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“HISTORY OF SALINE COUNTY MISSOURI”
Biographies by township

Clay Township

John M. Neff, farmer, was born in Tennessee, June 24, 1817. He came to Missouri with his mother when quite young, and was educated in this county. When they came to Saline, they settled on the farm now occupied by Dr. A. Neff. John Neff was married February 14, 1853, to Mary Neff, his second cousin, daughter of George Neff. After his marriage, Mr. John M. Neff lived on a farm twelve miles east of Marshall, upon which he died, August 28, 1877, and was buried on the Isaac Neff farm. They had eight children, seven of whom are living, five girls and two boys: Nancy E., Dixon, Lucy Ann, Mary Bell, Fanny G., Laura J., Isaac and Walter A. Mrs. Neff and her sons continue to carry on the farm since her husband’s death. Page 618

Daniel L. Watts. The subject of this sketch was born in Ross county, Ohio, March 6, 1817, where he was raised and educated in the common schools of Ross and Highland counties. At the age of nineteen he went to Covington, Kentucky, and learned the plasterer’s trade. From there he went to Madison county, Indiana; from there he re-crossed the Ohio, to Henry county, Kentucky, working at his trade. In 1842 he came to Marshall, Missouri, remaining one winter, and then went to Arrow Rock, where he stayed until 1849. In 1848 he was married to Miss Julia Bingham, daughter of John Bingham, of Saline County. In 1849, the gold fever took him to California, and he stayed there two years. Not having much success, he retuned to Arrow Rock, until 1866, when he moved to his farm of 170 acres on which he now resides, and to which he devotes his whole attention. Page 618

William Frazer, deceased. Mr. Wm. Frazer was born in Spottsylvania county, Virginia, near Fredericksburg. At the age of 15 he went to Fayette county, Kentucky, and there attended Transylvania University, studied law in Lexington Kentucky, and practiced his profession several years at Williamstown, Kentucky. He then gave it up, and began the manufacture of bagging and bail rope, at Lexington, Kentucky, at which he continued for forty years. Was married in Fayette county, Kentucky, to Miss Ann Overton. He had seven children, six of whom are still living, three boys and three girls: William, James and Robert, Mary, Rebecca and Virginia. In 1854 he moved to Lafayette county, Missouri, and in the following spring, moved to Utica, Livingston county, Missouri, where he lived seven years, and made brick extensively. In 1861 he moved to Springfield, Missouri, and thence into Arkansas. In a short time he returned to Missouri, to Audrain county; and in 1867 moved to Saline county and settled on a farm three miles west of Saline City, where he died August 14, 1880, and was buried at Union burying ground. His wife died in 1879, and was buried at the same place. Robert, third son of Wm. Frazer, was born in Lexington, Kentucky, February 23, 1839, where he was educated in Transylvania University, and lived with his parents until 1861. He enlisted in the Confederate army (see soldier’s record). After the war he came to Saline and engaged in farming. In the fall of 1880 he was elected to the legislature from the first district of Saline county, which office he now fills. Page 618-619

Archibald Gregory, Gregory & West, farmers. Mr. Arch. Gregory was born one mile north of Marshall, August 2, 1838, and educated in Saline county. His father was a native of Tennessee. John B. West. Mr. Gregory’s partner and brother-in-law, was born in East Tennessee, in Knox county, Nov. 15, 1827. His father was a native of Rockingham, county, Virginia. In 1847 he was married to Sarah Gregory, daughter of William Gregory, and some years after settled on the farm where he now lives. Messrs. Gregory & West are at present engaged in farming and stock-feeding in partnership. They are farming 860 acres of land, 580 of which they own. In 1880 they raised, on 180 acres, 5,335 bushels of wheat, besides dealing very largely in stock. Page 619

William Shepherd, P. O. Cambridge. Son of William and Phoebe Shepherd, was born in Fayette county, Kentucky, on the 15th of October, 1839, and in 1841 was moved by his parents to Monroe county, Missouri. In 1856 he came to this county, and has been engaged in farming ever since he came to Saline, making a specialty of tobacco-growing. He was married to Miss Paulina Morgan on the 21st of May, 1865, and has six children, two sons and four daughters. Page 619

Jesse M. Mabry, P. O., Little Rock. Mr. Mabry was born in Georgia, December 26, 1846, and moved with his father to Ray county, Missouri, in 1854. In 1875 he went to Colorado; returned in 1877 to Ray county, and in the next year, 1878, moved to this county and settled in Clay township. On the 9th of June 1878, he married Miss Elizabeth Johnson, and has one son, born September 10, 1880. Mr. Mabry is a farmer and stock-dealer, and has been very successful in handling stock since he came to Saline. Page 619

Joseph R. Dennis, P. O., Little Rock. Son of James M. and Annie Dennis; was born in this county, March 25, 1846, where he has lived nearly all his life, except about four years, during which he was in the Federal army, in which he enlisted in 1862, as a private, and was discharged in the spring of 1865. August 2d, 1862, he enlisted in company F, Eighty-fourth Indiana regiment; was engaged in the battles of Chicamaugua, Atlanta, Sherman’s March, Nashville, and others; and came through without a scratch. After the war he returned to Saline, and on 10th of March, 1867, was married to Miss Mary Pursley, and has five children, two sons and three daughters. He farms largely, and handles stock considerably. Page 619-620

Albert Murphy, P. O., Little Rock. Is the son of John and Elizabeth Murphy, and was born in Howard county, Missouri, on the 20th of September, 1827, and at the age of nine years came with his parents to this county. On the 20th of July, 1854, he was married to Miss Jemima Dennis, and has nine children, six sons and three daughters. Mr. Murphy is a farmer by choice of occupation, and one of excellent judgment and large experience. Page 620

M. F. Dennis, P. O., Little Rock. Mr. Dennis is a native Missourian, and was born in this county on the 9th of February, 1849, where he has grown up on a farm, and was educated. On the 22d of October, 1873, at the age of twenty-four, he was married to Miss Martha J. Evans, and has one daughter, Mary E. Dennis, born March 3, 1876. Mr. Dennis is one of the solid farmers of Saline, and is adding to his estate, year by year. Page 620

William F. Rowland, P. O., Little Rock. Was born in Randolph county, Missouri, May 7, 1844, where he spent his youth and grew to manhood. At the age of seventeen, he joined the southern army, in 1861, and remained to the end, in 1865. He first joined the M. S. G. under Gov. Jackson’s call, then, in 1862, he enlisted as second corporal in company G., Capt. Perkins, 9th Missouri in Gen. Shelby’s command, and was slightly wounded four times, and surrendered at Shreveport, in 1865. He was engaged in following battles: First and second Booneville, Lexington, Pea Ridge, Cross Hollows, Wilson’s creek, Cape Girardeau, Old Jackson, and others. After the war, he returned home, and in 1870 moved to Pettis county, and the next year, 1871, came to this county, and settled, as his permanent home. On the 1st of January, 1874, he married Miss Annie Eversman, and has one daughter, Annie R., born April 17, 1875. Mr. Rowland is one of the extensive farmers and stock men of Saline. Page 620

Henry Deer, P. O., Little Rock. Is the son of Lewis and Nancy Deer, and was born in Boyle county, Kentucky, May 11, 1819, where he was raised and educated. In 1843, January 18, he married Miss Cynthia A. Fisher, and in 1847, moved to Buchanan county, Missouri, where he remained until 1863, and then returned to Kentucky. After the close of the war, he returned to Missouri, and settled in Saline county, which he has made his permanent home. By his first wife he has five sons, and one daughter. His first wife died August 12, 1854, and he married again May 10, 1855 to Miss Margaret Crutchfield, and has one son, making seven children in all. Mr. Deer is a hard working, genial and honest farmer, whose greatest pleasure is in his own fireside and family. Page 620

Meredith Crosslin, P. O., Gilliam. Son of James and Sarah Crosslin, was born in this county, August 28, 1824. In 1855 he moved to Howard county and lived there ten years, and returned to Saline in 1865. On the 1st of August, 1852, he married Miss Elizabeth Liggett, and has eight children, four sons and four daughters. Mr. Crosslin is a hard working, honest man, and during the war, remained at home at work and attending to his own business, until the fall of 1864, when he too was forced to leave and seek refuge in the confederate army. He joined the army on Price’s raid through Missouri; and the next spring returned home, and to work with his accustomed energy. Page 621

William P. Morrison, P. O., Cambridge. Is a native Missourian, and was born in Clark county, Missouri, September 14, 1849, and moved to Saline county with his parents, in 1855, and settled on the farm where he now lives. On the 26th of November, 1871, he was married to Miss Mary N. McKinney, daughter of John F. and Virginia McKinney. They have three children, one boy and two girls. In 1875, Mr. Morrison moved to Cambridge, and for two years engaged in the general mercantile business, and succeeded beyond his anticipations. But he had been raised on a farm and liked it so much better than selling goods, that he sold out and returned to his farm. Page 621

Michael C. Johnson, P. O., Little Rock. Mr. Johnson was born in Howard county, Missouri, June 14, 1830. He moved to Jackson county, in 1856, and farmed there for several years, and then came to Saline county, where he has since resided, except while in the Confederate army. He was married to Miss Martha B. Woollard, March 13, 1856, and has three children living, two sons and one daughter. He has given farming his special attention, and by economy, industry and judgment, has succeeded in laying up a comfortable living for his family. Mr. Johnson enlisted in 1861, under Gov. Jackson’s first call for state troops, in Gen. Raines’ brigade, M. S. G., as a private, then in the C. S. A.; a while with Quantrell, and then gave up and quit, in 1864 and 1865. Was taken pris-over at Lone Jack, but escaped soon after. Participated in the battles of Wilson’s Creek, Lexington, Lone Jack, Pea Ridge and many others. Page 621

James E. Nickell, P. O., Cambridge. Was born in this county on the 18th of July, 1839. He is a son of Carvile and Nancy Ann Nickell, and like the rest of his father’s sons, has lived in this county all his life, except during the time he was in the Confederate army. On the 5th of June, 1879, he was married to Miss Maria C. Ayers, and has one child, a daughter: Rosie F. Nickell, born August 13, 1880. Life his brothers, he is one of the solid farmers of the county. In November, 1862, Mr. Nickell enlisted as sergeant in Co. E. 1st Reg. Mo. Cavalry, Col. Shelby first, then Gordon, and surrendered in May, 1865. Was slightly wounded in left wrist at Corinth, and in right side at Cane Hill. Participated in the battles of Prairie Grove, Newtonia, Cane Hill, Lexington, Cape Girardeau, Helena, Little Rock, Salina River, Mark’s Mill, Wilson Creek, Corinth, Shiloh, Grenada, etc. Page 621-622

Isaac R. Nickell, P. O., Little Rock. Son of Carvile and Nancy Ann Nickell, was born November 28, 1841, in this county, and has spent his life here, except the time during which he was in the army. On the 8th of February, 1866, he was married to Miss Mary J. Ford, and had one daughter, Ada W., born December 27, 1867. His first wife died on the 27th of June, 1869, and he married his second wife, Miss Mary E. Wilhite, April 4th, 1879. By this second marriage he has two children, Floyd, born March 17, 1880; Mitchell B., born April 4, 1881. Mr. Nickell has served his township as constable for four years. His occupation is farming, which he has always followed. In November, 1862, Mr. Nickell enlisted as a private in Company E., Captain Garrett, First Missouri cavalry; Colonel, first Shelby, then Gordon, and served through to the close, in May, 1865 and surrendered. Was never captured or wounded. He participated in the following battles: Prairie Grove, Newtonia, Cane Hill, Lexington, Cape Girardeau, Helena, Little Rock, Salina River, Mark’s Mill, Wilson Creek, Corinth, Shiloh, Grenada, etc., etc. Page 622

William B. Haring, P. O., Little Rock. Mr. Haring is the son of James H. and Mary Haring, and was born in this county on the 12th day of June, 1847, and so far has made Saline county his home all his life. On the 20th of April, 1869, he was married to Miss Melissa A. Harris, and has five children, born as follows; Lena M., born July 14, 1871; William H., born June 17, 1873; Lugenia, born August 22, 1875; George F., born March 3, 1878; Winnie A., born March 31, 1880. Mr. Haring has given his whole attention to his farm, and is a great admirer of fine stock. Page 622

Andrew Nickell, P. O., Cambridge. Was born in Saline county, Missouri, February 19, 1844, and has lived in this county all his life, except during the time he was in the Confederate army, in Price’s raid, fall of 1864, to the spring of 1865. He was the son of Carvile and Nancy Ann Nickell. On the 13th day of January, 1876, he was married to Miss Nellie D. Cameron, and has two children: Sarah E., born December 6, 1877, John H., born March 24, 1879. By occupation Mr. Nickell is a farmer, and by economy and industry has made for his family a comfortable home. Page 622

James Wilhite, P. O., Cambridge. Was born in Washington county, Tennessee, August 1st, 1796, and moved to West Tennessee, and married Miss Charity Hays, July 25, 1815. In 1816 he came to Missouri and settled in what is now Saline county, four years before the county was organized. He has six children living, his son William, once a merchant in Arrow Rock, now living with his father, and taking care of him, and five daughters. On the 14th of January, 1859, his wife died, after they had lived together forty-four years—and on the 10th day of March, of the same year, at the solicitation of his children, he married again. For his second wife he selected Miss Sallie C. White, and has ever since regarded the same as the best and most important act of his life. He witnessed the great overflows of 1843 and 1844, and greatly assisted the sufferers in that disastrous time. He vividly remembers how difficult it was to travel here in those early times, there being almost no roads but hog-paths, and poor hog-paths at that. Mr. Wilhite was in the war of 1812, under Gen. Andrew Jackson, but was in no regular battle, and has drawn pension for ten years. He was one of the men who built the first church in the county, forty-two years ago—Cumberland Presbyterian. He is now eighty-five years old and the most active man in the county of his age. Page 622-623

John M. Roberts, P. O., Cambridge. Was born in Nelson county, Virginia, on the 8th of June, 1830, and is the son of Jeremiah and Mary A. Roberts. He moved to Missouri and settled in this county, and married Miss Sarah E. Fields on the 15th of October, 1860. He then returned to Virginia, and served to the close of the war in the Confederate army. In 1866 he returned to this county, and purchased the farm on which he now lives, and commenced farming, which he has continued to the present time, except a winter passed in Texas, where he went to locate, but did not like the country. He returned to his farm in Saline where he proposes to stay. He has four children, two sons and two daughters. Page 623

George W. Duncan, P. O., Cambridge. Mr. Duncan is the son of B. F. and Sarah A. Duncan, and was born in Logan county, Kentucky, February 5, 1834. In 1837 he moved, with his parents, to Howard county, Missouri and to Saline county in 1842, and though but a boy, remembers the great overflow of the Missouri river in 1843-4, of which he was an eye-witness. On the 15th of January, 1857, he married Miss Charlotte J. Shumate, and to this marriage were born seven children, five sons and two daughters. Mrs. Duncan died May 11, 1880. On the 19th of April, 1881, Mr. Duncan was married the second time, to Miss Mary Hays. He is one of the solid men of Saline county, giving now all his attention to farming and dealing in stock. Page 623

A. R. Goodman, P. O., Gilliam. Was born in Henrico county, Virginia, October 30, 1821. Moved to Barren county, Kentucky, in 1835, and to Saline county, Missouri, in 1842; and remained here until 1851, when he removed to Atchison county, and lived there until 1860. In that year, 1860, he moved back to this county. On the 3d of July, 1850, he was married to Miss Catherine N. Huff, daughter of Isaiah Huff, one of the oldest citizens of Saline county. He has five children, three sons and two daughters. Mr. Goodman is a carpenter by trade, but is now devoting his attention entirely to farming and stock raising. Page 623-624

Anthony C. Huff, P. O., Gilliam. Mr. Huff is a native of this county, where he was born on the 4th of April, 1827. In 1849, and again in 1852, he went to New Mexico; and on his return, stopped for a time in Platte and Holt counties, but soon returned and settled in this, his native county, in 1860, and has lived here ever since. On the 20th of March, 1852, he married Miss Mary A. Hamilton, of which marriage they have one child, a daughter, Sarah E. Huff, born, April 8th, 1855. Mrs. Huff died on the 20th, day of January, 1857, and on the 20th day of May, 1859, he married Miss Sarah F. Goodman, and to this union eight children have been born, as follows: Lindsa L., born July 10, 1860; Sterling, born October 12, 1861; Robert E., born March 10, 1863; Anthony, born March 11, 1865; Cella M., born April 14, 1867; Boliver, born April 12, 1869; and Lee A., born June 27, 1872. Mr. Huff has been in very delicate health; but it is hoped that the healthy location of his farm will add greatly to his comfort, and prolong his useful life. Page 624

Edward McClain, P. O., Cambridge. Was born in Johnson county, Indiana, on the 4th day of February, 1844, and in the year, 1877, came to Missouri, and settled in Saline county. On the 29th day of August, 1860, he married Miss Margaret Miller; they have four children, two boys and two girls. When he first visited Saline county, he was so enraptured with its matchless soil and excellent class of people, that he immediately purchased land, his choice falling upon an admirable farm. Page 624

Edward Goodman, P. O., Gilliam. Was born in Henrico county Virginia, on the 18th day of July, 1826, and moved to Kentucky when quite a boy, and to Saline county, Missouri, in 1842. On the 20th day of July 1847, he was married to Miss Minerva Dennis, of Indian, and to this marriage was born five children, four sons and one daughter. In August, 1865, his wife died, and on the 29th of July, 1867, he was married again—this time, to Miss Sarah M. Crosslin. By this union he has two children, both girls. Mr. Goodman has lived in Saline ever since 1842, and has devoted all his time and attention to his farm, and to raising stock, being a great admirer of fine stock, and one of the best judges of horse-flesh in the county. Page 624

James M. Jackson, P. O., Gilliam. Son of William and Margaret Jackson. Was born in Howard county, Missouri, December 14, 1831, and was married on the 14th of February, 1861, to -------. They have five children, born as follows: Lillian, born June 10, 1863; Robert E. Lee, born April 19, 1866; Eva May, born May 14, 1868; Martha C., born November 5, 1870; Sallie P., born October 12, 1878. Mr. Jackson moved to Saline county in 1874, and purchased the splendid farm on which he now resides, and has since lived in this county. Before his marriage he sold groceries in Glasgow; since, he has given his undivided attention to farming and stock-feeding. Page 624-625

N. S. Brundege, P. O., Gilliam. Was born in Howard county, Missouri, December 19, 1829, and is the son of John and Sarah Brundege. In 1840, he went to Boone county, and January 1, 1853, married Miss Minerva White. In 1865, he moved to Randolph county; and then, in the fall of 1870, moved to Saline county, where he has since lived. By his first marriage he has one son, Willie, born March 10, 1855. His wife died in January, 1858; and in July, 1859, he was married again, this time to Miss Susan Reed, and by this second marriage has three children, all daughters. In April, 1871, his second wife died; and on the 31st of October, 1872, he married Miss Minerva Allen, who has borne him three children, two sons and one daughter. Mr. Brundege has been a farmer all his life, and by economy and good management has purchased himself a snug farm. Page 625

Evan B. Morgan P. O., Slater. Son of Evan B. and Abigail Morgan. Was born in Cook county, east Tennessee on the 2d of August, 1806, and came to Saline county, Missouri, in 1817. On the 11th day of March, 1840, he married Miss Caroline Jones, to which union there were born seven children, four sons and three daughters. Mr. Morgan was raised on a farm, and is considered in Saline, a successful farmer. Page 625

Andrew J. Plemmons, P. O., Gilliam. Son of John F. and Nancy Plemmons. Was born in Buckner county, North Carolina, on the 8th of July, 1821, and in 1826, moved with his parents to Cooper county, Missouri. They lived a short time in Cooper, and then went to Cole county; from there to Carroll county, and from Carroll to Illinois. From Illinois they moved to Saline county, Missouri, then to Vernon county. In 1876, A. J. Plemmons moved back to Saline county, has lived here ever since, and intends to remain here. On the 7th of April, 1858, he was married to Miss Mary A. Denham. She died May 4, 1875, leaving no children. He married the second time, on the 16th of December, 1878. Except about a year that he was engaged in the mercantile business, in Arrow Rock, he has given his undivided attention to farming. Page 625

Henry Johnson, P. O., Little Rock. Is the son of C. and Patience Johnson, and was born in Ohio, on the Miami river, on the 21st of June, 1822. Came to Missouri and settled in this county in 1839. On the 20th of July, 1843, he married Miss Rhoda A. Cott, and has fifteen children, born as follows: William M., born May 24, 1845; Marietta, born March 12, 1847; James M. P., born August 17, 1848; Richard J., born February 12, 1851; Sarah C., born October 7, 1853; Elizabeth A., born October 5, 1855; Missouri A., born July 1, 1857; Milton P., born February 16, 1859; Sonora J., born November 11, 1860; Joseph M., born May 3, 1862; Pike, born November 21, 1863; Francis S., born September 6, 1865; Patience, born February 10, 1867; Charles L., born November 24, 1868; Fannie W., born March 28, 1871. Mr. Johnson is a blacksmith by trade, and a fine mechanic. He owns and carries on one of the best farms, where all the farms are good, and has a shop on his farm. Page 625-626

James S. Evans, P. O. Gilliam. Son of Bird E. and Elizabeth Evans, was born in Danville, Virginia, December 5, 1816. He first settled in Cooper county, Missouri, and lived there until 1870, and then came to this county. On the 4th of June, 1844, he was married to Miss Melinda Smith, and has three children, two sons and one daughter. He has lived in this county since 1870, and expects to continue farming in Saline the balance of his life, and to find his final resting place beneath her sod. Page 626

William M. Gwinn, P. O. Gilliam. Mr. Gwinn was born on the 30th day of May, 1833, and was married to Miss Martha M. Liggett on the 24th day of July 1855, and has nine children—one son, and eight daughters. Was a member of the Missouri state guard, in 1861, and was in the battles of Booneville, Wilson’s Creek, Pea Ridge and others. From 1875 to 1879, he was justice of the peace; and also postmaster at Fish Creek post office, during the same time. His occupation was that of a blacksmith. He is now, however, giving his whole attention to his farm, which is a fine one. His farm is admirably watered, and some of the springs on it are noted in the neighborhood for their medicinal qualities. Mr. Gwinn is a son of Arthur and Diana Gwin. Page 626

Aaron C. Bradshaw, P. O., Gilliam. Son of Frederick H. and Sarah Bradshaw, was born in Mercer county, Kentucky, December 18, 1854, and settled in Saline county in 1870. He was married to Miss Martha M. Crosslin on the 26th of September, 1876, and has one child, a son, born October 26, 1878. Mr. Bradshaw has lived in this county ever since he came here in 1870. His neighbors and friend consider him as a wide awake and thrifty farmer. Page 626

Mrs. Mildred Page, P. O., Cambridge. Mrs. Page was born in Nelson county, Virginia, on the 14th of February, 1803, and moved with her parents to Missouri in the year 1810, locating in Saline county, where she has sever since resided, and has never been outside of the county. On the 14th of May, 1833, she was married to Mr. John W. Page, and has seven children, one son and six daughters, eight grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren. Mrs. Page has one daughter who is known over the county, and more or less over the State. Miss Sophronia L. Page has been confined to her bed for nineteen years, and is probably on of the greatest sufferers in Missouri, yet she has borne her sufferings with the greatest christian patience, and fortitude. At her husband’s death, Mrs. Page was left with the care of a large family on her hands, and she has nobly fulfilled her mission, besides carrying on the farm. Page 626-627

Sylvanus Reavis, P. O., Little Rock. Son of Edward and Sarah A. Reavis, was born in this county on the 28th of January, 1851. In 1870 he went to Pettis county, Missouri, where he lived about one year, and from there went to St. Clair county, where he also remained a year. From St. Clair he moved to Bates county, and lived there two years. He then returned to his old home in Saline county, disgusted with roving around, and has lived here since. On the 22d of November, 1871, he married Miss Kassie C. Smith. Has four children, two boys and two girls. He is a plasterer by trade, but is now an experienced and extensive farmer. Page 627

Granville A. Bigelow, P. O., Little Rock. Son of Rufus and Harriet E. Bigelow, was born in St. Charles county, Missouri, October 7, 1849, and came to Saline county with his parents in 1856. He worked on the farm, and attended school at every opportunity, until he grew to manhood, when he bought a small farm of his own. On the 23d of January, 1873, he married Miss Sarah L. Wilhite, and has five children, born as follows: William Rufus, born May 2, 1874; Etta Belle, born December 22, 1876; Mary A., born February 11, 1878; Richard A., born October 22, 1879; baby, not named, born March 6, 1881. Mr. Bigelow has a good farm, which he has greatly improved. As a generous, hospitable gentleman, he has no superior. Page 627

HAMDEN S. PIPER, P. O., Little Rock
The subject of this sketch, son on John and Adaline Piper, was born in this county, February 26, 1843, and except while in the southern army, and two years spent in Montana, has passed his life in Saline county. Was in Montana from 1864 to 1866. On the 3d of May, 1866, he was married to Miss Matilda Eversman, and has three sons and three daughters. He has a handsome estate, and is one of the most prosperous farmers in this county. Mr. Piper joined the M. S. G. in 1861, as a private in Captain Liggetts company, Col. E. W. Price’s regiment, Parsons’ division and was discharged at Shreveport, Louisiana. Was once taken prisoner but escaped in a few hours, after a close chase for two miles. He was in the battles of first and second Booneville, Dry Wood, bombarding of steamer White Cloud, and in many fights and skirmishes. (page627)

John R. Hardin, P. O., Slater. Son of Henry and Margaret Hardin, was born in Loudon county, Virginia, on the 14th of February, 1819, where he was raised, and farmed for a number of years. At one time before the war, he was an extensive dealer in leaf tobacco. He served in the Confederate army from the beginning to the close of the war, then left Virginia, moved to Missouri, and settled in this county. He was married on the 13th day of May 1841, to Miss Annie Workman, and has nine children, five sons and four daughters. Ever since his arrival in Saline he has been engaged in farming and stock-feeding, etc. Page 627-628

Joseph P. Davis, P. O., Little Rock. Son of David B. and Rebecca C. Davis. Was born in Callaway county, Missouri, July 1, 1834. Moved first to Dade county and lived there five years, then to this county in 1867, and has lived here ever since. On the 20th of November, 1856, he married Miss Elizabeth A. Lakin, and has seven children, two sons and five daughters. In his early days he gave lessons in music, and was very successful. He is at present engaged in agricultural pursuits, and feeding stock. By energy and business management, he has accumulated a handsome property. During the war, Mr. Davis was in the state militia for six months. Page 628

David C. Morrison, P. O., Little Rock. Was born in Clark county, May 12, 1844, and, at ten years of age, in 1854, came with his parents, Archibald and Catherine Morrison, to Saline county. On the 15th of September, 1867, he married Miss Evaline Willis, and has seven children, one son and six daughters. Mr. Morrison has spent yearly all his life in this county, except while in the Confederate army, and is noted for his thrift and hospitality. Mr. Morrison enlisted as a private in 1861, in M. S. G., and was in first and second battles of Booneville, etc. Was captured on Blackwater, in Col. Robinson’s regiment of recruits, and held prisoner in St. Louis and Alton for nine months; then released and came home; then enlisted in company E., Capt. Garrett, 1st Missouri cavalry, Col. Shelby, afterwards Gordon. Page 628

Charles E. Eversman, P. O., Little Rock, son of Lewis and Annie Eversman, was born in Warren county, Missouri, January 25, 1828; and came to Saline county in 1854, and has one son and three daughters. Mr. Eversman is one of Saline’s best farmers, and an admirer of fine stock, which he handles to some extent. He feeds stock heavily each year. Page 628

Judge Robert Field, Sr., P. O., Little Rock. The subject of the following sketch is the son of John and Sarah Field, and was born in Albemarle county, Virginia, December 14, 1803. In June, 1830, he loaded his team at Richmond, Virginia and moved to Missouri. He was married in Virginia on the 14th of December, 1829, to Miss Nancy Piper, who bore him four sons, and three daughters. On the 16th of June, 1844, his wife died, and in December, 1846, he was married again to Miss Fannie H. Combs, and by this marriage he has one daughter. His second wife died May 13, 1869, and he married the third time, on the 14th day of September, 1871, to Mrs. Catherine Morrison. Judge Field is one of the old settlers and one of the solid farmers of Saline county. He served the county as sheriff for two terms, 1840 to 1844, and was judge of the county court foury ears. Page 628-629

William H. Thompson, P. O., Little Rock. Son of Thomas G. and Mary Thompson; was born in Robertson county, Tennessee, June 14, 1828. When about two years old, his parents came to Missouri, and settled in Saline county, in 1830; he has lived in this county ever since. On the 27th of March, 1850, he married Miss Annie Johnson, and has seven children living, three sons and four daughters. During the war he served in the Seventy-first regiment, E. M. M., in Capt. Burnsides’ company, and afterwards in the Fifth prov. regiment, but was in no engagements. Mr. Thompson is a practical farmer, industrious and full of energy, and has the reputation of being a straightforward intelligent gentleman. Page 629

George G. Haring, P. O., Cambridge. Was born in Saline county on the 14th of July, 1849, and was married October 19, 1871, to Miss Sarah E. Hays, daughter of James and Rebecca Hays, also of this county. To this union have been born five children; Joseph R., born August 25, 1872; Mary W., born April 2, 1874; Sarah F., born November 30, 1875; Edward, born January 15, 1877; and James M. born March 11, 1879. Mr. Haring’s occupation is that of farmer. He has followed tilling the soil, and raising and feeding stock, all his life, and has never lived out of this, his native county. Page 629

Benjamin F. Duncan, P. O., Cambridge. Mr. Duncan was born in Culpepper county, Virginia, on the 4th of December, 1800, where he was raised and educated; and moved to Logan county, Kentucky, in 1828; thence to Howard county, Missouri, in 1837; and finally to this county, and first settled in the Big bottom, opposite Glasgow, but on account of the overflow of the bottom lands, was obliged to moved out to the high lands. In 1844, he moved to Lafayette county, where he continued until 1849, and then returned to Saline. On the 22d of January, 1828, he was united by marriage to Miss Sarah A. Shields Pendleton, of Warrington, Virginia, and has five children, four sons and one daughter. He has also eighteen grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren. Mr. Duncan, though now in his eighty-second year, is in the enjoyment of his faculties, and has excellent health. He is living on his farm at the present time, giving his whole attention to agriculture. Surrounded by his children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren, the evening of his days is passing calmly and peacefully away. Page 629

George W. Baker, P. O., Slater. Mr. Baker was born March 15, 1815, in Clark county, Kentucky and is a son of George and Martha A. Baker, who went from Virginia to Kentucky. Mr. Baker spent his early life on the farm and at school. He was educated at Sylvan Academy, Kentucky. He came to Missouri in 1839, and settled in Cooper county, where he was engaged in farming until 1855, when he moved to Saline county. He now lives four and a half miles south of Slater, where he has a fine body of land. Mr. Baker was married May 1, 1836, to Miss Harriet P. Allen of Kentucky. They have seven children: James A., Mrs. Mary E. Daniel, Eliza G., Mrs. Martha R. Dickinson, Mrs. Susan B. Baker, George W., and Thomas J. Mr. Baker has always been an active, public-spirited citizen. He and family are members of the Christian church. Page 629-630

Joseph Newton Chiswell, P. O., Slater. Was born August 4, 1827, in Montgomery county, Maryland, and is a son of Augustus and Jemima Eleanor Chiswell, of the same county and state. He helped on the farm, attending school in the winter, until his father died, when he was thirteen years old, and he then assisted his mother inn managing the farm. He went to Loudon county, Virginia, and learned the trade of blacksmithing, remaining three years—then returned to Maryland for five years. In 1849 he came to Marion county, Missouri, and spent one year in blacksmithing. Returned to Maryland, and during his stay the old homestead was sold, and he then came to Saline county, in 1856, and worked at his trade, near the farm he now lives on. In 1859 he bought 200 acres of raw prairie, and forty acres of timber on Fish creek, and commenced improving, by degrees. His first dwelling house was accidentally burnt. He rebuilt a smaller house, and in 1871 he made an addition to it—and again in 1880, he enlarged it considerably, building a gothic front, as it now stands. Page 630

Capt. Pike M. Thomson, P. O., Slater. Is the son of Capt. John and Ann Thomson, and was born in Fayette county, Kentucky, August 25, 1819. His grandfather was a revolutionary soldier, and his father in Gen. Jackson’s army, at the battle of New Orleans, in 1815. His maternal grandfather was a revolutionary soldier, and was with Daniel Boone at the battle of Bryant’s Station, Kentucky. Soon after his birth, Capt. Pike Thomson was brought by his parents to Saline county, Missouri, where they settled in 1819. His father died, and his mother returned to Kentucky, where she is now living, at the age of eighty-three. In 1839 he came back to Missouri and settled on Foster’s Prairie, Howard county. He sold his farm in 1844, and returned to Kentucky. October 15, 1843, he married Miss Elizabeth E. Goodwin, daughter of Floyd K. and Mary J. Goodwin, of Fayette county, Kentucky. March 8, 1849, he returned to this county, and purchased of W. B. Shackelford, the farm he now lives on, which he increased to 1,700 acres, by additional purchases. He has children living; John W., Floyd G., Lucien M., Pike M., Ruth Elizabeth, and Laura. Capt. Thomson enlisted in the Missouri state guard upon Gen. Jackson’s call for men, on Col. Dill’s staff, Parson’s division; was in the battles of Dry Wood and Lexington. At Green, was sent back for stores, and captured at home. Page 630

Joseph Smith, P. O., Slater. Son of Joseph and Mary Smith, was born June 17, 1814, in Morgan county, Virginia. His father and mother were both natives of Virginia. He remained until he was nineteen years old on his father’s farm. In the spring of 1838 he moved to Fayette county, Ohio, remained there several years, and then returned to Virginia. In 1842 he married Miss Elizabeth Compton, daughter of Jonathan and Mary Compton, of Virginia. In 1844 he moved to this county, and settled first near High Hill. In 1846 he purchased the farm he now lives on, to which he has added by subsequent purchases, until it now amounts to ninety-four acres of land. Mr. Smith has five children, three sons and two daughters. Two of his sons died in early manhood, and also one of his daughters, dying after she was married. The other daughter is married and living, with two children. Mr. Smith has made his property by industry and economy. He is a member of the C. P. Church. Page 631

William Bibb Soper, P. O., Orearville. Son of James and Elizabeth Soper. His grandfather came from Germany; his father was born in Maryland, and went to Jessamine county, Kentucky, when a boy, with his parents, in 1800. His mother also was born in Jessamine county, Kentucky. His mother died in 1873, while at Mrs. Jeff. Allen’s in this county. The subject of this sketch came to this county in December 1860, in company with his brother-in-law, Jeff. Allen, and in partnership with him rented the Duggins farm. In 1867 they bought the farm of 400 acres on which they now live, and which formerly belonged to Willis Piper. Mr. Soper makes his home with his brother-in-law, Jeff. Allen, being himself unmarried, as yet! In 1861 he enlisted in Capt. George Bingham’s company, company H, 71st regiment. E. M. M., and served three years. Surrendered at Glasgow in 1864, under Chester Harding, to Gen. Shelby’s command. Page 631

Thomas Jefferson Allen, P. O., Orearville. Was born in Jessamine county, Kentucky, November 19, 1831, where he was raised on his father’s farm. His father was a brickmason in early life, but quit the trade and went to farming. His father was George W., and his mother Eliza C. Allen, and they both died in this county. Mr. Allen learned the blacksmith’s trade, and worked at it six or seven years before he left Kentucky. In December, 1860, he came to Saline county, Missouri, and settled on land of Lewis Duggins, eight miles east of Marshall, and in 1863 moved to the farm afterward purchased by J. Long, five miles south of Miami. In 1867, he bought the old Willis Piper farm, on which he now lives. In 1853, Mr. Allen married Miss Nancy Agnes Soper, daughter of James and Elizabeth Soper, who was born in Jessamine county, Kentucky, in September, 1831. They have four children: Alice L., William F., James E. and Bettie S., all living. Mr. Allen has a half interest in about 400 acres of as fine wheat and grass land as there is in the county. The parents of Mrs. Allen were natives of Kentucky. Mr. and Mrs. Allen are both members of the Christian church. Page 632

Dr. Charles Alexander Carthrae, P. O., Orearville. Dr. Carthrae is the son of Charles W. and Elizabeth Carthrae, and was born, October 7, 1829, in Rockingham county, Virginia. He was mostly educated in Saline county, Missouri, to which he came when quite young, with his parents. He studied medicine with Dr. F. A. Combs, then of this county, now of California, and attended the Missouri Medical College, St. Louis, where he graduated in two years, and entered into partnership in the practice with his brother-in-law, tutor, and friend, Dr. F. A. Combs, which partnership continued about six years. Dr. Combs, who went to California, in 1877, practiced medicine in this county for nearly thirty years, from 1848 to 1877. Page 632

Jesse Orear, P. O., Orearville. Was born in Mt. Sterling, Montgomery county, Kentucky, January 9, 1827, and is the son of Ross and Melinda Orear. He was educated at the country schools, commenced merchandising early in life, and the greater part of his life has been devoted to it since. He has accumulated a handsome property up to this time, having a splendid farm of 376 acres, well improved. His fortune is due to his own unaided efforts, accumulated by close attention to his business, steady, moral habits, and his career should furnish an example, and encouragement to the young men of Saline county. Page 632

Dewilton Pope Ming, P. O., Orearville. Son of Charles Anthony and Nancy Ming, of Calloway county, Missouri. Was born March 26, 1835, in Greene county, Kentucky. His father was a native of Virginia, and his mother of Kentucky. Her maiden name was Lewis, and she has raised fourteen children, six boys and eight girls. Soon after the birth of D. P. Ming, the subject of this sketch, his parents moved to Callaway county, Missouri, where he was raised on his father’s farm. In 1866 he came to this county, and settled near his present residence, three miles south of where the city of Slater now stands. In 1871 he was married to Mrs. Mary Piper, widow of Willis Piper, and daughter of Charles W. and Elizabeth Carthrae. Her father was a native of Rockingham county, Virginia, and her mother of Albemarle county, Virginia. They moved to Saline county, Missouri, in 1837. Mrs. Ming had one son, Charles Eugene Piper, by her former husband. In 1878 Mr. Ming purchased the farm of Dr. Fielding A. Combs, of 160 acres of splendid land. He afterward added fifteen acres, making the farm contain 175 acres, situated three miles south of Slater. He devotes his attention to the growth of grain, and to stock-feeding. Page 632

Prof. Joseph Baker Davis, P. O., Slater. Son of Isaac and Rebecca Mary Davis, formerly Baker. Was born March 9, 1848, in Marshall, Saline county, Missouri. His parents were natives of Virginia, his father, a merchant by profession. They came to Booneville, Missouri, about 1820, and remained there eight to ten years. In 1830, they moved to Jonesboro, in this county, and in 1835, to Marshall, where he established the first store. Cornelius Baker, grandfather of the subject of this sketch, was the first justice of the peace in Marshall. His father died soon after the birth of his son in 1849. Prof. J. B. Davis was educated at Central College, Fayette, Missouri, graduating in 1869. He then entered the State University, and graduated there in 1873. He afterwards studied medicine and attended lectures at the St. Louis Medical College. Since then he has been occupied in teaching. He has taken great interest in the success of the teachers of the county; and at the last meeting of the institute, he was elected editor of the educational department of the Saline County Progress. Page 632-633

John William Thomson, P. O., Slater. Son of Capt. Pike M. Thomson and Elizabeth E. Thomson, his wife. Was born in Fayette county, Kentucky, January 21, 1845. When he was but three years old, his parents moved to Missouri, and settled in this county. He was raised and educated in this county, and assisted in managing his father’s farm, before and for several years after the war. In 1864, he entered the Confederate army, during Price’s last raid, in company G, Williams’ regiment, Jackman’s brigade, and was in the battles of Big Blue, Westport, Newtonia, and Fayetteville. He was married October 15, 1869, to Julia Franklin, daughter of A. S. Graves and Augusta J., his wife of Washington county; children: Emmett, Claude, Emma, Lillian and an infant. Mr. Thomson is an energetic, enterprising man; a grain grower and stock feeder, and a lover of fine stock and pedigreed animals. Page 633

Judge Ebenezer Waldon Jenkins, P. O. Slater. Son of William and Mary Jenkins. Was born in Brooklyn, New York, November 19, 1827. When he was but eight years of age, his parents moved to Genessee Valley, Wyoming county, New York, and engaged in farming. He was educated in Wyoming county, at Middlebury Academy. At the age of eighteen, he commenced teaching, and continued attending school until he was twenty-two. In 1852, he came to Saline county, and taught two years in the Walnut Grove school-house, four miles west of Arrow Rock, on the old state road. In 1854, he was married to Miss Louisa S. McMahan, daughter of Thomas and Margaret McMahan. In 1857, he moved to Howard county. In 1859, moved to St. Louis, and commenced studying law. In 1861, he returned to this county; and in 1862, located in Marshall for the practice of law, which he continued from 1862 to 1873. In 1862, he was made county attorney, which office he held from 1862 to 1867. From 1870 to 1872, he was probate judge of Saline county. In 1873, he bought of Pike Thomson the farm upon which he now lives, to which he has since added, until he has now 320 acres of splendid land. The judge’s children are as follows: Ella, Jennie, Alice, Lillie, and Kate. Page 633-634

James Burton Brown, farmer, P. O., Arrow Rock. Mr. J. B. Brown was born in Albemarle county, Virginia, August 16, 1817. He was but seven years old when his parents moved to Mead county, Kentucky, where he lived about five years, and then moved to Saline county, Missouri, and settled on the E. W. Brown farm. The subject of this sketch was mostly educated in Saline county. In 1837 he was married to Miss Eliza R. Durrett, daughter of Capt. Wm. Durrett, a native of Wilson county, Virginia. Mr. Brown had twelve children, eleven of whom are now living. He is at present living upon and cultivating his farm, a splendid one of 400 acres, well improved. When the war broke out he enlisted in Price’s army, in 1862, and was discharged in 1865. Was in the battles of Lexington and Pea Ridge, and was wounded in the thigh. He was taken with typhoid fever, and was hauled home from Ozark. He is the son of Judge Bernis Brown, who was one of the prominent men of the county. Page 634

Wm. B. Brown, farmer, P. O., Orearville. Was born in Saline county, November 12, 1840, and was raised and educated in Saline county, and farmed on his father’s farm until he went into the army. In 1861 he enlisted in the Saline Jackson Guards, and in the Missouri State Guards. Was in the battles of Booneville, Carthage, Lexington, Elkhorn town, Cave Creek, Huffman’s Ferry, Hartsville, Fort Scott, Cane Hill, Cape Girardeau, Helena. He was taken prison at Granby, was paroled, and came home; staid about a week, and then joined the recruits taken out by Congreve Jackson; discharged in 1865; and his shoulder broken by being thrown from his horse during the war. Returned home to Saline after the war, and was married March 28, 1866, to Miss Mary Miller, daughter of Samuel Miller, and a native of Saline county. Has five children: William, Jesse, James, Mary, and Etta. He is a son of James and a grandson of Bernis Brown. Page 634

G. W. Cowan, farmer, P. O., Slater. The subject of this sketch was born in Jefferson county, Tennessee, October 24, 1822. At the age of twelve, in 1836, he came with his mother and the rest of the family to Saline county, Missouri, in wagons, and settled on the farm then owned by Daniel Thornton. After coming to Saline, he learned the carpenter trade from Howard Cameron, and followed it for about ten years, and then went to farming. In 1847 he was married to Miss Mary Thornton, daughter of Daniel Thornton, one of the first settlers of Saline county, She was born in 1830, in Saline county. They have had nine children, and have seven now living: Daniel, Robert, William, Howard, Mrs. F. R. Wiley, Nancy E., and Mary A. Since 1857 he has lived on a farm four miles west of Saline City. In 1864 he enlisted in the Confederate army, in Price’s last raid, and was at the Big Blue fight, and in the fights of the retreat. Page 634-635

Isaac Thornton, P. O., Little Rock. Was born in East Tennessee, January 26, 1816 in the spring of which year his parents moved to Saline county, Missouri. His father being in very moderate circumstances, Isaac did not go to school much, but worked on the farm. He remained with his father until his marriage. His father, Daniel Thornton, came to Saline county by water, on a keel-boat worked by oars. There were four men, two women and four children in the boat. The children were John, Susan, Rebecca, and Isaac Thornton. They landed at Cooper’s fort, in Howard county, where they remained a couple of weeks, and then pulled on up the river and landed in Saline, one mile and a half above Arrow Rock, and settled in the timber, two miles from the river, on the farm now owned by John Thornton. They first lived in a single room log cabin, and had to endure many hardships. Until Isaac was grown he did not know what it was to go to a store to buy clothes. On the 2d of February, 1837, Mr. Thornton was married to Miss Rebecca Chapell, daughter of E. Chapell, a native of North Carolina. They have had eight children, six of whom are living, five boys and one girl; James H., D. B., A. J., E. E., William H. and Mary Frances. In 1858 he moved to Saline City and commenced running a grist and saw mill, which now has an engine of forty-horse power, that only requires sixty pounds of steam to run the whole machinery. In 1838 he moved up to Buchanan county and set up a mill about six miles east of St. Joe, and staid there until 1855. He then sold his mill and returned to Saline, and put up a mill three miles west of Saline City, and in 1858 moved to Saline City, as related. His father, Daniel Thornton, died in 1855, and was buried at Concord Church. His wife died in 1874 and was buried at the same place. Page 635

John M. Jackson, P. O., Little Rock. Was born in Howard county, Missouri, four miles east of Glasgow, October 1, 1828, where he lived with his father until 1844, getting his early education in a log cabin, Wm. Burton, teacher. In 1844, he came over to Saline county, and settled on what is now known as the Jeff Howard farm, close to Saline City, and went to clearing land, his father having bought the land from Ephraim McClain, and in 1845 his father also moved over from Howard to this farm. He remained on the farm with his father until 1861. In 1850, his father (Thomas Jackson) went to California, where he remained three years. Two years before he had gone to New Mexico, prospecting, and about the same time (1848) Johnson Jackson, his brother, and uncle of the subject of this sketch, was killed in New Mexico, for his money, by Simms and Constable. Constable turned state’s evidence and Simms was hung. Constable was afterwards killed. In 1861, John Jackson enlisted in the state guard, and then in the Confederate army, and was in the following battles: Booneville, Lexington, Wilson Creek, Huffman’s Ferry, Newtonia, Hartville, Cane Hill, Cape Girardeau, Lone Jack, Big and Little Blue, Little Rock, Prairie Grove, &c. His rank was corporal bugler of Capt.Tilton’s battery. At the battle of Prairie Grove, he captured a bugle from the enemy, which he has yet. It has a dint on one side which was made by a minnie ball while he had it at his mouth in the act of blowing. After the war (discharged 1865), he came home and went to work on the farm where he has been ever since. Has never married. Page 635-636

William P. Lee, P. O., Little Rock. Mr. W. P. Lee was born in Albemarle county, Virginia, October 12, 1833, where he received his early education, and lived until about thirty years of age. At the age of twelve years, he entered the store of his uncle Walter Perry, in Charlottsville, as salesman, then went in the dry goods and grocery business at the same place. In 1865 he left Charlottsville, to travel for the Fairbanks company, and remained on the road about fourteen years. Previous to this however, he had traveled through Missouri soliciting risks for a St. Louis insurance company, in which he continued for about three years. In October 1879, he settled in Saline City, in this county, where he has since resided, engaged in the mercantile business, and is one of the prominent merchants of that thriving little city. Mr. Lee is a first-class business man, and has a fair future before him. Page 636

A. J. Thornton, P. O., Little Rock. Was born in Saline county, in 1833 on the Daniel Thornton farm, where Mr. A. Price now lives. He went to school and farmed, until he was twenty-eight years old. He then went to blacksmithing on the home farm, having learned the trade mostly by himself. He worked there until 1876, when he moved to Saline City and there followed his trade. Mr. Thornton was married in 1860 to Miss Sarah J. Wiley of this county, a daughter of N. Wiley, and a native of North Carolina. Their family consists of two boys and six girls; Henry, Charley, Mary B., Susan A., Alice, Clara L., Rebecca E. and Sallie B. October 16, 1864, he enlisted in the confederate army as it passed through Saline county, on Price’s last raid. He was a private on detached service, and was discharged in the spring of 1865. He is the youngest son of Daniel Thornton, one of the oldest settlers of Saline county. In July, 1865, while going on a steamboat from Shreveport to Baton Rouge, with 250 soldiers, when about fifteen miles below Shreveport on Red River, the boat struck a snag and sank and broke in two. Quite a number were thrown into the river, and about sixty were drowned. Mr. Thornton escaped by swimming. Coming home on the steamer Henry Ames, when just above Vicksburg, Mr. Thornton was standing on the hurricane deck, and noticed that the boat was on fire in the pilot house. By prompt alarm and action, the fire was extinguished and the boat was saved. Page 636-637

John D. Thomason, P. O., Little Rock. Was born in Scott county, Kentucky Nov. 15, 1847, where he was reared and received his education. After quitting school he taught school and worked in a saw-mill. February 19, 1868, he was married to Miss Bettie Thomason, daughter of Granville Thomason, and in the fall of that same year he moved to Saline county, and settled on the old Howard farm, west of Saline City, and went to farming. Two years after he moved to a farm northwest of Arrow Rock, but remained there only a year. He then removed to Saline City, and taught school for several years. He then went into the drug business, his being the first drug store established in Saline City. Two years after he sold out his stock of drugs to W. A. Morehead, and purchased the dry goods and grocery business of W. H. Ballard, and has been in this business ever since. In 1880 he took Mr. J. A. Howard in as partner, and under the firm name of Thomason & Howard, compose one of the principal business firms of Saline City. Mr. Thomason has four children, all boys, viz: Clarence, Irvine, Luther, and Claude. He is licensed as a Baptist preacher, and preaches at Saline City, and at the Fish Creek Church, twice per month at each. He joined the Baptist church when but sixteen years of age. Messrs. Thomason & Howard have a commodious warehouse and an excellent boat landing. They handle the Saline City lime, and are agents for the same for central Missouri. This line is of the best quality, and has no superior. The company manufacture their own barrels, and their business is immense. In 1880 they shipped 4,800 barrels, and didn’t have enough to supply the demand. Page 637

Charles W. Hensick, P. O. Little Rock. Was born in St. Charles county, Missouri, May 17, 1848. His father (Casper Hensick) and mother emigrated from Germany to the United States, and settled in St. Charles county, Missouri. Mr. Hensick lived in St. Charles county until he was sixteen years old, obtaining there his education. At the age of sixteen, he left St. Charles, and went over to St. Louis county, and worked for his brother Ernest about one year, farming. He then returned to St. Charles county, and worked in a livery stable in Wentsville for over two years, and then came to Saline county in the year 1870. Since then he has lived in and near the town of Saline City. In 1872, he was married to Miss Amanda Jackson, daughter of Thomas Jackson, a native of this county. Mr. Hensick then commenced farming, on the farm upon which he low lives, adjoining Saline City, having purchased a portion of Thomas Jackson’s farm. He has one child, a girl, Georgia Belle. Mr. Hensick is a fair example of the success which ever attends industry and steady habits. Page 637

George F. Pearson, P. O., Little Rock. The subject of the present sketch was born, two miles west of Arrow Rock, February 6, 1846. His father, O. B. Pearson, was born in Spartanburg, South Carolina, and came to Saline county, Missouri, in 1830, landing at Arrow Rock. He was a merchant and pork packer, being, at one time, in partnership with Gov. C. F. Jackson, in the latter business. He lived in the town of Arrow Rock about ten years, and put up the first mercantile house built there. He then moved to his farm, two miles west of Arrow Rock, where he died May 10, 1871, and was buried in the Arrow Rock cemetery. He was first married to Miss Mary Wright, sister of Com. Wright, and they had seven children. His first wife died in 1845. Afterwards he married Miss Eliza Ealback, a native of North Carolina, and to this union five children were born, four boys: George, Richard, Henry and William, and one girl, Roxy. At the age of fourteen, he enlisted in the army, and fought in the war of 1812. Mr. George F. Pearson obtained his education in Saline county, and farmed on his father’s farm, mostly, until he was married. In 1865, he went to Adams county, Illinois, and remained a short time, but soon returned home. He was married. January 25, 1877, to Miss Mary E. Eversman. They have had but one child, a girl, who died January 5, 1881, and was buried in the Arrow Rock cemetery. He is now engaged in farming near Saline city, and is the owner of the noted lime works, one mile north of that town. Page 638

Ephraim S. McClain, pioneer; P. O., Little Rock. Mr. E. S. McClain was born in Madison county, Kentucky, April 1, 1800. At the age of eleven he came with his parents to Howard county, Missouri, and settled near what is now known as New Frankfort, and lived in Howard county until 1827. In 1819 he went to farming for himself, and in 1827 moved over into Saline county. He first settled on what is now known as the Jeff Howard farm, adjoining Saline City, which he entered, and upon which there was a spring, called "the Big Indian Spring." April 18, 1821, he married Miss Sallie Cooper, daughter of Colonel Ben. Cooper, also a native of Madison county, Kentucky. He lived on the farm he entered until l844. Six children were born to him, three boys, David Elijah and Benjamin, the last now dead; and three girls, Mrs. Leanna Neff, Anna and Matilda. David McClain, the father of Ephraim, was a native of South Carolina, and moved to Kentucky at a very early day, and married Miss Leanna Oldham, of Kentucky. There were in his family ten children—six boys and four girls. Ephraim was the fourth son. In the early times, Billy Cooper, James Sappington, S. Cooper, and Colonel Cooper and Ephraim McClain were close neighbors. There were plenty of Indians in this county then, when he lived in Howard county, and they gave the settlers much trouble. He once attended a war dance at the place where the town of old Franklin was built. When he came to Saline county the Indian troubles had ceased. In 1826 the settlers got their meal and flour from a mill run by a tramp wheel located at the edge of the Glasgow bottom. Mr. McClain’s wife and daughters spun and wove flax and cloth, and made their own carpets. In 1814 his brother William was killed by the Indians. He was out with his brother, Ewing, and William Brown, hunting, where Fayette now stands. The Indians hearing the reports of their guns, waylaid them and shot William McClain. They shot at the others, but missed them. They skinned William McClain’s head, and cut his head off; split open his breast and took out his heart. The body was found the next day and buried, but the heart could not be found. Mrs. McClain died in 1873 and was buried in the Sappington graveyard, one mile southwest of Saline City. Mr. Ephraim McClain is now living in Saline City with his son. E. S. McClain, the second son of Ephraim, was born in Saline county, May 26, 1830. He was married to Miss Sallie Steele, February 22, 1859. They have had six children, three of whom are living, all girls. Page 638-639

Charles Edward Wood, P. O., Little Rock. Was born July 3, 1850, in Saline county, where he was raised and received his education, finishing the same at Milton’s academy, Arrow Rock. His father, Milton Wood, was born in Albemarle county, Virginia. He came to Saline at an early date, settling near Jonesboro. He was married to a sister of Judge Robert Field. His family consisted of thirteen children, eight boys and five girls: Wm., John, Ras, James, Joseph, Thomas, Robert, and Charles; Paulina, Sarah, Anna, Lucy, and one now deceased. The boys are all living; the girls living are, Mrs. Sarah Huston, Mrs. Anna Minor, and Mrs. Lucy Mitchell. Mr. Wood died about 1855, and was buried about two and one-half miles southwest of Jonesboro. Charles E. Wood, the youngest son, spent most of his life on his father’s farm, until the fall of 1864, when he enlisted in Col. Robert Wood’s regiment, Clark’s brigade, Marmaduke’s division. C. S. A., and was discharged in 1865. He was engaged in the battles of Little and Big Blue, Independence, Westport, and in all the long days of fighting from Westport to Fort Scott, Lanesville, &c. Rank, sergeant major. On the retreat to Texas they were sometimes for days without other food than the acorns. At one time Mr. Wood went to Gen. Price’s headquarters and got some beans, the General remarking that beans was the best he had. When he enlisted he weighed one hundred pounds, and weighed just seventy-five pounds when he reached Clarksville, Texas. He was taken sick with camp fever, at Myrtle Spring, Texas, and was down for five weeks. As soon as he could travel, he went to Washington, Ark., where his brother Robert was held as a prisoner, and remained until his brother was released. When the war ended, he came back to Arrow Rock, and went into the drug business, in which he continued about four years. He then went into the grocery business, continuing it three years. In May, 1871, he was married to Miss Columbia Gregory, of St. Louis. In 1876, he lived one year on his father’s place, and then moved to the farm upon which he now lives, one mile west of Saline City. Mr. Wood was the youngest soldier in the Confederate army, (he thinks), from Saline county. He was census enumerator, in 1880, for Clay township. Page 639-640

John J. G. Burton, P. O., Little Rock. Was born in Dyer county, Kentucky, in 1812, where he grew up and was educated. His father, Hutchins Burton, was a native of Virginia. Married Miss Elizabeth Stepp of Virginia, and came to Kentucky at an early day, and settled in Dyer county. There were nine children, five boys and four girls. The subject of the present sketch was the third son, and when about seven years of age, his father moved to Missouri and settled in Howard county. He lived with his father until he grew to manhood, and then purchased a farm of his own in Howard county, east of Saline City, in the river bottom, where he lived and farmed until he came over to Saline county. He was first married to Miss Mahalie Finley, March 27, 1834, a native of Tennessee. They had six children, four sons and two daughters. The first Mrs. Burton died in 1851, and was buried at the graveyard near Lisbon school house, Howard county. October 6, 1852, Mr. Burton was married to Miss Caroline West, by whom he has five children, three sons and two daughters. Thirty-five years ago he joined the Christian Church in Howard county. The names of his children are (by first wife): Milton H., Marion F., Harrison, Riley, Lavinia, and Adaline. By the second union: Joel H., Thomas J., Nicholas, Sarah E., and Clementine. He is now engaged farming fifteen miles east of Marshall. Page 640

Aaron Starns, P. O., Little Rock. Was born in Howard county, Missouri, August 6, 1844. While he was yet an infant his father moved to Lafayette county, and remained there about two years, then to Putnam county, then to Linn, county, and then back to Howard county, where his son received his education. His first schooling was in Linneus, Linn county. In 1860 his father’s family moved to Prairie county, Arkansas, and remained there until the fall of 1861. They then moved to Carroll county, and stayed until the spring of 1862, and then returned to Camden, Missouri, where Aaron Starns enlisted in the United States army. His father was a native of Howard county, Missouri, married Sarah Stanley, and had nine children, six of whom are still living: Aaron, Daniel, Thomas, Amanda, Margaret, and Mary. In December, 1862, he died at Cape Girardeau, and was buried there; his wife died in 1879. In 1862 Aaron re-enlisted in the 29th Missouri infantry, was discharged in 1865, at Indianapolis. Was not in any battles. In 1868 he was married to Miss Martha J. Highberger, a native of Scotland county, Missouri, by whom he has six children, four boys and two girls: William, John, James and Walter, Ivy and Mary. Mr. Starns is now engaged in farming fifteen miles east of Marshall. Page 640-641

John Fisher, P. O. Little Rock. Mr. Fisher was born in St. Louis, June 14, 1853. When he was only three years old, his father, Lewis Fisher, moved to Montgomery county, Missouri. His father was a native of Germany, came to St. Louis, and then married Catherine Flintrope, also a native of Germany. They had three children, all boys, William, Lewis and John. In 1862 Lewis Fisher, Sr. died and was buried in Montgomery county, and his wife in 1868, and was buried in the same place. John Fisher obtained his education in Montgomery county, and after he was grown, worked several years in a vineyard in Montgomery county. After that he hired as a farm hand to Dr. Marrick; worked also in Franklin county. In 1877 he was married to Mary Burbom. They have two children, both girls, Louisa and Henrietta. In 1879 he came to Saline county and settled on a farm, which he now owns, situated two and one-half miles west of Saline city. Page 641

Rufus Bigelow, P. O., Little Rock. Was born in St. Charles county, Missouri, May 27, 1824. His father, Moses Bigelow, was born in Shenandoah county, Pennsylvania, in 1796. In 1820 he moved to St. Charles county, Missouri, and in the same year was married to Miss Perthana Bryant, a native of Kentucky. They had seven children, three boys and four girls: James, Rufus, Abner, Russia, Phoebe, Agnes, and Perthana, the last two dying when quite young. He died and was buried in St. Charles county, in 1863; also his widow in 1873. Rufus, the second son, was raised and educated in St. Charles county. At the age of twenty-two he was elected justice of the peace for one of the townships of St. Charles county and served eight years. At the age of twenty-three he was married to Henrietta E. Eversman. In 1856 he was elected assessor of St. Charles county, served one year, and then, 1857, he moved to Saline county, and located where Saline City now stands. He cleared off the site in 1857, part of the land belonging to heirs, for whom he was executor; but there being no power in the will authorizing him to lay off and sell town lots, he went to Jefferson City during the session of the legislature in the winter 1857-8, and obtained the passage of a law authorizing him as executor to lay out one-half of the town of Saline City, and sell the lots, by giving additional bond. Col. Allen, then county surveyor, laid out the town. The site of the town, when he moved there, was covered with hazel brush, and a tall growth of black oak. The number of bears killed there had given it the name of Bear thicket. He lived there until 1870, selling dry goods and groceries. In that year he moved to the farm on which he now lives, one and one-half miles west of town. He has nine children, five boys and four girls: Granville A., Jonathan B. Edward C., James R., Rudolph A., Alice E., Martha C., Addie E., and Lena D. Has a fine farm of 170 acres, and pays attention to fine stock; has the Glendower breed of horses, and short-horn cows. Page 641-642

Zachariah W. Rowland, P. O., Little Rock. Mr. Rowland was born near Winchester, Clark county, Kentucky, April 22, 1813, where he obtained his early education. His father, William Rowland, came to Clark county, Kentucky, at an early day, and was married there to Mrs. Nancy Ronimas, widow of Frank Ronimas. They had but one child, Zachariah W. Rowland. While he was still an infant, his father enlisted in the United States army, war of 1812, and died in that army. His mother afterward married Archibald Morton, and Z. W. Rowland lived with his mother and her third husband until he reached the age of fifteen years, when he hired out on a farm. At sixteen years old he came to Missouri, in 1830, and settled in Randolph county for one year, then went to Macon county and lived there until 1871. On the 29th of November, 1839, he was married to Miss Elizabeth Rowland, a daughter of Thomas Rowland, and also a native of Clark county, Kentucky. They had nine children, six of whom are now living: W. F., Thomas L, Presley, Mary Eliza, Louisa F., and Luvisa. In 1871, he went to Pettis county, Missouri, and about fifteen month after came to Saline county, and settled on the farm where he now resides, nearly two miles west of Saline City. In 1864 he enlisted in Col. Perkins’ command, and was discharged in 1865. Was in the battles of the Big Blue and near Ft. Scott. Page 642

John Fritz Teckemeyer, P. O., Little Rock. Was born in Austria, September 15, 1843. His father, Christopher Teckemeyer, was a native of Austria, and married Mary Deiker, by whom he had seven children, three now living: John F., Louis E., and Mrs. Eliza Archmane. They came to the United States about 1846, and settled in St. Charles county, Missouri. He died and was buried in St. Charles county, in 1866, as also his wife in 1875. The subject of this sketch got his education at the common schools of St. Charles county, worked with his father, and hired out until he was twenty-three years of age. He then went to farming, having lost his father. He was married, December 5, 1867, to Miss Julia Peuster, daughter of Wm. Peuster, a native of Prussia. They have two children, one boy, Andrew W., and one girl, Margaret D. In 1877 he moved to Saline county, and settled on Henry Hensick’s farm, and in the following November moved to the farm on which he now lives, four miles northwest of Arrow Rock. In 1861 he enlisted in the home guard, under Col. Krekle. Page 642

Catlett Orear, P. O. Orearville. Mr. Orear was born at Frederick county, Virginia, November 15, 1806. When quite young he came with his parents to Clark county, Kentucky, and then to Montgomery county, where he was raised and educated. His father, Robert Orear, was a native of Fauquier county, Virginia, was born in 1783; was married to Malinda Orear, also of Fauquier county, Virginia. They had eight children, seven of whom are still living: Catlett, B. F., George H., John W., Nelson, Jesse, and Mrs. Elizabeth Gorrell. He died about 1871, and was buried at Orearville. His wife died many years before him, in 1828, and was buried in Montgomery county, Kentucky. He married again, Miss Sallie Cork, a native of Kentucky; they had one child, now dead. In 1854, Robert Orear moved to Saline county, Missouri, and settled near Orearville, where he lived until he died. Catlett Orear came to Saline county in 1843, and settled on the place he now lives on, about eight miles east of Marshall. In 1839, he was married, in Nicholas county, Kentucky, to Sarah R. Caldwell, a native of that county. They have had three children, two of whom are now living, both boys: Dr. W. C. and Judge Bellvard J. His farm contains 200 acres, 120 acres in cultivation. Is a member of the Methodist Church south, and has been twenty or thirty years. Page 642-643

Judge Bellvard J. Orear, P. O., Orearville, Was born in Montgomery county, Kentucky, June 24, 1838. His father Catlett Orear, was born in Fauquier county, Virginia, and moved to Kentucky at an early date, and while in Kentucky was married to Sarah R. Caldwell. They had three children, two of which are living. B. J and Dr. W. C. They came to Saline county in 1843, and first settled where he now resides, about ten miles east of Marshall. Bellvard, the oldest son, was only six years old when his father moved to Saline county, and his education was obtained at the common schools of this county. In 1856, he went to the state university and remained three years, but did not graduate. He then taught school three years in Boone and Saline counties, and then went to farming, in which pursuit he has been engaged ever since, merchandising in Orearville for two years, 1872 and 1873. In 1861, he was first married to Miss Maggie H. Brown, of Callaway county. They had three children, all living; Annie B., Sallie J., and Celsus. His first wife died February 12, 1871, and was buried at Orearville. The second time, he married Miss Sarah E. Brooks, of Johnson county, Missouri, June 1, 1873. They have one child, Lester. The second wife died September 13, 1875, and was buried at the same place as his first. May 23, 1878, he married Miss Mary McMahan, of Johnson county. In November, 1878, he was elected judge of the county court, from the first district. In 1865, he bought the farm he now lives on, ten miles east of Marshall, and has 320 acres of splendid land. In the fall of 1863, he enlisted as private in the Confederate army, company K, Wood’s regiment, Jackman’s brigade, and was discharged in 1865. Was in the battles of Lexington, Little Blue, Westport, Ft. Scott, and Newtonia. Page 643-644

Joseph Gorrell, P. O., Orearville. Was born in Berkley county, Virginia, July 5, 1814. His father, William Gorrell, was also a native of Berkley county, Virginia, and was there married to Nancy Vanvector, also a native of Virginia. They had nine children, five of whom are now living. Joseph, Antony T., William J., Mary, and Susan F. In 1843, he moved with his family to Saline county, and stayed a year; then moved to Pettis county. He died about the year 1856, and was buried at the Union Church, two and a-half miles south of Longwood. His widow died in 1870, and was buried at the same place. Joseph, the eldest son, was educated at the county schools of Berkley county, and stayed with his father until he was twenty-two years of age. In 1858, he came to Saline county, and settled on the farm on which he now lives—100 acres of fine land, ten miles east of Marshall. He was first married in 1833 to Miss Priscilla Blue, of Berkley county, Virginia. They had three children, all living: William, James P., and John P. His first wife died in 1848. He afterward married Miss Angeline McGill, who only lived sixteen months. He then married Miss Elmira Miller, and they had one child, a girl. His third wife died, and he was married the fourth and last time to the widow Marshall, daughter of Robert Orear. Page 644

Samuel P. Allen, P. O., Orearville. The subject of the following sketch was born in Jessamine county, Kentucky, December 4, 1845. His father, George W. Allen, was a native of Virginia, moved to Kentucky when quite young, and was married to Eliza Sale, also a native of Virginia. They had twelve children, ten of whom are now living, eight boys and two girls: Thomas J., James William, John H., Richard M., Hugh G., George W., Jr., Lawrence R., Samuel P., Elizabeth and Sallie. George W. Allen, with his family, moved to Saline county in September, 1859, and settled near where the city of Slater now stands, farming. He died in June, 1878, and was buried in the Slater cemetery; his wife died in the preceding April, and was buried at the same place. S. P. Allen obtained his early education in Kentucky at the country schools, and finished at Arrow Rock, George Miller, teacher. He then farmed near Jonesboro for two years. In 1872 he purchased the farm on which he now lives, eight and one-half miles from Marshall, consisting of 182 acres of choice land. In October, 1868, he was married to Miss Emma Durrett, a native of Saline county, and daughter of Benjamin Durrett. They have two children, both boys: Ernest V. and Arthur. In 1864 he enlisted in the Confederate army under Gen. Shelby, as a private, and was discharged in 1865. Was engaged in the battles of Lexington, Little and Big Blue, Independence, Westport, Fort Scott, Cane Hill, etc. Was sick near Shreveport for two months with typhoid fever, taken in February, 1865. Page 644-645

Joseph M. Cott, P. O., Orearville. Was born in Saline county, Missouri, December 3, 1844. His father, Solomon Cott, was a native of Ohio, and was married to Miss Sarah Fort, a native of Virginia. They came to Saline county at an early date, and settled five miles northwest of Saline City, on what is now known as the Flemming farm. They had twelve children, eleven of which are still living, five boys and six girls: Jackson, Amos, Freeman, Harry, Joseph, Catherine, Jane, Mary, Elizabeth, Margaret, and Rhoda. He died November, 1867, and was buried at Fish Creek Church; his widow died in January, 1881, and was buried at the same place. Joseph M., the subject of the present sketch, received his education at the country schools. In 1861, when only seventeen years old, he enlisted in the southern army under Gen. Stump Price, who was captured, and the command devolved on Congreve Jackson. Discharged in 1865. Was a private, and was engaged in the battles of Pea Ridge, Corinth, Grand Gulf, Vicksburg, the Georgia campaign, Franklin, Columbia, Nashville, Port Gibson, Iuka, Champion Hill, and Black River. Captured at Vicksburg and at Greensborough, North Carolina. After the war he returned to Saline, and to farming. In 1875, he purchased the farm he now lives on, of 115 acres of first class land. In 1866 he was married to Jennetta Brown, a native of Saline county and a daughter of Benjamin Brown. They have four children, three boys and one girl: Eugene, Amma, Tasso, and Cora. Page 645

John R. Durrett, P. O., Orearville. Mr. John R. Durrett was born in Albemarle county, Virginia, February 15, 1832. His father William L. Durrett was also a native of Albemarle county, and was married to Miss Roberts, a native of the same county. They had ten children in all, only four of whom are now living: John R. William, Dr. F. R., and Mrs. Elisa Brown. About the year 1832, William L. Durrett, with his family, moved to Saline county, Missouri, and first settled three miles northwest of Saline City, and engaged in farming. He died in June, 1879, and was buried in the Lankford graveyard; his wife had died long before him, and was buried three miles west of Saline City. John R. Durrett, obtained his education in Saline county, finishing at Bethany College, Virginia. After returning home he went to Texas, traveling for a time. Returning home, he went into the mercantile business at Cambridge, in this county, continuing about two years. He then went to farming. In 1861 he enlisted under Shelby, as a private, served through the war, and was discharged 1865. He was engaged in the battles of Booneville, Big Blue, Helena, Independence, Cape Girardeau, Cane Hill, Little Rock, Springfield, Hartsville, Westport, Little Blue, Cove Creek, Coon Creek, Mark’s Mill, etc. He was wounded in the shoulder at Westport with a minnie ball. Coming home after the war, he went to farming seven miles east of Marshall, and remained there five years. He then came to the farm on which he now resides, nine miles northeast of Marshall, where he is engaged in farming, owning 140 acres of fine land, well improved. In 1869 he was married to Miss Cynthia Townsend, a native of Cooper county. They have had two children, but only one of them. John R., is now living. His wife died in 1875, and was buried at the Townsend graveyard in Cooper county. Page 645-646

John Thornton, P. O., Arrow Rock, Was born in Jefferson county, Tennessee, July 21, 1813. His father Daniel Thornton, a native of South Carolina, moved with his father to Tennessee, and was married there to Mary Nave, sister of Henry and Isaac Nave. They had twelve children, four boys and eight girls. In 1816 he came to Saline County with his family, traveling by water, on a keel-boat. At that time John was about three years old, yet remembers the start from Tennessee. They first landed at Pier Flesh Creek, just above the present town of Arrow Rock. Just previous to his arrival the inhabitants had been greatly alarmed on account of the killing of a man named Gray, by the Indians. Gray lived in the bottom below Saline City. On arriving, Mr. Thornton went with his family to Cooper’s fort, and remained there a couple of weeks, and then settled in Saline county, two and a half miles from Arrow Rock. He stayed there until the land sales of 1819, and when the speculators bought the land on which he had settled, he moved two and one half miles further out, into the prairie, and entered the land now owned by H. Price. He died August 31, 1855, and was buried at Concord church. His widow died March 3, 1874, and was buried at the same place. John Thornton never had the advantages of much education—working on the farm until twenty-one years of age, when he went into his father’s blacksmith shop, and learned the trade. His father made the plows that broke the first prairie soil of Saline. From his father’s shop, John moved to Arrow Rock, and carried on the trade there for sixteen years. In 1836 he was married to Sarah Oldham, and they had eleven children, seven of whom are now living: Daniel, Rasweight, John, Aurelia, Laura and Lucy. His first wife died December 14, 1875, and was buried at Concord Church. September 19, 1880, he was married to Mrs. Hubbard, relict of William Hubbard, her maiden name, Miss Arretta Groom. Mr. Thornton now resides on a farm three miles north of Arrow Rock. Page 646-647

Abram Groom, P. O., Little Rock. Was born in Montgomery county, Missouri, September 24, 1832. His father, Aaron Groom, was a native of Kentucky. He was first married in Kentucky, and had four children by his first wife: Betty, Jacob, James and John. He came to Montgomery county, Missouri, about 1815, and settled in the southern part. His first wife dying, he afterwards married Martha Quick, a native of Kentucky. They had nine children, five boys and four girls: William, Abram, Marion, Aaron, Newton, Martha, Malinda, Arretta and Lucinda. Aaron Groom died in 1845, and was buried in Montgomery county, Missouri; his wife died in 1871, and was buried in the same county. Abram, the second son by his father’s second wife, continued to live in Montgomery county until 1864, engaged in farming. In 1871 he was married to Mary J. Snethen, a native of Montgomery county. They have two children, one boy Ollie, and one girl, Annie B. Groom. In 1876 Mr. Groom came to Saline county, and settled on the farm on which he now resides, four miles north of Arrow Rock; has a fine farm of 125 acres, and is a good farmer. In 1861 he enlisted in the southern army, under Col. Dorsey, of St. Charles county, and was in the battle of Mt. Zion, in Boone county. In 1862 he was taken prisoner, and taken to Mexico, in Audrain county, and was imprisoned for eleven days and then turned loose. He was discharged in 1865; rank, private. Page 646-647

John M. Tennill, P. O. Gilliam. Is the son of Hugh and Elizabeth Tennill, was born in Saline county, Missouri, in June 1842, and has lived all his life in this county, except three years service in the Confederate army. What education he received he got by chance, that is, as he could get it at odd times. He was raised on a farm, which employed pretty much all his time. In the spring of 1862, he enlisted in company E., 1st Missouri cavalry, first under Col. Shelby, then under Gordon, and was in the battles of Booneville, Lexington, Dry Wood, Cape Girardeau, Wilson’s Creek, Hartsville, and many others. Was wounded at Cape Girardeau, in the shoulder, of which he still feels the effects. He was taken prisoner some twenty-five or thirty times, but always managed to escape. On the 17th of June, 1866, he was married to Miss Columbia Goodman, and has seven children, six of whom are living. Hugh E., James B., Joseph V., Philema, Sophronia M. and Robert M. Since the war Mr. Tennill has given his whole attention to farming. Has been deputy sheriff, and is at present deputy collector for Clay and Cambridge townships. Page 647

Jesse Lankford, P. O., Marshall. Mr. Lankford was born in Isle of Wight county, Virginia, March 19, 1796, and is the son of George and Pamelia Aurora Lankford, formerly Herring. During his infancy, his parent moved to Pulaski county, Kentucky; remained there ten to twelve years, and then moved to Robertson county, Tennessee. Here his father died and his mother moved near to Nashville, Tennessee. When but nineteen years old, he went to New Orleans (as a substitute), in the command of Gen. Carroll, and took part in the battle of New Orleans, in 1815; after which he returned to Tennessee. In 1817, being then in the employ of Dr. John Sappington, of this county, he came with that gentleman, first to Callaway county, Missouri, and remained a year, and then moved to Saline county. He built a two-story log house for Dr. Sappington, it being the first two-story house in this county; and the lumber was sawed by hand. In 1821, in company with Alex Gilbraith, he built a saw mill on Salt Fork, now Jonesboro, which was the first mill in the county. He was married to Miss Nancy Garrett, April 24, 1828, daughter of Abel and Nancy of this county, natives of Virginia. In 1820 to 1829, Mr. Lankford was engaged in manufacturing salt. He spent much time and money in this enterprise, even purchasing in Virginia, a large cast-iron pan, with a capacity of three thousand gallons, which was transported on a flat-boat to the Lamine river, and landed at Saline. But he failed of success, and lost all the money he had invested in the enterprise. In 1841, he built a second mill at Jonesboro, in company with Mr. Boswell. In a few years, he returned to his farm. The school building in Arrow Rock was built by him. He was commissioned by Governor Miller, major of the militia. The names of Mr. Lankford’s children are as follows: Lavinia, Emily, Louisa J., Garrett, Jas. D. Geo. W., now living, and married, except George W., circuit clerk of the county. Mr. Lankford was the most enterprising man in Saline county, in those days, and through his long life has proved himself one of the most valuable citizens the county has ever had. In all his many years, his usefulness has been unflagging. In eleven more years, he will have lived a century, which proves how steady and temperate his habits have been. Trembling now, on the borders of that better, though unseen world, his long and honorable life stands out, a worthy example to the present and future young men of Saline. Page 647-648