

William T. Pattison, P. O., Arrow Rock. Son of Dr. John Pattison, who was a native of Ireland, and came to the United States and settled in Virginia at an early date; his mother was a native of New England. The subject of this sketch was born on New Year’s Day, 1822, in Fairfield county, Connecticut, at which place his parents were sojourning at that time. While he was yet an infant, his parents returned to Monroe county, in what is now West Virginia, and there he grew up, and was educated in the county schools, and at YaleCollege. At the age of twenty-three, Mr. Pattison, with a younger brother, established the first printing press in Monroe county, Virginia, and later the same couple founded at Omaha, the first newspaper ever published in Nebraska. On the 31st of October, 1849, he was married to Miss Nancy B. Clark of Monroe county, Virginia, and had six children – two of them now living, Mary S. and Henrietta V. In 1850, Mr. Pattison moved to this county, and taught the male and female seminary in Arrow Rock for two years. He then bought a farm on Blackwater, and tried farming – at the same time continued teaching – and continued both for about eight years. He then moved to Marshall, and was appointed postmaster to succeed Michael Flynn, and was also made a justice of the peace, which offices, as well as that of express agent, stage agent, and notary public, he held at one and the same time, and in addition carried on a book and news store. During the war, Mr. Keithly was elected county treasurer, and failed to give bond. The court appointed Mr. Pattison to fill the office, giving bond, which he did, and collected about $11,000 of revenue, when he discovered that his appointment was illegal, and resigned. In his settlement with the court there was a difference of ten cents, and that against himself. He then engaged in the grocery business, in what was then well known in Marshall as the old “gun-boat” house. He remained in Marshall until 1864, when the guerrillas and militia became so dangerous to non-combatants the he moved his family to Canada, and remained till the war ended, and then returned to Saline, and settled in Arrow Rock, where he now resides. He is a justice of the peace, and has been for seventeen years, and notary public for many years. In 1860, he took the United States census for Saline county. His pen was known in the old Marshall Democrat, and for the last seven or eight years has been connected with the Saline County Democrat. He is a well-known and witty writer, and was the author of certain famous articles in 1860, known as the “Book of Chronicles.” He is a public-spirited gentleman, and has done much to develop the mineral resources of Saline.Page 535-536

Judge Stephen M. Thompson, P. O., Arrow Rock. The subject of this sketch was born in Jefferson county, New York, June 3d, 1825, and is now in his fifty-sixth year. His father, Ichabod Thompson, and his mother Achsah, were natives of New York, and are both now dead. He was raised on his father’s farm, and was educated in the common schools and in the Clinton Seminary, Oneida county, N.Y. After he became of age, he engaged mostly in mechanical work and business. In 1867 he came west, and settled in Booneville, Mo., and lived there a short time, and then moved to Arrow Rock, in this county, where he settled permanently, and engaged in the milling business – operating a steam flouring mill, elevator, and saw mill. In 1870 he was elected one of the judges of the county court. He was a republican, but as he was never extreme, he joined the liberal wing in 1870, and was elected for six years. While on the bench he continued to prosecute his milling and elevator business, and does still. On the 6th of February, 1850, Judge Thompson was married to Miss Cyrene L. Norton, of Jefferson county, N. Y., and has three children – Alice M., Norton S., and Bertha C. Judge Thompson has closely identified himself with the interests of this county, and while on the bench his mechanical knowledge enabled him to save the county many hundreds of dollars. Page 536


Templeton C. McMahan, P. O., Arrow Rock. Was born in Cooper county, Mo., October 10, 1830. His father, Wm. C. McMahan, a native of Kentucky, came to Missouriin 1810, and settled on a farm in Cooper county, and was killed near Brownsville, in this county, by the Indians, and robbed of about $20,000.

   He was raised on a farm and educated in the neighborhood schools. In 1850 he entered the store of his uncle Jesse McMahan in Arrow Rock, and remained there as clerk for six years. For several years after this he was occupied in teaching school in this and Cooper counties.
     In April, 1858, he married Miss Sarah E. McJilton, of Arrow Rock and in 1864 his wife died, leaving three children, two now living: William E. and Nannie. In 1861 he engaged in the commission business in Arrow Rock, and continued it until 1865. He then went into the stove and tinware business with McGuffin, which they continued until 1872, when he returned to the commission business.
     On the 1st of September, 1870, he was married to Miss Annie M. Reid of Cooper county, (now principal of the McMahan Institute), and has two children by this marriage, Carl Templeton and Arter Reid. Mr. McMahan has lived many years in Arrow Rock, and is ranked among the most respectable citizens of the place. He was often arrested during the war by the soldiers on both sides, but was never taken from the county. He lost heavily by the war.  Pages 536-537


William M. Tyler, P. O., Arrow Rock.  Was born in Cooper county, Missouri, October 10, 1852. His father, Wm. D. Tyler, was a native of Virginia, but came to Missouriat an early day, and settled on a farm in Cooper county, where the subject of this sketch was raised, and educated in the country schools, and at Booneville. His mother was a native of Missouri. At the age of twenty-one he came to Arrow Rock, in this county, and engaged in the drug business, which he continued for several years, and then went into the grocery and produce business. Most of Mr. Tyler’s business life has so far been spent in Arrow Rock, where he had many friends and a lucrative trade, obtained by fair and honest dealing. On the 8th of October, 1879, he was united in marriage to Miss M. P. Reid, of Cooper county. He is justly ranked among the leading business men of Arrow Rock. Page 537


Samuel C. McClean, P. O., Arrow Rock. Was born in earborn county, Indiana, August 31, 1848. His father was a native of Kentucky, but moved to Indiana, and settled on a farm, where the subject of this sketch was born and raised to the age of sixteen. He then went to Owensville, Kentucky, and served an apprenticeship at the saddler trade, and then engaged in journey-work until 1871, when he left Kentucky and came to Missouri and located at Kirksville, in Adair county, and remained there seven years in the saddlery and harness business. In 1878 he left Kirksville and located in Arrow Rock, in this county, where he now is; and as he is the only saddler in Arrow Rock, he has a large trade, which he deserves, as he is a good workman, and deals honestly and squarely by his patrons. On the 8th of May, 1869, he was married to Miss Mary E. Richart, of Bath county, Kentucky, and has had five children, of whom only one, Charles Howe, is now living.  Page 537


Pleasant Davis, P. O., Arrow Rock.  Was born in Kentucky, March 18, 1816. When he was but three weeks old, his father came to Missouriand settled in Howard county. There he was raised, and received such education as the country schools afforded. His father was a native of Virginia, but came to Kentuckywhen thirty-two years of age, and married in that state. His parents both died in Howard county, where they lived for thirty years. Mr. Davis was engaged in farming until 1841. He then went to Caldwell county, Missouri, where he remained about 8 years, engaged in farming. When the war broke out, Mr. Davis entered the Confederate army under Gen. Sterling Price, and was in the battles of Wilson Creek. Pea Ridge, Carthage, Cane Creek and Little Rock. He was under Shelby for about two years, served throughout the war. After the war, in the spring of 1866, he came to Arrow Rock, where he has since been engaged in the livery business, and has a first-class business. At twenty-one years of age he married to Miss Berthilda Duncan, of Howard county, Missouri; has four children; Sarah L., Wade Hampton, Lena and Thomas. Page 537, 538


Andrew Brownlee, P. O., Arrow Rock. The subject of this sketch is a native of Augustacounty, Virginia, where he was born October 15, 1796. His father was a native of Pennsylvania, but moved at an early day to Virginia. In 1825, Mr. Brownlee moved to this county, where he worked at the carpenter’s trade a number of years. He had learned his trade in Virginia. He built the first house ever erected in Arrow Rock, a log house of two rooms – this was in the spring of 1830. In 1831 he purchases 160 acres of land, and in 1832 went to farming. He had lived on his farm, combining farming with his trade – his brother living with him, and running the farm. On the 9th of July 1829, Mr. Brownlee was married to Miss Betsey Hall of this county, and has had ten children, of whom six are living – Mary Jane (Fenwick), Eliza (Reynolds), Florence (Herndon) Darwin, Sarah, Justin (Jones). In 1874, Mrs. Brownlee died in Arrow Rock. Mr. Brownlee is one of the oldest citizens of Saline county and has the esteem of all who know him.  Page 538


Jacob Bingham, P. O., Arrow Rock. The subject of this sketch was born in Rockingham county, Virginia. February 20, 1820. His parents, John and Mary Bingham, were natives also of Rockingham county Virginia, and moved to Missouri in 1825, and settled in this county on the farm where Jacob now lives, adjoining the town of Arrow Rock, and where the old people lived until their deaths. His father died November 5, 1838, and his mother June 25, 1863. Mr. Bingham purchased the farm on the death of his parents, and has added to it 200 acres. The farm is an excellent one, finely improved, and very valuable. Mr. Bingham is one of the first settlers in this locality and has seen it advance from unclaimed wilderness until it has been made to blossom as the rose. His father, with Burton Lawless, donated the land on which Arrow Rock is built. He was but five years old when his father came to Missouri. He has been a successful farmer, as his farm improvements abundantly testify.  Page 538


James A West, P. O. Arrow Rock. The subject of this sketch is a native of Tennessee, where he was born, May 20, 1820. His parents, Jesse and Susan West, were natives of Virginia, moving to Tennesseeat an early day, and settled in the eastern part of the State. His mother still lives, and resides with him. In 1837 his parents moved to Missouri, and settled in this county, where he went to work on his father’s farm. He has worked hard during his life, and has made a competence, and is prepared to live easy the rest of his life. In 1849 he moved to Arrow Rock and located there, and engaged in the livery business, which he continued to conduct for twenty-five years, and for nine years had charge of the mail route from Booneville to Marshall – the chief route from the east. He is known throughout the county, and is esteemed as an honorable and upright man. In 1870 he bought the farm on which he now lives. Mr. West was married the 19th of November, 1844, to Miss Ellen Hukill, of this county, a native of Fayette county Kentucky. They have eight children: Jesse, Stephen G., Susan, James, John, Emma, Mitchell and Sallie. Pages 538-539


John B. Townsend, P. O., Arrow Rock. Mr. Townsend was born in Cooper county, Mo., February 20, 1821. His father moved from South Carolina to Kentuckyat an early day, and remained there about three years, and then moved to Cooper county, Mo., near the Saline county line. Here John B. was born and raised on the farm, and was educated in the neighborhood schools. In 1849 he moved to this county and settled on the farm where he now lives. Mr. Townsend married at the age of forty-five. On the 20th of September, 1866, he was united in marriage to Miss Eliza Dysart. They have five living children: Lena F., John E., Robert Lester, Susan P.,  Anna Louisa. Mr. Townsend is an old settler of Saline county, and a worth citizen, who pays his taxes, lives honorably, hurts nobody, and renders to every man his due.  Page 539


Jeremiah Johnson, P. O. Arrow Rock. The subject of this sketch was born in Howard county, Missouri, March 11, 1820, and there are few men living in Saline county who were born in Missouri, and are as old as he. His parents Dabney and Elizabeth Johnson, were natives of Virginia, and moved to Missouri in 1815, and settled in Howard county. His father was a soldier in the war of 1812, and died in 1835. His mother died in 1860, at a very advanced age. When Mr. Johnson was four years old his father moved to Jacksoncounty, and engaged in farming. He was raised there on the farm, and educated in the country schools. In 1837 he went to the Platte purchase, and lived in Platte county twenty-seven years, farming. In 1856-7 he went to Kansas, then returned to Platte. In 1865 he moved to Illinois, lived there two years, and then returned to Missouri, and settled in Saline county, near Arrow Rock, where he has since resided, engaged in farming, which he has followed all of this life, up to one year ago, when he moved to Arrow Rock, February, 1880, where he is now living. In 1839 Mr. Johnson was married to Miss Amanda Simpson, of Platte township, who was a native of Tennessee. They have had six children, of whom only two Dabney and Benton, are now living, and these two are twins. Mrs. Johnson died on the 27th of July 1880. Mr. Johnson is honored and respected by all who know him, and is marshal of the town of Arrow Rock. Page 539


William Davis, P. O., Marshall Was born in Augusta county, Virginia, May 21, 1821.When he was still quite young, his parents moved to Howard county, Missouri where he was raised and educated. At the age of 21, he studied law with Judge Napton, studying at home, and the judge examining him two or three times a week. At the age of 23 he was admitted to the bar in Marshall, and practiced his profession in this county for about five years. February 1, 1844,he was married to Miss Nancy H. Brown, daughter of Judge Bernis Brown. They had seven children, of whom six are living – Bernis B., Wycliff, Walton, Mrs. Mary J. Harvey, Mrs. Willie Odell, and Mrs. Lizzie M. Gregory.

William Davis and his wife were divorced in 1864, Mrs. Davis bringing the suit, habitual drunkenness being the alleged cause of action. Mrs. Davis and her children are living on a fine farm of 200 acres of choice land. Her father came to Missouri in 1828, and settled in Saline on what is now known as the E. W. Brown farm. He was a practical surveyor. For several years he was county surveyor, and laid off the town of Marshall. Page 539-540


N. H. Lewis, farmer, P. O. Napton. The subject of this sketch was born in Albemarlecounty, Virginia, in 1827, moved to Missouri, with his father’s family, in 1834, and was reared in Cooper county. In 1846 he enlisted in the 1st Missouri Mounted Volunteers, and under Col. Doniphan, accompanied the regiment to Chihuahua, and was engaged in the battles of Bracito and Sacramento, and assisted in taking the first piece of artillery captured at the Bracito. In the spring of 1849, Mr. Lewis went to California across the Plains, taking three months to make the trip. He mined for two years, and then returned home, and concluded to settle down. In the spring of 1852, he was married to Miss Lucy Thompson, of Cooper county, and lived in Cooper until the spring of 1860, when he moved to Saline. They have had four children, two of whom are living. When the war broke out Mr. Lewis was a constitutional Union man, and refused a colonel’s commission under Gen. Parsons, with whom he had formerly served in the Mexican war. The pressure of events was too much for him, however, and he started south with Robertson ‘s regiment of recruits, and was captured at Blackwater, imprisoned at St. Louis, and then at Alton, where the provost marshal took the oath for him (?) and he came home. Mr. Lewis is a member of the Baptist Church, of Arrow Rock and is a member of the Grange. Page 540


Dr. W. G. Fisher, physician and surgeon, P. O. Napton. Dr. Fisher was born at Napton, (then Jonesboro) in Saline county, February 10, 1845. His parents were from Virginia, and his father died of cholera in 1854, contracted while in St. Louis, purchasing machinery for a mill to be erected at Jonesboro. Dr. Fisher was educated at the Kemper high school, in Booneville, and graduated at the St. Louis Medical College, in 1866. Since then he has practiced his profession at Jonesboro (now Napton) in this county. He was married November 16, 1870, to Miss Mary Field, daughter of Col. Joseph Field, of this county. They have three children: William Field, Mabel Evangeline and Nadine, all living. Dr. Fisher is the only physician at Napton, and has a large and paying practice. Page 540-541 ( 14 )


Philip Leininger, farmer and blacksmith, P. O. Napton. Mr. Leninger was born in Landshutt, Germany, in the year 1836. Ran away from home and came to America in 1856, and in 1857 located at Jonesboro, Saline county, Missouri, where he has lived ever since, running the only blacksmith’s shop in Jonesboro (now Napton). In 1862, he and C. Q. Lewis, built at Jonesboro, a steam mill of two run of stone, and two carding machines, and also a saw-mill in connection, which they operated for seven years, when the whole was destroyed by fire. In December, 1861, being a southern man in sentiment, Mr. Leininger joined the Confederate recruits from Saline, under Robertson, and with them was captured at Blackwater, December 19, 1861, and was taken with the rest of the prisoners, first to St. Louis, then to the Alton penitentiary. In the spring of 1862 was released on oath, and returned home to Jonesboro. Mr. Leininger is an old bachelor, and by his own unaided efforts has made all he has – quite a large estate.  Page 541


   William H. Morris P. O. Napton.  Is a merchant, and owns the only store in the town of Jonesboro, and was born in Moniteau county, Missouriin 1851; lived there until 1864. Since then he has been engaged in farming and school teaching in this county, until a short time ago when he went into business in Jonesboro, with a good stock of general merchandise. In 1873, he married Miss Gertrude Springer, daughter of John Springer, of Pettis county, and has three children – Oliver L., Carrie M., and Mabel C. Mr. Morris is a member of the Zoar Baptist Church. He has only recently entered the mercantile business, but keeps a first-class country assortment.  Page 541


  George W. Gilmer, farmer, P. O., Marshall. Born in Greene county, Kentucky, April 23, 1832. He was about two years old when his father, John Gilmer, moved with his family to Saline county. He was raised on a farm, educated in the common schools. In 1850, he had a severe attack of the “gold fever,” which carried him off to California, where he remained for six months, meeting with success in mining. Returning home in 1861, he enlisted in the Confederate army, Gen. Price’s command, Capt. Brown’s company, Marmaduke’s regiment. In 1862, he was transferred to Gen. Armstrong’s command, east of the Mississippi river. He participated in the following battles: Booneville, Springfield, Wilson Creek, Carthage, Dry Wood, Lexington, Cove Creek, Pea Ridge, Corinth, Jackson, Bolivar, Holly Springs. Afterwards he was with Gen. Forrest when he engaged in the battle of Fort Pillow, where he was wounded in the leg with a minnie ball, which laid him up for six weeks. He was wounded the second time, in the shoulder, at a battle which occurred on the Mobile & Ohio railroad at Guntown. After this he was promoted to the rank of third lieutenant, in which capacity he served till the close of the war, coming home with a good record. In 1873, he bought the farm, of 120 acres, upon which he now resides. Page 541-542


Chas. H. Bradford, farmer and stock-raiser, P. O. Napton. Born in Arrow Rock, Saline county, June 13, 1845. He is the second child of C. M. Bradford. His early education was obtained in Arrow Rock. In 1858 he went to the St. Louis University, spending two years there. At St. John’s College, Fordham, Westchester county, N. Y., he spent two years, being obliged to leave the latter place on account of the sickness of his father. In 1863 he went to Poughkeepsie, N. Y., where he spent one year at the Mill. Institute, completing his education. Returning home, he settled upon a farm near Arrow Rock, where he resided for eleven years. In 1878 he removed to the farm where he now resides, situated eight miles west of Arrow Rock. His farm consists of 120 acres of very fine, tillable land. He was married to Susan L. Smith, daughter of Thos. Smith, a native of Cooper county. They have three children, two boys and a girl: Charlie E., Thomas G., and Helen L. Page 542


Samuel H. Kennedy, farmer and miller, P. O. Napton. Born in Davidson county, North Carolina, in September 4, 1828. His father, Bryson Kennedy, was a native of South Carolina. He married Lydia Teague, by whom he had seven children, five now living, all boys: A. J., Moses E., Joseph, Jacob and Samuel. Bryson came to Saline county in the fall of 1865 and died in July 1869. He was buried at Jonesboro. His wife died during the war and was buried in North Carolina. Samuel H., the second child, was educated at Salem, North Carolina, in the common schools and also at the high school. In 1850 he came to Lafayette county, Missouri, and settled at Lexington, where he engaged in milling. He did a flourishing business, his patronage extending within a radius of fifty miles. In February, 1852, he was married to Rebecca A. Wilburn, a native of Indiana, and a daughter of Philip Wilburn, Esq. They have eight children, five boys and three girls, all living: Alonzo, William, Samuel H., Jr., Stonewall, Leslie H., Emma Crutches, Kate Thorpe and Annie. His first wife died in March 1866, and was buried at Jonesboro. He afterward married Mrs. M. Hicks, widow of Dr. Hicks of Kentucky. They have two children, one boy and one girl; Percy and Mollie. In 1857 he moved to Saline county, where he was engaged in milling for three years. He afterwards turned his attention to farming and stock-raising, and has continued in the same business up to the present time. He is a member of the Baptist church, at Zoar.  Page 542


John S. Staples, P. O., Arrow Rock, stock raiser and farmer. Born in Henry county Virginia, December 4, 1828. At the age of eleven years, came to Saline county, Missouri, with his father, James Staples. He was educated in the commercial schools of said county. In 1861, he enlisted in the Confederate army, under Gen. Price, in Capt. Wm. Brown’s company, Col. Bob Woods’ regiment, Gen. Shelby’s division. He participated in the following battles: Booneville, Lexington, and Dry Wood. At the end of six months he came home. In 1864, he re-enlisted under Gen. Price, in Capt. Thos. Woodson’s company, Col. Bob Woods’ battalion, where he served until the end of the war. On the 31st of October, 1865, he was married to Martha C. Lakin, a native of Cooper county, and daughter of Thos. Lakin, who was killed by the militia. Their union was blessed with three children, two of whom are now living; Wm. C., and John Henry. He is the possessor of a fine farm of 200 acres, which was given him by his father, and upon which he has resided since 1866. Page 542-543


James K. Staples, farmer, P. O., Arrow Rock. Born in Cooper county, February 26, 1845. His uncle, James Staples, was a native of Virginia, and came to Missouriin 1839. In 1840, came to Saline county, where he entered the tract of land where he and his nephew now reside. James K.’s father, Joseph, was a native of Henry county, Virginia. He was married to Elizabeth A. Poindexter, December 21, 1825. They became the parents of seven children, six of whom are now living. He brought his family to Cooper county, Missouri, in 1835. Joseph Staples died May 28, 1859. His wife died February 27, 1863. Both lie buried in Cooper county. James K., the sixth child, was educated in the common schools of Cooper county. In October, 1864, he enlisted in the Confederate army under Gen. Price, Capt. Pool’s company. Afterward he was transferred to Capt. Woodson’s company, Gen. Shelby’s division, Col. Wood’s battalion. He served until the close of the war. November 12, 1867, he was married to his cousin, Ruth Staples, daughter of James Staples. They have two children, both living, Alonzo and James Joseph. In the year of his marriage he moved to Saline county, where he now resides. Page 543


James Thornton, farmer and stock-raiser, P. O., Arrow Rock. Born in Howard county, Missouri, March 13, 1827. His father, Peter Thornton, was born in Virginia, 1779. He married for his first wife Mary Miller, January 20, 1802, by whom he had five children, all deceased. He moved to Howard county, and married Elizabeth Snyder, September 16, 1824. They had one child James. Peter Thornton moved to Saline county in 1830, and settled on the farm where his son James now resides. His wife died July 6, 1857, and he followed her February 5, 1860. They are both buried on the home place. James the only child, was educated in the common schools of Saline county, He was first married to Amanda M. Bridgewater, November 21, 1844. They had five children, three of whom are now living, two boys and one girl: William D., Emma E. Crockett and James C. His first wife died May 26, 1863 and was buried in the family graveyard. He was married again August 1, 1865 to Eliza E. Talbott, daughter of Rev. N. M. Talbott. They have six children, all living, three boys and three girls: Susan J., Frances E., Nathaniel P., Luraney D., Edward F. and Henry B. He owns 300 acres of splendid land. Is engaged in farming and stock-raising. In 1864, he enlisted as private in the Confederate army, under Gen. Price, in Capt. Divers’ company, Col. Wood’s battalion, Gen. Shelby’s division. Was in the following battles: Lexington, Blues, Independence, Newtonia, and Little Osage, where Gen. Marmaduke was captured. In the battle of Independence he had a very narrow escape. He was ordered to dismount and advance ten paces to the front. His regiment was ordered to form on him. Just then the enemy made a flank movement, and his colonel ordered the regiment to retreat. Mr. Thornton, with two of his comrades, did not hear the order, and when the regiment fell back, they were left alone to receive the fire of 300 Federals. They, however, miraculously escaped without a scratch. In the fall of 1872, he was elected county assessor of Saline county. In 1874, he was re-elected, serving two terms with credit to himself and his county. He has been an honored member of the Baptist Church since the age of twelve years.  Page 543-544


Charles S. Fetters, coal miner, P. O. Arrow Rock. Born in Clinton county, Ohio. August 24, 1850. Came to Saline county in 1875. Was married to Martha Harrel, a native of Kentucky, in March 1878. He discovered the celebrated cannel coal on the farm of W. B. Sappington. It is a fine vein of nineteen feet in thickness. The bituminous coal underlying it is forty feet in depth. He is now working a bituminous vein in the north part of section 8, township 49, range 19, the thickness of which is about eight feet.  Page 544


Henry Crouch, brick mason and farmer, P. O., Arrow Rock.  Born in county of Kent, England, August 8, 1839. His father, Edward Crouch, was  was born in England, 1800. Was married to Jane Brisley. They had five children, three boys and two girls, all living: John, Henry, William, Annie, and Jane. Edward Crouch still lives in England. His wife died December 23, 1880, and was buried in the county of Kent. Henry the second son, was educated in the common schools. Was married to Mary A. Leach, a native of England, June 9, 1860. They have four children, all living, three girls and one boy; Agnes, Ellen, Edith, and Bernard. In 1871, May 15, he landed at New York. He came to Saline City, Saline county, Missouri, July 12th, 1871, where he followed his trade for two years. In 1879 he bought the farm where he now resides, ten miles east of Marshall. He is energetic and industrious, and is gradually accumulating a handsome property. Page 544-545


Edwin Crockett, P. O., Marshall. Born in Rockland, Maine, February 20, 1829. His father, James Crockett, was born in Maine, April 9, 1798. On the 10th of January, 1822, he was married to Mary Haskell, a daughter of an old revolutionary soldier. They had eleven children, six of whom are now living, four girls and two boys. Edwin, Edward, Annie, Amanda, Celia, Marian E. About the year 1831, James Crockett moved with this family to Seneca county, Ohio, where he died in the autumn of 1873. His wife died in the spring of the same year. Both lie buried in said county. During his early life, he followed the sea. While living in Ohio, he engaged in agricultural pursuits. Edwin Crockett, the fifth child, was raised on a farm. During youth, he attended the common schools. At an early age he graduated at an academy in the town of Republic, Thomas Harvey, principal. At the age of 23, he had a severe attack of the “gold fever,” which carried him off to California, overland route, where he remained six years, engaged in mining. While here he was moderately successful. From here he went to Frazer river, Dominion of Canada, where he remained two years mining. Next we find him on the border, mining and trading during one summer. From here he went to Washington territory, where he lived for six months during the winter of 1860-61, engaged in splitting rails. He next went to Idaho, being among the first to enter that territory. With four others, he invested $7,000 in a mine, which yielded them $23,000, a handsome profit. He then went back to Ohio. On the 26th of May, 1862, he was married to Miss Jessie, daughter of Thomas Reed, a Scotchman, from the county of Ayr. They have a family of seven children, all living, five boys and two girls: Thomas, Josiah, James, Edward, Charles, Marion and Mary. In 1863, he volunteered as a private in company G, 65th New York infantry. He was engaged in the following battles: Wilderness, in the eight days’ fight, beginning there and ending at Spottsylvania; Cold Harbor, Petersburg. Washington, Shenandoah Valley. He was wounded at Cedar creek, and was taken to the hospital at York, where he remained six months. He returned to the service in time to engage in the battle of Richmond, after which he returned home. He lived in Henry county, Ohio, engaged in farming, until February 1880, when he moved to Saline county, Missouri, and settled on the farm where he now resides, nine miles east of Marshall, on the Arrow Rock road. His farm consists of 226 acres of very fine land. Page 545


Elihu Green, farmer, P. O. Marshall. Born in Howard county, Missouri, September 16, 1828. His father, Samuel H., was a native of Estelle county, Kentucky, born in 1797. He married Elizabeth McKinney, by whom he had ten children, eight of whom are now living. He came to Saline county at an early day, and settled on a tract of land about one and one-fourth miles west of Arrow Rock, now known as the “Green farm.” He died in 1871 and was buried at the Arrow Rock cemetery. His wife is still living. Elihu, the second son, was educated in Saline county at the public schools. In 1849 he was married to Emily C. Rumins. They became parents of ten children, nine of whom are now living six sons and three daughters: John H., Samuel H., Stephen E., Elihu H., Abram E., Thomas W., Susan Elizabeth, Wilmoth Ann, Elna J. His wife died in 1877 and was buried at Napton. In 1851 he purchased a farm lying about eight miles west of Arrow Rock, and consisting of eighty acres of very fine farming land, which by prudence and good management he has since increased to 103. In 1862 he enlisted in Captain Bingham’s company, Seventy-first regiment, E. M. M. In 1864 he was discharged on account of disability. Page 545-546


Cyrus A. Kirtley, farmer and justice of the peace, P. O., Marshall. Born in Livingstoncounty, Missouri, August 22, 1841. His father, Asa F., was a native of Kentucky. Came to Saline county in 1839. In 1840 he moved to Livingstoncounty, where he remained until 1867, moving there to Lafayettecounty. His first wife was Miss Mary B. Rogers, by whom he had eight sons, six now living. His wife died February 24, 1854. In 1857 he married Mrs. M. Herndon, by whom he had three children, two of whom are living. C. A. Kirtley, the fourth child by his father’s first wife, completed his education at Carrollton Seminary, in 1858. In 1861 he came to Saline county. May 28th, he enlisted in Captain Crew’s company, Missouri State Guard. While in this service he was in the following battles: Booneville, Carthage, Wilson Creek, Dry Wood and Lexington. In November he enlisted for three years or the war. He entered Captain G. R. Kirtley’s company, Jo Shelby’s regiment, under Gen. Marmaduke. He participated in all of the battles in which his command was engaged. He was wounded twice and captured at Linn Prairie. He killed his guard with a secreted derringer and succeeded in making his escape. At the close of the war he returned to Saline county. October 24, 1866, he married Mattie A. Huey, a native of Boone county, Kentucky. They have had seven children, five of whom are now living, two sons and three daughters: Russell A., Mary K., Mattie C., Nora C., and Robert L. From 1866 to 1872 he was engaged in farming and milling. In 1876 he bought the farm on which he now resides, consisting of 200 acres of raw prairie, which under his skillful management, has become one of the finest farms in the county. During the years of 1877, ’78, ’79, ’80, he sold produce to the amount of $6,299; raised and marketed at an expense of $1,100, realizing a handsome profit of over $5,000. In 1878 he was elected justice of the peace for Arrow Rock township, which office he still holds. Sixty-seven different cases have been brought before him, and in none of them has there been an appeal from his decision. Since 1858 he has been a member of the Baptist church. Page 546-547


John Swinney, P. O., Arrow Rock. Was born in Bedford county Virginia, January 28, 1816. His father, William Swinney, was born in Buckingham county, Virginia, and was married to Sarah Johnson, also a native of Virginia. They had three children, two girls and one boy, only one of them living now: John. William moved to Wilsoncounty, Tennessee, with his family, engaged in raising tobacco, and died August 29, 1855. John lived in Tennesseeuntil, 1838, when he moved to Posey county, Indiana. In 1857, he was married to Celia Hambleton, who died and was buried in Posey county in 1840. In October, 1846, he married Miss Maria French, a native of Indiana. Her father was born in Hopkins county. Kentucky, and was one of the first settlers of Indiana. John Swinney and his second wife have had twelve children, ten of them now living: Wm. D., John T., Lardner C., Loyd E., James T., Lenora, Mary Senter, Emma, Esther Morris, and Ann. Mr. Swinney lived fifteen years in Indiana, and in 1856 moved to Polk county, Missouri, but not liking that county he moved to Chariton county and lived there about eight years, tobacco farming. In the spring of 1865, he moved to Illinois, and lived there twelve years, and then purchased the farm in this county, on which he now resides, containing 152 acres of excellent tobacco land. Page 547


Robert Emmett Beazley, P. O., Arrow Rock. Mr. R. Beazley was born in Culpepper county, Virginia, March 5, 1834. His father, Charles Beazley, was a native of the same county, and was married to Lucy Randall, also a native of Virginia. They have had eight children, five now living: Mrs. M. E. Sidenstriker, Mrs. Sarah J. Levy, Mrs. C. Clemmens, Mrs. Martha Harris and Robert E. In 1842 he moved from Virginia west, and settled in Saline county, in what is at present Liberty township. He then purchases a farm near Arrow Rock and there settled. In June, 1862, he died, and was buried  at the Arrow Rock cemetery. In 1838 his wife died and was buried in Virginia. Robert E., the eldest son, was raised and educated as a farmer in Saline county. September, 1861, he was married to Lucy Fenwick, a native of Cooper county. They have had ten children, six of them now living: Minnie, Pettis, Maud, Nellie, Jesse, and Emmet. While confined with a spell of pleurisy, one night in 1860, he got out of bed and (unconscious of the act) left the house, and wandered off several miles. The weather was so cold that his feet were frozen, and had to be amputated. In 1861 he went to Texas, and stayed there until 1865, teaming. After the war he came home, and lived on his farm near Arrow Rock. In 1880 he ran for constable of Arrow Rock township, and the election was a tie. The election was held over, and Mr. Beazley received a unanimous vote, his opponent refusing to run against him. Page 547-548 


Peter J. Hillen, P. O., Arrow Rock. Was born in Prussia, September 19, 1849. His father, Franz J. Hillen, was a native of the same place, and was married to Miss Dorodea Lower, also born and raised at the same place. They had eight children, six of them now living: Franz J., Nicholas, Jacob, Philip, Peter and Margaret. Franz, Jr., and his wife are still living in the old country. Peter was raised and educated in Prussia. Want of health exempted him from military service and in December, 1870 he left the “Faderland” for the United States and landed in New York in the Christmas holidays. In his early life he had learned the shoemaker and butcher trades. Early in January, 1872, he came to Arrow Rock in Saline county, and did every sort of work to make a living. As soon as he could he went to butchering in Arrow Rock for about six months, and then in the saloon business for about the same time. He then went to butchering again, farming and selling ice, at which occupation he is now engaged. May 18, 1872, he was married to Barbara Alflen, of Germany. They had five children, four of whom are now married: Peter J., Dorodea, Horace, and Gertrude. They are both members of the Catholic Church.  Page 548


Wm. McJilton, P. O. Arrow Rock. Born November 6, 1813, in Maryland, where he was raised and educated, and came to this county in 1830. He was a carpenter by trade. In 1839 he was married to Miss Rachel Huston, daughter of Jos. Huston, a native of this county. Rachel was born February 18, 1822. Her father, Joseph Huston, was born in Augusta county, Virginia. He came to Saline at a very early day, and before he came he married Sarah Brownlee. After her death, he married the widow Lalliss, of Saline. He died in 1862, and was buried in the Arrow Rock cemetery, as also, his second wife. He had five children by his first wife, of which three are now living: Mrs. McGoffin, Mrs. N. Huston, and Mrs. McJilton. By his second wife he had five children, two now living – Joseph and Samuel. In 1839, the marriage between Rachel Huston and William McJilton took place, of which union there were born seven children, two of who are living: Mary Emma and Charles. When he first came to Arrow Rock, he followed the milling business, with Samuel Huston. He died, and was buried in the Arrow Rock cemetery. After her husband’s death, she continued to reside in Arrow Rock to the present time. In 1876, she commenced keeping the Arrow Rock hotel, where she does a good business.  Page 548


William R. Rhoades, P. O., Arrow Rock. Was born in Saline county, April 16, 1853, where he was raised. His father, Judge George Rhoades, was born in Virginia. He was first married to Miss Hawkins, a native of Virginia, also. They had four children, only one of whom is now living – Rev. Richard Rhoades. After the death of his first wife he married Jane Hall, also a native of Virginia. They have had nine children, all now living – five sons and four daughters: William Rufus, M. M., George, Jr., John T., Ethel L., Henrietta Gilliam, Miriam Mead, Mary Mead, and Hattie. In 1826, Judge Rhoades came to Saline county, and settled in Jefferson township, where he now lives. William Rufus, the fourth son of his father’s second wife, was educated at William Jewell College, Liberty, Missouri, afterward, in 1873, attending the school of Pharmacy in St. Louis. Returning home he entered the drug business, at Arrow Rock, where he has since continued, and is doing a prosperous business. January 3, 1878, he was married to Miss C. J. Bowers, born in this county, and a daughter of Dr. G. H. Bowers, a prominent physician of Saline. They have two children: Zeta A. and Marcus Rufus.  Page 548-549


Elias Shannon, Sr., P. O., Arrow Rock. Was born in Scott county, Kentucky, September 8, 1802. His father, E. Shannon, was also a native of Kentucky; married Nancy Shannon, a native of Woodford county, Kentucky. He died and was buried in Woodford county, as also his wife. They had six children, only one, Elias, now living, who was the youngest, and raised and educated in Henry county, Kentucky. In 1824, he was married to Jane Shannon, a native of Woodford county. They had ten children, six of them now living: James D., Nancy, Samuel, Catherine, Elias and William. In 1844, he moved to Missouri, and settled in Saline county, five miles east of Marshall, where he continued to live over thrity-three years, and then moved to Arrow Rock. He and his son William keep the city hotel, and are proprietors of one of the large livery and sale stables of Arrow Rock. Mrs. Shannon died November 18, 1879, at the age of seventy-nine, and was buried at the Gilmore graveyard.  Page 549


Mathew Gaunt, P. O., Arrow Rock. Was born in Yorkshire, England, April 21, 1821, where he was raised and educated. In 1840, he was married to Sarah Hainesworth, an English lady. They had eleven children, only three of them now living. In 1844, he came to the new world, and settled in St. Louis, where he lived about five years. In 1857 he came to this county, and located a carding machine in Arrow Rock, to which he built an addition of grist and woolen mills, at a cost of $4,000, the total cost being about $10,000. At that time, this was the only woolen mill in the county, and here was done the first spinning, weaving, and fulling otherwise than by hand; and some of the cloth made at this mill is yet being worn, though made twenty years ago. The business done here, at one time, was enormous; often as many as forty wagons were in the yards at once, and as many as five or six hundred pounds of wool carded in one day. People came with their wool as far as one hundred miles to these mills, because they were fixed to do business cheap and on a large scale. They continued all right until just before the war closed, when, in the absence of Mr. Gaunt, the mills went down. There is no better place in the county for a woolen factory.  Page 549-550


Mrs. M. C. Ballantine, P. O., Arrow Rock. Mrs. Ballantine was born in Booneville, Cooper county, Missouri, March 21, 1842. Her father, N. Dickinson, was born in Virginia. He was married to Henrietta Sites, also a native of Virginia. They had nine children, six of them now living: John, Oliver, Elizabeth Randolph, Griffith, William and M. C. Mr. Dickinson first came to Cooper county in 1841, and then to Arrow Rock, where he went into merchandising. His first wife died in 1862, and was buried at Arrow Rock cemetery. Afterward he married the widow Grove. He died in 1876, and was buried at Arrow Rock cemetery; his second wife died in 1878. Mrs. M. C. Ballantine, the youngest daughter of her father’s first wife, was educated in Arrow Rock. July 20, 1865, she married D. J. Ballantine, a native of Indiana, raised in Booneville. Mr. Ballantine was a steamboat clerk for a number of years, on the Missouri and Mississippi rivers. Afterward, he kept hotel at Macon City, Missouri, where he died October 17, 1878, and was buried at Walnut Grove cemetery. After her husband’s death, Mrs. Ballantine moved to Arrow Rock, and engaged in millinery and dress-making, in which she is now doing a flourishing business.  Page 55


Daniel Urick, P. O., Arrow Rock. Was born in Lebanon county, Pennsylvania, January 14, 1815. His father, Nicholas Urick, was a native of Pennsylvania, also, and was married about the year 1798, to Mary Brightbill, also born in Pennsylvania. They had seven children, of whom four are now living – Daniel, Jacob B., Mrs. Mariah McClure, and Mrs. Sarah Hetrick. Nicholas Urick died September, 1863, in Pennsylvania, and was buried near Mechanicsburg; his wife died in 1820, and was buried at Walnut C. H. graveyard, Lebanon county. Daniel Urick, the second son, graduated at the Gettysburg (Pennsylvania) college, in 1840. He was married in Pennsylvania, to Margaret Reigel, also a native of Pennsylvania. They had seven children, four of who are now living; Jacob C., Daniel E., Sarah Wilson and Florence. While he remained in Pennsylvania, he was engaged in farming and in merchandising. In 1864, he moved to Keokuk, Iowa, and lived there until 1869, engaged in the commission business. September 1869, he moved to Arrow Rock, where he has been engaged principally in fruit-raising. His oldest son is proprietor of one of the Arrow Rock lumber yards, and is doing a flourishing business. Page 550


Jesse McMahan, P. O., Arrow Rock. Mr. Jesse McMahan was born in Cooper county, Missouri, April 19, 1813. His father, Samuel McMahan, was born in Clark county, Kentucky, in 1774, and was married in Madison county, Kentucky, to Sarah Clark, daughter of Benjamin Clark, and a native of Albemarlecounty, Virginia. They had five children, three of them now living: Jesse, Thomas A., and John W. In 1810, he moved west, and with others, made a settlement in Cooper county, six miles south of Arrow Rock, and about four miles south of Arrow Rock, built a block house, or fort, called Anderson’s fort. They brought their families west in 1811. His immediate neighbors were Wm. Anderson, Andreas Anderson, George Anderson, David Jones, J. Wolfskill, Wm. Ried, and Stephen Turley. In 1813, the Indians drove them away, to Cooper’s fort, and burned Anderson’s fort, and while there, he was killed during the Christmas week. He had recrossed the river to get his cattle, and while driving them to the river, the Indians (who were on the lookout for a man named Mukchax) saw him, and opened fire on him. His horse fell, shot under him. He started to run, but hearing the voice of the chief, whom he knew, and supposed to be friendly, he halted and turned around. As he faced them the Indians shot him dead. His body, cut into several pieces and scalped, was recovered, and buried at Booneville. His widow survived him until 1872, and was buried six miles below Arrow Rock. Jesse, the youngest child, and his friend, Jesse Reid. Were the first children in that neighborhood, born south of the river. He was raised on a farm, and in 1831 he went to the Indian nation on a trading expedition and returned in August. While there, the Indians got after him, and in his efforts to spur his mule he sprained his knee so severely, that it rendered him a cripple for life. He escaped, however, and returned to Arrow Rock, where in 1834, he went into the dry goods and grocery business, which he continued until 1875. Since then he has traveled a good deal. In 1837, he was married to Miss Susan Vaughan, a native of Tennessee. They have four children, all living: Clayton, Henry T., Mrs. Nannie H. Sutherlin, and Mrs. Sallie R. Piper.  Page 551


Joseph H. Green, P. O., Arrow Rock. Was born in Green county, Kentucky, May 23, 1850. His father, D. D. Green, was a native of New Jersey, and came to Kentuckyat an early day. He first did business at Danville, then at Lexington, and then moved to a farm near Greensburg, in Green county. He was married to Miss A. C. Phillips of Green county, in 1846. They had three children, only one of whom, Joseph M., is now living. In 1852, his father came to Saline county, and went into the harness business at Arrow Rock. He died in 1875, April 2d, and was buried at the Arrow Rock cemetery. His widow still survives, and lives with her son in Arrow Rock. Joseph was educated in this county, and learned the saddlery and harness business, which he followed here, and in Booneville, until 1875. He then, with Mr. G. Dickinson, purchased a stock of groceries in Arrow Rock, which they continued together for three years; he then bought out his partner, and has been in business alone ever since, and is now one of the most prominent grocery men in Arrow Rock, owning two business and two dwelling houses in the town.  Page 551-552


Philip Goetz, P. O., Arrow Rock. Mr. Goetz was born in the Kingdom of Wurtemburgand in the town of Kemnath, October 7, 1839. His father, Christian Goetz, was a native of Germany, and was a carriage painter by trade. He was married to Mary Gauder, having six children, only two of them now living, Philip and Mrs. Sophie Heinesh, who is still living in the old country. He died in Germany, December 23, 1872, where he was buried. His widow still survives him. Philip, the third child, was educated in Germany, and served six years in the army, and obtained his discharge April 6, 1866. In that same year he came to the United States. He stopped first in Cincinnati, and stayed three months in a furniture factory. In the old country he had served an apprenticeship at, and learned the shoemaker’s trade. He then went to New Orleans, where he worked at his trade two years. Then moved to Booneville, Missouri, and then to Arrow Rock in June, 1868, where he has followed his trade ever since and carries a considerable stock of boots and shoes. He is the only business man in Arrow Rock who handles boots and shoes, and has an excellent trade. He was married in March, 1871, to Margaret Sauerysing. They have had five children, only two of whom are living: Willie and Mary.  Page 552


Charles M. Bradford, P. O., Arrow Rock. Was born February 27, 1817, in New York City. His father, Joel Bradford, was born in 1753, in New York, and was married to Sarah Stockin. They had ten children. He died in 1836, in New York, and was there buried, his wife dying in Chatham, Connecticut. Charles M. was the youngest, and was educated in Pennsylvania, and graduated in medicine at the Penn University. In March, 1839, he moved to Missouri, and in 1840 began the practice of medicine at Arrow Rock. October 26, 1841, he was married to Lavinia M. Pearson, granddaughter of Dr. John Sappington, and step-daughter of Gov. C. F.  Jackson. They had seven children, four of whom are living: Ida, Mrs. Belle Baker, Mrs. Lavinia Nelson, and Charles Bradford. The deceased were: Mrs. Helen Russell, Mrs. Sarah Price, and George H. Bradford. Dr. Charles M. Bradford died August 21, 1862, at the age of forty-two and was buried at the Sappington cemetery. He was a very successful physician, but his health was feeble during the last half of his life. He was the postmaster at Arrow Rock for some time after he came to that city. Mrs. L. M. Bradford was educated in Saline county, and now resides in Arrow Rock. She was born in Howard county, August 23, 1825.  Page 552


George Dickson, P. O., Arrow Rock. Was born in Bourbon county, Kentucky, March 3, 1799, but was educated in Mercer county, Kentucky, where he lived until he was grown. His father, Josiah Dickson, was a native of Scotland, and was married to Isabell Reed, also of Scotland. They had eleven children, only two of whom are now living – George and Rev. Wm. Dickson. Josiah Dickson moved to Cooper county in 1819, and went to farming there. He died in 1829, and was buried four miles east of Booneville, he wife surviving him until 1831, and was buried at the same place. George Dickson came to Missouri with his parents, and in 1827 he was married to Miss Nancy Calvert. They had but three children, and only one now living, James L. Dickson. After the death of his first wife, he married Prudence Simpson, September 14, 1837. They had seven children, five of them now living – Josiah, William, Catherine, Sarah P., and Dorsie. October 22, 1868, his second wife died, and was buried at the Arrow Rock cemetery. Mr. Dickson came to this county in 1868, and settled two miles west of Arrow Rock, where he now lives on a farm of 160 acres of first-rate land.  Page 552-553


Henry J. Blackwell, P. O. Arrow Rock. Was born in Hickman county Tennessee. His father, Joseph Blackwell, was born in North Carolina, and was married to Mary Wilkins. They had thirteen children, only seven of whom are now living: Henry G., Richard, James C., Thomas, Mrs. Nancy Baker, Sarah and Joseph. He died March 4, 1857, in Franklin county, Arkansas, where he was buried. His widow survived him until 1863, when she, too, died, and was buried with him. Henry J. Blackwell, the youngest child, was raised and educated in Kentucky, until he was sixteen years old, when he moved with his father to Franklin county, Arkansas, and continued to work on his father’s farm until March, 1856, when he was married to Elizabeth J. Campbell a native of Perry county, Tennessee, where she was raised and educated. They had three children, two now living: Mrs. Martha Buley and Mrs. Mary Lowe. In 1862 Mr. Blackwell enlisted in the Confederate army in Arkansas, as sergeant, and was in the following battles: Fayetteville, Newtonia, Clarksville, Crooked Creek, Hartsville, Little Rock, Ft. Smith and Helena. After the war closed he lived at Granby, mining and merchandising for four years. Then went to Joplin, in mercantile business, four years. In October, 1880, he bought the farm he now lives on, in Saline county, three and a half miles west of Arrow Rock. April 1879, with Dr. McClelland, Thos. Moppin and Chas. Walters, he leased with privilege of buying, 200 acres, in section 19 township 49, range 19 and they are mining for lead with bright prospects of success.  Page 553


Mrs. Ida R. Gambrell, P. O., Arrow Rock. Was the youngest of the twelve children of Judge Bernis Brown, and was born in Saline county, November 27, 1837, and was educated at McPherson Female College, Lexington, Missouri. Her mother died when she was quite young, and she was living with her sister in Lexingtonat that time. She was also two years at the Tracy College, in Booneville. Soon after returning home from school, she was married, July 26, 1855, to W. J. Gambrell, a native of Virginia. He came when quite young to St. Louis, and then moved to Kansas City, where he was living at the time he was married. He was in the commission business. They lived in Kansas Cityuntil 1863, when they moved to St. Louis, where he purchased an interest in the steamboat Sultana, running from St. Louis to New Orleans, and was her captain. April 27, 1865, while loaded with 2,000 Federal soldiers, taken on at Vicksburg, and about 200 passengers and crew, the Sultana burst one of her boilsrs, a few miles above Memphis, took fire and burned to the water’s edge. In this disaster, over 1,500 persons perished, and among them Captain Gambrell. His body was never recovered. Mrs. Gambrell then returned to Saline county to the farm, on which she now lives. She has three children: William J., Rowena, and Lillie.  Page 553-554


Richard Gaines Robertson, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Petersburg, Virginia, December 1, 1838. His father, Francis A. Robertson, was descended from John Robertson, of Scotland, who settled near Sappony Church, in Chesterfield county, Virginiawhere Deacon Francis A. Robertson was born. He was the son of John and Catherine (nee Taylor) Robertson. Born at Mt. Pleasant on the Appomattox, July 26, 1810. He was married to Mary E. Gaines, daughter of Richard Gaines and Mary A. C. Gaines. In 1829 he moved to Petersburg, and in 1831 united with the Baptist church. In 1834 he removed to Farnesville, and with his brother, Deacon B. M. Robertson, laid the foundation for the great prosperity of the Baptists at Farmville. In 1836 he returned to Petersburg, where, except short intervals during the war, he continued to reside until his death, which took place at his home, October 8, 1880, where his widow still survives him. He was a most earnest Christian, and, according to the Religious Herald, Richmond, Virginia, his name was well and widely known through Virginia. Mr. F. A. Robertson had eleven children, ten of whom are now living, six sons and four daughters: R. Gaines, John J., Marcus W., Francis H., Joseph T., Linneus P., Catherine S., Mrs. Mary E. Talley, Mrs. Maria J. McManaway, and Sallie G. The oldest son, Richard Gaines, and the subject of this sketch, was educated at the Charlottesville Military Institute, and at the Richmond Baptist College. In September, 1858, he came to Saline county, Missouri, and taught school, first in the Good Hope school house, he being then only nineteen years old, and has been teaching nearly ever since, in Missouri, Texas, Arkansas, and Illinois, and holds first-grade certificates of each state. He is now teaching in the Jester school house, four or five miles east of Marshall. March 1, 1861, he was married to Miss Annie Garrett, a native of this county, and daughter of James Garrett. A few months after his marriage he enlisted in Capt. Wm. B. Brown’s company, M. S. G., and was drill master of that company. He afterward enlisted as orderly-sergeant in Anderson’s company, Robertson’s recruits, and was captured with the whole command, at Blackwater, December 9, 1861. In prison three months, went home on parole and was exchanged 1862. In August, 1862, he joined (and was orderly-sergeant) Garrett’s company, 1st Mo. Cav., Col. Shelby,  afterwards Gordon’s Reg., Shelby’s brigade, and Marmaduke’s division. Was in the battles of Booneville, as flag-bearer, 2d Lexington, Coon Creek, Prairie Grove, Cape Girardeau, Helena, Little Rock, Bayou Meter, fighting every day for forty miles south of Little Rock, Cane Hill. In Shelby’s raid in 1863, Mr. Robertson was captured in Saline county, and in prison to the end of the war. At the battle of Helena he assisted the battery, and helped to take a piece from a critical position, where out of thirty men detailed, sixteen were wounded, more or less severely. Page 554-555


James Gilmer, P. O., Marshall. Born in Green county Kentucky, August 14, 1824. John Gilmer, his father was born in 1791, in Virginia, and moved to Kentucky, when quite a boy with his father, to Adair county. He was married to Elizabeth Phillips, also a native of Virginia. They had thirteen children, seven now living, five boys and two girls: James Campbell, Washington, Robert and Squire A., Mrs. Martha S. Reynolds and Mrs. Bettie P. Phillips. In 1834, Mr. John Gilmer moved to Saline county, Missouri, and settled on the farm where his son James now lives, six miles east of Marshall, and died February 8, 1873, and was buried on the home place. Mrs. Gilmer died June 10, 1865, and was buried in the same place. Mr. James Gilmer was the second son, and was ten years old when his parents moved to this county. Neighbors at that early day, were few and far between. His father first built a log house of one room – and the next year, added another log room. The land was purchased from a man named Goff, who begun a cabin, but had not finished it. Mr. Gilmer finished and lived in it. The Marshall and Arrow Rock road, though received by the county court, was still called the “Indian,” and by some the “buffalo trail.” Religious services were held mainly in private houses, and people made their own clothes, of flax, wool, cotton, and buckskin. Mr. Gilmer went to school in the neighborhood, and lived with his father on the farm until he was married. In 1842, the brick house in which he now lives, was put up by his father. In June, 1856, he was married to Miss Catherine A Harvey, who was a native of Saline, and raised by Jacob Keyster, her father James Harvey, dying when she was an infant. They have eight children now living, six boys and two girls: Jacob W., James W., John M., Robert A., Wade H., Martha E., Harvey and Mary J. Mr. Gilmer has a splendid farm of 240 acres under fence, and 125 acres of it in cultivation, and is a successful farmer.  Page 555-556


Daniel M. Embrey, P. O., Arrow Rock, Missouri. Mr. Embrey was born in Staffordcounty, Virginia, in 1845, where he was raised and educated. He left Virginiain 1868, and came directly to Saline county, Missouri. He was raised on a farm, and after being in this county about one week, he went to work on a farm, and in the employ of Mr. Joel Scott. The war had ruined his father, as it had done most Virginians, (and many Missourians). Mr. Daniel Embrey came west in the endeavor to better his fortunes, and those of his family. He has two brothers in this state, E. E., living five miles east of Miami, in this county, and John W., living in Dalton, Chariton county. In 1876, Mr. Embrey was elected school director for the Neff district. In 1870 he was married to Miss Mahala Nave, daughter of Henry Nave, one of the oldest settlers of the county.  Page 556


John Q. Moore, P. O., Marshall, Missouri. Was born in Hampshire county, Virginia, May 3, 1837, came to Saline county at eight years of ago with his parents, and here received his education. His father, Philip Moore, was also a native of Hampshire county, Virginia, and was married in 1821 to Miss Hester Byser, also of Virginia. They had ten children, six of them now living – three boys, Solomon, John Q. and Daniel, and three girls, Mrs. Millie Chappell, Mrs. Julia A. Baker and Mrs. Elizabeth Kennedy. In 1845 Philip Moore came to Saline county with his family, stopping first, for one year, near Marietta, Ohio. Landed near Cambridge, and first settled near Miami, where they lived several years. In 1849 he moved to Jonesboro where he lived until 1876; after which time he lived around with his children until he died January, 1879, and was buried at Jonesboro. His wife died January 17, 1878, and was buried at the same place. John Q., the fifth son, in 1862, purchased his father’s farm near Jonesboro, where he farmed until 1876, when he sold the farm, and moved to the farm he now lives on, nine miles east of Marshall, containing 200 acres of splendid land. November 21, 1865, he was married to Laura A. Hansbrough, a native of this county, and daughter of Hector Hansbrough. They have seven children, three boys and four girls: John, Obz. G. and Charles E., Lucy D., Lucy B., Mary W., and Pearler W. In 1861 he enlisted in Captain Emmerson’s company under Colonel Robertson, and was captured with the command at Blackwater, December 19, 1861. Released on oath in 1862 and came home.  Page 556


James Neff, P. O., Marshall. Mr. Neff was born in Cook county, Tennessee, April 27, 1833. His father, Isaac Neff, was born in Jefferson county, Tennessee, in 1798, and was married to Lucy Romines, of which union there were five children, four of whom are now living: John, Abram, James and Susan. Isaac Neff came to Saline county in the fall of 1836, traveling in wagons, with his family and twelve or thirteen negroes. He died in 1879, and was buried on the home place. His widow still survives him, and is living at the old home place. His name originally, was Nave, but he had it changed to Neff. Mr. James Neff, the oldest son, was but three years of age when his parents moved to Saline. He was educated at the country schools, and continued on his father’s farm until 1866, when he moved to a farm which his father entered, and on which he now lives, eight miles east of Marshall, where he now owns 600 acres of fine land, 180 under fence. In the spring of 1861, he was married to Miss Mary Hungerford, who is a native of this county, born September 13, 1844. Seven children have been born to this union, six of whom are now living, three boys: Isaac, Robert, and James; and three girls: Ella, Lulu, and Sadie. Ida, the eldest daughter is now deceased.  In 1861, Mr. Neff enlisted in the Confederate army, first in Capt. Wm. B. Brown’s company, then in Col. McCullough’s regiment; was at the battles of Booneville, Carthage, and Wilson’s Creek. After which he was taken sick, and returned home, and in December, 1861, he intended, with his brother, to go in Robertson’s command, but failed to get ready, and thus escaped capture. He could not stay at home, so he went to Logan county, Illinois, and stayed there until the war was over, and then returned home.  Page 556-557


Norwood Wiley, farmer, P. O., Arrow Rock. Born in Gilford county, North Carolina, in 1819, June 27, where he obtained his education and was raised, and worked at the carpenter’s trade, which he carried on extensively until 1859. His father, Hewey Wiley, was a native of North Carolina, and married Jane Garrison, widowed daughter of William Matthews. They had two children: one boy, Norwood, and one girl, Caroline. In 1840, Norwood Wiley was married to Alice Gosset, who died in 1863. Afterward he married Lydia Dixon, a widow, and a native of Saline county. In 1859, he moved to Saline county, where he has since resided, settling on Fish creek, on the Isaac Neff farm; and, in 1870, moved to the farm he now occupies, four miles northwest of Arrow Rock, and is now engaged, generally, in farming and stock-raising. In 1852, he served as representative for Guilford county in the legislature of North Carolina. Mrs. L. Wiley was born in Saline county, March 12, 1826. Her father, Daniel Thornton, was born in South Carolina, October 26, 1788, and went to Tennessee when quite a boy; and was married to Mary Neff, sister of Isaac and Henry Neff, in Tennessee, about 1816, They came all the way from North Carolina to Missouri by water – down the French Broad and Tennessee rivers to the Ohio.  Page 557


Joel Scott, farmer, P. O. Arrow Rock. Mr. Joel Scott was born six miles east of Georgetown, Scott county, Kentucky. His father was also a native of Scott county, Kentucky, and his mother, whose maiden name was Hawkins, was a native of Mason county, Kentucky. His father was also a farmer before him, and moved to Missouriin 1832, stopping in Boone county, and moving to Saline county the next year purchasing 650 acres of land ten miles east of the present county seat. Joel, the fifth son, now lives at the old homestead, ten miles east of Marshall. He was only four years old when his parents came to Missouri, but still has an indistinct remembrance of coming from Kentucky in wagons. The family were in a carriage made in the Kentucky penitentiary, for which, with the harness, they paid $1,000. Mr. Scott, after the lapse of half a century, has still some remains of those harness. Joel was educated at the neighboring schools of Jonesboro and Arrow Rock, until the age of eighteen, when he assumed charge of the farm for his father. In 1857, at the age of twenty-one, he went to California and worked in the gold mines, and trading between Sacramento and the mines, in which he had good luck for over two years., when he returned home with a check on Page, Bacon & Co., St. Louis, for $6,000 over all expenses. Returned by the isthmus of Panama. Mr. Scott was married, in November, 1857, to Miss Nannie Townsend, daughter of A. S. Townsend, deceased of Cooper county. He has six living children, and is now a flourishing farmer and stock man, on the old Scott homestead, which he has enlarged to over 1,000 acres. Mr. Scott lost one of his eyes by the glancing of a nail which he was driving, striking him in the pupil.  Page 557-558


Bernis B. Brown, P. O., Arrow Rock. Is a native of Saline county, born December 16, 1832. His parents came to Saline county from Albemarlecounty, Virginia, in 1828. His father served as one of the judges of the county court of Saline for about fifteen years. He was also a surveyor of the county for a number of years. He died in 1867, his wife having died in 1840. Bernis B. Brown, the fourth son, now lives ten miles east of Marshall, near the old homestead. He attended school and worked on the farm until he was eighteen years old, when, in 1850, he took the gold fever, and went to California. He returned home from California, after working in the mines for a time, through Mexico, it taking about six months to make the trip. In March, 1867, he was married to Miss Emma Tarrant, daughter of Henry Tarrant, of Cass county, Missouri, having four children, two boys and two girls. When the war broke out, he enlisted in Capt. Brown’s company, and was at the first Booneville fight. Continued in the State Guards until his time expired, and returned home. Could not stay long; went south and enlisted in the Confederate army, under Gen. Shelby, and continued until the surrender, in the spring of 1865. Since the war Mr. Brown was turned his entire attention to farming.  Page 558


Ezekiel W. Brown, P. O., Arrow Rock. Mr. E. W. Brown was born in Saline county, August 4, 1834. He was educated at the country schools and at the Masonic College in Lexington. In 1853, he took the gold fever, and struck out for California, and with his brother-in-law, took a drove of cattle over the plains to California, and came near to starving to death in the passage of the Nevadamountains. He remained in the far west until 1867, when he returned home on horseback, without having made much of a fortune, as he was sick for the last three years of his stay in California. Mr. Brown was married at Arrow Rock, Missouri, in 1868, to Miss M. E. Durrett, daughter of Richard Durrett, a native of Albemarlecounty, Virginia. He has had five children, only two of whom are now living. Mr. Brown resides upon his farm, about ten miles east of Marshall, and is a good farmer and a hospitable gentleman. Page 558-559


MARSHALL D. PIPER, P. O., Arrow Rock. 
Marshall Piper was born in Albemarle county, Virginia, April 26, 1817, and obtained his education at the country schools of that county. At the age of twenty-three he moved to Saline county with his mother and her ten children, moving by land. About two years after he first came to Saline, he married Miss Sarah Brown, daughter of Bernis Brown. After his marriage, he continued on his farm, about fifteen miles east of Marshall, until the breaking out of the war. His ill health not permitting him to take an active part in the war, he remained quietly on his farm, though a southern man in sentiment. On the 8th day of August, 1864, Col. Lazear, of the first regiment, M. S. M., ordered all the male residents in Mr. Piper’s neighborhood to repair to Arrow Rock on the following day, where he intended to make them a speech. Mr. Piper, with many others, obeyed this order, and while there, he was suddenly arrested and ordered to be shot, on charges unknown to his family. He was shot that same day, near Arrow Rock, by a detail of ten men, but upon examination, eleven wounds were found upon his body. Upon permission from Col. Lazear, his friends took his body to his home and buried it decently. His widow Mrs. Sarah E. Piper, was born January 22, 1826, and came with her parents to Saline county, when only two years of age. Since her husband’s death, she has tarried on the farm with her children, two of whom are now married, and comfortably settled around her.
Submitted by
Vicki Piper July 2004 ( See "The War in 1864" for more information and see additional information in a family sketch submitted by Ken Pickard, Kpickard@flash.net (Dallas, TX) Kpickard@sprynet.com (Austin, TX) and Old Union or Frazer Cemetery.


Vicki notes : ( starting here) you will notice a change in presentations, ie the P. O. sometimes does not appear. It feels as if it might  be a different author. I am not changing anything, including punctuation and spelling! And to complicate things further the first bio of this set states plainly the man is a resident of Clay township!


Harman D. Ayres. The subject of this sketch was born in Bourbon county, Kentucky, March 18, 1835, where he spent most of his live. His education was obtained in the country schools of Bourbon county. His father also, Harman Ayres, was born in Bourbon county Kentucky, in 1810, and was married to Miss Charlotte Lutton, of Bourbon county. They had three children, one boy and two girls; Mr. H. D. Ayres being the only son. One daughter, Mrs. Kate Halladay, now living in Bates county; the other is dead. Mr. Ayres was married in Bourbon county, Kentucky, February 6, 1855, to Miss S. L. Turner, daughter of William Turner, a farmer of Bourbon. In KentuckyMr. A. was engaged in farming and stock-raising, mostly blooded cattle. He moved to Saline county, Missouri, with his family, October, 1878. Mr. Ayres brought a lot of fine stock, thirty-five cattle, eight horses, twenty-one sheep and thirty-five hogs. He his now engaged in farming a fine farm of 400 acres in Clay township.  Page 560


Joseph Schiesser was born near the Rhine, in Wurtemburg, Germany, February 12, 1834, where his early life was spent, and his education obtained. His parents were both natives of Wurtemburg, and had nine children, (five boys and four girls) of whom Joseph was the eldest son. At the age of nineteen years, Joseph, in company with two companions, started to the United States. He worked in New York several months, and then gradually worked his way to the west, until he reached St. Louis, Christmas eve, 1853. He worked in and about St. Louis for some time, until he was taken sick. He was finally cured in Jefferson, by Dr. Grouce, after a nine month’s spell. He then worked around at St. Paul and Dubuque, staying at the latter place nearly four years. In 1857 he was married to Caroline Ostwalt, in Iowa, now dead. Farmed for five years in Minnesota. He married again, to Agnes Gartner, who is also dead, February 17, 1871. His third wife, Barbara Keller, is still living. In 1880 he came to Saline and settled on his present farm.  Page 560


William Davis, was born in Sullivan county, Ind., in 1823, where his early life was spent, and his education received. At the age of 25, he moved to Iowa, and in 1857, he was married to Elizabeth Major, a daughter of Andrew Major, a native of Ohio. About nineteen years of his life were spent in Wapello county, Iowa, when he moved to Missouri, first to Pettis county, then to Saline, 1868, to the farm where he now resides, consisting of 720 acres of first-class land. He has four children, all boys; Andrew J., Simon, Thomas J., and John G. Mr. Davis has a splendid farm and elegant orchard, finely improved, and is a successful farmer.  Page 560


James S. Thomas, P. O., Arrow Rock. The subject of the following sketch was born in Clarkcounty, Kentucky, February 8, 1820, where he grew up to manhood and received his education from the country schools, and also at Whittlesey’s Academy, Harrison county, Kentucky. Moved with his father, Geo. Thomas, to Bourbon county, Kentucky, where he lived until 1870, farming. His father was born in Bourbon county, Kentucky, 1799, where he was married to Susan Strode, daughter of Jas. Strode. They had five children. He afterward married a widow by the name of Thomas, and by her he had three children, all girls. After the death of his second wife he married Emily Berry, and by her he had three children. He died in 1855, in Bourbon county, and was there  buried, at his home place, five miles from Paris. In 1846, James S. Thomas was married to Julia A. Thomas, of Bourbon county, Kentucky. In October, 1870, he moved to Saline county, Missouri, and settled on the farm he now occupies, two and a half miles northwest of Arrow Rock. He has ten children, five boys and five girls. While living in Kentucky he was taken prisoner by the Federal authorities in 1862-3, and incarcerated in Lexington, Covington, Mt. Sterling, and Camp Chase. As fast as he would pay his way out he would be re-arrested and imprisoned. In earlier years he engaged in intimate acquaintance with Henry Clay, whose hospitality he many times enjoyed. The names of his children are: James M., George A., H. Clay, William S., John T., Mrs. Susan E. Haggin, Mrs. E. M. Piper, Mrs. Phoebe M. Webb, Mary Lee and Emma D.  Page 561


Joseph Connell, farmer, P. O., Arrow Rock. Mr. Joseph Connell was born in Page county, Virginia, in the year 1846, where he grew to manhood and received his education. His father, Brice Connell, was a native of Page county, Virginia, born, 1798, and about the year 1820, was married to Elizabeth Summers, daughter of George Summers, also a native of Page county. He died in 1880, and was buried in Page county. At the age of twenty-three Joseph came west to the southern part of Illinois, where he remained about two years. He then went to central Indiana, and farmed for a year or two. In the spring of 1869, he came to Luter Island, in Montgomery county, Missouri, and farmed there three years. In 1874, he moved to Saline county, and settled on what is known as the Chestnut Hill farm, one mile and a half from Arrow Rock, which farm he cultivated for several years, and then moved to Wm. Price’s farm, and then to the farm on which he now lives, four miles northwest of Arrow Rock, and is one of the prominent stock feeders of Saline county. He was married February 20, 1877, to Miss Bettie Smith, of Howard county, Missouri; three children, two boys and one girl.  Page 561


JESSE ROMINE, born in Cox county Tennessee, March 20 1808, where he spent his early life, and received his education. In 1833, he came to Saline county and settled down to farming, and married Catherine Nave of Saline. They had twelve children, six of whom are now living: John, Isaac, Abram, Mrs. Mary A. Hensick, Mrs. Rhoda Talbott, and Mrs. Catherine Maddix. Mr. Romine died in August, 1865, his wife died in April 29, 1875. Isaac second son of Jesse Romine was born in Saline county, October 12, 1852. In 1879, he was married to Victoria Piper, daughter of Benj. Piper. At present he is engaged in farming on the old Romine homestead. Abram, third son of Jesse Romine, was born in Saline, June 21, 1855. He was married in 1879 April 26, to Miss Bettie Thornton, daughter of Jack Thornton, of Saline. Abram, and his brother, both live at the old homestead.  (page 561)


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