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“HISTORY OF SALINE COUNTY MISSOURI”
Biographies by township

Marshall Township
pages 718-792

Joseph Baker, farmer, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Ross county, Ohio, in 1822. His early life was passed on a farm. Was educated in the public schools. In April, 1846, he was married to Miss Charlotte Byers, of same county. Ten children were born to them, as follows: Wm. Joseph, Edward, Josiah, Minerva, wife of Chas. Norton, of Slater: John, Elisha, Theodore and James. In 1861, Mr. Baker enlisted in the Federal army, Capt. S. Orange’s company, under Gen. Sigel. Although a private, he was given the title of "Col." by his comrades, for valorous conduct at the battle of Strasburg, Virginia, having assumed command of his regiment, which, with its officers, was in full retreat, ordering it to halt and face the enemy, which command was obeyed, resulting finally in the total rout of the Confederates. He was engaged at the second battle of Bull Run, where he, with 1,200 others, was taken prisoner, paroled and sent to Columbus, Ohio. He was suffering then, and is now, from a disease contracted in the service, in consequence of which he has made application for a pension. After the war, he returned home in Ross county, Ohio, where he resided until 1871, when he came to Saline county and engaged in farming and dealing in stock. Page 718

Conrad Oser, farmer and overseer of the poor farm. P. O., Marshall. Was born in Ripley county, Indiana, in 1845. Was educated there. Served as an apprentice to the carpenter trade in Aurora, Dearborn, county, for seven years. In 1863, he went to Boone county, Kentucky, where he followed his trade for six years, in Belleview. Mr. Oser was married in 1869, to Miss Isadora Loudon, of Boone county, Kentucky, by whom he had four children: Emma, Susan, Mattie and William. In 1869 he came to Saline county, and located near Arrow Rock, where he engaged in farming for several years, afterwards working at his trade in said city. He took possession of the county poor farm in March, 1880, which has improved much under his careful management. Page 718-719

Joseph C. Clark, farmer, P. O., Marshall. Was born in county Dublin, city of Dublin, in 1855, where he was raised and educated. At the age of sixteen, he came to America, his parents, now dead, having emigrated before him. Landing in New York, he remained there a short time, and then went to Ross county, Ohio, where he farmed for seven years. In January, 1877, he left Ohio, and located in this county, where he has since resided, engaged in farming. He is industrious and trustworthy, and a credit alike to the "Emerald Isle" and the land of his adoption. Page 719

William R. Miller, farmer, P. O., Marshall. Is a native of this state and county; born, near Malta Bend, in 1853. Was educated in this county, and raised on a farm. His father, Robert Miller, was a native of Rockingham county, Virginia, coming to this county at an early period in its history. He was emphatically one of the pioneer settlers of this section, and had been closely identified with its progress and development. He died in 1855, deeply regretted by all who know him. His widow has since married Mr. John Kiser. Wm. R. is now engaged in farming, paying considerable attention to stock-raising. He is a young man of more than ordinary promise, and is highly respected by the community in which he resides. Page 719

James P. Adams, farmer, P. O., Marshall. Born in Henry county, Kentucky, April 4, 1846. When three years of age his father’s family moved to Saline county, locating on a farm. He was educated in the common school of said county. He married Miss Lillie Shannon, a native of Henry county, Kentucky. They have one child, Ollie May. In 1864 he enlisted in Capt. Harris’ company, Col. Wood’s battalion, Gen. Marmaduke’s division. He was engaged in the following battles: Blues, Independence, Westport, Little Osage, Newtonia and all others in which his command took part during the raid. He surrendered at Shreveport and returned home. He now resides on a farm two and one-half miles east of Marshall. Page 719

John K. Lewis, farmer, P. O., Marshall. Born in Saline county, March 2, 1842. He is the eighth child of Geo. W. Lewis. Was raised on a farm and educated at the place of his birth. In 1862 he enlisted in Capt. Geo. Kirtley’s company, Col. Shelby’s regiment, Marmaduke’s division. He participated in the following battles: Coon Creek, Prairie Grove, Helena, Little Rock, Mansfield, Newtonia, Pineville, Pleasant Hill (Louisiana), Jenkins’ Ferry and Camden. At the battle of Helena he was wounded by a minnie ball in the left leg and struck in the right side by a piece of shell which broke three of his ribs, which laid him up for seven months, being taken care of by Maj. Clark, now of Booneville. He remained south until the surrender at Shreveport, when he returned home. March 2, 1872, he married Mattie Peterson, a native of Saline county. They had five children, two now living: Hattie E. and James S. He now resides three miles east of Marshall, upon a fine farm. Page 719-720

James M. Odell, farmer and stock-raiser, P. O., Marshall. Born in Saline county, October 14, 1844. He is the second child of William Odell. Was educated in the public schools of Saline county. Was raised on a farm. In November, 1877, he married Miss Ollie Jesler, a native of Nodaway county, Missouri. They have two children, girls: Ara Belle and Ida. At present he is engaged in farming and stock-raising, four miles east of Marshall. In 1864, he enlisted in Capt. Davis’ company, Col. Wood’s battalion, Gen. Shelby’s division. He was engaged in the following battles: Waverly, Blues, Westport. His company was not engaged in the battle at Independence, it being upon the left wing. Page 720

John T. Moreland, farmer and stock-raiser, P. O., Marshall. Born in Bourbon county, Kentucky, August 15, 1857. Was educated at a private school in the same county, and also at the Edgar Military Institute, Paris, Kentucky. His father, Thos. R., was a native of Bourbon county. He married Catherine T. Hedges. They had eight children, seven of whom are now living. Thos. R. died in Illinois, in January, 1864. His wife is still living there. At the age of six years, John T., the sixth child, went to live with his aunt. Mary A. Scott, who raised him. She lived in Paris, Kentucky, until the year 1858, when she came to Saline county, and bought a farm near where John T. is now residing. She then went to Illinois, where she has remained ever since. John T. is now residing on an excellent stock farm of 450 acres, where he is giving special attention to the raising of blooded stock. Page 720

Enos Dull, farmer and stock-raiser, P. O., Marshall. Born in Augusta county, Virginia, November 23, 1819. Was raised on a farm. Ws educated in the same county. September 7, 1843, he married Sallie Hanger, a native of the same place. They had no children. His wife died in 1847, and was buried at Mt. Tabor. He was again married to Miss Angeline Stauffer, a native of Maryland. They have two daughters: Lizzie Virginia and Lillie Ann. Up to this time he was engaged in milling. In 1848 he came to Saline county and lived for two years on what is now known as the Stephen Smith farm. In 1850 he bought the farm on which he now resides, six miles southeast of Marshall, consisting of 100 acres of excellent land. In 1864 he enlisted in the Confederate army, Capt. Payne’s company, Gen. Shelby’s division. Was engaged in the following battles: Independence, Blues, Little Osage, and all other engagements in which his command participated. At the battle of Little Osage he was nearly covered with dirt thrown up by a cannon ball. Page 720-721

Richard E. Holmes, farmer and stockraiser, P. O., Marshall. Born in Prince William county, Virginia, April 24, 1826. Was educated in same place. Raised on a farm. January 12, 1854, he married Charlotte C. Peters, a native of Fauquier county, Virginia. They had nine children, four of whom are now living, three daughters and one son: Laura L., Bettie, Annie R., and Willie S. In 1857 he moved to Saline county, locating near Marshall, where he remained for two years. In 1860 he purchased the farm upon which he now resides, consisting of 240 acres of good farm land, which by steady application he has developed into a well appointed farm. In the fall of 1861 he enlisted in Captain Emmerson’s company and was captured at Blackwater. He was held prisoner at St. Louis for three months, when he took the oath of loyalty and came home. Page 721

Charles N. Martin, farmer and stock-raiser, P. O., Marshall. Born in Shelby county, Kentucky, January 28, 1815. His father, Peter, was a native of Virginia, and came to Kentucky when a boy. He married Sallie Neal, by whom he had twelve children, six of whom are now living, four sons and two daughters. He died January 1, 1863. His wife died, January 20, 1867. Both are buried in Henry county, Kentucky. Charles N., the sixth child was educated in Shelby county. He lived with his father on a farm until he was thirty-two years of age. November 26, 1846, he married Lavinia Smith, a native of Henry county. They had seven children, six of whom are now living, three sons and three daughters: Isaac P., James L., John C. B., Mary E. A., Lucy C., Mignonette. After his marriage, he lived in Henry county for about eight years, removing from there to Saline county, where he settled upon the farm where he now resides, situated six miles southeast of Marshall, consisting of 240 acres of very fine, well improved land. He is a member of the Baptist Church. His wife is a member of the M. E. Church, South. He has served as school director during two terms. Page 721

Benjamin F. Paul, farmer, P. O., Marshall. Born in Woodford county, Kentucky, August 5, 1837. His father, Henry L. Paul, was only four years of age when his father went to Woodford county, Kentucky. He was a farmer. He married Catherine McKee, a native of Bourbon county, Kentucky. They had ten children, six of whom are now living. Henry L. Paul died in 1870, at the ripe age of ninety-seven. His wife died in 1849, September 3d. Both lie buried in Woodford county. Benjamin F., the eighth child, was educated in the public schools of Woodford county. In the fall of ’54, he came, with his father, to Saline county, where he remained a year, assisting his brother, James H. and Samuel, with their farming. Returning home at the end of that time, he remained there till 1860, where he settled in Saline county, living with his brothers, keeping bachelor’s hall. In November, 1861, he enlisted in Capt. Emmerson’s company, which was captured at Blackwater. He was not captured, being ordered by the Captain to wait for some others who were to follow. While waiting, the balance of the company were captured. In February, 1862, he re-enlisted in Capt. Englehart’s company, which started to join Gen. Price. They arrived within thirty-five miles of Grand river. Finding all of the crossings guarded by Federals, they determined to return to Marshall, and wait till the river could be crossed. On the evening of their return, the whole company was captured by Capt. Ostermeyer, with the exception of Benjamin F. Paul, Thomas O’Donnell, Jo. Allen, William Russell and Charlie Fitz. Mr. Paul then went to Kentucky, where he remained till the close of the war. July 24, 1867, he married, in Bourbon county, Catherine Shropshire, a native of Scott county, Kentucky. After living in Kentucky one and a half years, he came to Saline county, and settled one mile north of where he now resides. In 1872 he removed to the farm where he now is, given him by his father, consisting of 240 acres of hemp land. It is one of the best stock farms in the county, being watered by Dick’s creek, and some six or seven good springs. Six children were born to him—two now living. William B. and Lucy Anna. His wife has been a member of the Christian Church since the age of eighteen. Page 721-722

Jacob F. Smith, farmer, P. O., Marshall. Born in Boone county, April 14, 1854. His father, Henry Smith was a native of Kentucky. At the age of fourteen, he came to Boone county, where he married Henrietta Houck. Twelve children were born to them, eight of whom are now living. In 1877, he removed his family to Cooper county, where they now reside. Jacob F., the fifth child, obtained his education in the public schools of Boone county. His early life was spent on a farm. At the age of twenty-two, he left the homestead, and for two years was foreman on tie-work, in Boone and Cooper counties, for John B. Readmon. In March, 1879, he came to the farm, consisting of 80 acres of fine tillable land, situated five and a half miles southeast of Marshall. August 5, 1880, he married Lucy Roberts, a native of Boone county, Missouri. In 1879, he served, for a short time, as deputy sheriff. Page 722

James L. Martin, farmer and stock-raiser, P. O., Marshall. Born in Henry county, Kentucky, November 5, 1851. He is the second child of Charles N. Martin. He was three years of age when his father and family moved to Saline county. He obtained his education in the Saline county common schools. His early life was spent on a farm. In 1872 he married Susannah Campbell, a native of Mercer county, Kentucky, and daughter of John Campbell. Five children are the fruit of their union, three girls and two boys: Edna, Bettie M., Lulu H., Charlie, and John C. He is now residing on a farm, six miles southeast of Marshall. He and his wife are members of the M. E. Church, South, he uniting in 1865, and she in 1870. Page 722-723

Arthur J. Wilson, mill operator, P. O., Marshall. Born in Indiana, in August, 1846. At about the age of twenty-one he came to Cooper county, Missouri, where he lived until 1876, when he moved to Saline county. He and his father Jonathan purchased and operated a saw-mill situated on Camp creek, seven miles southeast of Marshall. It has a capacity of 6,000 feet per day, and is run by two engines of ten-horse power each. Arthur J. still continues in the business. The mill is one of the best in the state, and is complete in all of its appointments. He is using Scott & Cooper’s engines. December 18, 1879, he married Miss Jennie Downs, a native of Saline county. He has spent some time traveling over the western states and territories. July 15, 1867, his father was killed by falling upon a circular saw, and was buried at Pilot Grove. His wife died in 1871, and was buried at the same place. Page 723

Andrew J. Odell, P. O., Marshall. Born in Saline county, Missouri, April 9, 1845. His father, William, was a native of Virginia. He married Matilda Sandwich. Moved to Marshall, Saline county, at an early day, where he is still living. Andrew J., the oldest child, was educated in Saline county in the public schools. Was raised on a farm. In October, 1864, he enlisted in Capt. Davis’ company, Wood’s battalion, Shelby’s brigade. He took part in the following battes: Glasgow, Lexington, Blues, Independence, Kansas City, Coonskin Prairie. At Kansas City he received fourteen bullet holes in his clothes, but miraculously escaped without a wound. While in the army he did not taste bread nor salt for thirty-one days. For three days he was absolutely without anything to satisfy hunger. In December, 1866, he married Mary F. Pannell, a native of Todd county, Kentucky, and daughter of Moulton Pannell. They have five children, all living, four sons and one daughter: J. W., J. M., Lonzo E., Walter A., Susan J. At present he is engaged in a saw mill, owned by Wilson & Carroll, situated on Camp creek, seven miles southeast of Marshall. Page 723

John B. Peterson, farmer and stock-raiser, P. O., Marshall. Born in Saline county, July 5, 1844. His father, Thomas, came to Saline county at an early day, and married Miss Mary Hall. They had eight children, five now living, three boys and two girls: John B., Edward, Glenn H., Martha Lewis, and Cornelia. Thomas died in 1873, and was buried at Rock Creek. His wife died in 1877, and was buried in the same place. John B., the eldest son, was reared on a farm and educated in Saline county. In the fall of 1861 he enlisted in Capt. William Emmerson’s company; was captured at Blackwater; was detained a prisoner at Alton until the spring of 1862, when he was exchanged and came home. In the same spring he re-enlisted in Capt. Jackson’s company, Col. Dorsey’s cavalry, and went to Arkansas, where he was transferred to Capt. Laseur’s battery, under Brig.-Gen. Hindman. He engaged in the following battles: Blackwater, Saline City, Prairie Grove, Little Rock, Helena, Mansfield, Camden, Jenkins’ Ferry. At the battle of Helena thirteen of his company were killed and wounded. At the battle of Jenkins’ Ferry his horse was shot four times. After the surrender at Shreveport he came home. In February, 1873, he married Mary Lewis, a native of Saline county. They have three children, two sons and one daughter: George F., John B., Annie K. He now resides on a farm two miles east of Marshall. Page 723-724

Jesse VanWinkle, P. O., Norton. Founder of the town of Norton, and the son of Job and Elizabeth VanWinkle, was born in St. Clair county, Illinois, January 15, 1825. His father was a native of Pennsylvania and his mother of Kentucky. After marriage they moved to the then territory of Illinois; they were greatly exposed to the attacks of Indians, and had often to seek shelter in a fort. They lived and died within twenty-five miles of St. Louis. The subject of this sketch pursued farming until 1850, and then went to California, staying over a year, and then returned to his home in Illinois. In 1866 he came to Saline county, and settled on the land he bought of Dudley Cooper, upon part of which the town of Norton now stands. September 18, 1856, he was married to Miss Lucinda Padfield, daughter of James and Lavinia Padfield, of Christian county, Kentucky. They have seven children; John H., Nevada A., Ella J., Jessie, Mary, Florence L., and Nora, all living. Page 724

W. S. Holland, M. D., P. O., Marshall. Was born in Allen county, Kentucky, December 4, 1825. Came to Missouri with his parents when fifteen years old. Commenced the study of medicine in 1844, and first graduated March 2, 1848. Married January 11, 1849, and located, March 1, 1849, in Calhoun, Henry county, Missouri, where he practiced his profession until the close of the war. Was surgeon in the Union army for two years. Was a member of the constitutional convention which framed the state constitution of 1865. In 1866 was elected to the state senate from the fifteenth district, composed of the counties of Johnson, Henry, St. Clair and Benton. In 1861 was appointed receiver of the land office, which was then located at Warsaw. In 1866 was appointed United States examining surgeon, which position he still holds. He was a democrat until the first year of the war. He espoused the Union cause at the beginning, and acted and voted with the republican party until 1868, since which time he claims to have held no allegiance to any party, but has only voted for such men as he deemed worthy of the offices they sought. The word nominee has had neither charms nor terrors for him. The doctor was one of the pioneers of the temperance work in Missouri, and has so earnestly advocated advanced temperance views, both with pen and speech, as to be frequently called a temperance fanatic. On January 1, 1877, he commenced the publication of the Irrepressible Conflict, which was the first prohibition paper ever published in this state. In 1868 he voted the national prohibition ticket, the only man in Saline county that voted it. The doctor has never hesitated to stand alone and battle for what he considered right. For thirty-three years he has been engaged in an active practice of his profession and still seems to delight in it. Being a graduate of an eclectic school of medicine as well as an allopathic graduate, and giving his preference to homeopathy, he is not recognized by the allopathic school as regular, and is by them commonly styled a quack. In 1848 he joined the Christian Church, and has been a prominent and active member of that church ever since, but has held the most kindly feelings for other denominations. The doctor located in Marshall June 12, 1874, and says he never expects to have any other home on earth. Page 724-725

John M. Elgin, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Washington county, Maryland, in 1847. Was there raised and educated to the age of twenty-one. He came to Missouri in 1868, but returned to Maryland in 1869. He again came to Saline county in 1871, and has lived here ever since. In 1878-9, he was engaged in the grocery and butcher business, in Marshall. In 1869, he married Miss Kate Rose, daughter of R. F. Rose of this county. They have two children, Julian H. and Tucker R. His first wife died July 4, 1872. In 1873 he married his present wife, Miss Jennie Tomkins, of Bourbon county, Kentucky, daughter of George A. Tomkins, and they have three children: James F., Annie E. and John M., all living at home. Mr. Elgin did not enter either army. Is a member, at Mt. Olive, of Old School Presbyterian Church; a Mason, a member of A. O. U. W. Lives on his father’s farm of 163 acres, and cultivates the same. Page 725

Andrew M. Rader, P. O., Marshall. Mr. Rader was born in Nicholas county, West Virginia, in 1824, and lived there until 1838, and in 1839, he moved to Johnson county, Missouri, and settled near what is now Rose Hill. Lived in Johnson county until 1851, when he moved to Henry county, where he held his first pastoral charge, he having been ordained a minister; then to Bolivar, Polk county; then Buffalo, in Dallas county; Carthage, Jasper county, where he bought a farm and was living there when the war broke out. In 1864, he moved to Saline county, where his family have lived ever since, he being mostly engaged in preaching in this and adjoining counties. He has been engaged in preaching the gospel, for over thirty years, in the M. E. Church, South. In 1843, Mr. Rader married Miss Isabella McFarland, having thirteen children, of whom eleven are living: Harriet, Laura, Daniel L., Henrietta, Thomas, John, Perry, Ella, Robert, Marvin and Milton. Mr. Rader joined the Confederate army during the war, and was captain of company D, Eleventh Confederate regiment, afterwards chaplain of the Second Missouri, but resigned in 1863, and was not connected with the army afterwards. Was in the battle of Pea Ridge, in command of his company. His oldest son, William was killed while scouting in Jasper county. Is still connected with the conference of the M. E. Church, South, but is on what is called the "Supernumerary List." Page 725-726

Martin A. Gualdin, farmer. The subject of the following sketch, Martin A. Gauldin, was born in Campbell county, Virginia, in the year 1818, where he received his education, and served an apprenticeship at the carpenter trade. At the age of twenty, in 1838, his parents having recently died, he left Virginia for Missouri, and after prospecting several counties, finally settled in Marshall, Saline county, in 1840, where he remained until 1846. In that year he was married to Miss Nancy Kiser, daughter of old Capt. Daniel Kiser, one of the pioneers of the county. His family consists of Edmund, Giles, Addie, Mollie, Marcellus, Joshua, Robert, Bertie, Martin, and Callie, all of whom are living. During the war he enlisted for the southern army, but was captured at the famous Blackwater capture. For years past Mr. Gauldin has dealt largely in stock, and now owns land in five different sections in township 50, range 21. Page 726

Wm. M. Chrisman, farmer. Was born in Jessamine county, Kentucky, near Nicholasville, the county-seat, in the year 1833. As a boy he was in the primary department of the celebrated Transylvania University, Lexington, Kentucky. In 1843 his father removed to Missouri, but the general sickness of the next year, 1844, drove him back to Kentucky, where he remained four or five years, chiefly in Lexington and Louisville. In 1849 he returned to Saline county, and resided on a part of the H. H. Chrisman farm, which he had purchased. He was married in 1852, to Miss Eliza Bywaters, of this county. His family consists of George, Clara, Fanny, Lewis, William, Minnie, Dulin and Alonzo. He died in 1872, of cerebro-spinal meningitis. With the exception of two children, his widow and children still survive him. Page 726

Joshua Self, farmer. Was born in Virginia, in the year 1833. His father moved to Kentucky when Joshua was only five or six years old, and there he received his education, and served an apprenticeship at the blacksmith trade. In 1855 he left Kentucky, and settled in Saline county, Missouri, where he followed his trade until the war broke out. In 1861, being warmly southern, he joined the southern army, and served under Gen. Price until the close in 1865. In 1867, he married Miss Lucy J. Kiser, of this county. They have six children: Vernetta, Sarah E., Francis V., John W., Emma, and Emmet, the last two being twins. Mr. Self is now working his farm, raising stock, etc. Page 726-727

Lenten Yeager, farmer. Mr. Yeager was born in Madison county, Virginia, in the year 1847. In 1868 he came to Saline county, Missouri, and worked five or six years at the carpenter trade, in and near Marshall. In March, 1877, he was married to Miss Virginia E. Sydenstriker, and has two children, Ina L., and Mattie V. In 1878, he purchased part of the old Menager farm, on which he has since been farming, stock-raising, etc. Page 727

A. J. Sydenstriker, deceased. The subject of this sketch was born in Lewisburg, Greenbriar county, Virginia, in the year 1828, where he received his education. His father moved to Missouri while he was yet a boy, in 1835. Two years after, he was apprenticed to the tailoring trade in Independence, Missouri, to his half brother, John Kelley. Soon after attaining manhood he quit his trade and became a farmer, which occupation he liked much better. In 1852 he was married to Miss Mary E. Beazly, originally from Virginia. The children living consist of Virginia Yeager, wife of L. Yeager; Robert Everett, and Stonewall Jackson. During Price’s last raid, in 1864, he joined the Confederate army and went south, but returned to his home before the final surrender. He died April 15, 1876. His widow and three children survive, and still conduct the farm. Page 727

Hugh H. Chrisman, farmer. Was born in Jessamine county, Kentucky, in the year 1828, where he was brought up on a farm and educated. In 1856 he moved to Saline county, Missouri. He was married in Kentucky in the year 1856, to Miss Mary Scott, of Jessamine county. Their children consist of, Bettie, Maggie, and Katie, all living. In 1861, he enlisted in F. Robinson’s regiment for the Confederate army, but was captured with the regiment a few days after at Blackwater crossing. In 1862 he took an oath, was released and returned to Kentucky, where his family was at the time. In 1867 he returned to Saline county, and has ever since been engaged in farming, stock-feeding, etc. Page 727

William P. Tate, farmer. Was born in Lincoln county, Kentucky, October 17, 1838, where he was educated. In 1859, he told his father he was free, and attempted to throw the old man down, but got badly sold in the effort. He then made his way to Nashville, Tennessee, then to Fannin county, Texas. When the war broke out, in 1861, he joined the Ninth Texas cavalry, in which he served until the battle of Holly Springs, Mississippi, where he was wounded. After recovering, he joined Price’s Missouri troops and participated in the battles of Pea Ridge, Corinth, etc. In 1865, he joined Bill Anderson’s Partizan Rangers, with whom he continued until the war was over. In 1866, he was married to Miss Mollie Martin, of Saline county, Missouri, by whom he has five children: Sallie B., Tillie C., Mary L, Lena and Gracie. Since the war he has been engaged in farming and stock-raising. Page 727-728

Thomas J. Thorp, farmer. Was born in Howard county, Missouri, in the year 1827, and came to Saline county, in 1847. During 1847, ’48 and ’49, he taught school at Ridge Prairie, and in the Sappington neighborhood. In 1852, he married Miss Mary J. Marshall, daughter of Richard Marshall. They have had ten children, eight of whom are living: Hattie B., William M., Thomas J. Jesse H., R. Marshall, Robert P., Pearlie B., and Edward S. In 1852, Mr. Thorp moved to his present residence. In 1874, he rented out his farm and went to California with the intention of moving there; but not liking the prospects, he returned to his farm in Saline, where he has remained since. In 1864, he joined the Confederate army on Price’s last raid, and was in Blue Mills, Osage, Westport, and all the battles of the retreat. He was educated at the Howard high school, since called Central College, and has been a member of the Baptist church for thirty-eight years; membership at Zoar. Has 320 acres of fine farming land, all under fence, and in cultivation and pasture. Page 728

Colonel Joseph Field, farmer. The subject of the following sketch was born in Albemarle county, Virginia, May 10, 1815. He came to Saline county in 1839, and first settled in Blackwater township, but moved to the farm on which he now lives, in 1854. In 1847, he was married to Miss Susan F. Brown, daughter of Edmund Brown, of Saline, but who also came from Albemarle county, Virginia. They have had eight children, seven of whom are living, viz: Mrs. Mary Fisher, Miss Eva, William M., Edmund B., Joseph, Marshall and Claude E. Colonel Field served as sheriff of Saline county in 1844, and afterwards was one of the justices of the county court. During the war he took no part on either side, but stayed quietly at home. For some years, Colonel Field has turned his large farm over to his boys, except William, the eldest, who is in business at Rich Hill, Missouri Page 728

Henry Ransberger, farmer, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Augusta county, Virginia, in 1819, and lived there until nineteen years old. In 1838 he moved to Washington county, Missouri, where he lived four years. From Washington he moved to Jefferson county, where he lived until 1855. He then went to Moniteau county, and lived there until 1865, when he came to Saline county and settled on the farm he now occupies. In 1839 he was married to Miss Elizabeth Shelton, of Washington county, Missouri. Ten children have been born to them. Three are at home: Benjamin F., Th. J., and Julia A. Margaret is the wife of George Purcell; John is farming in Cass county, Missouri. Several of his sons are farming near Salt Springs, in this county. Mr. Ransberger is a member of the Baptist Church at Marshall. A constitutional Union man, he took no part in the war, though his sympathies were, naturally, with the south. He started in life with nothing, and by energy, intelligence and perseverance, has made a comfortable living for his old age. His farm of 280 acres is well stocked, and finely improved. His oldest son is a member of the firm of Ransberger & Lantz, Marshall, Missouri. Page 728-729

A. S. Buie, P. O., Marshall. Born in Saline county in 1844. His father came from Kentucky in 1832, and first settled in Boone county, Missouri, and moved to this county sometime in 1844, and settled in the southern part of Marshall township, where A. S. Buie now resides. About a year after he died. He was a Cumberland Presbyterian preacher. He had a family of thirteen children, seven of whom are now living, three sons and four daughters. He was the first Cumberland minister in Saline. A. S. Buie was married September 25, 1870, to Miss G. V. Elgin, daughter of J. C. Elgin, formerly of Saline, now dead. He had three children, two of whom are living: C. V. and Zula G., living with him. He enlisted in the Confederate army in Clark’s company, Marmaduke’s escort, and surrendered at Shreveport in 1865. Mr. Buie is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. He had little to begin with, and now owns a good farm of 100 acres unincumbered. Page 729

F. H. Ellyson, P. O., Marshall. Mr. Ellyson was born June 25, 1840, in Franklin county, Virginia. He came to Missouri in 1871, and first settled in Monroe county, where he was engaged in farming for four years, when he moved to Saline county, and settled seven miles northeast of Marshall, where he owns 140 acres of land. His parents, Payton and Maglin Ellyson, were born in Virginia. They both died there. Mr. Ellyson was married December 6, 1866, to Miss Fannie A. Baldin, of Roanoke county, Virginia. They have six children: Cora Ann, Maggie T., Eliza J., Washington Lee and Minnie, youngest child not named. Mr. Ellyson served in Gen. Early’s division, the 36th Virginia, for over four years. Most of the time was spent in West Virginia, and the valley of Virginia. He was in several noted battles. Page 729

Joseph H. Rea, P. O., Marshall. The subject of this sketch was born in Saline county, Missouri, January 12, 1848, and is the oldest son of Rev. P. G. and Mary A. Rea. At the age of twelve he went with his parents to Booneville, where he spent several years at school. He was educated at Kemper’s family school. During the years 1867 and 1868 he was business manager of Missouri female college, of which his father was president. In the spring of 1869 he returned to Saline county, where he has been engaged in teaching and farming until April, 1881, when he engaged with the Missouri Historical Company. Mr. Rea was united in marriage May 19, 1875, to Miss Emma, daughter of Judge George R. Hines, of Leavenworth, Kansas, formerly of Kentucky. In 1875 and 1878 he was a delegate from New Lebanon Presbytery to the general assembly of the C. P. Church. Mr. Rea is a Royal Arch Mason, and a ruling elder of the C. P. Church. Page 729-730

William M. Vardeman, clergyman and farmer, P. O., Marshall. Is a native of Shelby county, Kentucky; born in 1842. Was educated in the public schools, and bred on a farm. In 1864 he was united in marriage to Miss Sarah M. Scarce, a native of the same county. Four children were born to them: Anna L., Lizzie B., Minnie W. and Willie. In 1877 he moved to Switzerland county, Indiana, where he resided for eighteen months, farming and preaching for two churches, called respectively, Olive branch and Mt. Zion. In 1878 he moved to this state and county, locating on the farm, where he now resides. He has charge of the Baptist Church of Orearville, and is a genial, whole-souled gentleman, to whom an appeal for charity, from a worth object, was never made in vain. Page 730

Urial B. Wingfield, physician and surgeon, P. O., Shackelford. Was born in Kanawha county, West Virginia, November 22, 1854. In 1866, he came to Saline county with his father. Most of his life has been spent in school; his first schooling was received in the private schools of Virginia, and public schools of Missouri. In the fall of 1871, he entered Kemper’s Academy at Booneville, Missouri, where he remained one year. In 1872, he attended McGee’s College, Macon City, where he remained two years. From McGee’s College he went to Columbia, Missouri, and began a course in medicine and surgery, in the medical department of the University of Missouri. He remained here one year. He then entered the Missouri Medical College, St. Louis, Missouri, where he graduated with much honor and credit to himself. He has cast his lot with the people of Shackelford community, where he expects to discharge all the duties devolved upon him, as a practitioner of medicine. Judging from his college grade and his sturdy habits, we think him a man to be trusted. Page 730

Michael Flynn, merchant and postmaster, P. O. Shackelford. Was born in Dublin county, Ireland, and educated in the national schools. Came with his father to Saline county, Missouri, in 1869. He farmed with his father here till June 1879, when he commenced general merchandising at Shackelford. Being a man of character and enterprise, he has made a successful merchant. Page 730

Michael Lynch, farmer, P. O., Shackleford. Owns 200 acres of land, and was born in Kerry county, Ireland, February 1, 1834. In 1848 came with his father to America. Lived in New York one year, then in Wheeling, Virginia, working on the railroad. In 1854 went to Ross county, Ohio, and engaged in farming near Chillicothe. In 1869 he came to Saline county, and purchased the farm he now lives on. He was married in December, 1853, to Miss Catherine O’Conners. Children: Mary A., Maggie, Dennis, Ellen, Celia, Michael, and William. In 1863 was drafted in the Federal service, but sent a substitute. (Can’t say whether his substitute did good work or not.) He is a member of the Catholic Church. Mr. Lynch has never held a public office in his life, but is an honest, straightforward man, who believes in honesty and justice, and has a first-class farm, in good condition. Page 730-731

Jacob H. Miller, farmer, P. O., Shackleford. Owns 165 acres of land; was born in Madison county, Virginia, December 29, 1835, and was raised and educated in the academic schools of Madison county. His father, Jacob, was a tanner, and his mother’s name was Mary Ann. He left his father in 1855, and came to Saline county, where he was overseer on a farm until the year 1863. January 13, 1863, he was married to Miss Margaret, daughter of Samuel and Julia E. Miller, of Lexington, Missouri, by Rev. Mr. Wardsworth. By this union they have five children: Mary J., Harvey, Sophy, Araminta D. and Oats. In 1863 he purchased land in his county, and commenced farming. In 1867 he purchased his present farm, where he has resided since as farmer and stock-raiser. Page 731

Henry Sherk, P. O., Slater. Son of Christian Sherk and Eliza Sherk (formerly Springer) his wife, was born in Welland county, Canada, February 1, 1838. His father was born in Canada and his mother in Pennsylvania. Until 1862 he assisted in the management of his father’s farm, and then went to the gold regions of Idaho and Montana; was also in Oregon, where he taught school for two winters. In the fall of 1866 he returned to Canada, and married Phoebe Hoover, daughter, of Abram and Catherine Hoover. She was born in Haldimand county, Canada. In 1868 he visited and purchased land in Missouri, and in 1869 came with his family, and began improving his land. It being prairie, 185 acres, he has it now in a high state of cultivation, adorned with a handsome gothic cottage, and his grounds beautifully laid out to correspond. He is now setting his whole farm in grass, which will add greatly to its beauty. He is giving his attention almost entirely to stock raising. Canada has done well for Saline county, and it would be well for the county if the dominion would furnish it more of her sons and daughters. Mr. Sherk has no children. Page 731

 

John Young, P. O., Slater. Son of Henry and Margaret Young, of Montgomery county, Missouri, where he was born May 13, 1831, and assisted his father on his farm until he was twenty-two years of age, when he went to Monroe county, and remained a short time; then to Glasgow, and then to Independence, Missouri, engaged mostly as a farmer. In 1856 he farmed on the land on which a portion of Kansas City now stands. In the fall of that year he went south, and thirty miles southwest of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, engaged in setting out and raising cypress timber. From there, after three years, he went to the Sabine river, Texas, and from there made a trip to Liverpool as a sailor. On his return, engaged in making a levee on the Wachita river, Arkansas; then up the Mississippi river to Minnesota; returned to Quincy, Illinois, and farmed one year in Illinois. In 1860 he came to Saline county, rented a farm of Rev. P. G. Rea for one year, and then, in the spring of 1861, bought land and improved it. In August, 1861, he enlisted in a Saline county company for the Confederate army, and was in the battles of Lexington, Pea Ridge, Corinth, Iuka, Grand Gulf, Baker’s Creek, and at the siege of Vicksburg, where he was paroled and sent to Demopolis, Alabama; was there exchanged; rejoined the Confederate army under Gen. Johnston, in north Georgia, and was at the battle of Atlanta, and there wounded, the second time, with a piece of shell. Surrendered in April, 1865, with Gen. Johnston’s army in North Carolina. In the summer of 1865 he returned to Saline county, and bought the land on which he now resides. January, 1868, he married Miss Sarah Ellen Gwinn, daughter of William A. and Sarah Gwinn, of this county. They have four children: Orlando, Otho, John, and Allen G. Is a member of the Christian Church. Page 731-732

Oliver Terrill, P. O., Slater. Son of Henry T. and Fannie Terrill; was born in Garrard county, Kentucky, June 8, 1850, where he was raised in the country and educated, taking the management of his father’s farm at the age of twenty-one. In the fall of 1878 he came to Boone county, Missouri, and while on a visit to this county, bought the farm of R. H. Willis, four miles southwest of Slater, and in 1880 moved to this farm. He was married July 8, 1875, to Miss Margaret Maupin, daughter of T. J. and Jane Maupin, of Madison county, Kentucky. They have two children, Thomas Jefferson and Clelland. Page 732

Richard B. Thorp, farmer, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Howard county, Missouri, in 1824, and was raised on a farm. In 1848 he came over to Saline county and engaged in teaching for several years. He then turned his attention to farming, which has occupied him ever since. In 1848 he was married to Miss Julia A. Marshall, daughter of Richard Marshall of Saline county. They have had nine children, of whom seven are living; Mary Louisa, James M., Richard J., Joseph T., Jennie, Minnie and John. In 1860, Mr. Thorp was elected school commissioner, and held the office until it was abolished. In 1865 he was appointed public administrator and road commissioner, which offices he held until the death of his first wife, 1867. In 1869 he married Mrs. Mary A. Marshall, by whom he has one child, Richard B. He has been a member of the Baptist church ever since his seventeenth year, with his membership at Zoar. Has been a very successful farmer, and has raised a large family successfully and well, notwithstanding the troublous times through which they have passed. During the war Mr. Thorp was steadily and uncompromisingly devoted to the cause of the Union, though a Missourian born and raised, but he did not enter the army. He was a pronounced republican at the close of the war. But in 1869 to 1870, he became convinced that the movement of B. Gratz Brown and Carl Schurz and others, for the re-enfranchisement of the rebels and southern sympathizers of Missouri was right, and joined in the "Liberal" movement with great earnestness. Mr. Thorp was a delegate from Saline to the republican state convention, which met in Jefferson City on the 31st of August, 1870. The convention divided on the question of enfranchisement, and about two hundred and fifty delegates, among whom was R. R. Thorp, led by Carl Schurz, seceded from the regular body, and organized a "Liberal" convention, and nominated a full state ticket. On the return of Mr. Thorpe, and in accordance with the general agreement, he called a Liberal county convention to meet in Marshall, and fixed the day for holding primaries to select delegates to the same. When the convention assembled Mr. Thorp was chosen chairman, and it proceeded to nominate a full set of candidates for county offices, and among the rest, Mr. R. B. Thorp was nominated for sheriff of Saline county. It was soon discovered that the registration supervisor for this senatorial district was in sympathy with the "Liberal" movement. In accordance with certain representations made to him, he dismissed the registrars for this county, (except one) and ordered a new registration, in which southern sympathizers who had not been in the army, were registered upon taking an oath to support the constitution of the United States and of Missouri. This registration let in about 1,200 disfranchised democrats to the polls, and the result was that the whole county (and state) "Liberal" ticket was elected. Mr. Thorp was elected sheriff, and held the office for two years. Page 732-733

John Wall, P. O., Marshall. Son of Samuel and Margaret Wall. Was born January 18, 1819, in Montgomery county, Virginia. Came with his parents to Saline county, Missouri in 1833, and in 1835, settled on the farm on which the son now lives, about five miles northeast of Marshall, and engaged in farming, until 1846, when he enlisted in the Saline company, which formed part of Doniphan’s regiment, and took part in his expedition to Chihuahua, and participated in the battles of the Bracito and Sacramento. In July, 1847, he returned to his farm in Saline. In 1849, he went to California, returning home in December, 1842. After his return home, he engaged in the mercantile business, at Cambridge, under the firm name of M. T. Powell & Co. In 1866, he was elected sheriff for four years. February 14, 1856, he was married to Miss Mary B. Gault, having five children: Edwin E., John E., Samuel G., Henry W. and George Curtis. Page 733

Owen Thomas Willis, P. O., Slater. Was born in Culpepper county, Virginia, February 20, 1821, where he was raised and educated, and assisted on his father’s farm until his sixteenth year, then lived with his grandfather, Isaac Willis, and managed his business for twelve years. His father, Joshua Willis, and his mother Ava Willis, formerly Garnett were both natives of Culpepper county, Virginia. He was married December 10, 1844, to Miss Sarah Ann Garnett, daughter of Larkin and Elizabeth Garnett, of Culpepper county, Virginia. He continued farming in Virginia until 1850, when he came to this county, and bought 120 acres of land, two and one-half miles south of the present site of Slater. After building and moving to his farm, he lost his dwelling house by fire, which, with its contents were valued at $1,000. After this, he sold out to his uncle, Bobert Willis, and bought the farm now owned by Reuben Eubank. Selling this to Mr. Eubank, he purchased the farm he now lives on, adjoining the town of Norton on the east, containing 160 acres of land. From 1853 to 1866, he ran a saw mill, six miles east of Miami. Mr. Willis’ children are as follows: Evelyn P., now Mrs. David C. Morrison, of Saline county; Alice, now Mrs. Theodore Haynes, of Slater; Oswald T., Ida B., now Mrs. E. H. Head of Quincy, Illinois; Harry C., William P., Melbourne, E., Price, Owen Shelby, and Sarah E., all living. Mr. Willis has been a member of the Baptist Church since his eighteenth year, and has been connected with Bethel Church for over twenty years. Page 733-734

John Thomas & Son, P. O., Marshall. Mr. John Thomas was born in Wayne county, Missouri, (from which Oregon and Ripley counties were formed), in 1824, where he was educated and raised on a farm. From Oregon county he moved to this county in 1863; having enlisted in Gen. McBride’s command, Missouri State Guards, in 1861, and taken part in the battles of Lexington and Wilson’s Creek. In 1845 he was married to Miss Clarinda Smith, of Oregon county, Missouri. His children consist of Mary, Elizabeth, William M., George L., Leta, Sarah A., Lafayette, Drusilla, Jackson, Ridley, Meredith and Virginia. Since 1863 Mr. Thomas has been engaged in farming and handling stock. His son W. M. Thomas was born in Oregon county, Missouri, in 1850, and came with his father to this county in 1863, and went to farming with him. He received his education in this county. Has worked at the carpenter trade. In 1877 he was married to Miss Virginia Fisher, daughter of G. T. Fisher, of this county. He carries on farming in company with his brother Ridley. Page 734

Dr. Elijah Smith Clarkson, deceased. Dr. Clarkson was born in Bourbon county, Kentucky on the 30th of May, 1807, where he was raised on a farm, and educated in the "Old Field" schools. He was the youngest son of Major William Clarkson, a soldier of the revolution, and a native of Albemarle county, Virginia, who came to Bourbon county, Ky., at a very early period, entered and settled upon a large body of land. He had a large family of children, none of whom are now living. The maiden name of his wife was Mary Smith. Dr. Clarkson commenced the study of medicine in Cincinnati, under old Dr. Drake, father of the late Judge C. D. Drake, in 1828, and graduated in the medical department of the old Transylvania University, Lexington, Kentucky, under Profs. Drake, Eberle, Caldwell, McDowell, etc. He first entered on the practice of medicine near Cincinnati, Ohio, (now within the city limits), but two years after, in 1834, moved to Boone county, Kentucky, where he purchased a farm, and continued to practice and carry on the farm until 1857. On the 30th of March, 1833, he married Miss Caroline F. Menzies, then of Boone county, Kentucky, but a native of Staunton, Virginia. To this union were born ten children, of whom only four are now living: Dr. C. A., Mary Elizabeth, Marguerite M. and Adam W. In the fall of 1857 he disposed of his farm in Kentucky, and moved to St. Louis county, Missouri, where he lived until the spring of 1859, when he moved to this county and located on a farm of 720 acres, one mile south of Marshall, where he engaged largely in the production of hemp, corn and wheat, and lived until the winter of 1863-4, when it became so dangerous for southern men to live in Saline county, that he returned to Boone county, Kentucky, remained there until 1867, and then returned to Marshall. In the mean-time all his crops and personal property on the farm having been taken, or destroyed, he was unable to meet the balance due on the purchase money for his farm, and lost the same completely. When he returned to Saline, he engaged in the practice of his profession in and around Marshall, until he became too feeble to continue it. He was an earnest and sincere Christian, a member of the Old School Presbyterian Church; and died on the 15th of February, 1881. Page 734-735

Thomas Humphreys, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Harrison county, Ohio, in 1836, where he was raised and educated, and lived until he came to Missouri, in 1865, and settled in this county, purchasing the place on which he now lives. It was mostly raw prairie then. He first engaged in handling sheep, having from twelve to fifteen hundred. His farm consists of 318 acres, 240 in cultivation, and well improved, good house and barn, and well stocked. Mr. Humphreys has been farming all his life. His parents were Scotch-Irish, and came to this country in 1822, and settled in Ohio when the country was new, even there. At the age of seventeen, Thomas took charge of his father’s farm, and carried it on until twenty-four years of age. He is a precise, exact business man, keeping a daily record of every business transaction. Mr. Humphreys was married in April, 1877, to Miss Cindarella Oneal, daughter of W. Oneal, of Saline county, and has two children: William W., and Elizabeth J. Page 735

Samuel T. Steel, P. O., Marshall. Was born in February 22, 1822 near Saline City, in this county, in the bottom, and remembers when a small boy, fleeing from the wrath of the overflowed Missouri, his father then moving to a farm three miles southeast of Jonesboro. They lived there about eight years, and then moved to near Henry Nave, where he lived to his twenty-sixth year, and then moved to the farm on Salt Fork, on which he now lives. His father, Adam Steel, came from Christian county, Kentucky, in 1813, to Saline county, and was one of the very first settlers of the county, and was the father of nine children, seven living: Benj. P., Thos. J., Sam’l T., Eliza A., Cynthia, Mary J., and Serena M. He was mail contractor for eight years, and was a useful and respected citizen, and died January 2, 1844. Samuel T. Steel was married in 1872 to Miss Mary Shannon, daughter of Samuel Shannon, of Saline county, and is the father of one child: Elias L. Steel. He is a member of the M. E. Church, South, membership at Smith’s chapel, and has been for thirty years. Is a member of I. O. G. T. of Saline City. Lost all the property he had accumulated, in the war, and had to begin again. He was captured December 19, 1861, in Robinson’s recruits at Blackwater, taken to St. Louis, and to Alton, Illinois. Took the oath under protest, and returned home. In 1864 joined Gen. Price in his last raid, and surrendered at Shreveport, 1865. Page 735-736

Colonel A. T. Watson, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Christian county, Kentucky, in 1834, where he was raised and educated until his eighteenth year, when he moved to Montgomery county, Tennessee, and lived there three years. He then went back to Christian county, his father having died. In a short time he moved to Memphis, Tennessee, and remained there until 1859, engaged in the grocery business there, and at Brownsville, Tennessee. In 1861, he entered the army under Magruger, lieutenant in battery, and at the close of the war, was colonel in command of the battery. He was in the battles of Belmont, Shiloh, Murfreesboro, Corinth, and all the Georgia campaign. He served under Bragg, Beauregard, Hood, Johnson, etc. Was slightly wounded in the service, at Shiloh. Was taken prisoner several times, but always escaped, until about the close of the war; was then captured and taken to Camp Chase, and stayed there until June 10, 1865, and went to Tuscaloosa, Alabama. In 1866 he came to this county and bought the farm on which he now lives. He started life with $2,000, which he lost in the war; and now owns 200 acres of fine land, all in cultivation, and well stocked, which he had made by his own energy and industry, aided by his wife. In 1859, he was married to Miss Harriet S. Baugh, daughter of Thomas M. Baugh, of Tennessee, formerly of Virginia. The Baughs are of French extraction, the name being DeBaugh. Colonel Watson’s parents were from Virginia, moving to Kentucky in 1832. They had a family of eight children, five of them now living, three in this county, and two in Kentucky. During the war, Mrs. Watson had many escapes from the Federal lines, having once to take the oath, but finally, at the close of the war, found herself in Alabama, where she was joined by her husband. Page 736-737

H. Rouse, mill operator, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Ross county, Ohio, September 13, 1832. Was raised on a farm. In 1866, he married Miss S. J. Baker; they have two children living: Charlie and Mollie H. Came to this county in 1867, locating on a farm near Malta Bend, where he lived until 1877. He then bought a half interest in the water mill, situated on Salt Fork, two miles southeast of Marshall. In 1878, he became the sole owner of said property, which has remained in his hands ever since. The mill was built in 1865 and remodeled in 1873 at a cost of $7,000.00. It has three run of stones, with a capacity of 100 bushels of wheat and 100 bushels of corn per day. It has all the apparatus necessary for the production of the very best grade of flour. The building is forty by thirty feet and three stories high. It has a saw mill attached. The dam is built on a rock foundation and has fourteen-foot head. He owns forty acres of land contiguous to the mill. Page 737

Henry C. Simmons, farmer and blacksmith, P. O., Marshall. Born in Washington City, District of Columbia, August 17, 1813. His father, William Simmons, is a native of Ireland, and his mother of England. At an early age Henry moved, with his father’s family, to Barren county, Kentucky. He was educated in the public schools of that county. At the age of fifteen, he learned the blacksmith and gunsmith trade, which he followed for seven years in Kentucky. He came to Saline county, November 10, 1839, and settled at Marshall. He walked from St. Louis to Marshall, where he worked at his trade for ten years. He built the first blacksmith and gunsmith shop in Marshall. It stood on what is known as "Dog Row." He paid $105 for the lot—60x120. In November, 1849, he married Miss Sarah A. Gilmer, daughter of John Gilmer. They have one daughter, Mary E. Wilcox. In same year he had an attack of the "gold fever," which carried him off, across the plains, with an ox-team, to California. He remained there two and a half years, engaged in freighting, in which business he was quite successful. He returned home via the Isthmus and New York, paying $200 for his passage. In 1854, he purchased the farm on which he now resides, consisting of 600 acres of well-improved farm land. His first wife died June 18, 1859, and is buried at the Gilmer graveyard. In 1862 he was again married, to Miss Frances Vivian, a native of Howard county. Their union was blessed with six children, four of whom are now living: William, Robert, Alfred, and Samuel. Page 737

Benjamin F. Whitlock, farmer, P. O., Marshall. Born in White county, Tennessee, February 10, 1842. His parents were natives of Kentucky. They had three children, of whom Benjamin F. is the youngest. At the age of nine years he was "bound" to his uncle, James M. Gordon, whom he served until 1861. His education was quite limited, being compelled by his uncle to work the most of his time. In 1861 he left his uncle and went to Clark county, Missouri, where he succeeded in finding work. While here he joined Gen. M. Green’s troops, and participated with them in the battles of Athens and Kirksville. Being taken sick he left his company and went to his uncle, William Gordon, in Clark county. Recovering, he came to Saline county in 1866. In 1869 he purchased a farm upon which he settled in 1871, and where he now resides, engaged in farming and stock-raising. Page 737-738

Abraham Rumans, mill operator and engineer, P. O., Marshall. Born in Boone county, Missouri, October 24, 1842. Educated at Booneville and Fayette. In 1859 he came to Saline county, and settled at Arrow Rock, where he remained until 1867. March 28, 1862, he enlisted in the 5th M. S. M.—Capt. Peter Austermeyer, under Col. Sigel. After serving fifteen months in this company, he enlisted in Company "I," 12th Missouri cavalry, Capt. W. A. Mills, Col. Well’s regiment. He took a prominent part in the following battles: Nashville, Frankfort, Clifton. In 1866 he was married to Emily Ward, a native of Illinois. Four children were born to them: Maggie C., Robert L., Ollie B., Abraham R. In 1867 he came to Marshall, where he has since resided. Part of the time he gave his attention to engineering. In 1881 he entered into partnership with Mr. F. Tucksmyre, in the fitting up of a saw-mill, situated five miles northeast of Marshall. The outfit is entirely new, consisting of a portable steam engine, circular saw fifty inches in diameter, and all the apparatus necessary for a well appointed mill. It has a capacity of from two to five thousand feet per day. It is called the "Eagle Mill." Page 738

N. M. Corbin, farmer, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Nichols county, Kentucky, in March, 1833. Was educated in the common school of that county. His father, Joshua, was a native of Maryland, his mother being born in Kentucky. N. M., the third child, worked on his father’s farm in Kentucky until 1859, when he came to Saline county. In the same year he purchased the farm where he now resides, consisting of 212 acres of excellent land, lying five miles east of Marshall. Is engaged in farming and sheep-raising. In 1881 he raised sixty-two lambs. March 7, 1859, he was married to Ellen McClintock, a native of Kentucky. They have one son, Thomas M. His wife died in 1864, and was buried in Bourbon county, Kentucky. In 1871 he was again married, to Miss Pauline Ross, a native of Howard county, Missouri. They have one son, Nathaniel. His second wife died in 1876, and is buried at Arrow Rock. Page 738

William Cooper, farmer, P. O., Marshall. Born in Delaware, February 5, 1835. While he was quite young his parent moved to Adams county, Illinois; obtained his education in the common schools of that county. Having learned the miller’s trade, he followed it up to the year 1874. In 1873 he was united in marriage to Alice Fanning, a native of Morgan county, Illinois. One boy, Mark, was the fruit of their union. From 1874 to 1879 he was engaged in farming in Adams county. In the latter year he came to Saline county and bought the farm upon which he now resides, consisting of eighty acres of well-improved farm land. He is giving special attention to the raising of swine of the Berkshire breed. Page 738-739

Patrick Cooney, farmer, P. O., Marshall. Is a native of Ireland, born in the county of Meath, and was educated there. His early life was spent on a farm. Immigrated to the United States in 1854. He came to Saline county in 1856. In 1858 he bought the farm upon which he now resides, five miles northeast of Marshall. In February, 1861, he was married to Sarah Weiley. They have eleven children, six daughters and five sons: Mary, Tarasa, Catherine, Sallie, Rose, Bettie, Philip, Edward, Patrick, John and George. In the fall of 1864 he enlisted in company C., Col. Crew’s regiment, Shelby’s division. He participated in the following battles: Lexington, Independence, Blues, Westport, Newtonia. While in Arkansas he joined the infantry, Capt. Otley’s company, Col. Mitchell’s regiment, Gen. Price in command. Surrendered at Shreveport and came home. Page 739

Garrett M. Davis, farmer, P. O., Marshall. Born in Bourbon county, Kentucky, January 23, 1851. His father, Garrett, was a native of Kentucky. He married Miss Rebecca Trimble, by whom he had three children. His wife dying, he was afterward married to Mrs. Thomas Elliott. They had one child. Mrs. Davis died in 1868, and was buried at Paris cemetery. Mr. Davis died in 1872, and was buried at the same place. Garrett M., the only child by his father’s second wife, obtained his education in the common schools of the county of his birth. At the age of eighteen he entered the Washington and Lee University, Virginia, where he spent three years. He turned his attention principally to the study of the law. After leaving the university he practiced law for five years at Paris, Kentucky. In 1879 he came to Saline county and settled on the farm where he now resides, situated one and a quarter miles south of Marshall, and consisting of 120 acres of good land. In December, 1876, he was united in marriage to Elizabeth R. Smith, a native of Kentucky. They have one child, a daughter: Sue H. Page 739

Charles W. Downs, farmer, P. O., Marshall. Is a native of this state and county, born October 20, 1843. His early live was spent upon a farm, and in attending the common schools. His father, Benj. F., came to this county in 1830, and settled on what is now known as the Swinner farm, four miles southeast of Marshall. He died in 1866, and was buried in the Stephen Smith graveyard. In 1864, Charles W., the oldest child of a family of seven, and the subject of this brief sketch, enlisted in Capt. Diur’s company, Col. Wood’s battalion, under Price. He was held prisoner by Capt. Bingham when the Glasgow fight came off. He was engaged in the following battles: Lexington, Blues, Independence, Westport, Carthage, Little Osage. At the battle of Westport he was struck by a minnie ball, in the shoulder, sustaining a slight flesh wound. He surrendered at Shreveport, was regularly paroled and came home. In 1869, he was married to Miss Sue Ramsey, by whom he had four children, two now living: Benj. H. and Eva. In June, 1871, he purchased the farm where he now resides, two miles southeast of Marshall, consisting of eighty acres of first-class land, which under his skillful management, is being transformed into a fine farm. Page 739-740

Dennis H. Hartsook, farmer and stock-raiser, P. O., Marshall. The oldest son of a family of nine. Is a native of Frederick county, Maryland, born January 18, 1831. His parents were natives of same state. Dennis attended the common schools up to the age of nine, when he, with his father, went to Indiana. Finding no educational facilities, he returned to Maryland for the purpose of completing his education. In 1855, he moved with his father’s family to Illinois. While there he was engaged in farming and buying and shipping stock. In 1862, he was married to Mary C. Head, a native of Ohio. They had no children. In 1869, he came to this county and settled on the farm where he now lives, two miles southeast of Marshall, consisting of 200 acres of well improved land. Is engaged in breeding blooded stock. He has horses sired by "Messenger," "Hambletonian," "Trojan," "Flying Duke." His bull is of the "Thorndale" stock. He has found a deposit of potter’s clay on his farm, which is equal, if not superior, to any found in any other state. His father, Ephraim, died in 1857, while crossing the plains to California. His mother died in 1873, and is buried at Rock Island. Page 740

Frank M. Kidd, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Lexington, Kentucky, October 22, 1841. He was educated in the common schools, and also at the Methodist College at Millerburg, Bourbon county. While in Kentucky, was engaged in cattle trading. In March, 1878, he came to this state and county, locating near where he now resides. In July, 1880, he was married to Mrs. S. M. Steward, a native of this county, and daughter of Alfred Allison. They have one child, a son, James A. His wife had one child by her former husband, Nillie E. Steward. In 1861, he enlisted in company "B," Col. Helm’s regiment, under Gen. Sydney Johnson. Was mustered out at Chattanooga, in 1862. Re-enlisted in the same year, under Gen. Morgan, company "D," Eighth Kentucky, Col. Clarke. He was engaged in the following battles: Hartsville, and others that occurred on the raid into Ohio. Was captured there, and held prisoner for eighteen months. He was with President Davis the day before he was captured, having the treasury in charge. Is now living on a farm of seventy acres, three and a half miles southeast of Marshall. Page 740-741

J. W. Newland, farmer, P. O., Marshall. Is a native of Barren county, Kentucky, born in January, 1816. Was raised on a farm, obtaining his education in the common schools of that county. His parents were natives of Virginia. At the age of seventeen, he went to Crab Orchard, Lincoln county, Kentucky, where he acted as clerk, during twenty-four years, for the mercantile firm of Whitley & Hogg. At the end of that time, he purchased the business, continuing in it fifteen years. At the age of thirty-five, he was united in marriage to Miss Esther Whitley, a native of Kentucky, by whom he had six children, three now living: William F., Andrew S. and Jennie. His first wife died in December, 1851, and was buried in Louisville. He left Crab Orchard in May, 1851, and moved to Louisville. Went into the jobbing grocery business at first and afterwards to wholesaling dry goods. While there he was again married to Mrs. Moran, a native of Kentucky, who died a short time after their marriage. In 1856, he moved to Pettis county, and in the following year was married to Bettie Woodson, a native of Virginia; six children were born to them, five now living: Emma, Price, Thomas, Joseph and Harry. While here, he owned a farm of 1427 acres, farming it upon a large scale. In 1862, he went to St. Louis, where he remained during the war, engaged in furnishing the government with hay and cattle. After the war, he returned to Pettis county, and sold his farm. In December, 1879, he came to this county and settled upon the farm where he now resides, consisting of 200 acres of blue grass land. He is a member of the Baptist church, at Marshall. Page 741

Vardaymon W. Dawson, farmer, P. O., Marshall. Is a native of Hart county, Kentucky, born September 7, 1841. His parents were natives of same state. At the age of nine, he came to this state and county, with his father, who died a short time after arriving, and settled near Marshall, on a farm. Was educated in the common schools of this county. In 1853, he bought the farm upon which he now resides, three and a half miles southeast of Marshall, consisting of eighty acres of fine farming land. In 1862, November 18, he enlisted in Capt. Crispin’s company, Col. Gordon’s regiment of cavalry, under Gen. Kirby Smith. Participated in the following battles: Springfield, Hartsville, Marshfield, Frederickstown, Poison Springs, Helena, Marks Mills, Pine Bluff, Little Rock. He was taken prisoner at Helena, remaining imprison until March 1, 1865, when he was exchanged at Richmond. He re-enlisted in 2d Missouri cavalry, Capt. Sutherland’s company, under Gen. Forrest. Remained with this command until its surrender at Columbus, Mississippi. He then returned to his farm, upon which he still resides with his sister. Page 741

Owen Sweeney, farmer, P. O., Marshall. Is a native of Ireland, born in 1831. He followed the sea for six years, during which time he visited many different countries. Finally he landed in New York, and cruised about on dry land a while. His life has been an eventful one, experiencing some hair-breadth escapes, upon the plains, among the Indians. In 1854, he came to Saline county. In 1866, he married Emily Cox, a native of this county, by whom he had eight children, six of whom are now living: Ellen E., Melissa E., Thomas B., Emma A., Orren E., and John. In 1862, he enlisted, at St. Louis, in the Eleventh Illinois U. S. Infantry, Capt. Duncan’s company, under Gen. McPherson. Held the rank of first sergeant. Participated in the following battles: Fort Donelson Shiloh, Vicksburg, Port Gibson, Raymond, Champion Hills, Liverpool Heights, on the Yazoo; Yazoo City, Jackson, Fort Blakely. In 1872, he purchased 160 acres of land, upon which he now resides, contentedly in the bosom of his family, who are never tired of listening to the narration of his experiences and narrow escapes. Page 742

Elmer Phillips, farmer and stock-raiser, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Ross county, Ohio, May 28, 1861. At the age of five years he came to Saline county with his mother and brothers. The family settled upon the farm where he now resides, four miles southeast of Marshall. He was educated in the common schools of this county. March 22, 1881, he was united in marriage to Miss Susan Cook, a native of Wyoming county, Virginia. His father, Geo. Phillips was a native of Ross county, Ohio. Was raised on a farm. In 1849, was married to Hannah McPhiders, by whom he had five children, four sons and one daughter, all of whom are now living: Frank M., George A., Ellsworth, Evaline, and Elmer. The old gentleman died in 1861, and was buried in Ross county, at the Chillicothe cemetery. Page 742

Ellswerth Phillips, farmer and stock-feeder, P. O., Marshall. The subject of this sketch is the third son of George Phillips, was born in Ross county, Ohio, in December, 1856. He attended the common schools of that county, and also of this county, after the removal of the family hither, which occurred in 1866. Was reared upon a farm. In August 1879, he was joined in wedlock to Miss Georgia Ann Hunter, a native of this county. Their wedded happiness was sadly brought to a termination by the death of his wife, which occurred May 10, 1881. She was buried in the Odell graveyard, north of Marshall. Since her death his mother has made her home with him, on his farm of eighty acres, where he is engaged in farming and feeding stock. Page 742

Benjamin F. Downs, deceased. Was born in Clark county, Indiana, August 13, 1820. His early life was spent on a farm and in attending the common schools of said county. In 1842 he came to this county in company with his brother, Letitia Neeley, (the lady whom he afterwards married), her sister and her husband. At that early day, there being no railroads in this section, they were obliged to travel in wagons. On January 16, 1843, he was united in marriage to Miss Neely, by whom he had five children, all of whom are now living, two sons and three daughters: Chas. W., Alvin F., Margaret A., Laura A., and Synthia B. Benjamin F., the subject of this sketch, died August 15, 1867, and was buried at the Stephen Smith cemetery. His widow, Mrs. Letitia Downs, still lives with her daughters upon the home place of 200 acres, which is under her sole supervision. A glance at the farm and its appointments, shows the passer-by that a skillful hand is at the helm. Benjamin, during his life time, was a consistent member of the Christian Church, at Marshall. Mrs. Downs is also an active member of the same church. Page 742-743

Thos. T. Piper, farmer and stockraiser, P. O., Marshall. Is a native of this county, born April 19, 1856. His father, John Piper, was a native of Virginia, and born in 1804. Was about twenty-six years of age when he came to this state and county. He was married in 1829 to Miss Huston, by whom he had six, children, five of whom are now living. She died in 1850 and was buried in Arrow Rock. In 1853 he was again married to Jeannette McMahon, a native of Cooper county. They had two children, one son, Thomas T., and one daughter, Mrs. Jennie Huffaker. He died in February, 1865, and was buried at Arrow Rock. Mrs. Piper is still living. Thomas T., the subject of our sketch, was educated in the public schools of this county, and his early life was spent on a farm. He was married, March 22, 1877, to Susan J. Thorp, a daughter of Richard Thorp, and a native of this county. They have two children, one son and one daughter; Clarence N. and Hattie G. he is now engaged in cultivating a fine farm of 120 acres. Page 743

J. M. Sphar, farmer and stock-feeder, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Clark county, Kentucky, January 2, 1849. His father Willis F., and his mother Mary E., were natives of the same state and county. J. M., the eldest of a family of eight, was educated in the common schools. His early life was spent on a farm. In 1868 he removed to Boone county, where he remained for eighteen months. At the end of this period he came to this state and county, and leased a farm seven miles south of Marshall, upon which he lived for eleven years. In the fall of 1880, he, in partnership with C. M. Gilpin, purchased a farm two and three-fourth miles north of Marshall, consisting of 860 acres, upon which they carry on an extensive business in feeding and shipping stock, the average number fed per year exceeding 600 head. In June, 1870, he was united in marriage to E. A. McClure, a native of Montgomery county. They have four children, one son and three daughters: Willis, Pearly, Lucy, and Willie. Page 743

Milvin Godman, farmer and stock-raiser, P. O., Marshall. Is a native of Bourbon county, Kentucky. Was born August 14, 1818. Was reared and educated there. His father, William, was a native of Virginia, and born near Richmond. He married a Miss Drummonds, a native of Bourbon county. They had four children, none of whom are now living. His wife dying, he again married a Mrs. Smith, (whose maiden name was Sarah Litton,) a native of Maryland. She had six children by her former husband. By this wife he had five children, three of whom are now living, Milvin being the only son. William moved to Marion county, Missouri and purchased some land. He died there in 1830. His widow, with Milvin and the youngest children returned to Kentucky, where they remained six years. The family, with the exception of Milvin, then went back to Marion county, where Mrs. Godman died, in 1854. Milvin, still remained in Kentucky, and was married to Mary R. Marsh, a native of Nicholas county, born in 1825. Eight children were born to them, four of whom are now living; two sons and two daughters: William C., B.M., Mrs. Josephine C. Way and Mrs. Mattie B. Naylor. In 1868, he moved to this county, and in September of the same year, settled one and a half miles northwest of Marshall, upon the farm where he now resides, containing 200 acres of excellent land. Page 744

William C. Godman, farmer, P. O., Marshall. The subject of the following brief sketch is a native of Bourbon county, Kentucky, born June 27, 1845. He is the eldest of a family of eight children and was educated in the common schools. Was raised on a farm. In 1862, he enlisted in Captain Breckenridge’s company, under General John Morgan. Was the second man to join the company. He was engaged in the following battles: Cynthiana, Gallatin, Tennessee; Hartsville, Nashville, Lebanon, Kentucky; Brandenburg, Lexington, and all in which his command was engaged while on their raid into Ohio. He was captured at Buffington Island and imprisoned for nineteen months. When he was released, he was suffering with the "bone scurvy." Afterwards he joined President Davis’ body-guard and was with him until his capture. On the morning before they separated, Davis divided the contents of the treasury among his guard, giving each man $26, a portion of which Mr. Godman still retains. In 1868, he came to this county, with his father’s family, with whom he lived till marriage. In September, 1873, he was married to Mary F. Lawter, a native of this state. A short time after his marriage he went back to Kentucky, returning to this county at the end of two years and settling where he now resides. His farm contains 200 acres of good tillable land. They have had four children, three sons and one daughter, all living: William H., Thomas M., Charles F. and Lee, daughter. Page 744

Thomas McDonough, farmer and stock-feeder, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Mayo county, Ireland, May 10, 1821. His parents are natives of same country. He is the recipient of a good common school education. During the time he lived in Ireland he engaged in farming. In 1846 he went to London, where he spent five years, following the occupation of a builder. He was married to Margaret Boyle, a native of his own country. They had nine children, six of whom are now living: Bernard, Timothy, Nancy, John, Mary and Thomas Jr. In 1851 he came to the United States, landing in New York City, where he remained for three months. From there he went to Thompkins county, stopping one year, and from there to Schuyler county, Illinois, where he remained fifteen years. Next, we find him in Chariton county, Missouri, living here one and a half years, at the end of which time he came to this county. In 1871, he located upon the farm where he is now living, consisting of 1,040 acres, and located three miles southwest of Marshall. He also own, 160 acres three miles west of same place. His family are members of the Catholic Church of Marshall. Page 745

William E. Prior, P. O., Marshall. The subject of this sketch was born in Charleston, S. C., December 23, 1842. His father, William, was a native of Ireland, emigrating to the United States in 1832, and settling in Charleston. In the same year he married Ellen Johnson, also a native of his fatherland. Seven children were born to them, five of whom are now living, four sons and one daughter. In 1845 he moved his family to this state and county, locating four miles west of Marshall. William E. the third child, was quite young when the family came here. He obtained his early education at a subscription school of the county, and at the age of twenty-three attended the academy of Christian Brothers, in St. Louis. Leaving there, he took a commercial course at a branch of the same college at La Salle, Illinois. After finishing the course he returned home, and has been identified with the interests of the county ever since. He was married February 7, 1869, to Frances E. Prior, a cousin, and a native of South Carolina. At present he is living on a well improved farm of 155 acres, upon which is a splendid orchard, consisting of 150 trees of many varieties. His wife is an active member of the Catholic Church at Marshall. Page 745

John T. Van Hook, farmer, P. O., Marshall. Is a native of Bourbon county, Kentucky, born November 11, 1850. His father John W., and his mother, Margaret, are both natives of that state. John T., the second child of a family of six, was educated in the common schools of that county, and also at a high school at Paris, Kentucky. Was reared on a farm. In 1871 he was joined in wedlock to Lucy Prather, a native of his county. They have one child, a boy: Lester Orren. While in Kentucky, he was engaged in farming. In the spring of 1879 he moved to this state, living in Cass county for one year. The following spring he came to this county. In the spring of 1881 he bought the farm upon which he now resides, consisting of eighty acres of fine blue grass land. It is situated about three miles west of Marshall. He is an honored member of the M. E. Church, South, and stands high in the esteem of his fellow citizens. Page 745-746

W. C. Baskett, farmer, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Fluvanna county, Virginia, July 22, 1826. When six years of age, he went to Shelby county with his parents, where he was educated and spent the greater part of his life. His parents were both natives of Virginia, living on a farm. October 23, 1845, he married Amanda E. Yeager, a native of Jefferson county, Kentucky, by whom he had eleven children, nine of whom are now living: James, Charley F., Mrs. Mary Devall, Mrs. Alice Thompson, Mrs. Phoebe Bozzell, Rosa, Maggie, Carrie, Lizzie. While living in Kentucky he engaged in farming. During the years of 1871 and 1872 he operated a distillery in connection with his other business. By the accidental explosion of a steam boiler the building and apparatus sustained damages, the reparation of which cost him $6,000. In addition to this he was obliged to pay $6,000 government tax for the time during which his distillery was lying idle. Being unable to raise the money at the time, his entire property was attached and sold to liquidate his indebtedness. He succeeded in saving about $5,000 from the wreck, which he brought to Missouri and invested in Saline county land. He owns 160 acres of excellent land. Page 746

James H. Craddock, farmer, P. O., Marshall. The Craddock family is of English origin. The great grandfather of the subject of this sketch came from England at an early day, and settled in Virginia. His, (James’) father, Zarrell R., was born in Virginia. Moving to Kentucky when a boy, he settled on the Little Bowen river, in Washington county. In 1824 he was married to Mary McElney, a native of that state. They had seven children, four of whom are now living, two sons and two daughters: William J., now living in Louisville, Kentucky; James H., of Saline county, Missouri; Elizabeth Neal, now of Bates county, and Mrs. J. D. Rosseau, of Perryville, Kentucky. He was a prominent stock raiser. Died in the year 1847, and was buried at Hunley Church yard, six miles south of Louisville. His remains have since been moved to the cemetery near the city. His wife died in 1839, and lies buried in the same place. James H., the third son, was born in Barren county, Kentucky in 1832. He was educated there, and at the age of fifteen he moved to Cooper county, and lived three years with his brother, near Booneville. He then came to this county, where he has lived since. He and his oldest son bought the farm where he now resides, three miles south of Marshall, consisting of 200 acres of fine blue grass land. In 1861 his brother, Pascal D., enlisted from this county in a company raised by John Marmaduke. They were ordered to Jefferson City, where he was promoted to second lieutenant. Lieut. Craddock was engaged in the battles of Booneville and Carthage. His captain being wounded, and wishing to go to Virginia, he obtained a furlough and accompanied him thither. He came back to Louisville, and while there, died of consumption, in September, 1862. He was buried in Cave Hill cemetery. He was married to Rebecca S. Sandwich, a native of this county, in 1866. They had six children, four of whom are now living, two sons and two daughters, Luella, Archie, Robert and Mary E. Page 746-747

Henry H. Harris, farmer and stock-raiser, P. O., Marshall. Born in Howard county, Missouri, February 23, 1825. His father, Peter B. Harris, was a native of New London, Connecticut. Was a hatter by trade. Came to Franklin, Howard county in 1817. Here he married Miss Ann Hook, sister of William and Henry Hook, Santa Fe traders. William put up and operated a grist-mill on the site of the present one on Salt Fork, in 1832 or ’33. People came twenty miles to this mill. Peter B. and his wife were blessed with five children, all boys, one of whom is now living, Henry H. Peter B., died in 1875; his wife followed him in 1876. Both were buried in the Gilmer Cemetery. Henry H., the oldest son was educated at New Franklin and at Booneville. In 1846 he went to Santa Fe, New Mexico, entering into a partnership with his uncle, William Hook, which continued until 1847. In the spring of 1850 he went to California, where he remained until 1855, meeting with a moderate degree of success in mining. On his outward trip he crossed the plains with an ox team, returning by way of the isthmus. In the fall of 1855 he purchased the farm entered by his father consisting at that time of 400 acres, which by industry and economy he has increased to 500 acres. It is well improved, having a very fine dwelling and all of the appliances necessary for the cultivation of a well ordered farm. It is situated on the Marshall and Arrow Rock road, about five miles east of the former place. February 10, 1857, he married Mary Ann Staples, daughter of Col. James Staples, a native of Henry county, Virginia. They have six children, four girls and two boys: Mamie, Virginia, Annie Bird, May S., Thomas, and Henry H., Jr. In the fall of 1872 he was elected collector for Saline county. In 1874 he was re-elected to the same office, serving two terms with honor and credit to himself and his county. In 1850 he started with nothing. In 1874 we find him owning a fine farm of 500 acres, and standing high in the esteem of his friends and neighbors. Page 747

James W. Kent, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Fluvanna county, Virginia, July 10, 1834, where he was raised and educated. His father, H. L. Kent, was a native of Virginia, and born October 25, 1810. May 24, 1833, he married Miss Mary J. Page, a native of Goochland county, Virginia. They had fourteen children, ten of whom are living, four sons and six daughters: James W., Warner R., Thomas J., Napoleon B., Mrs. Sarah E. Allen, Mrs. Mary L. Moyer, Mrs. Martha Hauchins, Mrs. Minerva A. Jones, Adeline and Jane E. Mr. H. L. Kent lives at North Garden, Albemarle county, Virginia. James W., the eldest son, and the subject of this sketch, came to Saline county, Missouri, in 1864. He is a stone-cutter by trade, and followed that occupation in Virginia, but when he came to this county, he settled on a farm, about five miles from Marshall, upon which he still lives and farms. September 23, 1864, he was married to Miss Joanna Burnley, a native of Albemarle county, Virginia, daughter of James M. Burnley, who was a native of Goochland county, Virginia. He married Prudence Sommons, and they have two children, now living, Mrs. Joanna Kent and Mrs. Elizabeth Steel. Mr. Burnley came to Saline county in 1845, and went to Gen. Smith’s farm, where he lived as the general’s overseer for sixteen years. In 1861, he moved to the farm on which he now lives with his son-in-law, James W. Kent. Mr. and Mrs. Kent have had seven children, six of whom are now living: James L., William Warner, Richard E. R., (E. M., now dead), Charles W., Mary Ella and Dovie M. In the latter part of May, 1864, about one o’clock at night, the family were awakened by the dogs, and then startled by a shot fired into one of the lower rooms, the mark made by the bullet being still visible. From an upstairs window (the moon shining brightly), Mr. Kent could see five men in the yard, dressed in blue uniform. He immediately slipped down stairs with a loaded rifle in his hands, and crawled toward the east front door, in order to reach and open a partition door, that would guard both front doors, there being two to the house. When he reached the east front door, the men were pounding on it and demanding admission. Mr. Kent called out, "Gentlemen, if you break down the door, you do so at your own risk." They demanded what he said? As he begun to repeat it, a shot came crashing through the door, passing over Mr. Kent, who was stooping, and lodging in the partition. The men then disappeared and that was the last of it. On going into the west room, Mr. Kent found Mr. Burnley busily loading a shot-gun. Page 747-748

Capt. Joseph P. Elliott, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Richmond, Virginia, May 27, 1840. His father, Benjamin Elliott, was also a native of Virginia, and married Angelina Crenshaw, a native of Hanover county, Virginia. They had six children, four of whom are now living, three boys and one girl: Cornelius D., Edwin V., Joseph P., and Mrs. Anna McCrosky. In 1843 Benjamin Elliott moved to Missouri, and settled in Saline county, about six miles northwest of Arrow Rock, upon a farm. About the year 1844 he died, and was buried at Concord Church. His wife survived him about twenty years, died in 1864, and was buried with him at Concord Church. Joseph was raised and educated in Saline county, and was engaged in farming when the war broke out. In 1861, he enlisted in the southern army. When he returned to the county after the war ended, he again went to farming, and in 1880 bought the farm on which he now lives, six miles east of Marshall. In December, 1868, he was married to Miss Mary T. Ross, a native of Fayette, Howard county. Her parents were natives of Indiana. Her father, James Ross, died, and was buried in 1860, in Boliver, Polk county, Missouri. His wife survived him until 1874, when she died, and was buried at Arrow Rock, in this county. Mr. Joseph P. Elliott has only two children, both girls: Josie and Mamie. Mr. Elliott enlisted in 1861, in Capt. Wm. B. Brown’s company, as a private, in the state guard service. Afterward under Capt. Sutherlin, and was in the battles of Booneville, Carthage, Wilson’s Creek, Lexington. In 1862 enlisted in the Confederate army, first lieutenant, company E., 1st Missouri cavalry, Col. Shelby. He was in nearly all the battles and fights in which Shelby was engaged in the war—Coon Creek, Cane Hill, Prairie Grove, Springfield, where he was wounded in the leg and disabled four months; carried in an ambulance to Hartsville, where he was abandoned by his own men, and taken prisoner; was paroled and exchanged at Batesville, Arkansas; rejoined his command, and was promoted to captain, Capt. Garrett having been wounded at Hartsville, and died from his wounds—Cape Girardeau, Helena, Brownsville, Little Rock; volunteered in Shelby’s raid to Missouri, fall of 1863, fighting all the way, and battles of Marshall, Prairie De Ann, Mark’s Mills, Iron Mountain, Lexington, Big and Little Blue, Independence, Westport, near Fort Scott, Newtonia, Cane Hill and Fayette, etc. Capt. Elliott had three horses shot under him during these long years of fighting. Page 748-749

William S. Durrett, P. O., Marshall. Mr. W. S. Durrett was born in Saline county, April 13, 1834, where he was raised and educated. At the age of eighteen, he attended one session at the State University at Columbia. He is the fourth son of William L. Durrett and, until his marriage farmed on his father’s farm. In 1856, he was married to Miss Louisa Lankford, daughter of Jesse Lankford, and sister of the present circuit clerk of Saline county. Soon after his marriage, Mr. Durrett moved to the farm where S. P. Allen now lives, where he lived until he bought the farm he now lives on from Mr. Lankford, situated six miles east of Marshall, and containing 240 acres of prime land. He has only one son, Frank, who is twenty-four years of age. In 1862, he enlisted, as a private, in the Confederate army, Garrett’s company, Gordon’s regiment, Shelby’s brigade, and was in the following battles: Coon Creek, Prairie Grove, Springfield, Hartsville, Helena, Pine Bluff, Cape Girardeau, Camden, Mark’s Mills, Little Rock, Saline River, Cove Creek, Cane Hill, Booneville, Lexington, Big and Little Blue, Independence, Westport, Five Prairie Creek, Newtonia, &c., &c. Surrendered, and came home in 1865. Page 749-750

James S. Ingram, deceased. Was born in Montgomery county, Virginia, April 4, 1802, where he was reared and educated. In 1829, he moved to Fayette, Howard county, Missouri, where he sold goods with his uncle, Waddy T. Curren, until 1832. In 1830, he was married to Mary J. Gorham, a native of Robinson county, Tennessee, coming to Howard county, with her father, in 1820. Her father was a native of Loudon county, Virginia. Her mother was a Seig, and a native of South Carolina. In 1834, after living in Randolph county, Missouri for several years, Mr. Ingram moved to Hinds county, Mississippi, where he lived about two years. He then moved back to Missouri, to Saline county, and settled on what is now known as the Frazer farm near Saline city, which Mrs. Ingram’s father bought at the land sales of 1819, and lived there until 1848. He then moved to the farm on which Mrs. Ingram now lives, six miles east of Marshall. They have had thirteen children, only six of whom are now living, four girls and two boys: Mrs. Mary F. Allison, Mrs. Virginia A. Boyd, Mrs. Missouri A. Gaines, Mrs. Armeda Ballard, James G., and Robert B. Mr. James S. Ingram farmed in Saline until he died, which event took place, September 20, 1878. He was buried on the home place, where he died, and his widow still lives with her son Robert. The farm contains 120 acres of choice land, well timbered and watered. Page 750

John A. Trigg, deceased. Was born in the year 1815, in Virginia. When he was a child his parents moved to Tennessee, then to Alabama, and in 1830, moved to Chariton county, Missouri, near Glasgow. He received a thorough education. In 1835, he came to this county, and in the same year married Miss Rebecca Bingham, of this county, and cousin of the celebrated artist of that name. She died October, 1850. In 1836 he was elected clerk and recorder of the county, which office he held fifteen years. Mr. Trigg had read law with Col. Davidson, and at the age of twenty was admitted to the bar. In 1849 he went to California, and returned in 1850. While in California he was offered a high position there, and intended to return there, when he came back to Missouri, but his wife died in the meantime, and he never went back. In 1852 he was married to Miss Amanda H. Harvey, of Saline county, and also a cousin of George Bingham, the artist. From 1853 to 1867, he lived in Cooper county, then returned to Saline county, and in 1870 was elected clerk of the circuit court, which office he held until his death, March 14, 1872. He was a strong Union man in the war, and a member of the Methodist Church from a boy. He had six children by his first wife, five of them still living, two by the second wife: Dotia A., and Abner J. Page 750

Andrew Olson, stone-mason, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Sweden, December 27, 1846, where he was raised on a farm. At the age of twenty, learned the stone-mason trade. In 1869 he came to the United States, stopped in Illinois four months, and then came to Sedalia, Missouri, and followed bridge-building on the railroad for two years. In 1871 came to this county and located in Marshall, where he has since lived, and done an extensive business in his line—sometimes amounting to $15,000 per year. He was the means of bringing to this county quite a colony of an intelligent and an industrious class of people from Sweden. He is an elder in the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. In 1865 he was married to Miss Caroline Bowman, of Nova, Sweden. They have three children: Emily, Matilda O., and William. Page 751

L. H. Duggins, deceased. Was a millwright by trade, and was born in Louisa county, Virginia. January 5, 1808, where he was raised on a farm. In 1838 he came to Saline county, and worked at his trade here for some years. In 1849 he took the gold fever and went to California, where he was successful in mining, and returned to this county in 1853; located in Cambridge, and engaged in merchandising, which he continued till the breaking out of the war. He then sold out and went to farming, at which he continued until his death, September 19, 1875. He was a member of the Methodist Church since he was a boy, and honest and conscientious in all his dealings. He began life with nothing, and accumulated quite a fortune, nearly all of which he lost in the war. He was first married soon after he came to Missouri, to Miss Hester A. Goodrich, and had two children. She died in 1847. Was married again in 1860, to Miss Ann Eliza Doak, daughter of Col. Samuel Doak, of this county, formerly of Augusta county, Virginia. By this union there are two children: Lizzie Lee and Mary Blanche. Page 751

Dr. C. W. Chastain, physician, P. O., Marshall. Dr. Chastain was born in Benton county, Missouri, May 6, 1857. When he was five years of age his father moved to Henry county, Missouri, where they lived until 1865, and then moved to Pettis county, where they lived until 1869, and he went to school at Forest Grove Institute. His father dying, his mother moved to Marshall, in this county, where he finished his schooling under Prof. Newton. In 1872 and 1874 he was page in the state senate; was deputy recorder in 1877, and in 1878 was deputy circuit clerk. In 1879 he entered the medical department of the State University, Columbia, Missouri, where he graduated in 1880, and then entered the New York College of physicians and surgeons, and there graduated May 13, 1881. He then engaged in practice with his brother, Dr. M. T. Chastain, in Marshall, Saline county. Page 751

Jacob Fink, Fink & McLumphy, blacksmith and machine shop, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Germany, August 28, 1836, and in 1854 he came to the United States, and located in St. Louis, and learned the black-smith trade. In 1861 he enlisted in the 4th Missouri cavalry, as regimental blacksmith, for three years. In 1865 he went to the Rocky Mountains. Returned, and in 1867 engaged in the blacksmith business in Kimmswick, Missouri, for ten years. In 1877 he came to this county and located in Marshall, where he carried on his trade until 1881. In 1881 he entered in partnership with Mr. McLumphy, and they are now erecting in Marshall and extensive machine shop, two stories high, forty-five feet front, and sixty-five feet back, in which they propose to repair all kinds of machinery, and manufacture plows and wagons. In 1867 he was married to Miss Gertrude Smith, of Jefferson county, Missouri, and has six children, all living: Matilda E., Emily M., Annie G., Carrie, Frederick, and Charles E. Page 751-752

John R. Sparks, carpenter, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Tioga county, N. Y., September 26, 1842, where he was raised on a farm. At the age of fifteen he went to sea, and followed sea life until he was twenty-three years old. In 1862-3 he served in the U. S. navy for fourteen months, on the steam sloop of war Brooklyn, in Admiral Farragut’s fleet. In 1866 he came to Missouri, and landed in Saline county without a dollar, and now owns a handsome home of ten acres, adjoining Marshall, and one of the finest orchards in the county. In 1867 commenced the carpenter trade in Marshall, contracting and building until 1879, when he accepted the position of foreman for E. R. Page. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and of the Knights of Pythias. In July, 1864, he was married to Miss Malinda M. Edson, of Tioga county, New York, and has had five children, three of whom are living: John R., jr., Lola E., and Georgie A. Page 752

Dr. N. M. Edwards, Smith & Edwards, physicians, P. O., Slater. Was born in Christian county, Kentucky, February 22, 1839, where he was raised on a farm, and graduated at Bethel College, Kentucky, in 1857. He then commenced the study of medicine, and graduated at the University of Pennsylvania, at Philadelphia, in 1860. He began the practice of his profession in Christian county, and remained there until January, 1881, when he came to Saline county, Missouri, and located in Slater, and entered into co-partnership with Dr. E. W. Smith. He has been recently appointed physician for the C. & A. railroad. He was married in 1860 to Miss Lutitia Douglas, of Sumner county, Tennessee. She died, May 18, 1874, leaving four children: Rufus D., Younger, Georgie, and James S. He was again married October, 1875, to Miss Maggie Gunnell, of Bloomington, Illinois. In 1862 he enlisted in the Ninth Kentucky infantry, C. S. A., and was appointed surgeon of the regiment, and in 1863 was appointed brigade-surgeon, and served in that capacity to the end of the war. Page 752

Judge James Cooney, probate judge, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Ireland, August 26, 1848. At the age of six he came with his parents to the United States. They located at Troy, New York. When he was only eight years old he was left an orphan by the death of both of his parents. His early life was spent on a farm, and at the age of eighteen, in 1866, he came to Knoxville, Illinois, and attended the Knoxville academy, and taught school at the same time. In 1868 he attended the State University at Columbia, Missouri, teaching at the same time, until 1872. From 1873 to 1875 he was principal of the high school at Sturgeon, Boone county, Missouri, and read law during the time. In the fall of 1875 he came to Marshall, in this county, was admitted to the bar, and located there for the practice of his profession, and entered into co-partnership with L. W. Scott, Esq. From 1876 to 1880 he was justice of the peace for Marshall township, and in 1880 was elected probate judge of Saline county. In December, 1874, he was married to Miss Lilly Orme, of Sturgeon, Missouri, and she died in Marc, 1875. Page 753

Benjamin F. Naylor, Willis & Naylor, grocers, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Dallas county, Arkansas, October 21, 1851. When he was six years old his parents moved to St. Louis county, Missouri, where he grew up on a farm, and was educated in the common schools. In 1870 he came to this county, and settled in Marshall, and clerked for the grocery house of P. H. Rea until 1879, when he entered into partnership in the grocery business, with R. H. Willis, making one of the leading houses in Marshall. On the 9th of June, 1875, he was married to Miss A. D. Paxton, daughter of Rev. J. T. Paxton, of this county. They have had three children, of whom two are living: Frank H. and Archie W. Page 753

Philip H. Franklin, druggist, P. O., Marshall. Was born on the 4th of July, 1841, in Campbell county, Virginia, where he was raised on a farm, and was educated in the private schools. At the first call of Virginia for troops he enlisted in the 11th Virginia infantry, and was in that famous brigade, commanded first by Longstreet, then by Beauregard, then A. P. Hill, Kemper, and Terry, and was in the battles of Bull Run, Drainsville, Yorktown, Seven Pines, seven day’s battle, Williamsburg (where he was wounded), and the battle of Frazier’s Farm (where he was taken prisoner and kept in Fort Delaware until exchanged, August 31, 1862, and returned to his command); the battles of Fredericksburg, Gettysburg (where he was severely wounded, and six months recovering), then in the battles of Drury’s Bluff, Gaines’ Mill, Petersburg, and the various other engagements to the close of the war. After the war, in 1868, he came to this county, and engaged in the drug business at Cambridge, where he had a large and extensive trade until 1876, when he left Cambridge and located at Marshall, where he is now doing a flourishing business in the drug, medicine and fancy line. From 1876 to 1878 he was chairman of the democratic county committee. On the 1st of May, 1872, he married Miss M. E. Gilliam, daughter of F. H. Gilliam, of Saline county, and has two children: Daisy C. and Philip H., Jr. Page 753-754

L. W. Scott, Esq. attorney-at-law and public administrator, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Boone county, Missouri, February 8, 1843, where he was raised on a farm, and educated at the State University, graduating in 1865. He read law with Judge James Gordon, and in the latter part of 1865 entered the law office of J. B. C. Karnes, of Kansas City, Mo. In 1867 he was admitted to the bar by Judge Buck Hart, and in the same year located in Marshall. In 1872 he was elected public administrator of Saline county; re-elected in 1876, and again in 1880, without opposition. In 1876 he was married to Miss Nellie Holland, daughter of Dr. W. S. Holland, of Marshall. Page 754

Leonard Wilson, postmaster, P. O., Marshall. Mr. Wilson is a native of this state, also of this county, and was born in Marshall on the 13th of January, 1846. At the age of fifteen he commenced clerking in the store of Q. O. Striker, in Marshall, and from 1862 to 1864 he was deputy postmaster of Marshall. In 1865 he was deputy circuit clerk. In 1870 he was engaged in the grocery business in Marshall, which he continued to 1873, when he was appointed by President Grant, postmaster of Marshall, re-appointed in 1877 by President Hayes, and in 1881 by President Garfield. In 1864 he served in Capt. Bingham’s company E. M. M., and was taken prisoner at Glasgow, which ended his military service. On the 6th of October, 1868, he was married to Miss Mary Sandidge, daughter of John Sandidge, of Saline county, and has had three children, only one Leonie, living. Page 754

George V. Rayner, Menager & Rayner, millers, P. O. Marshall. Was born in Chelmsford, England, August 5, 1840. In 1855 he went to London, and learned the business of a miller, and followed it there until 1864, when he came to the United States. He worked at various places until 1866, when he came to Glasgow, Missouri, and continued in the Glasgow mills for fourteen years. In 1880 he came to this county, and purchased an interest in the Marshall steam flouring mills, Marshall, under the firm of Menager & Rayner, and he is probably the most experienced miller in the county. In 1869 he was married to Miss Ruth Scott, of Glasgow, Missouri, formerly of New York, and has two children, Minnie and Carrie A. Page 754

C. J. Menager, Menager & Rayner, millers, P. O., Marshall. Is a native of Ohio, and was born at Gallipolis on the 15th of January, 1819, where he grew to manhood, and was educated at Marietta College, Ohio, and at the Georgetown College, Kentucky. In 1844 he commenced merchandising, and continued it for seven years, then engaged in farming until 1856. In that year he moved to Missouri, and settled in this county, purchasing a farm five miles northwest of Marshall, upon which he lived and farmed until 1880, when he bought an interest with Mr. Rayner, in the Marshall steam flouring mills, and moved his family to Marshall, where he now resides. In 1862 or ’63 he joined Capt. Burnside’s company enrolled Missouri militia, but remained only a few months, and did no actual service, having a large family of children to look after. Mr. Menager was married in May, 1855, to Miss E. Irvine, of Florence, Alabama, and has had ten children, of whom nine are living: Katie D., Emily, Maggie, Ella, Irvine, Jennie, Minnie, Georgie L. and Dion P. Page 754-755

Charles H. Vanstone, Centennial mills, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Devonshire, England, August 20, 1844. In that same year, his parents moved to American and settled in Huron county, Canada, where he grew up, and at the age of seventeen, learned the business of milling, and worked at it until 1868. In 1868 he came to Missouri, and landed at Laynesville, in this county with just $7.50, which he paid out for board; but by untiring energy, and cool, level headed sagacity, he has since made a fortune. He now owns 1200 acres of land near Malta Bend, in this county, and 1000 acres in Carroll county; and a one-half interest in three saw mills; the Centennial flouring mills; and a one-half interest in the Marshall steam flouring mills, and has $20,000 at interest, which shows what a man of pluck, energy, and sagacity can do in Saline county. In 1869 he and Mr. J. W. Lane laid out the town of Laynesville, and started the first business there. For ten years he followed saw milling, then, in 1876, built the Centennial flouring mills, at Marshall, which he still carries on, having moved to Marshall the same year. On the 5th of November, 1872, he was married to Miss M. E. Blain, of Malta Bend. She died on her twenty-sixth birth-day, January 1, 1881, leaving four children: Mary L., Minnie E., Ida E. and Samuel W. Page 755

Peter H. Rea, Rea & Page, commission merchants, P. O., Marshall. Mr. Rea was born in Carroll county, Missouri, May 3, 1840, where he grew to manhood, and was educated at the Masonic College in Lexington, Missouri, and at the State University, Columbia, Missouri. In 1861, he joined the Missouri state guard, on the call of Governor Jackson, in Captain Brook’s company, from Carroll county, as a private, and was mustered out as adjutant of the regiment, being engaged in the battles of Wilson Creek, Dry Wood and Lexington, where he was slightly wounded, and Pea Ridge, Corinth, and was then discharged. In 1863 he went to Nebraska City, and clerked in a store for one year; in 1864 he went to Helena, Montana, and started the third store in that place, and continued there for six years; and at the organization of the county, was selected as the first county treasurer. In 1870 he went to St. Louis, and in 1871, came to Saline county and located in Marshall, where he engaged in the grocery and implement business, until 1878. At the opening of the C. & A. railroad, in co-partnership with C. G. Page, he built an elevator of 20,000 bushels capacity, at the Marshall depot, and entered into a general grain and commission, and agricultural implement business, in which they have prospered greatly. He took an active part in securing the railroad, and is one of the directors of the original company. Mr. Rea is an intelligent, enterprising, and public-spirited business man. On the 4th of May, 1869, he married Miss M.E. Samuel, of St. Louis, daughter of E. M. Samuel, one of the leading bankers of that city. They have had five children, of whom four are living: Edward S., Mary V., William G. and Mattie E. Page 755-756

D. B. Coltrane, jeweler, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Randolph, North Carolina, December 25, 1842, where he was brought up on a farm and educated at private schools. In 1861 he enlisted in company I, 5th North Carolina cavalry, C. S. A.; served the first year in North Carolina, and in 1862 joined Gen. Jeb Stuart’s cavalry, in Virginia, and was at the battles of Brandy Station, Gettysburg and all the fights and battles in which Stuart’s cavalry were engaged, to the end of the war, being twice wounded, and surrendered at Greensborough. In February, 1866, he came to Arrow Rock in this county, and engaged in jewelry and photographing there until 1869, and then moved to Miami, where he continued the same business until 1879, in which year he located in Marshall, where he now lives and carries on one of the leading jewelry establishments in the county. He came to Saline county almost penniless, and has made all he is now worth by his own energy, industry and integrity. In 1866 he was married to Miss E. P. Vanice, of Arrow Rock, and has had three children, two now living; Lester D. and Juniatta. Page 756

Dr. C. Lester Hall, physician, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Arrow Rock, in this county, on the 10th day of March 1845, was raised on his father’s farm, and educated at the Kemper high school, Booneville, Missouri. He is a son of Dr. M. W. Hall, with whom he read medicine, attended one course of lectures at the St. Louis medical college, and graduated at the Jefferson medical college, Philadelphia, in 1867. Practiced with his father until 1873, when he located in Marshall, and has now a large and increasing practice. In 1869 he was married to Miss K. P. Sappington, daughter of E. D. Sappington, deceased, of this county, and has had three children, two of whom, Darwin W., and Penelope, are living. Page 756

John W. Nordyke, Nordyke & Spencer, druggists, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Mercer county, Missouri, October 24, 1850, where he lived until fifteen years of age, as was raised on a farm, and was educated in the common schools, and by Prof. Hughes, at Marshall, Missouri. In 1865 he moved with his parents to this county and settled in Marshall, where he has since lived. In 1868 he clerked for C. C. Hagood; and in 1872 engaged with his father, in general merchandise, in Marshall, and from 1872 to 1877, was book-keeper for Cordell & Montague, bankers, Marshall, Missouri. In 1877 he engaged in the drug business, under the firm of Harrison & Nordyke, which in 1879, was changed to Nordyke & Spencer, the present firm, now doing a good business, with a first-class drug store. He had nothing to begin with, and has made what he has by his own unaided exertions. On the 8th of October, 1871, he was married to Miss Belle Rockwell, of Marshall, Missouri, and have two children: J. F., and Lewis T. Page 756-757

A. B. Maxey, of Maxey & Kice, grocers, P. O., Marshall. The subject of the following sketch was born in Sonoma county, California, November 30, 1855. When two years of age his parents moved east, to Jefferson City, Missouri, and at the age of four years he was left an orphan, and was raised by his grandfather, Hiram H. Baber, who was eight years auditor of the state, and his grandmother was the granddaughter of Daniel Boone. He was educated at Westminster College, Fulton, Missouri. In 1874 he went to southern Colorado and New Mexico, and for three years was engaged in sheep raising. In November, 1877, he returned to Jefferson City, Missouri. In 1878, he came to Saline county, and located in Marshall, in the grocery firm of Reed & Maxey. In 1870, he bought out Mr. Reed, and, in 1881, took Mr. Kice in as partner, under which firm, Maxey & Kice, they are doing a flourishing trade in the grocery line. Page 757

J. P. Kice, of Maxey & Kice, grocers, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Lexington, Missouri, April 5, 1854, where he grew up, and was educated in the state normal school at Warrensburg, Missouri. For five years, he worked at the harness trade. He spent the years 1877-8-9, in Dakota territory, Montana, Colorado and Arizona, in mining. In 1880 he returned to Missouri and engaged in the grocery business, and in 1881 located in Marshall, in this county, and entered into partnership with Mr. A. B. Maxey. He is one of the rising young business men of Marshall. Page 757

I. M. Mossler, of Mossler Brothers’ clothing house, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Prussia, May 12, 1849, where he lived until fifteen years old, and was educated in the Gymnasium College. At the age of fifteen years, he went to Berlin and clerked one year, and in 1865 came to the United States and located at Indianapolis, Indiana, and clerked one year; then went to Hillsborough and clerked until 1871. He then went into the clothing business and continued until 1874; then returned to Indianapolis, and engaged in business until 1877. In 1877 he returned to Hillsborough. In 1878, he came to this county and located in Marshall, and engaged in the clothing and gentlemen’s furnishing goods business, under the firm of Mossler Bros. They are now doing a large trade, and carry the largest stock of clothing of any house in the county. They also have a branch store in Taylorville, Illinois. Page 757-758

Dr. M. T. Chastain, physician, P. O., Marshall. Dr. Chastain was born in Logan county, Kentucky, May 13, 1839. Soon after, his parents moved to Christian county, Kentucky, where they lived until 1849, and then moved to Benton county, Missouri. They lived in Benton until 1857, and he was educated at Wilson’s Academy in that county, and at Locust Grove Academy, in Christian county, Kentucky. He read medicine, and graduated at the University Medical College, New York. In April, 1863, he entered as a private in company F., 7th Missouri State Militia, and was soon after appointed assistant surgeon of the regiment, in which capacity he served until the regiment was mustered out March, 1865. In 1866 Dr. Chastain moved to this county and located in Marshall, for the practice of his profession, where he has since lived and practiced. For some years he was in partnership with Dr. Sam Smith, since dead. He has now taken into partnership his brother, recently graduated. From March, 1865, for some months, he was examining surgeon for the government for Pettis county. Dr. Chastain is a scientific physician, a genial, agreeable gentleman, and is very popular with all who know him. Amidst all the cares of a busy life, and the demands of an exacting profession, he has found time to take an active part in county politics, and to devote to literary pursuits. Dr. Chastain was married in May, 1865, to Miss Lou Sandidge, daughter of J. W. Sandidge, of this county, who died in February, 1867. He was again married in October, 1870, to Miss Fratie Holland, daughter of Dr. W. S. Holland, of Marshall, Saline county. They have one child, Julia. Page 758

S. T. Potter, saddle and harness maker, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Patrick county, Virginia, December 1, 1833, where he grew up and was educated. At the age of thirteen years he learned the saddle and harness trade, and worked at the trade in various places in Virginia, and Indiana until 1855, when he moved to Lone Jack, Jackson county, Missouri, and remained there, engaged in his trade, until 1861. He then went back to Indiana, and went into business with some business men in Bloomfield, Indiana, and remained there until 1865. Returned to Lone Jack in 1865, and was appointed postmaster at that place; but resigned in 1866. In that year he came to this county and located in Marshall, and has since carried on an extensive and constantly growing saddlery and harness establishment, and is now doing a business that often reaches as high as $18,000 per annum. Mr. Potter is one of the directors of the Farmers savings bank He is a public spirited gentleman, ever ready to use his means for the advancement of town and county, and has the confidence of the business community. He was married in 1860 to Miss L. Umbager, of Monroe county, Indiana, and has six children: Ella G., Charles, Fannie, William, Eddie and Mamie. Page 758-759

Dr. Fisk Elgin, physician, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Washington county, Maryland, March 11, 1850, where he was brought up on a farm, and educated at the Maryland Agricultural College. In 1871 he came to St. Claire county, Illinois, and commenced the study of medicine under Dr. T. L. Miller. Attended the St. Louis Medical College, where he graduated March, 1877. In the same year, 1877, he came to this county, and located in Marshall, where he has since been engaged in the practice of his profession, and was one year secretary of the Saline county Medical Society. Dr. Elgin was married June 6, 1877, to Miss S. E. Bretelle, of St. Louis, Missouri, and has one child; Maggie J. Elgin. Page 759

J. A. Maddox, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Warren county, Ohio, April 16, 1834, where he grew to manhood. When but four years old his father died, and at the age of seven he went to work by the month on a farm, which he continued until twenty-two years of age, when he went to Clarksville, Clinton county, Ohio, and learned the saddle and harness trade, which business he carried on until 1871. In 1871 he moved to this county, and settled in Marshall, and engaged in the grocery business, in which he has continued to the present time, and is now doing a good business. Mr. Maddox had nothing when he began life, and has made all he is worth by his own exertions. He was married January 1, 1861, to Miss Harriet Nichols, of Clarksville, Ohio, and has had two children, only one, Charley F., living. Page 759

Ed. R. Pemberton, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Saline county, Missouri, October 16, 1854, where he grew up on a farm and was educated in private school. In 1875 he came to Marshall, where he was employed as salesman in different stores, for several years. In 1878 he went into the agricultural implement business by himself. The next year, 1879, he went in with Sutherlin & McMahan, and in 1880 with McMahan alone, having one of the leading trades of the county. Mr. Pemberton is a young man of good moral character, and of good business qualifications. Page 759

Moses Levy, Levy Bros., dry goods and clothing, P. O., Marshall. Was born, June 13, 1847, in Prussia, where he lived until seventeen years of age. His early life was spent in a store, and in attending school; his parents died when he was only eight years old, and since that time he has made his own way in life. In 1864, he came to the United States, and spent that and the following year doing business in Macon City and Sedalia, Missouri. In the spring of 1866 he moved to this county, and located in Arrow Rock, where he engaged in general merchandise, and did an extensive business until 1873. In that year he moved to Marshall, and now carries on a large business, in two buildings, one a clothing and the other a general dry goods store. Levy Bros. have, besides their extensive establishment in Marshall, a store in Sedalia, Missouri, and one in Nevada, Missouri. Moses Levy is a young man of energy, good character, and excellent business qualifications. Page 759-760

Jack T. Weller, druggist, P. O., Marshall. Mr. Weller was born in Henderson, Henderson county, Kentucky, where he grew to manhood, and commenced clerking in a drug store. His whole life has been spent in the drug business. In 1870 he went to St. Joseph, Missouri, and traveled for the wholesale firm of Riddlesex & Hardy for two and one-half years; and in 1873 engaged with A. A. Miller, wholesale druggist, of St. Louis, and traveled for that house in Missouri, Nebraska, Kansas, Iowa, Texas, Colorado, Arkansas, and the Indian territory until 1878. He then came to this county, and purchasing the drug establishment of H. D. Doak, deceased, he located in Marshall, and has since carried on the drug business, and is one of the leading drug houses in Marshall. Mr. Weller is a man of pluck and energy, and has made his own living since he was twelve years old, sometimes working for ten cents per day. He is a first-class business man, and a genial, polished gentleman. Page 760

Thomas G. Ehrnman, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Fairfield county, Ohio, May 30, 1819, where he was raised on a farm and educated in the common schools. In 1838, moved to Pickaway county, and farmed until 1848, when he engaged in the grocery business at Circleville, Ohio, which he continued until 1853, and during that time was a member of the city council. In 1853 he moved to Lee county, Iowa, and farmed there for seventeen years, working over 200 acres of land per annum; and was justice of the peace for three terms, and held the office of township assessor for several terms. In 1870 he moved to Marshall, in this county, where he has since resided, engaged in the grocery business. Mr. Ehrnman has made his property by his own industry, perseverance and good management. He has been a member of the Presbyterian Church, O. S., since he was twenty years of age, and all of his children are members of the same church. He has also been a member of I. O. O. F. for twenty years. On the 29th of March, 1838, he was married to Miss Susannah Christy, of Pickaway county, Ohio, and has had ten children, nine of whom are living: John H., Minerva C., Luther C., Emanuel G., George A., Thomas C., William R., Arthur M., and Alice J. All of his children (except one, who lives in Nebraska), are living in Saline county. Page 760

William Madison Walker, county collector, P. O., Marshall. Mr. W. M. Walker, the present collector of Saline county, was born in Smith county, Tennessee, October 22, 1833, coming to Miami with his parents when but three years old, and was raised on a farm in Moniteau county, in this state. His father, Samuel Walker, was born in 1798, in North Carolina; his grandfather, Edward Walker, was a native of Virginia, born about 1745, and was an orderly sergeant in the Revolutionary war, and was present at the battle of Cowpens. His father came from England. When a young man, Samuel Walker moved with his parents to Tennessee. Mrs. Agnes Walker, nee Bradford, the mother of William M., was born September 6, 1793, in Tennessee. Her father, Bocker Bradford, was born in Virginia, about 1750, and was also of English descent and a soldier in the Revolutionary war. Nine children blessed the marriage of Samuel Walker and Agnes Bradford, (one of them dying in infancy). They moved to Moniteau county, Missouri, in 1836, and there spent the rest of their lives. She died October 11, 1857, and he June 16, 1865. At the age of twenty-two, December 20, 1855, William M. Walker was married to Miss May Isabel Garrett, of Saline county, where she was born, February 5, 1834. Her father was a native Virginian, and his father, Abel Garrett, of Scotch origin, was also a soldier of the Revolution. In 1859 William M. commenced farming for himself in Moniteau county, which he continued for six years, and then, in 1865, moved upon a farm in Saline county. After about four years, he moved to the neighborhood of Orearville. Industry, economy, perseverance and a genial disposition will readily account for the steady increase of his estate and of his influence in the county. In 1876 he was elected county collector in a hotly contested canvass, and the next year, 1877, he moved his family to the county seat, where he now resides. In 1878 he was re-elected, almost without opposition, and in 1880 was again elected, though there was a keen contest for the office this year. His election to the third term demonstrates the satisfaction he has given his constituents as collector of the county. His integrity is above suspicion, and the people can find no fault with him as an official. Mr. Walker is a Royal Arch Mason, a granger and a member of the Baptist Church, as are also Mrs. Walker and the two elder daughters. Seven children have been born to them, all living, as follows: Narcissa, born November 1, 1857; Mary Helen, born February 16, 1861; Samuel Lee, born August 19, 1862; William Madison, born September 26, 1866; Viola Belle, born April 16, 1869; Thomas Rooker, born August 15, 1870; Nannie S., born February 22, 1873. Page 760-761

Reuben V. Montague, P. O., Marshall. Mr. Montague was born in Marengo county, Alabama, May 31, 1831. In 1846, moved with his parents to Brandon, Mississippi, and in 1848 to Madison Parish, Louisiana. He was raised on a plantation, and was educated at the Mississippi University, at Oxford, and at the Lebanon Law School, in Tennessee. He lived in Madison parish until 1862, when he had to leave on account of his union sentiments, and went to St. Louis, where he remained until May, 1863, and then went to Vicksburg, and entered with Grant’s army, on the 4th of July. He remained at Vicksburg, in commission and cotton business, until 1868. He then came to Ralls county, Missouri, where he engaged in farming. In 1873, he moved to this county, and in 1874, located in his present business in Marshall. In March, 1868, he was married to Miss Emma Hammet, of Vicksburg, Mississippi. Has six children living: Georgia, Robert V., Mickelborough L., Theodore H., May A., Hardeman C. Page 761-762

J. G. Goodwin, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Lafayette county, Missouri, on the 26th of February, 1859, where he grew to manhood. His early life was passed in school, and at the State University at Columbia, Missouri. From 1878 to 1879 he clerked in the Waverly (Missouri) bank, one year, and in 1880 he graduated at Eastman’s Business College, Poughkeepsie, New York. In April, 1880, at the age of twenty-one, he purchased the grocery establishment of Capt. Mark Belt, in Marshall, Saline county, and largely increasing the stock, has since carried on a first class staple and fancy grocery, now one of the leading houses in Marshall. Mr. Goodwin continued the business alone until December, 1880, when he took in as partner Mr. Charles Buckner, of Monroe county, Missouri, and old fellow-student at the State University. Though but boys in years, these young gentlemen have proved themselves men of first class business ability, and able to cope with older heads. Mr. Goodwin was married on the 5th of April, 1881, to Miss Mary Webb, daughter of Dr. William Webb, of Lafayette county, Missouri, who was educated at the Baptist Female College, Lexington, Missouri. Page 762

C. F. Odell, P. O., Marshall. Mr. Odell was born in this county, September 12, 1826, and is a son of Jerry Odell, one of the oldest settlers of the county, and the founder of the city of Marshall. He was raised on a farm, and was educated at the private schools. At the age of eighteen he clerked in a store, and continued it form a number of years. From 1848 to 1852 he was deputy sheriff. He then learned the carpenter’s trade, which he followed for some years, then clerked for Patrick Flynn, in Marshall, and then entered into partnership with B. F. Bradford, in the undertaking business and cabinet making, in which occupation they are now the only establishment in Marshall, and are doing a remunerative business. Mr. Odell was married in 1855 to Miss Matilda Gregory, of Saline county, formerly of Tennessee, and has two children, William L. and Frank M. Page 762

John R. Cason, sheriff, P. O., Marshall. Was born in De Soto county, Mississippi, March 29, 1843, where he was raised on a cotton plantation, and educated at North Mt. Pleasant, Mississippi. In April, 1861, he enlisted in the Pettis Rifles, 17th Mississippi infantry, C. S. A. Participated in the battles of Bull Run, Ball’s Bluff, Yorktown, seven days’ fight around Richmond, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Harper’s Ferry, Antietam, Gettysburg, and Petersburg. He entered the ranks as a private, and rose to the rank of captain, and was a brave and gallant soldier. After the war he returned to Mississippi, and in 1868 came to Marshall, in this county. From 1870 to 1878 he was continuously city marshal of Marshall. In 1878 he was elected sheriff of Saline county, and again elected in 1880, by a large majority in both elections and has proved an excellent and popular sheriff. In 1866 he married Miss Sue M. Bryant, daughter of Major J. W. Bryant, of this county. They have had seven children, five living: Stella, Brooks, Willie B., Robert Bryant, and Dell. Page 762-763

Dr. William Harrison, physician, P. O., Marshall. Dr. Harrison was born in Fayette county, Ohio, July 8, 1850. In 1865 he came to Cooper county, Missouri, with his parents, and in 1866 moved to this county. He was raised on a farm and educated in the private schools. In 1871 he commenced the study of medicine, and graduated in the St. Louis Medical College in 1874, and he entered on the practice of his profession in Marshall the same year, and has continued there ever since, and stands high in his profession. Page 763

C. M. Baldwin, Justice & Co., livery, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Meigs county, Tennessee, October 23, 1841. When he was two years old, his parents moved to Lawrence county, Missouri, where he was raised and educated, and lived until 1865. In that year he went to Montana, where he followed freighting for a year, and then came to Saline county, in 1866, and engaged in farming and stock-raising, until 1880, when he moved to Marshall, and in 1881, went into partnership with Mr. Justice in the livery business. He was married November 21, 1866, to Mrs. Mary Jane Wills, formerly a Miss Sandidge, of Boone county, Missouri. Page 763

William H. Rea, teacher, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Cooper county, Missouri, July 24, 1845.When he was five years old, his parents moved to Carroll county, Missouri, where he resided ten years. He was raised on a farm to the age of fifteen, and was educated at the Kemper high school, Booneville, Missouri. In 1861, he enlisted in company B., Hughes’ regiment, M. S. G., and was in the battle of Lexington. Started south in December, 1861, in the body of recruits, under Colonel Robinson, and was one of the few who escaped being captured at Blackwater, on the nineteenth of December, 1861. In the fall of 1862, he enlisted in company H., First Missouri cavalry, under Colonel Shelby, afterwards under Colonel B. F. Gordon; was in the battles of Coon Creek, Newtonia, Boston Mountains, Prairie Grove, Little Rock, Helena, Springfield, Hartsville, Cape Girardeau, and Marshall. He was taken prisoner at Marshall and held first in St. Louis, then in Rock island, Illinois; and in June, 1864, was released on special pardon from President Lincoln. He then returned to Carroll county, and followed farming. Went back to school to the Kemper high school, in Booneville, and then engaged in teaching, which he has followed ever since, in Carroll, Lafayette and Saline counties. He came to Saline in 1873, and has since lived in this county. Mr. Rea was married March 7, 1870, to Miss Mollie H. Rea, daughter of Rev. P. G. Rea, a graduate of the Missouri Female College, Booneville, Missouri. They have four children: Edna G., Florence, and twins, Madie and Sadie. Page 763-764

A. J. Ransberger, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Washington county, Missouri, July 27, 1839. Soon after his birth his parents moved to Jefferson, and in 1855, moved to Moniteau county. In 1861, he joined the M. S. G. for six months, and was in the battle of Lexington. In 1864, he re-enlisted in Gen. Shelby’s command, C. S. A., in which he served to the end of the war, participating in the engagements of that command. In 1867, he came to Marshall, in this county, and carried on his trade, that of blacksmithing. In 1871, he entered into partnership with Mr. Lantz, and established the business firm of Ransberger & Lantz, carriage and wagon makers, which he have carried on prosperously since. He was married December 3, 1873, to Miss Laura Neely, Washington county, Missouri. They have had three children, two living now: Lester H., Frank E. Page 764

A. R. Lantz, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Rockingham county, Virginia, January 31, 1844, where he was raised and educated. April, 1861, he enlisted in company E, 17th regiment Virginia cavalry, and was in the battles of Salt Pond Mountain, Lewisburg, Lynchburg, Narrow at New River, Salem, North Mountain, Hedge’s Depot, where he was taken prisoner, July 3, 1864, and was held prisoner for nine months, and exchanged March 18, 1865, and returned to Richmond, and surrendered at few months later. Returned to Rockingham county, and worked at his trade. In 1869 he came west, and located in Marshall, in this county, where he has since carried on his trade, carriage and wagon making. On the 4th of April, 1871, he married Miss Alice T. Piper, of Rockingham county; have had one child, who died at the age of six years. Page 764

G. C. Fletcher, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Mason county, Kentucky, November 20, 1810, where he grew to manhood on a farm, and was educated in the Old Field schools of that early time. In 1830, he came to Pike county, Missouri, where he remained two years, and in 1832 came to this county, where he married Miss M. A. Hall, of Saline. He remained in this county for two years and then moved to Henry county, and engaged in merchandising, and lived there six years. In 1838, he moved to Lafayette county, located in Waverly, and engaged in manufacturing rope, bagging, etc. He was the first man to start a power loom in the state of Missouri. In 1845, his bagging establishment was burned. Mr. Fletcher then went to farming again, which he continued for several years. In 1870, he engaged in the banking business, in Waverly, in the bank of which company he is now the president, and has been for many years. In 1879, the Farmer’s Saving’s Bank was moved from Waverly to Marshall, when Mr. Fletcher also moved to Marshall, and at the same time moved his dry goods store, G. C. F. Fletcher & Co., from Waverly to Marshall—and both bank and store have prospered since their removal. Mr. Fletcher has had eight children, three of whom are now living: John B., Thomas J. and William H. Page 764-765

James A. Gordon, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Lexington, Missouri August 26, 1841, and was educated at the State University, Columbia, Missouri. In 1862 he enlisted in Shelby’s command, and was in the battles of Coon Creek, Newtonia, Cane Hill, Poison Springs, Mark’s Mill, Cape Girardeau, Saline River, Springfield, Hartsville, Helena, Prairie Grove, Clarendon, (where he was seriously wounded with a bullet in his lungs, which remains there to the present day). Was captured in hospital, and paroled. Returned to his command as soon as able, and served to the end of the war. Was in all the battles of Price’s raid, and surrendered in 1865. Returned home and taught school until 1870. In 1870 he was elected cashier of the Farmer’s Savings Bank, at Waverly, Missouri, and still holds the same position since the transfer of the bank to Marshall, in 1879. On the 29th of December, 1868, he was married to Miss E. M. Catron, of Lafayette county, Missouri, and has had three children, one of whom is now living: William C. Gordon. Page 765

Solomon K. Selig, P. O., Marshall. Mr. Selig was born in the city of Lyons, France, January 18, 1850. In 1852, his parents came to the United States, and located in Philadelphia, where he was raised and educated in the city schools, and graduated in Bryant’s Commercial College. In 1866, he moved to Chillicothe, Missouri, and engaged in merchandise. The next year went to Kansas City, and in 1868, moved to this county and located in Marshall, where he has continued to the present time, doing a large and constantly increasing business. During the last three years his sales have enlarged at an almost marvelous rate, and he is now doing the most extensive business in Marshall, and stands among the first merchants of Saline county. In March, 1874, he was married to Miss Clara Kaufman, of Indianapolis, Indiana, and has three children: Estella, Samuel, and Lawrence. Page 765

H. Grossman, P. O. Marshall. Was born in Boone county, Missouri, May 5, 1846, where he was raised on a farm, and educated in the common schools, and followed farming up to 1876, when he went to Rocheport, Missouri, and engaged in the livery business. In 1879 he sold out in Rocheport and came to this county, and in 1880 located in Marshall, and went into the livery business. While he lived in Rocheport, he was town marshal one term, and also was a member of the town council one year. In 1864 he was married to Miss Martha Colbert, of Howard county, Missouri, and has six children, five now living: James, Carrie, Victoria, Leroy, and Dimmit. Page 765-766

Robert W. James, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Logan county, Kentucky, July 1, 1838, where he was raised on a farm, and lived there until 1865. He is own cousin to the now famous, or rather notorious Jesse and Frank James. In December 23, 1865, he landed in Kansas City, Missouri where he clerked in a store during the winter, and in the spring came to this county and settled at Salt Springs, where he farmed about five years, and then merchandised for five years in the town of Salt Springs. In June, 1880, he located in Marshall, and in October of the same year, engaged in the livery business, and March 1, 1881, he took in as partner, Mr. Gibbs. Mr. James also carries on a separate business, selling buggies, harness, etc. When he came to Missouri, in 1866, he had but $20, and has made all he has, which is considerable, by his own industry and good management. He was married May, 1868, to M. E. Deal, daughter of Capt. J. W. Deal, of Saline county, formerly of Virginia. They have had six children, five of them now living: Edna L., Robert F., Howard P., Alpha O., Beula I. Page 766

William H. Ancell, dealer in sewing machines, fanning mills, etc., P. O., Marshall. Was born in Cooper county, Missouri, October 22, 1844, and in 1845, his parents moved to Arrow Rock in this county, where he was raised and educated. In 1862, he enlisted in company H, Seventy-first regiment, E. M. M., under Capt. Bingham, and was appointed sergeant-major of the regiment. He was stationed at Lexington, and served two years. He then went to St. Louis, and graduated at Bryant & Stratton’s Commercial College, then returned to Arrow Rock, and clerked in the stores until 1870, when he was elected county recorder, which office he held one term of four years. In 1875 he carried on the grocery house of Sutherlin & McMahan, in Marshall, for one year; then, with G. W. Lankford, bought out Sutherlin & McMahan, and then, in 1877, bought out Lankford, and carried on the business alone until 1880. He then engaged in his present business. In October, 1870, he was married to Miss Jennie Tucker, daughter of William and Elizabeth Tucker. They have had three children, two now living, Earnest L. and Bessie M. Page 766

Daniel McGrath, harness and saddlery, P. O., Marshall. Was born in County Wallford, Ireland June 21, 1824. At the age of fourteen years he commenced to learn the saddler’s trade, at which he was apprenticed seven years. In 1849 he came to the United States, and located in New York City, and worked at his trade four years. In 1853, he went to Winchester, Clark county, Kentucky, and carried on his trade there until 1865, when he came to Carroll county, Missouri, and purchased a farm, and farmed for four years. In 1869, he came to this county and settled in Marshall, where he now has a prosperous business. He was, at one time, a member of the city council of Marshall. He was married, in 1855, to Miss Jane Cannon, of Winchester, Kentucky, and has had eleven children, nine now living: Elizabeth, John A., Catherine, Annie, Richard A., William C., Thomas D., Anora M., and Robert E. Page 766-767

Meredith M. Marmaduke, P. O., Marshall. Son of Gov. M. M. Marmaduke, was born June 24, 1835, in Saline county, Missouri, where he was raised on a farm, and was educated at the Masonic College at Lexington, Missouri. In 1863 he went to Colorado, and returned in 1865, and engaged in farming in his native county until 1880. In that year he located in Marshall, and engaged with Mr. J. G. Harvey in the agricultural implement business. He was married February 16, 1858, to Miss Mary L. Bruce, daughter of Aaron F. and Jane Bruce of Saline county. They have six children: Pearla, John S., Georgia Glenora, Emmet B., Meredith M., and Mary B. Page 767

John W. Bryant, P. O., Marshall. Mr. Bryant was born in Richmond county, Virginia, June 4, 1820. He was educated at Chesapeake Academy, Lancaster county, and graduated at Mt. Airy, Richmond county, in mathematics and the other higher English branches. At the age of eighteen, he removed with his father, first, to Limestone county, Alabama, where he remained one year, and then to Marshall county, Mississippi, near the town of Holly Springs. He entered the law office of Chalmers & Barton, Holly Springs, where he read law for one year. In August, 1841, he came to Saline county. Engaged first, as tutor in the family of Col. John F. Yancey, in the Grand Pass neighborhood, in which capacity he served for three years. In 1844 he came to Marshall, was admitted to the bar, and immediately opened a law office. In 1854 he was appointed circuit attorney, vice Samuel L. Sawyer, resigned. Prior to this, by appointment of the county court, he had been county attorney for a number of years. In 1856, he was elected to the office of circuit attorney for four years. His circuit then comprised what are now the counties of Jackson, Cass, Bates, Vernon, Johnson, Pettis, Saline and Lafayette. In the meantime, he had been appointed one of the government commissioners for the location of the "swamp and overflowed lands" of the county. His report is still on file in the proper office. In 1861, when the war was in prospect, Mr. Bryant opposed secession, and took no part in the movement to take Missouri out of the Union; but when the war actually began, and there was no neutral or middle ground for him to occupy, he sympathized with, although not actively aiding, the cause of the south. In consequence of his political views, when the Federal authority was established in the county, he and his family were greatly persecuted, harassed and abused, principally by the home militia, some of the members of which organization were ex-criminals, whom Mr. Bryant when circuit attorney, before the war, had prosecuted. He was often a fugitive, concealed or flying for his life. His daughter, then but a school girl of the tender age of seventeen, was arrested and taken off to prison, in St. Louis. His property was taken and destroyed; his house occupied by Federal officers, and he himself was arrested and carried off to St. Louis, where he was kept for some months, and only released through the interposition of Col. Thomas L. Price, a prominent Federal officer, but his personal friend, and upon giving a heavy bond. A company of Confederates, in this county, had chosen him their major, without his knowledge or consent, and upon hearing of it, he rode to their camp and positively refused the position, yet he was pursued, as if he had been in the active military service of the Confederacy. Upon his return from prison, in 1862, Mr. Bryant went to Booneville, where he engaged in the practice of law with William Douglas, Esq., until the close of the war, when he returned to Marshall, where he has remained ever since. In politics, Mr. Bryant has always been a Jeffersonian democrat. Before the war, he was known as an anti-Benton democrat, and in 1860, was alternate elector on the Douglas and Johnson ticket, and stumped his circuit for the "Little Giant." Upon the re-organization of the democratic party of the county, Mr. Bryant was made chairman of the county central committee, and served for some years, through the reconstruction period, until the party was restored to power, when he voluntarily relinquished the position to other hands. December 12, 1844, Mr. Bryant married Elizabeth M. Twyman, a native of Woodford county, Kentucky, then living near Independence, Jackson county. To them were born seven children, five of whom are now living, viz: Wm. Cullen, John W. jr., Thomas A., Dixie Lee and Mary Susan, now wife of John A Cason. Mr. Bryant has been a member of the Masonic order. He is not a member of any church, but holds to the general principles of religion, and believes more in works than in blind, unreasoning faith. His portrait appears on another page in this volume. Page 767-768

George B. Blanchard, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Lewis county, Missouri, August 4, 1839, and moved with his parents to Marion county, Missouri, where he was raised. His father was a merchant, and much of his early life was spent in this father’s store. He was educated at Central College, Fayette, Howard county, Missouri. In 1865 he went to Kentucky, and was married to Miss Payne, daughter of Newton Payne of Georgetown, Kentucky, one of the prominent families of Kentucky. Some years after he moved back to Missouri, and located on a farm in the western part of this county. He continued farming, raising stock and buying and selling stock until 1879, and then went to Marshall and engaged in the lumber business, first with Capt. Fisher, then by himself. They purchased the stock of Dreyfus, Hill & Woracek, and Mr. Blanchard now carries a large stock. He still owns his splendid farm of 320 acres in this county, and is one of the leading lumber merchants of Marshall. Mr. and Mrs. Blanchard have had eight children, of whom seven are living: Estelle, Frank, Marcus, Hiram, Oliver, Sallie, and Bowman. Page 768-769

James A. Tipping, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Selma, Alabama, September 16, 1851, and his parents soon after his birth moved to St. Louis, Missouri, then to Jefferson City, and then, 1858, to Arrow Rock, in this county, where he was raised and educated. At the age of eighteen he learned the marble and tombstone business, and started the first marble yard in Marshall, for Ed. Farley, in 1871. In 1873, he returned to Arrow Rock, and carried on the marble business there for several months. In 1874 he located in Marshall and entered into partnership with Mr. Farley, and the next year, 1875, went into business for himself, and is now doing the most extensive business in his line in Saline county, and does work for Kansas and Nebraska, as well as Missouri. He employs about fifteen men. He commenced life with nothing, and has made his way by his own energy, industry and judgment. Mr. Tipping was married in 1874 to Tinnie Bihr, of Columbia, Missouri, and has four children: William V., Mary E., Kate, and Frederick. Page 769

Hugh G. Allen, P. O. Marshall. Was born in Jessamine county, Kentucky, April 10, 1844, where he lived until sixteen years of age, and was raised on a farm. In 1860 he came with his parents to this county, where he worked on a farm and taught school until 1877. He then came to Marshall and clerked in the store of G. C. Fletcher & Co., until 1879, when he went into the grocery business with Mr. Adams, and the firm of Allen & Adams is now one of the leading grocery houses of Marshall. In 1871 he was married to Miss Virginia Adams, of Lexington, Kentucky, and has one child, Minnie L. Page 769

John W. Reid, P. O., Marshall. Mr. Reid was born in Knox county, Missouri, May 3, 1843, where he was raised and educated at a private academy. From 1863 to 1870 he taught school in Knox, Lewis, and Saline counties. In 1871 he came to Marshall, in this county, and taught the public school there. In 1873 he went to California for his health, and returned in 1874, and continued to teach until 1877, when he engaged in the hardware business in Marshall, in which he has continued to this time, the present firm, being J. W. Reid & Co., who now carry one of the largest hardware stocks in the county. He is a live, energetic business man, and has made all he has by his energy and industry. In December, 1876, he was married to Miss M. E. Holmes, daughter of Andrew Homes, Marshall. Page 769

Henry Strother Esq., P. O., Marshall. Was born in Henry county, Kentucky, August 6, 1850, where he grew up on a farm, and was educated at Newcastle Seminary, under Prof. Lee. He studied law under Joseph Barber, Esq., and Judge W. S. Pryor. During the time that he was reading law, he taught school. He came to Marshall in this county in 1874, and was admitted to the bar at Marshall by Judge Napton, in 1875. Mr. Strother pursued the practice of his profession in Marshall until 1879, when he combined with the practice a real estate agency and abstract of titles office, to which he now devotes most of his attention. In 1881, he entered into partnership with Mr. Thomas Boatright in the real estate and abstract business. They have now the best and most complete set of abstract books in Saline county, and are doing a large and growing business. On the 4th of October, 1880, he was married to Miss Sallie M. White, daughter of Col. D. B. White, of Howard county, Missouri. Mr. Strother’s father was a minister of the Methodist Church South, and being a man of studious and industrious habits, did not allow his sons to eat idle bread, and Henry was kept actively employed all his early life, and has been constantly employed since. Henry Strother is himself a member of the Methodist Church South, and has been for many years. Page 770

Thomas A. Bryant, P. O., Marshall. Is a native of Missouri, and was born in Marshall, Saline county, February 10, 1857, where he grew to manhood, and was educated at Prof. Newton’s high school. He has also a good musical education, and is possessed of a bass voice that has few superiors. A part of this early life was spent in clerking in stores in Marshall, and he spent some time in Texas and Colorado. In 1880 he went into the grocery business in Marshall with his brothers, under the firm name of Bryant Bros., and is now doing a flourishing business. Page 770

Rev. B. G. Tutt, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Cooper county, Missouri, February 11, 1839, where he grew up; and was educated at Westminster College, Fulton, Missouri. Much of his early life was spent on a farm. In 1860 he entered the ministry as pastor of Concord Church in Cooper county, the neighborhood in which he was born and raised and was its pastor for fiteen years. The church had sixty members when he took charge; and he increased the membership to two hundred, and built a church building costing $4,000. In 1876 he accepted a call to the first Baptist Church in Marshall, in this county, where he has since lived and preached. In 1860 he was married to L. E. Thornton, daughter of Col. John Thornton, an early settler of Cooper county. They have six children living: William P., (deputy postmaster of Marshall), Anna G., George E., Arthur M., Henry T., and J. Maurice. Page 770

Will H. Wood, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Saline county, Missouri, September 15, 1831, where he was raised on a farm, and educated in the country schools. First clerked in a store in Arrow Rock for two years. In 1853 he engaged in the grocery and commission business, and continued thes ame until 1864, he then engaged in steamboating, until the latter part of 1865; and then returned to the grocery and commission business in Arrow Rock, which he continued until 1874. In 1874 he moved to Marshall and entered into the banking business under the firm of Wood & Huston. They commenced with a capital of $20,000, which has now (in 1881), been increased to $50,000, with a surplus of $25,000. Mr. Wood was married in 1854 to Miss Jennie Fields, daughter of Judge Fields, of Saline county. She died in 1856, and he was again married in 1873 to Mrs. Wm. Potter of this county, formerly a Miss Durrett. They have one child, Fannie Wood. Page 770-771

Samuel Boyd, Esq., P. O., Marshall. Mr. Boyd is a native of Fleming county, Kentucky, where he was born, December 20, 1834, grew to manhood, and received a collegiate education. In 1854 he commenced the study of law in his father’s office; and in 1859 moved with his father to Bloomington, Illinois, and was there admitted to the bar. In the summer of the same year he moved to Marshall, in this county, and being admitted to the Saline county bar by Judge Russell Hicks, soon after his arrival, he at once entered on the practice of his profession. During the canvass of 1859 and ’60 he had editorial charge of the Saline County Standard, which he conducted with marked ability. In the summer of 1861 he went south with Gen. Price’s army, but remained in the army only a short time; then returned to Marshall and resumed his practice, to which his mind has since been wholly devoted. At present he stands at the head of the Saline county bar, and among the foremost attorneys of the bar of central Missouri. As a criminal lawyer he has had no equal in this county for many years, and few, if any superiors in western Missouri. For fifteen years he has held one side or the other of every leading case in the county; and in criminal cases, has been employed in every important case not only in this circuit, but has been employed in Kansas, Nebraska, and north Missouri. As a lawyer he possesses the abilities of a high order—keen, quick to discern the strong points of his own case, and the weak ones of his antagonist, his memory and his sagacity are rarely ever at fault; and his power over a jury consists in the clearness and forcible simplicity with which his arguments are addressed to their intelligence. His father, Wilson P. Boyd, Esq., and his mother, Susan E. (Lacy) Boyd, moved from Flemingsburg to Bloomington, Illinois, in 1857, and there Mr. Boyd practiced law until his death, in 1867. Mrs. Susan E. Boyd, after the death of her husband, moved to Arcola, Illinois, where she resided with her daughters until her death, March 10, 1877. Mr. W. P. Boyd was at one time a member of the state senate of Kentucky, and was appointed by the legislature of Kentucky chairman of the committee to receive Gen. Zachary Taylor at Louisville on his way to be inaugurated president, in 1849. He was a whig until 1858, when he affiliated with the democracy. Mr. Samuel Boyd was married March 12, 1861, to Miss Fannie M. Clarkson, daughter of Dr. E. S. Clarkson, of Saline county, formerly of Kentucky, who died February 10, 1866, leaving three children: Caroline Russell, Wilson Porter and Francis H. Mr. Boyd was again married July 21, 1868, to Miss Marguerite M. Clarkson, sister of his first wife, and to this union have been born five children, two of whom Samuel, Jr., and Isabelle, are living. Page 771-772

Samuel Davis, P. O., Marshall. Is a native of Saline county, Missouri, where he was born on the 17th of April, 1847, and was raised on a farm within a mile of Marshall. His education was mainly obtained in the Marshall schools, and one term spent at the Kemper high school, Booneville, Missouri. In 1868, he commenced the study of law in the office of John P. Strother, Esq., of Marshall, and was admitted to the bar, August, 1869, and at once entered on the practice in Marshall, where he has since resided and practiced. In the next year, 1870, he was elected justice of the peace for Marshall township, and in 1872 received the democratic nomination for prosecuting attorney, and, as the test oath had then been repealed, was elected by an overwhelming majority. This office he filled with marked ability, and in 1874, he was renominated and re-elected without opposition. In 1876 he declined a renomination for the office of prosecuting attorney, and was nominated to represent the first legislative district in the twenty-nine general assembly, and was, of course, elected. In 1878 he was renominated and re-elected. Since then he has held no office, but has pursued the practice of his profession. In both capacities, as legislator and as a lawyer, as lawmaker and law-expounder, Mr. Davis has exhibited decided talent; and, being yet a comparatively young man, a bright future is open to him. His father, Jesse Davis, was a well-known and highly respected citizen of this county, before the war. Was county clerk, at the beginning of the war, from which he was ousted by the Gamble government. He died in 1867, while yet a young man. His widow, Mrs. Lavinia (Jarboe) Davis, died in 1876. Samuel Davis, Esq., was married in Marshall, November 19, 1872, to Miss Julia Newton, daughter of Prof. G. B. Newton, of this county, and has had three children, only one of whom George, is living. Page 772

Hiram Ferrill, P. O., Marshall. Is son of Henry Ferril, one of the pioneers of Saline county, and the founder of the town of Miami, and was born in this county on the 30th of November, 1837. He was also raised and educated in this county. At the age of seventeen, in 1854, he entered a store as clerk, and remained there until 1860, when he commenced the study of law, and pursued the same until the war broke out in 1861. In the spring of 1861 he enlisted in company B., 1st infantry, 4th division, Missouri state guards, under the call of Gov. Jackson, and was engaged in the battles of Carthage, Wilson Creek (where he was wounded in the head and went to the hospital), and Lexington. In December, 1861, (the Missouri state guard having been disbanded), he started south in Robinson’s recruits, and was captured December 19, 1861, with nearly the whole body, on Blackwater, taken to St. Louis and Alton, Illinois, and exchanged at Vicksburg in October, 1862. He then enlisted and was second lieutenant in the 9th Missouri infantry, C. S. A., and was in the battles of Gaines’ landing, Pine Bluff (on staff of Col. Lawther), Pleasant Hill and Jenikn’s ferry, where he was promoted to first lieutenant. Served to the end of the war, and surrendered June 5, 1865. Served four years and never asked for leave of absence. In 1865 he returned home and clerked for John P. Scott, of Miami, two years; then went to St. Louis as barkeeper for Banks & Co., to 1870, then back to Saline, and was admitted to the bar 1877. Was justice of the peace for Miami township from 1875 to 1877. In January, 1881, he moved to Marshall, having been appointed deputy county clerk. He was married November 1, 1866, to Miss Eliza M. Cruzen of this county, and has no children living. Page 772-773

Micajah C. Sandidge, county recorder, P. O. Marshall. Was born in Hart county, Kentucky, April 3, 1835, and moved with his parents to this county, and settled six miles south of Marshall, where he was raised on the farm, and educated in the schools of the neighborhood. At the age of fifteen he clerked in a stone in Marshall, until 1857, when he went to Lanesville, Kentucky, and clerked two years in a grocery and commission house. In 1859 his father died, and he returned to Saline county, Missouri, and took charge of the farm. In 1861, he joined Capt. Crew’s company, M. S. G., and was in the battles of Wilson Creek and Lexington, and was discharged at the end of six months. In August, 1862, he enlisted in company D., First Missouri cavalry, Jo. Shelby, colonel; then Gordon. This company was afterwards made General Marmaduke’s escort, and was in the battles of Coon Creek, Newtonia, Prairie Grove, Helena, Little Rock, and Jenkin’s Ferry. In May, 1864, he was sent in the Federal lines as a spy, taken prisoner, and sent, first to the Arkansas penitentiary, at Little Rock, then to Rock Island, Illinois, where he remained until February, 1865, then sent to New Orleans, and then exchanged on April, 1865; went to Shreveport, joined his command, and surrendered in June. In March, 1866, he returned to Saline county, Missouri, and sold goods for Q. O. Striker, in Marshall, and then went to farming until 1875. He then sold his farm, and engaged in milling for three years, and in 1878 was elected county recorder for four years. On the 5th of December, 1869, he was married to Miss Elizabeth Mayfield, daughter of Dr. Thomas Mayfield, of Barren county, Kentucky. She died January 25, 1875, leaving three children: John T., Elizabeth A. and Micajah C. He was again married, March 5, 1879 to Mrs. Jennie S. Sappington, daughter of Captain Mason Brown, killed at the battle of Boonville in 1861. They have had two children, only one Ida C., living. Page 773-774

S. E. De Racken, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Williamsburg county, South Carolina, February, 24, 1842, and was raised on a plantation in Marion county, and educated at Flintville Academy. Taught school until 1863, when he was ordained a minister in the Baptist Church, and was stationed at Mt. Hope Church, at Williamsburg, 1866 and 1867. In 1868 he moved to Sharpsburg, Kentucky, and had charge of the Sharpsburg male and female seminary until 1870, and then took charge of the Louisburg Academy, in Mason county, Kentucky, in 1870 and 1871. In 1871 he came to Missouri, and had charge of the Baptist Church at Richmond, Missouri, one year. Then had charge of the academy at Oak Grove, Jackson county, Missouri, in 1874 and 1875. He then came to Saline county and taught school several years, having charge of the Union Church one year. In 1880 he moved to Marshall, and engaged in the newspaper business with Dr. Holland, establishing the Independent Missourian, and the next year, 1881, he bought out Dr. Holland, and is now editor and proprietor of the paper. May 28, 1863, Mr. De Racken was married to Miss Mary H. Conners, of Clarendon, South Carolina, and has had seven children, of whom five are living: Thomas H., Samuel E., Anna M., Lizzie C., and Wade Hampton. Page 774

William H. Letcher, Esq., P. O., Marshall. Is a native Missourian, having been born in St. Louis, September 4, 1824, and is the son of Isaac Addison and Julia (Robb) Letcher, the former of Virginia, and the latter of Pennsylvania. He was raised in St. Louis, and educated at Washington College, now Washington and Lee University, Lexington, Virginia. He studied law, first with Hon. Edward Bates, and then with Hon. Wm. M. Campbell. He was admitted to the bar by Judge Ezra Hunt, in 1848, and in the same year located in Marshall, Saline county. During those early times he acted as justice of the peace and postmaster. In 1850 he took the United States census for this county. In 1852 he filled the office of county school commissioner, and held it four years. In 1856 he was nominated for the legislature by the Whigs and Americans, and elected, and was again elected in 1858. While a member of the assembly the debate on the "Cape Girardeau Sunday Bill" occurred, in which debate Mr. Letcher had occasion to answer Col. Chris Kribben, who defended the law, and this reply gave him a reputation as wide as the state. In 1860 Mr. Letcher moved to California; returning to Missouri temporarily in 1864, he remained until 1866, and then went back to California. In 1868 he returned permanently to Missouri, and located for the practice of law in St. Louis. In 1873 he once more moved to this county, where he expects to finish his life in the practice of his profession. In 1875 he was elected one of the delegates to the constitutional convention from the district composed of the counties of Saline Lafayette, and Pettis, in the proceedings of which he took an active and efficient part. He is a man of great ability, and has a reputation extending over the state. In 1848 Mr. Letcher was married to Miss Evalina Ransom, daughter of Ambrose Ransom, of Union, Franklin county, Missouri, who died in 1851, leaving one son, now living, Jerrold R. In 1854 he married Miss Nannie Ransom, sister of his former wife, by whom he also has one son living. Rule Letcher. Of six children, these two sons only survive. Page 774-775

Joseph Huston, P. O., Marshall. Is a native of Saline county, where he was born March 13, 1827, and raised on his father’s farm until he was old enough to enter his father’s grocery store in Arrow Rock, as salesman. After he became of age he engaged himself in the grocery business in Arrow Rock, and in 1869 entered into co-partnership with Mr. Will H. Wood, and shortly after, in1865, they added the commission business. For ten years they had a large and flourishing trade, commanding nearly all the commission business of Arrow Rock, and about one-third of the county. They continued this business until 1869, when they gave up commission and merchandise, and established a banking house under the firm of Wood & Huston, in Arrow Rock. In 1873 they erected a banking house in Marshall, and removed their business there, establishing one of the strongest private banks in central Missouri. In 1849 Mr. Huston married Miss Virginia Thompson, daughter of Philip Thompson, one of the early settlers of Howard county. His first wife died, and Mr. Huston married again, in 1857, to Miss Mary Smith, daughter of G. S. Smith, of this county, formerly of Kentucky. He is the father of ten children, of whom six are now living. Mr. Huston has made a large fortune, and is one of the most solid men in this county. Page 775

Robert H. Willis, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Culpepper county, Virginia, on the 15th of December, 1837, where he was reared and educated. In 1860, he came to Missouri, and settled in Saline county. In 1861, he joined Capt. Ed. Browns’ company, in the M. S. G. and served six months, the time of enlistment. In December, 1861, he started south with Robinson’s body of recruits, and was captured with them December 19, 1861, on Blackwater, taken to St. Louis, and then to Alton, Illinois, where he remained three months; was then released, on taking the oath, and returned home. In 1864, as Gen. Price’s army passed through Saline, Mr. Willis again enlisted in the Confederate service, in Gen. Marmaduke’s escort company; remained in the service to the end of the war, and surrendered in 1865, at Shreveport. He participated in the battles of Wilson’s Creek, Booneville, Dry Wood, and Lexington. After the war, he settled down on the farm, northeast of Marshall, which he soon after purchased, and resided there until 1875. In 1874, he was elected sheriff of Saline county, and in 1875, moved into Marshall, the county seat, to assume his official duties. Mr. Willis is a democrat, and was again elected sheriff, in 1876. In 1879, Mr. Willis engaged in the grocery business, in Marshall, with Mr. Ben Naylor, until 1881, when Naylor sold out to Wm. Nordyke, and the firm is now Willis & Nordyke. They do a leading business in their line. In 1861, Mr. Willis married Miss Mary E. Cox, daughter of Jesse Cox, a lawyer and an old settler of this county. They have had ten children, eight of whom—two sons and six daughters—are living. Mr. Willis came to Saline poor, but by his industry and management is now in easy circumstances. Page 775-776

John B. Breathitt, P. O., Marshall. Is a native of Logan county, Kentucky, where he was born in 1844, and is son of Cardwell and Mary (Slaughter) Breathitt, and grandson of Gov. John Breathitt, of Kentucky. His father moved to Missouri in 1852, and settled on a farm close to the county line between Saline and Cooper, and in Cooper county, where he still lives, and where John B. was raised and educated. He also went two terms to Prof. G. B. Newton, in Pettis county. In 1861 he was appointed a cadet to the West Point Military academy, but owing to the breaking out of the war, he declined the appointment. In December, 1861, he joined Capt. Sutherlin’s squad of recruits for the Confederate army, who, on reaching Memphis, Tennessee, were organized into company G., 2d Missouri Cavalry, the only Missouri Cavalry east of the Mississippi river. He remained with his regiment all through the war, participating in all its battles, for a list of which, see muster roll of company G. 2d Missouri Cavalry, in soldier’s record. At the organization of the regiment it mustered over 900 men, and when it surrendered at Columbus, Mississippi, in 1865, it was reduced to 150 men, all told. After the war he returned home and went to work on his father’s farm, and reading law in all spare time. He was admitted to the bar in Marshall in 1873, by Judge Townsley. In 1876 he was elected prosecuting attorney for Saline county for two years. Since then he has devoted himself to the practice of his profession in Marshall. Page 776

John C. Patterson, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Warrensburg, Missouri, October 15, 1858, and in 1860 moved with his parents to Sedalia, Missouri, where he was raised and educated at the State Normal School, Warrensburg, Missouri, where he graduated in 1875 in the elementary course. In 1876 he came to Marshall, in this county, and worked for several years at the printer’s trade in the Progress office. In June, 1879, he established the Marshall Daily News, with a city circulation of 250. The Daily News has steadily increased in circulation and business, and is now one of the fixed institutions of Marshall. In 1880, Mr. Patterson added a weekly edition to his daily, which has rapidly enlarged its circulation, and now stands on a level with the best newspapers in the county. Page 776-777

John P. Martin, P. O., Marshall. Is a native of Jefferson county, Indiana, where he was born January 4, 1833. In 1842 he moved with his parents to Missouri, and came to Saline county, where, and in Cooper county, he has lived ever since. He was raised on a farm, and educated in the country schools. In 1850 he moved to Cooper county, and lived there until 1866, farming and teaching school. In 1866 he moved back to Saline, and farmed, south of Marshall, until 1871. In 1871 and 1872 he acted as deputy sheriff and collector. In January, 1874, he was appointed treasurer to fill vacancy occasioned by the resignation of B. Sappington. In November, 1874, he was elected treasurer, for two years, and was re-elected in 1876, 1878, and in 1880. As the continuance of his office would indicate, Mr. Martin has made an exceptionally good officer. His integrity is above suspicion, and he holds the confidence of the people as fully, perhaps, as any man in Saline county. Page 777

Judge John P. Strother, P. O., Marshall. Judge Strother was born in Henry county, Kentucky, February 16, 1837, where he was reared on a farm, and educated. His father and grandfather were ministers of the M. E. Church, South. Most of his ancestors were Virginians, and traced their lineage back to patrician origin in England and Scotland. His mother was a Bruce. The Strother family, wherever located in America, as far as known, sprang from a common source in England, where the family coat of arms was a red shield with a diagonal bar of silver, with three eagles in blue, and the shield surmounted with a yellow greyhound. On both paternal and maternal sides the Strother family has given the country many eminent men, such as Gen. D. H. Strother, (Porte Crayon) of Virginia; Wm. Preston, of Kentucky, and President Zachary Taylor whole mother was a Strother, etc., and not the least among them is Judge John P. Strother, of Missouri. Judge Strother early developed a thirst for knowledge, and received much of his education from the judicious aid of his father, who was a highly educated man. Like most imaginative youths at "sweet sixteen," he much affected poetry, and some of his early effusions found their way into the public journals. At the age of sixteen he also wrote a biography of his grandparents on the mother’s side who were pioneers of Kentucky. About the age of fourteen he united with the church of his fathers, to which he has ever since adhered; and he has been twice elected on the general conference. Some years since, he wrote a pamphlet on church matters, opposing several Episcopal decisions, which was published and largely circulated, and which is generally regarded as having settled the questions in dispute. In 1856 he studied law under Hon. W. S. Pryor, now of the Kentucky court of appeals, and attended the law department of the University of Louisville, where he graduated in 1858. He first began practice in New Castle, Kentucky, but desiring a broader field, in the fall of 1858, he came to this county and located in Marshall. Soon after the war broke out, he returned to Kentucky and remained until 1865, when he returned to Saline, stopped in Miami until 1867, then moved to Marshall, where he has since lived, and practiced his profession. Judge Strother was twice county attorney of this county, once before and once after the war; and in 1872 he was elected to the state senate for four years, and was chairman of the judiciary and several other important committees. In 1879 he came near being the democratic candidate for lieutenant governor, though not a candidate for nomination. In 1878 he only laced three votes, in convention, of receiving the democratic nomination (which was equivalent to election) for congress in this, the eleventh district. In 1880, desiring rest from practice, he consented to become a candidate for judge of this, the sixth judicial circuit, including the counties of Saline, Lafayette, and Pettis, was elected, and entered on his duties January 1, 1881. Judge Strother has filled every public office with which he has been entrusted, with honor to himself and credit to his constituents. It is but recently that he assumed the office he now fills, that of circuit judge, but the brilliant legal talents displayed in a long practice, insure an equally brilliant record on the bench. On the 23d of October, 1860 Judge Strother married Miss Mildred E. Lewis, of Marshall, and has had nine children, seven of whom are living. Page 777-778

C. L. W. McFarland, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Greenfield, Highland county, Ohio, April 10, 1849. His father was formerly from Maryland, and his mother from Georgetown, Kentucky. In 1851 he came with his parents to St. Louis, thence to Liberty, Clay county, Missouri. At the age of thirteen, he learned carriage and omnibus painting in St. Louis. In 1865 he moved to Rocheport, Boone county, Missouri. In 1874 he worked in a machine shop, in Rocheport, for two years. In 1879 he located in Marshall, and in 1881, he entered into partnership with Mr. Long, making the present firm. On the 4th of October, 1874, he married Miss M. V. Waddell, of Rocheport, and they have one child, Virginia B. McFarland. The father of Mr. McFarland was the investor and proprietor of the celebrated McFarland saddle. Page 778

Saint A. McAllister, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Marshall, Saline county, Missouri August 10, 1852, where he was raised and educated. When he was about sixteen years old, he went to St. Louis, and remained there for some time, and learned his trade as painter. He returned to Marshall and has lived here ever since. Saint is a good painter, and sometimes employs several hands. He was married on the 25th of June, 1877, to Miss M. E. Garrett, who is a native of Illinois, and accompanied the Isgrig family to this county. They have one child, Nellie M. Page 778

John Brandecker, merchant tailor, P. O., Marshall. Was born in the kingdom of Wurtemburg, Germany, November 15, 1824. He was raised in the city of Obendorff, and received a thorough classical education. At the age of sixteen he learned the tailor’s trade. In 1847, he came to the United States, and located in New Orleans, and remained there for three years. He worked in various places until 1853, when he came to Fayette, Howard county, Missouri, and carried on business there until 1861, then came to Marshall, Missouri and has been here ever since, except one year which he spent in Bushnell, Illinois. He was married June 20, 1853, to Miss Martha Hall, of Fayette, Howard county, formerly of Kentucky. They had three children, all dead, and Mrs. Brandecker died May 20, 1858. Was again married May 8, 1858, to Mrs. Eliza Adleman, formerly Miss Inglehart. Mr. Brandecker started life with nothing but his trade; by economy, industry, and good management, he has made quite a handsome property for his old age. He has a considerable property in Marshall that yields him a handsome revenue. Page 779

William A Conway, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Nicholas county, Kentucky, September 16, 1849, where he grew to manhood. He was raised on a farm, and educated in the public schools. In 1853 he moved to Ray county, and in 1865 back to Nicholas county, with his parents. In 1868 they came to Saline county, and followed farming and trading in stock. In 1876 Mr. Conway located in Marshall, where he has established an extensive meat market, and a large trade in stock generally. He was first married in 1873, to Miss J. Odell, daughter of William Odell, of this county, and had one child, John William. Mrs. Conway died in 1875. Mr. Conway married again on the 25th of September, 1876, to Miss Elnora Pendleton, of this county, formerly of Memphis, Tennessee. They have two children: Vinnie F. and Clair. Page 779

Dr. M. M. Bond, P. O., Marshall. Dr. Bond was born in Danville, Montgomery county, Missouri, October 30, 1849, where he lived to his fifteenth year. He was raised on a farm, and educated in private schools. In 1865 he went to Helena, Arkansas, and engaged as clerk in a drug store. In 1866 he went to Duvall’s’ Bluff and learned telegraphing, which he followed for ten years in various states. During this time he also read medicine, and graduated in the Kansas City Medical College in 1878. He then moved to Marshall, in this county, and engaged in the practice of his profession. For two years he has been the county physician. On the 30th of April, 1871, he was married to Miss Alice Spaulding, of Arkansas. They have four children; Julia, Henry P., Lucy, and Richard. Page 779

R. M. Price, P. O., Marshall. Is a native of Shelby county, Kentucky, where he was born on the 24th of October, 1832, grew to manhood, and received his education. He was raised on a farm, and continued to farm in Shelby county until 1864. In that year he moved to Crawfordsville, Indiana, and engaged in the manufacture of furniture. In July, 1867, he came to Saline county, and purchased a farm five miles from Marshall. He continued to farm until 1880, when he, in company with Mr. Perry, went into the grocery and meat business in Marshall. In 1857 he married Miss M. A. Wallace, daughter of Maj. J. H. Wallace, of Fayette county, Kentucky. They have have had nine children, six of whom are living: Agnes, Luella, John W., Sterling, Rankin M., and Richie. Mrs. Price died on the 12th of February, 1877, in Saline county. He was again married on the 5th of March, to Miss Mary Fitzpatrick, of this county.

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John R. Vance, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Knox county, Ohio, August 22, 1836, where he was raised on a farm, and was educated at Kenyon College, Gambier, Ohio, where he graduated in 1862. He then studied law, and attended the lectures of the law department of the university at Ann Arbor, Michigan. He commenced the practice of his profession in Columbus, in 1863 and 1864, and was also superintendent of public school in Columbus. In July, 1865, he came to this county, and located in Marshall, where he has since practiced law. In 1870 he was elected superintendent of public schools in this county, which he held one term. Mr. Vance was married in 1869 to Miss Annette Wilson, daughter of Col. Wm. A. Wilson, deceased, formerly of Marshall, and has two children: Minnie and Rufus. Mr. Vance stands well in his profession, and is a member of the law firm of Yerby & Vance. Page 780

Dr. L. L. Miles, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Miami county, Ohio, March 6, 1834, where he resided until seventeen years of age; was raised on a farm, and educated in the common schools, and with his parents moved to Wabash county, Indiana, and farmed up to 1858. He commenced the study of dentistry under Dr. Talbot, of Richmond, Indiana. In 1859 he attended a course in the Cincinnati dental college, and the same year, commenced the practice of dentistry at Wabash City, Indiana. He continued there until 1868. In 1868 he came to this county and located in Marshall, where he has since been one of the leading dentists. In 1854 he married Miss J. J. Hutchinson, of Wabash county, Indiana, and has four children: Annie H., Thomas H., Rollin, and Harry F. Mrs. Miles died in Marshall on the 17th of July, 1880, after a long lingering illness of many months, attended by almost unparalleled suffering, which was borne with true Christian patience and fortitude. Page 780

Thomas Conway, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Nicholas county, Kentucky, January 16, 1848, and in 1852, came with his parents to Missouri, and settled in St. Louis county, where they lived three years. They then moved to Ray county, where they stayed until 1865, and then moved back to Kentucky. In 1869, they moved to Missouri again, and settled in this county; and Mr. Conway had but five dollars when he arrived here, and went to work by the month. In four months he bought a horse on time, and began trading, first in horses, then in other stock, until he gradually became a regular stock-dealer. In 1876 he moved to Marshall, and purchased and interest in his brother’s meat market, which they have carried on ever since. On the 4th of April, 1872, he was married to Miss Emma Carver, of this county. They have had five children, only two of whom are now living: Aubrey and Ruby. Page 780-781

Wm. H. Pate, Jr., P. O., Marshall. Was born in Carroll county, Missouri, March 18, 1849. He was raised on a farm, and educated in private schools until 1865, when he came to this county with his parents. In 1872 he came to Marshall, and clerked for P. H. Rea in the grocery business for five years; then went to St. Louis and worked for J. E. Hayner & Co. one year. Since then he has been in the employ of McCormack’s machine company. He is a young man of strict integrity and good business qualifications. Page 781

C. C. Johns, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Columbiana county, Ohio, April 19, 1837. In 1847 he went with his parents to Beaver, Pennsylvania, where he lived until eighteen years of age. He then started out in life for himself, and went to Madison, Wisconsin, where he lived two years; then to Freeport, Illinois, and engaged in selling lightning rods for two years; then to Dubuque, Iowa, in 1865, and engaged in the lumber business. In 1867 went to near Davenport, Iowa, and followed farming and stock trading. From 1869 to 1872 he followed the photographing business in Iowa, Kansas, and Texas. In 1872 located in Brownsville, in this county, and in 1874 he located in Marshall, where he has now one of the finest galleries in Western Missouri, and does the leading business. In 1864 he married Miss Nellie Hiser, of Bloomington, Illinois, and has two children: Frank and Lucy. Page 781

J. W. Prosser, P. O., Marshall. Mr. Prosser was born in this county on the 7th of August, 1858, where he was raised on a farm, and educated at the state normal school at Warrensburg, Missouri. His father died when he was only nine years of age, and soon after, the care of the farm and family fell upon his young shoulders. They lost heavily during the war, in personal property. He carried on the farm until 1880, and then came to Marshall, and engaged in his present occupation, that of restaurant, grocery and fancy goods. He is a young man of moral and steady habits, of excellent business qualifications, and bids fair to build up a large and prosperous business in Marshall. Page 781

Joseph W. Bartlett, P. O., Marshall. Son of Foster Bartlett, of this county, where Joseph was born, on the 28th of September, 1855. He was raised on a farm, and educated in private schools. He was elected constable of Marshall township, in 1880, over five competitors, by a majority of 114. He is a steady and upright young man, and has proved himself a most excellent officer. Page 781-782

Prof. C. F. Storandt, P. O., Marshall. Prof. Storandt was born in Saxony, Germany, May 26, 1846. He commenced the study of music when he was but six years old. He was raised in Saxony, and was educated at the Teacher’s Seminary of that place. All his early life was spent in school. He commenced teaching music at the age of eighteen, and was leader of one of the German military bands for two years. In 1868 he came to America, and located at Wheeland, near Kenosha, Wisconsin, and taught German there for three years. In 1871 and 1872 he had charge of the musical department of the Christian College, Lexington, Missouri. In 1873 he went to Brownsville, and organized the brass band there, and taught music until 1877, when he came to Marshall; and has since followed teaching music and selling musical instruments. In 1872 he was married to Miss Emma Flynt, of Lexington, Missouri. Page 782

James M. Ancell, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Arrow Rock, in this county, November 11, 1852, where he was raised, and was educated at McGee College, Macon county, Missouri. His early life was spent in his father’s store in Arrow Rock. In 1878 he came to Marshall, where he clerked for his brother, W. H. Ancell, until 1880, when he engaged in his present business, that of restaurant. On the 13th of April, 1881, he was married to Miss Georgie Dance, daughter of Edward Dance, of this county. Page 782

William D. Merrell, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Lewis county, Missouri, August 14, 1844, where he grew to manhood on a farm, and was educated in Abingdon College. He followed farming and stock-raising, until 1869, when he located in Saline county. In 1871 he moved to Miami, and engaged in the livery business, and in 1873 moved to Brownsville, and continued the same business for two years. In 1875 he moved to Marshall, and at once established a large livery business, in which he has been engaged ever since. He has also a very valuable farm of over 100 acres, one-half mile from Marshall, which he carries on, and upon which he feeds large numbers of mules each winter. Mr. Merrell was married in 1867, to Miss A. V. Browning, of La Grange, Missouri. They have two children, Ella B. and Willie T. Page 782

George Mitchell, Mitchell & Son, jewelers, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Aberbrathswick, Farforshire, Scotland, April 17, 1818. His parents both died when he was but a child, and he was raised by his uncle. At the age of fourteen he learned the jeweler’s trade. In 1835, he came to the United States, and located at Pulaski, New York, and carried on the business there for twenty years. In 1857, he moved to Hannibal, Missouri, and there carried on his trade until 1865, and then moved to Quincy, Illinois, where he lived until 1873, when he moved to this county and located in Marshall, where he has since lived and pursued the jeweler’s business, having a large and paying trade. He was married in 1838 to Miss Amanda B. King, daughter of Major Henry King, Pulaski, N. Y. She died on the 10th of March, 1881. Frank G. Mitchell is the only child living, now doing business with his father. Page 782-783

P. A. Gibbs, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Franklin county, Kentucky, July 5, 1840, where he lived and in Shelby county, until 1850, when he came with his parent to Missouri, and located at Jonesboro, in this county. His father being a blacksmith, he commenced learning the trade at twelve years of age. In 1861 he enlisted in Capt. Crew’s company M. S. G., and was in the battles of Booneville, Carthage, Wilson’s Creek, Dry Wood, and Lexington. Re-enlisted, and was captured December 19, 1861, at Blackwater, in Col. Robertson’s regiment of recruits; was taken to St. Louis, then to Alton, Illinois, where he took the oath, and returned home. Went to Indiana in 1863, and stayed there blacksmithing until 1867. Then returned to Saline; went to Arrow Rock in 1868; went to Booneville, and in 1876 returned to Marshall, where he now is, working at his trade. He makes a specialty of shoeing fine horses, in which he has no superior. He married Miss Mary Ellen Mayfield, of New Albany, Indiana, in 1864, and has four children: Obie F., George P., James M., and Minnie May. Page 783

M. P. McGinnis, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Canada East, November 14, 1842. In 1849, came with his parents to Saline county. At the age of fifteen he went to St. Louis, and worked for Benton & Co., wholesale dry goods house, until 1866. He then returned to Saline county, with but two dollars, and went to farming. In 1875 he came to Marshall, and established the Senate saloon, which he owns at the present time, and from which he has realized a handsome fortune. Page 783

Thomas McGinnis, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Ireland on the 11th of July, 1839, and came with his parents to America the next year, locating in Canada East. Where they remained until 1849, and then moved to Missouri, and located in this county. In 1862 he enlisted in the 3d Missouri artillery, C. S. A., and served, principally in Arkansas, to the close of the war in 1865, participating in all the battles in which his battery was engaged. After the war, he returned to this county, and followed farming for four years. In 1871 he moved to Marshall, and was deputy marshal one term. In 1875 he engaged in his present business, saloon. On the 21st of March, 1869, he was married to Miss Kate Mahan, of St. Louis. They have five children living: Mary E., John T., William E., Michael J., and Catherine A. Page 783

James S. Jackson, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Albemarle county, Virginia, March 4, 1836, and came with his parents in 1848 to this county. He was raised on a farm. At the breaking out of the war in 1861, he enlisted in Capt. Brown’s company in the M. S. G.; then enlisted in the Confederate army, in Stallard’s company, Marmaduke’s escort, and after the capture of Marmaduke was transferred to Shelby’s command, where he served to the end of the war, and surrendered at Shreveport in 1865. He participated in the battles of Booneville, Lexington, Wilson’s Creek, and the severe engagements of Price’s raid. After the war returned to Saline, and farmed till 1877, then came to Marshall, and engaged first in the meat business, then in 1878 opened the National Hotel in Marshall, of which he is now landlord, and is doing a good and increasing business. He was married in 1873 to Miss C. S. Roberts of Nelson county. They have three children living: Cabell, Mary M. and James P. Page 783-784

L. A. Bradford, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Madison county, Virginia, June 20, 1835, where he was raised on a farm, and educated in the subscription schools, and at the age of eighteen learned the carpenter trade. In 1861 he enlisted as a private in company C., Fourth Virginia cavalry, under Gen. J. E. B. Stuart, and was in all the leading battles in Virginia: Seven days around Richmond, Chancellorsville, Antietam, etc., and followed the fortunes of that celebrated cavalry all through the war, and surrendered at Appomattox. He returned to Madison county, Virginia, and worked at his trade until he had made enough t come west, which he did in 1866, and located at Marshall, in this county, landing there with just $5 in the world, and has worked at his trade since. By his energy and industry he has accumulated property and prospered well. He was married in December, 1868, to Miss S. A. Webb, of this county, formerly of Albemarle county, Virginia. They have had four children, only one of who is now living: Daisie Webb Bradford. Page 784

Judge David Landon, P. O., Marshall. Judge Landon was born in Bradford county, Pennsylvania, June 2, 1825, where he was raised on a farm, and was educated in Troy Academy, Pennsylvania. He started out as a teacher at the age of twenty-two, and taught in Bradford county for some years. In 1859 he moved to Pettis county, Missouri, and taught there until 1863, when he moved to this county and located in Marshall, and was teaching there at the time of the battle of Marshall, and in 1864, at the time of Price’s last raid. In 1864 he was appointed probate judge and treasurer of Saline county, and held the combined offices until the next general election, in 1866, when he was elected to the same offices. He held these offices until 1869, when the office of probate judge was abolished, and he was appointed judge of the court of common pleas, until the next general election, in 1870. The office of treasurer was at this time separated from all other offices. In 1870 Judge Landon was defeated for the office of judge of the court of common pleas. In 1871 he was appointed county attorney, and held that office until that office was abolished, or merged in that of prosecuting attorney, in 1872. Judge Landon read law when a young man, and after 1872, practiced his profession for two years, when he went on a farm, for a year or so, for his health. Since then he has been teaching in Marshall. On the 11th of April, 1849, he was married in New York, to Miss C. M. Hunt, daughter of Major J. Hunt, a soldier of 1812; and has had four children, three now living; Frances E., wife of George Noble, Edward R., and Lillian H. Judge Landon was a conservative, union man in the war, and by his prudent kindness, saved the lives of many imprudent southern men. Page 784-785

George Weber, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Bavaria, Germany, April 28, 1841, where he was raised on a farm, and educated in the common schools. He followed farming in Germany, to the time he came to the United States. In 1867 he crossed the Atlantic, and located in Cincinnati, Ohio, and worked on the Marietta and Cincinnati railroad depot for ten months. In 1869 he moved to Missouri, and for a time worked in a vineyard at Fayette, Howard county, Missouri. In 1871 he came to Saline county, and for three years kept bar for Chris. Althouse. In 1876 he bought out Mr. Althouse’s saloon, and engaged in the business by himself until 1880, when he took Mr. Jacob Smith into partnership, under the firm name of Weber & Smith. Mr. Weber was married in 1876 to Miss Katie Postal, of Benton county, Missouri, formerly of Germany, and has one child a daughter, Rosa. Page 785

A. T. Swisher, P. O., Marshall. Mr. Swisher was born in Berkley county, Virginia, October 17, 1838, where he was raised on a farm, until he was nineteen years old, and educated in a subscription school. At the age of sixteen he learned the carpenter’s trade. In 1857 he came to this county with his parents, and has devoted himself to his trade ever since. For the first year or so he worked for other contractors; he has contracted for himself. At the breaking out of the war, in the spring of 1861, he joined the first company (Marmaduke’s) organized in this county, under Gov. Jackson’s call for the M. S. G. He was in the first battle of Booneville; and when his company broke up, after the battle, he joined the company formed by Capt. Sheridan, and was at the battle of Lexington. In December, 1869, he joined the body of recruits going south, under Col. Robinson, and was captured with them on Blackwater, December 19, 1861; was taken to St. Louis, then to Alton, Illinois; where in the spring of 1862, he took the oath, and came home. When the general call for all to join the militia was made, he again went south, in 1862, and joined Gen. Shelby’s command, with which he continued to the end of the war. After the war closed he returned to Saline county, and has been here ever since. In 1870 he moved to Marshall, and has steadily pursued his avocation of contractor and builder. In 1867 he was married to Miss M. C. Hedges, of Saline county, formerly of Virginia. Has had six children, five now living: Daniel A., Katie E., Henry H., Joseph F., and May. Page 785-786

James Henry, P. O., Marshall. Mr. Henry was born in county Antrim, Ireland, December 20, 1844, and in 1859 came with his parents to America, and stayed some time in New York, learning telegraphing. He then went to Grand Trunk R. R. in Maine and Canada for four years. He came back to New York city, and in a year, in 1866, moved west, and landed in Kansas City, Missouri, April 1867. But he was so disgusted with the raging river, which was then on one of its biggest booms, that he went back to New York. He came west again very soon, however, and commenced on the Vandalia road when it first started from East St. Louis. From there he came to the Missouri Pacific R. R., in 1870, and remained until he came to Brownsville, in this county, in 1871. In May, 1879, he accepted the agency of the C. & A. R. R., in Marshall, and left Brownsville. He has continued his engagement with the C. & A. R. R. ever since. He is a greenbacker of the straightest persuasion, and of the most radical type. On the 7th of July, 1872, he was married to Miss Matilda Fine, of St. Louis, and has three children, one son and two daughters: John Mitchell, Lafayette, Margaret and Agatha. Mr. Henry opened the first railroad station at Brownsville, in Saline county, December 31, 1871, on the then Lexington and St. Louis R. R. In 1875, the large corn crop year, he shipped from that station 1,955 car loads of corn within five months. Mr. Henry first inaugurated the shipping of Sweet Springs water. He sent samples of it to every express office for 500 miles in every direction. Page 786

Maj. John B. Perkins, P. O., Marshall. Son of Jacob and Elenor A. Perkins; his father being from Baltimore, Maryland, and his mother from Pennsylvania. John B. was born in Lexington, Holmes county, Mississippi, November 1, 1839. In 1849 he moved with his parents to Memphis, Tennessee, where he was raised, and was educated by a private tutor. In 1858 he engaged in the drug business, in Des Arc, Arkansas, where he remained until the beginning of the war, then joined the southern army, and was elected major of the Fifty-fourth regiment, Arkansas state troops. Was afterward transferred to the Confederate service. Was in the battles of Neosho, Carthage, Oak Hill, Corinth, and Tupelo. In 1863, was taken sick and sent to Mobile. He was then transferred to the quartermaster’s department west of the river, and served there to the end of the war. After the war he came to this county, and remained here until 1867, when he returned to Memphis, Tennessee, and engaged there in mercantile business for three years. In 1870 he came back to Saline county, and engaged in merchandising at Arrow Rock, and also in the study of law. He was admitted to the bar in 1876, and practiced in Arrow Rock until 1879, when he was appointed deputy county clerk, under W. S. Jackson, where he remained until Col. Jackson’s death, July, 1880, when he was appointed county clerk until the next general election. On the 11th of August, 1863, he was married to Miss Annie E. Jackson, daughter of Gov. C. F. Jackson, of Missouri, and had three children: Pearla, William Claiborne, and Henry Marmaduke. Page 786-787

Joseph Wronker, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Prussia, October 15, 1842, where he lived to thirteen years of age, and them came with his sister to America, and settled in St. Louis, and for ten years was traveling salesman for several different wholesale tobacco houses in St. Louis. In 1879 he came to Marshall, in this county, and established a cigar manufactory, and is doing a large and increasing business, under the name of Schnurmacher & Co. He was married, May 12, 1872, to Miss Mary Schnurmacher, and has two children, one son and one daughter, Benjamin and Flora. Page 787

John H. Ehrnman, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Pickaway county, Ohio, December 27, 1838. In 1853 his parents moved to Lee county, Iowa. He worked in a bakery, and learned the trade while a mere boy, and at the age of seventeen learned the carpenter’s trade, which last he followed for ten years. In 1870, he came to this county and settled in Marshall, working one year at the carpenter’s trade. The next year 1871, commenced the baking business; and in 1873 lost his bakery by fire. Started up again, the same year, and is now doing an extensive and paying business in his line. Has been a member of the board of aldermen for Marshall. In 1864, he was married to Miss Martha Donnell, of Keokuk, Iowa, and has had four children, two of whom are living: Maggie Jane and Rebie L. Page 787

Thomas B. Patterson, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Lexington, Missouri, July 28, 1849, and in 1858 moved with his parents to Waverly, Lafayette county, Missouri, where he grew to manhood, and was educated at private schools. In 1867 he learned the tinner’s trade, and went into the hardware and tin business. In 1875 he moved to Marshall, and in company with Mr. W. E. Woodson, he engaged in the drug business. In the fall of 1878 they sold out to L. P. Douglass & Co., and in the spring of 1881 they purchased the large stock of tin, stoves and hardware belonging to Mr. Charles Reed, which business they now carry on extensively. Mr. Patterson was married in 1875 to Miss Elizabeth Fitzpatrick, of Waverly, Missouri, and has one child, a son, John F. Page 787

John P. Philpott, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Macoupin county, Illinois, September 9, 1848, where he was raised upon a farm and educated in the common schools. In 1866 he moved to Saline county with his parents, and followed farming up to 1871. In that year he engaged in his present business in Marshall, and now carries the largest stock of boots and shoes in Saline county, working quite a number of hands, and makes a specialty of fine custom-made work. In January, 1868, he was married to Miss Caroline Lawton, of this county. Page 787-788

Luther C. Ehrnman, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Pickaway county, Ohio, on the 16th of March, 1843. When he was about ten years old, in 1854, his parents moved to Lee county, Iowa, where he grew up on a farm, and was educated in Fairfield College, Fairfield, Iowa. In 1863 he went to California, and followed farming, driving out an ox team; and in 1865, returned by the way of Nicaraugua. Returning to Iowa, he farmed there until 1870, and came to this county, and farmed until 1874. In December, 1874, he went into the grocery business with his father, in Marshall, under the firm name of Ehrnman & Sons. Mr. Ehrnman is one of the steadiest and most reliable business men in the city of Marshall, and has been a member of the city council. He, with his parents and all, or nearly all of brothers and sisters, are members of the Presbyterian Church. He was married on the 22d of February, 1870, to Miss Nannie Caldwell, of Lee county, Iowa. They have had five children, three now living: Annie G., Myrtle V., and Daisy B. Page 788

A. F. Vawter, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Monroe county, Missouri, September 26, 1840, where he lived until 1857, and was raised on a farm. In 1857 he moved with his parents to Fulton, Missouri, and entered Westminster College at that place and there graduated. In 1862 he engaged in farming, in Monroe county, Missouri, and in 1864, in the drug business in Florida, Monroe county, Missouri. In 1870 he came to Marshall, in this county, and entered the drug business with his brother, firm name of Vawter Brothers, in which he has continued to the present time, and is one of the oldest drug houses in Marshall. In 1873 he married Miss Emma Majors, of Kansas City, Missouri, and has two children: William E. and Fannie L. Page 788

Dr. W. F. Vawter, P. O., Marshall. Is a native Missourian; was born in Monroe county, December 28, 1844, where he lived until 1857, when his parents moved to Fulton, Callaway county, Missouri, in which place he was educated, in Westminster College. In 1864 he enlisted in Gen. Price’s army, (then passing through this state), in Col. Perkins’ regiment. He continued with the Confederate army until the close of the war, and surrendered at Shreveport in 1865. He then returned to Monroe county, and studied medicine, graduating at the St. Louis Medical College in 1869, and practiced one year in Kansas City. In 1870 he engaged in the drug business in Monroe county, and lived there for two years. In 1872 he moved to this county, and located in Marshall, where he and his brother purchased the drug store of Chastain & Sappington, and established a prosperous trade under the firm name of Vawter Brothers. Dr. Vawter was married in 1869, to Miss L. H. Buck of Audrain county, Missouri. Mrs. Vawter died in 1872, leaving one child, William A. Page 788-789

Robert J. McMahan, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Cooper county, Missouri, on the 23d of June, 1833, where he was raised on a farm, and educated in the schools of the county. In 1854, at the age of twenty-one, he went to California, where he was interested in the stock business, taking through a drove of cattle, and remained about two years. Came home by way of Panama, and engaged in farming for several years. In 1861 he enlisted in the M. S. G., and was at the first battle of Booneville. In December, 1861, he started south with the body of recruits under Col. Robinson, and was captured with them on the Blackwater on the 19th of December, 1861, and was taken to St. Louis, and then to Alton, Illinois, and on the 28th of February, 1862, was released on taking the oath, and returned home. For several years afterwards, he was engaged in freighting from Nebraska City to Montana. He then moved to Arrow Rock in this county, and was there engaged in merchandising from 1866 to 1871, doing an extensive grain and commission business. On the death of Col. Wm. S. Jackson, in 1880, he was elected to fill out his unexpired term, from 1880 to 1882, as county clerk of Saline county. In 1859 he married Miss S. E. Wing, of Cooper county, Missouri, and has had seven children, five now living: Jennie K., Lena R., Stella B., Robert W., and Sophia A. Page 789

George Althouse, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Howard county, Missouri, September 4, 1855, where his early life was spent in school, and in clerking in stores in Glasgow. In 1876 he graduated at Jones’ Commercial College, St. Louis. The same year he came to Marshall and engaged in the grocery business with Chris. Althouse, under the firm name of C. Althouse & Co. In connection with the grocery, they also carry on an extensive bakery. This firm is doing a heavy business, and are making money. In 1880 he was married to Miss Lizzie B. Denny, daughter of Capt. Alex Denny, Roanoke, Howard county, Missouri. Page 789

Thomas Boatright, P. O., Marshall. Mr. Boatright was born in Howard county, Missouri, and was raised in Saline county, having moved there with his parents while quite young, and was educated at private schools. In 1861 he joined Capt. Ed Brown’s company, M. S. G., as private, and served six months. Was at the first battle of Booneville, Wilson’s Creek, and Lexington. In 1864 he enlisted again, this time in Capt. Page’s company, in Marmaduke’s escort, as second lieutenant, and was in the battles of the Blues, Lexington, Westport, and the many others that occurred during Price’s retreat. He served on to the end of the war, and surrendered at Shreveport, in 1865. Returned to Saline, and farmed until 1871, then located in Marshall, and engaged in the insurance and real estate business. In 1878 he was elected city collector, and in 1880 re-elected. Is also a notary public, and the firm is doing an extensive and growing real estate business. Page 789-790

Dr. R. H. Winsborough, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Rockingham county, Virginia, November 27, 1845, where he was raised, and educated at a private academy. In 1861 he enlisted as second lieutenant in company E. 10th Virginia infantry, C. S. A. He participated in the battle of Manassas. He was taken prisoner in December, 1862, was taken to Camp Chase, then Fort Delaware, and was exchanged at City Point, April, 1863. He then joined Col. McNeil’s independent rangers, where he served to the close of the war, and participated in all the battles in the valley of Virginia during the last campaign. In 1866 he went to the dental college at Baltimore, then to Pleasant Hill, Missouri, and practiced to the fall of 1868, and in 1869 graduated at the St. Louis Dental College, and practiced dentistry in St. Louis until 1873. He then located in Marshall, where he now does a large and paying business. On the 22d of November, 1877, he married Miss Georgia Durrett, of this county. Two children, Durrett Winsborough and the baby, unnamed. Page 790

Frank Cole, P. O., Marshall. Son of Halbert Cole, one of the early settlers of Cooper county, Missouri, coming to that county in 1810, and his mother pre-empted the land where Booneville now stands. Frank was born on the 22d of February, 1833, where he was raised on a farm. In 1853 he went to California, and remained there three years, mining, and returned in 1856. In 1857 he again went to California, taking a drove of cattle. In 1858 he returned to Cooper county, and followed farming until 1862, when he came to this county, still farming and dealing heavily in stock, of which latter he was probably the heaviest dealer in the county at that time. In 1872 he moved to Montana, and the next year returned to Saline county, and has since been engaged in shipping fine stock to Montana, and trading in land. He has improved more farms than any other man in the county. He was married in 1860 to Miss Mary F. Dysart, of Saline county. They are the parents of nine children, and only three living: Robert D., Frank P., William H. Page 790

J. A. Justice, P. O., Marshall. Was born in Warren county, Kentucky, October 1, 1830, where he was raised on a farm, and commenced life without a dollar. In 1853 he came to Missouri. In 1854 he went to Texas, and the next year to Arkansas. In 1861 he came to Chariton county, Missouri, and in 1863 to this county, where he bought a farm, and went to farming. In 1878 he moved to Marshall, and entered into the livery business, where he is now doing a large and growing business. In 1857 he married Mrs. Horbert, formerly Miss Hobbs, of Carroll county, Arkansas, formerly of Indiana. They have had five children, four of them now living; Belvery D., Francis S., Susan L. and William T. Page 790-791

Rev. John T. D. Murphy, pastor of St. Peter’s Catholic Church, P. O., Marshall. Was born in the city of Toronto, Canada, in 1848. He first commenced the study of Latin under Rev. Father Hamill, and was afterwards sent to St. Mary’s Seminary, Perry county, Missouri, where he spent several years in preparing himself for the priesthood. Whilst at St. Mary’s Seminary he had the honor of studying rhetoric and elocution under the gifted and eloquent Father A. J. Ryan, the poet priest of the south. In 1863 he left St. Mary’s and entered St. Francis Seminary, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. On September 30, 1869, he was ordained priest by Archbishop Kenrick, in St. John’s Church, St. Louis, Missouri. After ordination, Father Murphy was sent to take pastoral charge of Potosi, Iron Mountain and Pilot Knob. In 1870 he was transferred to the Irish settlement, and became assistant pastor to the Rev. Father Hamill, the venerable patriarch priest of the diocese of Kansas City. The parish being divided by order of Archbishop Kenrick, in 1872, Father Murphy was appointed to take charge of the new congregation, and thus became the first resident pastor at Marshall. The Catholic Church at this place, built by the united patronage of Catholics and non-Catholics, is an ornament to the city, and a monument to the liberality of the many kind donors. Page 791

John Hardeman Cordell, P. O. Marshall. Son of Richard Lewis and Leona (Hardeman) Cordell, was born in Jefferson City, Missouri, July 19, 1842. In 1844 he moved with his parents to St. Louis county. Spent summer there, and winters in New Orleans, where he attended school until 1853, when he was sent to the Des Peres Institute, St. Louis county. In 1858 he entered Washington College, which he left in the spring of 1861. In May, 1861 he enlisted in M. S. G., and participated in the battle of Wilson’s Creek and the battle of Lexington, after which he was discharged on surgeon’s certificate. In 1862 he was employed by Mr. Ferd Kennett, of Selma, Jefferson county, as tutor for his children, and remained there until 1865. One of his pupils, F. B. Kennett, is now chief of Police in St. Louis, and another is now the wife of Hon. R. Graham Frost, member of congress from St. Louis. In 1864-5 he read law for a short time, first under Doniphan & Field, then under Adams & Shackelford, but gave it up after the passage of the Drake constitution. Then farmed one year in Jefferson county, and then entered the banking house of Thomson & Dunnica, Glasgow, Missouri. In 1868 he opened a banking house at Marshall in this county, under the firm of Dunnica, Cordell & Eakin, which was succeeded by Cordell & Montague, Mr. E. D. Montague entering, and Dunnica and Eakin retiring. On the 29th of April, 1868, he married Miss Alice Montague, daughter of Hon. R. V. Montague, of Alabama. In 1874 he sold out the banking business to the Saline County Bank, of which institution Mr. Cordell was elected cashier, and held the office until the bank went out of existence, March, 1879. He then immediately opened the banking house of Cordell & Dunnica, in Marshall, which is now doing a large, safe, and rapidly growing business. Page 791-792

J. G. L. Harvey, P. O., Marshall. The subject of this sketch was born in this county November 28, 1843, where he was raised on the farm and educated at the Westminster College, Fulton, Missouri, where he was when the war broke out, and left without graduating. In 1861, joined Captain Ed. Brown’s company, M. S. G., and was in the battles of Dry Wood and Lexington. In December, 1861, he started south in Colonel Robinson’s recruits, and was captured with them on Blackwater, December 19, 1861, taken to St. Louis, then to Alton, Illinois. In March, 1862, released on taking the oath, and returned home. In 1864, re-enlisted in Marmaduke’s escort company, in Price’s last raid, and was in the battles of Little Blue, Independence, Big Blue and Little Osage, where Marmaduke was captured, and surrendered at Shreveport in 1865. After the war he came home and went to farming. On the 10th of February, 1870, was married to Miss Virginia C. Harris, and has four children: Harry L., J. G. L., V. A. and K. E. In 1879, he moved to Marshall, where he has since been living, and is now engaged in the insurance, and also, with M. M. Marmaduke, in the agricultural implement business. Page 792