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“HISTORY OF SALINE COUNTY MISSOURI”
Biographies by township

Salt Fork Township

Peyton A. Brown, farmer, P. O., Fairville. Is a native of Cumberland county, Virginia. When quite young he came with his father, Henry Brown, to this state and county, locating upon the farm where he resides at present. Mr. Henry Brown was a minister of the M. E. Church, South. During his youth he exhibited considerable talent in sketching, to such and extent that his parents allowed him to cultivate it, together with the art of painting, in one of the finest schools of art in Philadelphia, the result of which far exceeded their expectations, he having since produced some very excellent paintings, some of which may be seen at his son’s residence, at that of T. R. E. Harvey, Robert Brown, A. T. Irvine and various others in the county. His family consisted of five children, four of whom are now living, the subject of our sketch being the second child. After the death of his father, which occurred in 1854, in the forty-third years of his age, Peyton lived part of the time in Missouri and part of the time in Virginia. With the exception of two years, in which he engaged in merchandising, he followed the occupation of a farmer. In 1858, September 21, he was married to Miss Sallie M. Hatcher, of St. Charles county, Missouri. They have had seven children, of whom six are living; Walter H., Edwin G., Chas. B., Susan, Eleanor and William C. In 1861, Mr. Brown enlisted in the Confederate service, under General J. E. B. Stuart, with whom he served until the close of the war. He participated in all the battles in which his command was engaged, with the exception of Gettysburg. He held the rank of first lieutenant, in company C, third Virginia cavalry, during 1861. Also acted as adjutant for some time. In 1868, Mr. B. came to Saline county and took possession of the property on which he now resides. His farm is one of the oldest and best improved in the county. Mr. B. acted as dispatch bearer for General R. E. Lee, at the time of the surrender. Page 792-793

 

Isaac C. Withers, P. O., Fairville. Is a native of Jefferson county, Kentucky, where he was raised and educated. His occupation has consisted principally of stock-trading and farming, although some years ago he was engaged, for a short time, in general merchandising, near Louisville, Kentucky. In 1847 he was married to Miss Artridge Fields, of Hardin county, Kentucky, who died in the winter of 1853, leaving two children, both of whom have since died. In 1851 Mr. Withers went to Knox county, Missouri, where he engaged in stock-trading and farming. He was married here, for the second time, to Miss Annie Hawkins, a native of that county, by whom he had six children, three boys and three girls, all living. In the fall of 1866 Mr. Withers came to this county, locating upon a farm, and by industry and good management has succeeded in making for himself and family a pleasant and comfortable home. Page 793

 

Thomas W. Price, deceased. Was a native of Cumberland county, Virginia, where he was raised, and received his elementary education. At an early age he entered Sydney College, located at Prince Edward, Prince Edward county, Virginia, from which he graduated with honor. Mr. Price came to this state and county in 1871, and two years after was united in marriage to Miss Polly P. Gauldin, by whom he had four children: Thomas, Sterling, Alexander, and Morton. He was a relative of Gen. Sterling Price. In November, 1880, he was elected to the office of county surveyor, which position he held up to the time of his death, which occurred April 14, 1881, at the age of thirty-two. Mr. Price was a man of sterling worth, highly respected by the community in which he resided, and for whose bereaved family it entertains the profoundest sympathy. Page 793

 

Robert J. Hendrick, farmer, P. O., Fairville. Was born in Cumberland county, Virginia. When four years of age, he went with his mother, his father being dead, to Buckingham county, where he was raised and educated. In 1845, he came to this state and county, having buried his mother a short time previous. March 15, 1855, he was married to Miss Virginia A. Gauldin, daughter of Josiah Gauldin, of this county. They have had six children, five of whom are now living: Sarah V., wife of Joel H. Price; Early, Robert, Mattie and Zella M. In 1864, Mr. Hendrick enlisted in the Confederate service, Captain Stallard’s company, under General Marmaduke. He was engaged in the battles of Tabo, Little Blue, Independence, Westport, Big Blue and Newtonia, in all of which engagements he bore himself in a manner becoming an honorable soldier. He surrendered at Shreveport, June, 1865, and returned to Saline county, where he has since lived, engaged in the cultivation of his fine farm. As an energetic business man, he has but few equals and occupies an enviable position in the esteem of his neighbors. Page 793-794

 

John W. Gauldin, farmer, P. O., Fairville. The subject of this brief sketch is a native of this state and county, born and bred upon a farm. Was educated in the common schools. In 1859, he was united in marriage to Miss Anne E. Surbaugh of this county, a native of Ohio. They have four children: Robert, Charles, Josie and Royal. He entered the Confederate service, joining a company raised by Captain Ed. Brown. After serving six months, he re-enlisted in Marmaduke’s escort, Captain Richard Stallard’s company, acting as orderly sergeant. He took part in the following engagements: Lexington, Little Blue, Independence, Westport and Newtonia. He was afterwards transferred to General Shelby’s command, in Texas, where he was engaged in the skirmish at Wachita. He surrendered at Shreveport, in June, 1865, and returned to this county, where he has since resided, engaged in farming, and the raising of stock. Mr. Gauldin is a man of strict integrity and moral worth and is zealously interested in promoting the public affairs of the county. Page 794

 

Daniel T. and Wm. R. Pope, P. O., Slater. The subjects of this sketch are natives of this state and county, and are sons of Thos. Pope, deceased, who came to this county from Kentucky, in 1851 or 1852. He was married, in Kentucky, to Miss Ellen Logan, who died in 1879, leaving him with four children: William R., Daniel T., Ellen, and John. Mr. Thomas Pope died during the year 1880. Daniel T. and William R. were raised and educated in their native county, where they have since resided, engaged in the cultivation of a splendid farm, which they jointly own. Daniel T. was married, February 20, 1881, to Miss Mollie Hatfield of this county. The Pope brothers are well known in the county, and enjoy the confidence and esteem of their numerous acquaintances. Page 794

 

Orlando J. Ralph, farmer, P. O. Fairville. Was born in Adams county, Illinois. Was educated in the public schools and raised on a farm. In 1861 he enlisted in the 2d Illinois cavalry, Col. Silas Noble, company E. This regiment was engaged in nearly all of the principal battles of the west, during the Mississippi campaign, taking an active part in the siege of Vicksburg and the capture of Mobile. He served until the close of the war, a part of the time in the secret service, and was honorably discharged at San Antonio, Texas. Mr. R. then returned to Adams county, Illinois, where he resided on a farm until his removal to this state and county, which occurred in 1868. August 16, 1866, he was married to Miss Martha Leachman, daughter of William Leachman, who was widely known as a breeder of the Onus, Blackhawk and Morgan horses. They had four children, three of whom are now living: Burlington K., Neva A. and Edna L. Mr. Ralph is now located upon a fine farm in this county, where he is giving special attention to the breeding of fine stock of all kinds. He is owner of the short-horn bull, “Jack Lee,” bred by W. E. Simms, of Paris, Kentucky, and got by the “4th Duke of Hillhurst,” bred by George Murray. “Jack” is a straight “Rose of Sharon” bull. The community fully appreciates Mr. Ralph’s laudable endeavors to improve its grade of stock. Page 794-795

 

John A. Gauldin, farmer, P. O., Fairville. Was born in Virginia. When quite young, his father, John S., came to this county locating near Fairville, on the place where Mr. Wm. Souther now lives. He died here, in 1850. The subject of this sketch was raised on a farm and educated in the common schools. In 1861, he enlisted in the Confederate army, Capt. Bexton’s company, Col. Frank Robinson’s regiment. He was captured at Blackwater, December, 1861, imprisoned in “McDowell’s college” and exchanged in the spring of the following year. He re-enlisted in the fall, under Gen. J. O. Shelby, Col. Shanks’ 2nd Missouri cavalry, Capt. Mace. He served with this command during the remainder of the war, with the exception of one year, during which he was connected with Collins’ battery. He participated in the battles of Prairie Grove, Camden, Helena, Tabo, Blues, Independence, Newtonia, and several others in which his command was engaged. He surrendered at Sherveport at the close of the war, and returned home. He was married March 4, 1877, to Miss Elizabeth Pope, daughter of Thomas Pope, deceased. By this union he has one child: Dotson J. Mr. Gauldin has a good record as a soldier, is a successful farmer, and a citizen whose life is well worthy of imitation. Page 795

 

Thos. J. Grayson, farmer, P. O., Fairville. Was born in Madison county, Virginia, January 13, 1837. He served an apprenticeship at the tanner’s trade at Wolfstown, in same county. In 1861, he enlisted in the 5th Virginia infantry, company I. His regiment belonged to the old “Stonewall brigade.” Was engaged in the following battles: Bull Run, Kearnstown, Post Republic, seven days fight around Richmond, Slaughter Mountain, second Manassas, and Chancellorsville. At the second battle of Bull Run he was quite severely wounded by a minnie ball passing through his right breast and lodging in his shoulder-blade. At Chancellorsville he had a finger shot off. At the battle of the Wilderness, he was captured, but succeeded in making his escape. In a skirmish on the Rappahannock, he was again badly wounded in the thigh, which so disabled him that he went home and did not again enter the army. In 1868 he came to this county, locating at Miami. In same year he purchased a fine farm in the “Plains,” where he is residing at the present time. Mr. Greyson was married to Miss Sarah Blackburn, a native of Ohio, on the 21st of January, 1874. They have three children by this union: Minnie T., Charley, and Lewis E. Page 795-796

 

Richard Campbell, farmer, P. O., Fairville. Born in Marion county, Kentucky, in the year 1845. When six years of age, his parents moved to Hancock county, Illinois, where they lived until 1872. Mr. Campbell spent his early life on a farm and was educated in the common schools of that place. He was married in Quincy, Illinois, to Miss Hattie Hoffman, of said city. They have five children: Bertha S., Jessie, Walter, Pearl A., and John T. In 1872 he came to this county and farmed for one year, at the close of which period, he started on a tour through Kansas, Nebraska and southern Missouri, returning in 1875, and settling permanently at his present residence. He is an excellent farmer, keeping pace with the times, and contributing largely to the development of the resources of the county. Page 796

 

Samuel Sailors, farmer, P. O., Norton. Was born in Monroe county, Ohio, in 1824. At the age of eight years his parents moved to Elkhart county, Indiana, where the family resided for twenty years. He lived on a farm the greater part of the time, and was educated in the public schools. In 1852 he went to Chickasaw county, Iowa, where he remained four years, engaged in farming. In 1844 he was married to Elizabeth Morris, of Elkhart county, Indiana, who died in 1869, leaving a family of four children to mourn her loss with him. They are named respectively: Lavina, wife of John Brown, living in Iowa: Julia A., wife of J. Smith, living in Chicago; Martha E., wife of Wm. Sytz, living in Newton, Iowa, and Sarah J. In 1856 Mr. Sailors left Chickasaw county, and traveled through Illinois, Iowa and Missouri, locating for a short time at divers places, until the year 1878, when he finally settled in Saline county, where he has since resided. March 16, 1879, he was married to Mrs. Susan Duckworth, (widow of Pleasant Duckworth,) a native of Hancock county, Illinois. She was first married to Stephen Moody, by whom she had one child, Adolphus. By her second husband, (Duckworth,) she had two: Mary E. and John A. Mr. Sailors is a man of strict integrity and close attention to business and an honor to the community in which he resides. Page796

 

William Griffitts, farmer, P. O., Norton. Is a native of Hancock county, Illinois; born in the year 1833. Has a common school education. His boyhood was spent on a farm. Was married in 1854 to Miss Martha J. Stanley, a native of Tennessee. They have eight children by this union: Ambrose G., Nancy J., wife of Chas. C. Miller, Susan V., Georgiana, Caroline, Artemesia, Mary A., and John T. In 1869 Mr. Griffitts came to this state and county, where he has since resided, occupied in the cultivation of a productive and well-appointed farm. He is a man of high moral worth, respected by all who enjoy his acquaintance. Page 797

 

Charles C. Miller, farmer, P. O., Norton. First saw the light of day in Rockingham county, Virginia, in 1857, where he spent the first six years of his life. His parents then moved to Preble county, Ohio, where he was raised and educated, passing his youthful days upon a farm. In 1868 they moved to this State and county, locating near Slater, at which place the subject of this sketch attended school during the winter and worked on a farm in the summer. He was united in marriage, July 4, 1879, to Nancy J. Griffitts, daughter of Wm. Griffitts, of this county. They have one child: Lucy Belle. Mr. Miller is located upon a farm, purchased from Mr. J. H. Irvine, which by his industry and enterprise, he has brought to a high degree of perfection. Page 797

 

Mitchell B. Lucas, farmer, P. O., New Frankfort. The subject of this short sketch was born in this state and county, in 1854 or 1855. Was raised on a farm, and educated in the common schools. Is engaged in the cultivation of a fine farm, which by industry and good management he has made to rival the garden of Eden. Mr. Lucas stands high in the estimation of his fellow-citizens as a strictly conscientious and honorable business man. Page 797

 

William Thomas Duggins, P. O., Slater. Of English descent; is the son of Thomas C. and Elizabeth W. Duggins, and was born May 28, 1838, in Saline county. His great-grandfather married an Irish lady in the city of Dublin, and when he died his widow, with her only child William, grandfather of the subject of this sketch, crossed the Atlantic, and settled in Fredericksburg, Virginia. She afterward married Robert Wilkinson, by whom she had three children, and then died in Fredericksburg. William Duggins (the grandfather) served through the revolutionary war, and after the war married Miss Elizabeth Perkins, daughter of William Perkins, of the well-known South Carolina family of that name. He was a member of the Episcopal Church, and a devout Christian. On the maternal side the great-grandfather of Mr. Duggins, Daniel White, was also a revolutionary soldier, and was present at the surrender of Lord Cornwallis. His maternal grandfather, Thomas Jackson, was a cousin of General Andrew Jackson. Mr. Duggins received a good education, and from 1858 to 1860 was engaged as salesman in a store in Cambridge, in this county. In the spring of 1861 he enlisted in Capt. Ed Brown’s company, M. S. G., then in the Confederate army, where he continued until the close of the war, 1865. In March, 1866, he married Miss Annie Pulliam, daughter of John C. and Catherine J. Pulliam, of this county. Her father was born in Tennessee, and her grandfather in Raleigh, North Carolina, August, 1771, and died August 9, 1849, in Saline county. Her grandfather, Col. Ben. Chambers, was an officer in the revolutionary army. Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, their home, was named for Gen. James Chambers, whose sword is now in the Pulliam family. Of this marriage there are four children: Kate W., Dora D., Mary C., and Clarence M. Mrs. Duggins died February 9, 1875, and he is still unmarried. Since the war he assisted his father in the management of his farm, on which he now lives since his father’s death, his mother living with him. The homestead contains 1,200 acres of magnificent land. Page 797-798

 

William W. Graves, P. O., Slater. A farmer, near Slater, in this county. Was born in Boone county, Kentucky, May 18, 1810, where he was raised on a farm, and received a good English education. After he was grown he taught school for a short time, and in 1835 moved to Adams county, Illinois, where he remained about a year, and in 1836 moved to Hancock county, Illinois, and engaged in merchandising for about seven years. In 1843 he came to this county, and settled on a farm east of where Slater now stands. For about ten years he here devoted his attention to farming, and then, in 1854, he returned to Hancock county, Illinois, where he farmed until 1879, and then returned to Saline. He was opposed to secession per se, but in the stirring times of 1861 his sympathies went with his native land, the south. He was a whig, but says he “abandoned the party when it went with the abolitionists.” In the old times, in Kentucky, he was orderly-sergeant and quartermaster in the state militia. In 1836 he was married to Miss Ann G. Garnett, in Culpepper county, Virginia, who died in September, 1847. To this union were born four children, all now dead. The Graves family were originally from Wales, and settled in Madison county, Virginia. John, the grandfather of the subject of this sketch, moved to Kentucky, where Reuben, the father was born, and lived, and had twelve children. He has been a member of the Baptist Church since his fourteenth year, and one of its officers for many years, and is an organizing member of two churches. He has a fine farm of 160 acres. Page 798

 

John L. Black, P. O., Slater. Was born June 9, 1820 in Augusta county, Virginia, where he was raised on a farm, and was educated in the country schools, until 1837, when his father moved to Wayne county, Missouri. In 1850 he moved to Knox county, stopping in Lewis county one year. He remained in Knox county until 1865, when he moved to Saline county, and located permanently, and has since been steadily engaged in farming and stock-feeding. He was a southern sympathizer in the war, though opposed to secession. Did not enter either army. In 1845 he was married to Miss Nancy J. Porter, daughter of David Porter, one of the members of the constitutional convention. To this union were born six sons and five daughters, living, and one son dead. Mr. Black has been the architect and builder of his own fortune. The war was a great drawback to him financially. When he came to Saline his affairs were greatly disordered, but by steady industry and economy he has again accumulated a fine estate. Has a splendid farm of 670 acres, well stocked and well improved. Is one of the stockholders in the Miami bank, and has just retired from the directorship. Page 798-799

 

Oscar K. Graves, P. O., Slater. Was born in Boone county, Kentucky, April 10, 1833. Was raised on a farm and educated in the county. He came to Saline county, Missouri, in 1855, and has considered it his home ever since. He has all the time been engaged in farming. In November, 1854, he was married to Miss Caroline Garnett. They have had five children, three living: Joseph, Birdie V. and Emma B., and two dead. He is a member of and deacon in the Baptist Church, also a member of the A. O. U. W. In the spring of 1861 he joined the M. S. G., and was out until he was disabled for service in 1863. In the state guard, he was in Capt. Sutherlin’s company. In February, 1862, he re-enlisted in company E., Gordon’s regiment, Shelby’s brigade. At the battle of Hartsville, he was wounded in the right knee, and captured. As his wound disabled him for service, he took the oath of loyalty, was released, and returned home. He entered the service an orderly and left it a lieutenant. On returning home, in 1863, he went to Kentucky and remained there three years, until the war was over. Has a fine farm of 220 acres well improved. Page 799

 

Rev. Peter Goodman Rea, P. O., Marshall. A minister of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, was born in Henry county, Virginia, May 9, 1819, and is the ninth son of Joseph and Mary Ann Rea. His mother died when he was quite young, and his father moved the family to Cooper county, Missouri, in the spring of 1832, and died in Booneville, in 1835. Mr. Rea’s first religious impressions were received from reading a tract of the American Tract Society; but from a boy was remarkable for his steady, moral habits. In October, 1836, he united with the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, in Booneville. In October, 1837, he was accepted as a candidate for the ministry, under the care of the New Lebanon Presbytery. He entered the Cumberland Presbyterian College, in Kentucky, with the intention of graduating, but his health failed him, and he left college in the fall of 1840. In the spring of 1841 he was ordained, and traveled as a missionary until 1843. During this period he organized five new churches in destitute districts. On the 31st of October, 1843, he was married to Miss Mary Evangeline Rubey, daughter of Judge H. McLean Rubey, and granddaughter of Rev. Finis Ewing. He then settled, as pastor over three churches, in Saline county, and during his residence here, for two years labored extensively in the state, as agent for the Board of Missions of the C. P. Church. In 1859 he was unanimously appointed by the Missouri Synod, to take charge of the church at Booneville, and was a member of the Synod committee to establish a female college at the same place. On May 15, 1862, he had the honor of being elected moderator of the general assembly of the C. P. Church, held at Owensboro, Kentucky. He never sought prominence as a popular preacher; his highest aim being to do good. In 1863 he was elected president of the Missouri Female College, Booneville, Missouri, where he continued seven years. In the fall of 1870 he returned to his farm in Saline county, and for several years he labored as an evangelist. In 1874 he accepted the charge of Mt. Horeb Church, which position he at present holds. He was stated clerk of the Missouri Synod for twenty-five years. Mr. Rea has five children: Ann W., Carrie F., Joseph H., Mary H., and Robert Ewing. Page 799-800

 

Joshua G. Tucker, deceased. Was born in Dinwiddie county, Virginia, April 18, 1815, where he was brought up on a farm and educated, and where he was married, December 14, 1836, to Miss Henrietta Harper, of Nodaway county, Missouri, and has had five children: L. H., Mary E. (Mrs. Guthrie, now dead), Virginia A. (Mrs. Tucker), Martha E., and Harvey S. In 1837 Mr. Tucker came to Missouri, and settled in Cooper county. The flood of 1844 washed away his crops and dwelling. In 1845 he came to this county, settling on the land now owned by his sons, L. H. and H. S. Tucker. Both he and his wife died in this county—he January 22, 1879, and she March 18, 1875. His son, H. S. Tucker was born in this county, on the Harvey farm, April 19, 1848, where he was raised on a farm and educated. On the 7th of October, 1875 he was married to Miss Lizzie S. Shaw, of this county, and has two children: Bettie M. and Luther L. He resides on the old homestead left by his father, and carries on farming in all its branches. Page 800

 

Col. George W. Jackson, P. O. Fairville. Was born in Parker county, Virginia, in 1831. Most of his early life was spent in central Indiana. In 1849 he went to California with the tide of gold emigration, and suffered the deprivations and dangers incident to a frontier life, his avocations being varied, and not possible, in this brief sketch, to particularize. He was at one time quite prominent as a mine prospector in California, and rendered some service to the government. In the winter of 1859 he returned to Indiana. In 1861 he enlisted in the 34th Indiana infantry, and served as captain of company C until after the siege of Vicksburg; acted as topographical engineer of the 10th division, 13th army corps, during the advance to and siege of Vicksburg. Was then commissioned colonel of the 9th Indiana cavalry, and served in that capacity until compelled to resign, January, 1865, on account of wounds received at Franklin, Tennessee. Was at the battles of Shiloh, Baker’s Creek, Champion Hill, Black River Bridge, Vicksburg, Nashville, and Franklin, and many small engagements not specified as battles. Being an invalid, Col. Jackson has not been permanently located, or confined to any specific avocation. February, 1881, he located in this county, on a farm near Fairville. He was married in St. Charles, Missouri, to Miss Bettie Hatcher, and has two children: Gay and Nettie. Page 800-801

 

James A. Dobbins, P. O., Miami. The subject of the following sketch was born in Eddyville, old Caldwell county, Kentucky, February 11, 1831, and was educated there. Clerked for his step-father, Mr. Brasswell, a merchant in Eddyville, for several years. At the age of seventeen, he came to St. Louis, and worked in the foundry of Gratz & McCune, and the Fulton foundry of G. B. Allen & Co., having become a machinist and engineer. In 1856 he came to this county. Was pilot on the Bennswick steam ferry one season, when the boat sunk; also served as pilot on Mountain boats, going to the Yellowstone on the first boat that ever went that far up the Missouri river. Five yeas ago he began the saw mill business near his present residence, with H. W. Sullivan, a partner for the last two years. In October, 1846, he was married, in St. Louis, to Miss Ellen Latour, of said city. They have seven children: Mary (Mrs. Hissell), Charles A., Sophia E., (Mrs. Hawkins), Ida J., Louisa B., David L. and Craig V. Mr. Dobbins is now engaged in farming, and in operating his saw mill. Page 801

 

Benjamin Cooper, P. O., Miami. Was born in this county, near Miami, July 29, 1836, where he was raised and educated. In 1862, he enlisted in company L., Seventh cavalry, Missouri Volunteers, U. S. A. Was in the battles of Little Rock and Mark’s Mills, when he was taken prisoner and exchanged December, 1864 at Galveston, Texas. Was mustered out when his regiment was consolidated with First Missouri Volunteer cavalry, and came home, and has been engaged in farming since, except three months spent in California. He handles stock extensively; cattle, horses, and sheep. Has a splendid thoroughbred bull, known as “Noble Duke,” and several thoroughbred cows and a lot of thoroughbred sheep. Page 801

 

Thomas Johnston, P. O., Miami. Was born in county Tyrone, Ireland, May 9, 1810, where he was raised and educated. His father owned a linen bleaching establishment, in which Thomas was employed as millwright until he left Ireland. He was married in Ireland in 1835, to Miss Eliza J. Anderson, of county Tyrone. They have seven children living: Ann (Mrs. McCormick), James A., Emma (Mrs. Hill), Maud (Mrs. Renick), William C., Martha W., and Robert C. In 1838 Mr. Johnston came to the United States, and moved direct from New York to Ross county, Ohio, where he lived nine years, occupied in carriage making. He moved to Pickaway county, Ohio, and farmed until 1871, and then came to Saline county and located on the Petite Saw plains. About 1876 his sons, James A., and William C., purchased the farm on which they and their father are now living. Besides carrying on farming they now deal largely in stock. Page 801-802

 

John Millsaps, P. O., Miami. Was born in Miami township, in this county, in 1833. Was raised on a farm and educated in the county. For seventeen years he made the handling of stock—cattle, mules and hogs—a specialty. In 1850 he went to California, where, on a ranche, he engaged in the stock business, and remained there two years. In 1853 he returned to this county and engaged in farming until 1861, when he enlisted in Capt. Crews’ company, Missouri state guards, and served six months. In December, 1861, he started south with Col. Robinson’s recruits, and was captured, with the whole outfit of 600 men, on Blackwater, December 19, 1861. Was taken to St. Louis and then to Alton, Illinois, and from there was sent to Vicksburg and exchanged in the fall of 1862. He then enlisted and was under John B. Clark, Jr. Was is the battles of Booneville, Carthage, Wilson’s Creek, Mansfield, Jenkins’ Ferry, where he was slightly wounded below the knee by a spent ball, and Camden. His rank was second lieutenant, company G, 9th Missouri cavalry, in which company he surrendered at Shreveport in 1865. He then returned to Saline, where he was married February 22, 1871, to Mrs. Sallie M. Rhodes, nee Rogers, of this county. Mr. Millsaps is at present and has been since his residence in the county, engaged in general farming business. Page 802

 

Samuel B. Winning, P. O., Miami. Was born in Berkeley county, Virginia, September 27, 1829. He came with his father, Edward Winning, also a native of Berkeley county, Virginia, to this county, when he was about twelve years of age, and located six miles north of where Slater now stands. He was raised and educated, principally, in this county. On the 26th of January, 1854, he was married to Miss Mary A. Rogers, daughter of Thomas Rogers, one of the old settlers of Saline, and they have four children: Louisa A., John L., William E. and Maud E. In 1864 he enlisted in the Confederate army, during Price’s last raid through the state, in Marmaduke’s escort company. He was present at nearly all the fights of the retreat, but as he was one of the unarmed, he could take no active part. At the crossing of the Little Osage, near Ft. Scott, he was captured with General Marmaduke. He was taken to St. Louis, then to Alton, Illinois, and after the surrender, was released and came home, and at once resumed his farming business. Page 802-803

 

George A. Renick, P. O., Miami. Was born near Malta Bend, in this county, in 1853. In 1860, went with his father to Pickaway county, Ohio, where he was principally educated. In 1868 he returned to Saline, and worked several years on his father’s farm, and then, in 1874, attended the state normal school, at Kirksville, Missouri. In April, 1877, he was married to Miss Maud E. Johnson, of Saline county, and they have two children: James W. and Alonzo A. Mr. Renick is a good farmer, and in addition to farming proper, handles stock to a considerable extent. Page 803

 

Thomas H. Harvey, deceased, was born in Northumberland county, Virginia, February 20, 1799. Was educated in his native county, and was raised on a farm. Was married August 19, 1817, to Miss Sallie C. Harding, of the same county, who died shortly after their marriage. January 13, 1820, he was married the second time, to Miss Elizabeth S. Edwards, who passed away January 25, 1853, after experiencing the trials and pleasures incident to thirty-three years of married life. Only three of the children born to him by his second wife, are living: T. R. E., Theodore and Jacquilin. While in Virginia Mr. Harvey held the rank of major in the state militia. In 1836, he came to this state and county, locating where his son. T. R. E., now resides. He followed the occupation of farming until his death, which occurred February 6, 1852, about one year previous to that of his wife. They lie, side by side, in the Carmel cemetery. In 1838, Mr. Harvey represented his county in the legislature, occupying a seat in the house. In 1840 he was elected to the senate. In the capacity of legislator, Mr. Harvey’s actions were characterized by that sound judgment which does honor to the man as well as the section which he represents. In 1872 his son, T. R. E., was elected a member of the house, indicating that the mantle of the father has fallen upon the son. Page 803

 

John H. Clarke, P. O., Fairville. Is a native of Rockingham county, Virginia, born in the year 1854. Was raised and educated there. At the age of eleven he entered the store of Phelix Streets, brother-in-law, as clerk, continuing with him for five years. When sixteen years of age he clerked for J. J. Cupp, another brother-in-law, doing business in Augusta county, where he remained for three years. May 5, 1854, he came to this state and county, locating in Miami, acting as clerk one year for the firm of Brown Bros. & Co. In 1855 he went to Carrollton, there entering into partnership with Wm. S. Brown, engaging in general merchandising. At the expiration of two years he returned to Miami, and became one of the firm of Brown, Buxton, & Co., who were doing a heavy warehouse and commission business, owning three large warehouses. In 1856 he was united in marriage to Miss Sarah C. Lane, daughter of Carr W. Lane. Mrs. Clarke died in 1857, leaving one child, a daughter, an infant two weeks old, named Sallie C. In 1859, having dissolved partnership with the above mentioned firm, Mr. C. went to Pike’s Peak, Colorado, prospecting, whence he returned to Carroll county, where he engaged in farming until the capture of Lexington by Price, in 1861. He then enlisted in the Confederate service, M. S. G., company C., Capt. Louis Bohannon. Was engaged in the following battles: Pea Ridge, Corinth, Farmington, Iuka, in numerous engagements with gunboats, Bruensburg, Baker’s Creek, and the siege of Vicksburg. After the fall of the latter place he was exchanged. He then entered the Eighteenth Virginia cavalry, with which command he was engaged in several skirmishes, in one of which he was wounded in the right ankle. Being unfitted for further service, he returned home, and engaged in teaching. In 1866 he came to this state and county, locating at Fairville, where he built and occupied the first store in the place. He was married in 1870 to Miss Narcissa J. Webb, daughter of Wm. P. Webb, of Miami. They have five children: Flora T., Isabella J., John H., Marietta V., and Edith. Mr. Clarke is now engaged in the grocery business. Page 803-804

 

George H. Stith, P. O., Fairville. Was born in Hardin county, Kentucky, 1854, where he was reared and educated, his early life being spent on a farm. He enlisted in the first company raised by Gen. Forrest, with which he remained until the fall of Fort Donelson, in 1862. He then joined the first Kentucky cavalry, Col. Hardin’s regiment. After serving in this two months, he was transferred to the second Kentucky cavalry, Basil Duke’s regiment, under Morgan. He participated in all of the battles in which the command was engaged. During the famous raid in Ohio, in 1863, he was captured and lodged in prison at Camps Chase and Douglass. Was held until February, 1865, when he was paroled and sent to Richmond, where he was furloughed. Returning home, he surrendered at Lexington, Kentucky. In 1866 Mr. Smith came to this state and county. Was married the following year to Elizabeth Gauldin, daughter of Josiah Gauldin. They have two children: Howard B. and Sarah A. Six months since he purchased the drug store which he now occupies, of Dr. T. A. Edwards. He expects to abandon the drug business, shortly and engage in farming. Page 804

 

Joseph D. Edwards, postmaster, P.O., Fairville. Was born in Northumberland county, Virginia, 1830. At the age of six years, he came to Saline county, Missouri, with his uncle, Maj. T. H. Harvey, having lost his parents while very young. He lived with his uncle until seventeen years of age, when he went to St. Louis, and engaged, as clerk, with A.M. & S. J. Lackey, dry goods, also with the hardware firm of Morris and Blackburn. After an absence of two years, he returned to this county, engaged in clerking for a while, finally entering into partnership with Saufley & Brown. In 1854 he soled out his interest, and engaged in farming. He was married, in 1850, to Miss Elizabeth Baker, daughter of James Baker, of Kentucky. Mrs. Edwards died in 1852, leaving one child: Marcellus J. Mr. Edwards was again married in 1854, to Mrs. Amanda M. Harl, nee Evans, by whom he had eight children, seven of whom are now living: Chas. J., Thomas A., Clara, Lizzie, Sarah L., Arthur H., and Mary P. In 1864 he enlisted in the Confederate service, Capt. Edmond’s command, under Gen. Mitchell. Going to Louisiana, he was detailed to do duty in the adj. general’s office where he remained only a few months, being discharged on account of sickness. He surrendered on a gunboat, on Red river, in 1865, when he returned to this county. Is now engaged in farming and general merchandising, besides holding the office of postmaster. Page 804-805

 

Edwin M. Haynie, farmer, P. O., Fairville. Is a native of this state and county, born September 24, 1838; was educated in the common schools, and raised on a farm. He is the son of Edward Haynie, a native of Virginia, who came to this county in 1836, settling near Miami. May 13, 1861, Mr. E. M. Haynie enlisted in the Confederate service, Capt. John S. Marmaduke’s company. (Capt. Marmaduke was afterward promoted to general.) While with this company, Mr. Haynie participated in the battle of Booneville, after which he was transferred to Capt. Ed. Brown’s company, with which he was engaged in the battle of Lexington. After the death of Capt. Brown he enlisted in Capt. James M. Garrett’s company, and was captured at Blackwater, taken to Alton, where he took the oath, and returned home. In 1862 he re-enlisted in the Confederate service for three years. Was engaged in the battles of Pea Ridge, Prairie Grove, Springfield, where he was slightly wounded, Hartsville, Cape Girardeau, where he was shot through the thigh with a four-ounce grape shot, and taken prisoner. He languished in prison till February 13, 1865, when he was paroled and sent to Richmond. In the same year he returned home, resuming his occupation of farming. He was united in marriage to Miss Sarah L. E. Grayson, by whom he had six children: Edwin H., John R., Robert L, Elmer J., Sarah E., and Price G. Page 805

 

Samuel Bruner, farmer, P. O., Fairville. The subject of this sketch was born in Hampshire county, Virginia, in the year 1808. Was educated partly in Virginia, and partly in Ohio, serving an apprenticeship at the carpenter trade in the latter state, having moved there in 1825. In 1832, he went to Indiana, locating near Marion, where he followed his trade for five years. He next spent ten years in Wabash county, same state. Here he married Miss Catherine Briggs, of Grant county, in 1838. They have six children living: Eliza A., wife of Whitsel Lewis; John S., Lennie, wife of Robert Strain, of Kansas, Jasper N., Orange L., and Elmer E. In 1867 he came to this state and county, locating upon a fine farm, near Fairville, where he has since lived, being assisted in his business operations by his two younger sons. He is a genial and open-hearted old gentleman, highly esteemed by the community in which he resides. Page 805-806

 

John B. Brown, P. O., Fairville. Was born in Bath county, West Virginia, in 1823. He is the son of Col. John Brown, a veteran of 1812. In the fall of 1837, Mr. B. came to Saline county, in company with his father, locating near Fairville. In 1846 he volunteered in the Mexican war, serving in Captain John Reed’s company, under Col. Doniphan. He was in the engagements at Bracito, Sacramento and Chihuahua, where he conducted himself as became a brave and honorable soldier. At the opening of the civil war, he enlisted for one year in the Confederate service, Capt. Ed. J. Brown’s company. Was taken prisoner at Blackwater, and held at Alton until the spring of 1862, when he took the oath and was released. In the same year he went to California, where he remained for five years, returning to this county in 1867. He was married March 22, 1875, to Miss Mary A. Manley, of Virginia, by whom he had four children, two of whom are now living: Edwin I. and John W. Mr. Brown is a confectioner by trade, and has a confectionery in connection with his grocery. Page 806

 

John H. Boyer, farmer, P. O., Fairville. Was born in Frankfort, Kentucky, 1842, where he was educated and trained to agricultural pursuits. In the fall of 1861 he enlisted in the command of Gen. Humphrey Marshall. Was engaged in the battles of Middle Creek, Piketon, and Princeton. His term of service having expired in 1862, he was discharged. Returning to his home in Bourbon county, he was there captured, together with several others, by Provost Marshal Evans. In September, 1867, he was united in marriage to Anna D. Webster, a native of the same county, who died in 1869, leaving him, with two small children, named respectively: Allie C. and Wm Z., to mourn the loss of wife and mother. In 1871, Mr. Boyer came to this state and county, locating in Miami, afterward settling upon the fine farm upon which he now resides. He was married for the second time to Miss Sally Bagly, who has borne him four children, three of whom are living: Fannie B., Irene, and John H. Mr. B. is a successful farmer and a man respected by all who know him. Page 806

 

Joseph Pittman, farmer. Joseph Pittman, was born in Prussia, August 1, 1838, where he was educated. In 1857 he immigrated to America, and settled in Saline county, upon the farm upon which he now resides. During the great sectional war he was engaged upon both sides, and honorably acquitted himself, to the satisfaction of both sides. In the fall of 1873 he was married to Miss Battie Shoer, originally from Baden, Germany. They have three children: Mary A., Battie, and Julia. Mr. Pittman has been steadily engaged in farming and stock-raising, and has grown up with the county. Page 806-807

 

Gustavus Kunze, farmer. Was born in Prussia, Germany, in the year 1846. When but eight years old he immigrated to America with his father, and located in St. Clair county, Illinois, where his father soon after died, and where Gustavus lived for more than twenty years. He was educated partly in Germany and partly in Illinois. While living in Illinois he married Miss Elizabeth Frudh, of St. Clair county, Illinois, by whom he has four children: Alma, Manda, August, and Herman. In 1875 he moved with his family to Saline county, where he has since been engaged in farming. Page 807

 

T. J. Edwards, farmer. Mr. Thomas J. Edwards was born in Northumberland county, Virginia, in what is known as the northern neck, near the mouth of the Potomac river, in 1823. He was partly educated in his native state, but chiefly in Missouri, to which state he came, an orphan boy, with his uncle. Major Thomas H. Harvey, in 1836, and located in Saline county. In 1846 he served in the Mexican war, in Col. A. W. Doniphan’s regiment, and was in the famous expedition to Chihuahua, and participated in the battles of the Bracito and Sacramento. In 1861 he enlisted for the Confederate army in Capt. George Kirtley’s company, in Robinson’s regiment, that was captured soon after it started, at the Blackwater crossing. He took the oath at Alton, Illinois, and made no further effort to join the Confederate army. Since the war he has been steadily engaged in farming and feeding stock. Page 807

 

Cuthbert H. Hickman, P. O., Slater. Mr. Hickman was born February 3, 1815, in Clark county, Kentucky, and was the son of Richard and Susan Hickman. Mr. Hickman came to Missouri in 1841, and settled in Saline county, where he remained until his death, which occurred August 11, 1880. He had before his death accumulated a large amount of valuable land. Mr. Hickman was married March 6, 1838, to Miss Elizabeth Grimes, of Fayette county, Kentucky. They have eight children: Mrs. Susan M. Garrett, Mrs. Mary E. White, Richard W., James L., Cuthbert H., Mrs. Martha S. Orear, Leslie C. and Leona D. Mrs. Hickman still resides on the old homestead, and the farm is carried on by Leslie, the youngest son, who is a young man of promise. Page 807

 

Jerome H. Cameron, P. O., Norton. The subject of this sketch is a son of T. A. H. and Nancy Cameron, and was born August 7, 1845, in Saline county, Missouri. His early life was spent on the farm and at school. He was educated at Mt. Sterling, Illinois. He is engaged in farming and stock-raising, and lives in section 8, township 51, range 20, and owns 170 acres of choice farming and timber land. Mr. Cameron was united in marriage January 11, 1872, to Miss Mary Reynolds, of Saline county. They have three children: William A. S., Lulu C., and I. E. He and wife are members of the Christian Church. Mr. Cameron’s father was from east Tennessee, and came to Saline county in 1840. His grandfather, Daniel Thornton, came here in a very early day, and broke the first prairie land in the county. Page 807-808

 

John P. Brown, P. O. Slater. Mr. Brown is a son of George E. and Lucynthia A. Brown, and was born February 16, 1845, in Albemarle county, Virginia. He came to Missouri in February, 1869, and settled in Saline county, where, he has been engaged in farming and carpentering. He now lives five miles west of Slater, where he owns 160 acres of good land. Mr. Brown was married September 5, 1872, to Miss Mary E. Cameron, of Saline county. They have two children: Mamie A. and Leona I. George P. died January 1, 1881. Mr. Brown is a member of the A. F. & A. M. and I. O. O. F. He enlisted May 1, 1861, in the Confederate army, in Longstreet’s corps, Pickett’s division, and served four years. He was taken prisoner April 7, 1865, and remained in prison at Point Lookout until July, 1865. He was in the battles of Bull’s Run, Fredericksburg, Cold Harbor, the seven days’ fight at Richmond, in which he was wounded, and the sieges of Richmond and Petersburg. Page 808

 

Archibald Paxton, deceased, was born in Prince William county, Virginia, June 21, 1810. When eight years of age, his father, who was a veteran officer of 1812, moved to Lincoln county, Kentucky, where he farmed upon an extensive scale, having about 100 slaves. Mr. Archibald was educated at the Transylvania University at Lexington, and graduated before reaching manhood’s estate. He enlisted under Gen. Harrison during the war in Florida, against the Blackhawk Indians, and was stationed at Fort Meigs. He served until the close of the war. In 1840 he was married to Miss Mary J. Davidson, a native of Kentucky, who died December 6, 1857, leaving seven children: Nancy E., wife of James O. Davis; William L., John A., Mary A., wife of Thornton Lyons; Joseph T., Emma E., wife of Jacob Harris; Rebecca I., wife to T. P. Hackley. In 1830 Mr. Paxton came to this county, and entered a tract of land comprising 460 acres, now owned by E. M. Price. He afterwards purchased all of section 17. He was married in May, 1860, to Mrs. Miranda C. Martin nee Cole, a native of Virginia, by whom he had two children: Mary C., wife of William P. Tate, and Tillie A. Mrs. Paxton also had one child by her first husband: Louisa E., wife of Thadeus J. Chrisman. During the war, Mr. Paxton was so unfortunate as to lose nearly all his property. He died at his home, March 24, 1878, of heart disease, and was buried at Bethel Church. Mrs. Paxton has been a consistent member of the M. E. Church South, for the past thirty years, and in her daily walk shows evidences of a membership in a church eternal as well as temporal. She lives on the home farm in Miami township, where she superintends its cultivation, and deals extensively n stock of all kinds. Page 808-809

 

George W. Gaunt, farmer, P. O., Miami. Is a native of Clark county, Virginia, born in 1810. Was raised on a farm and educated in the common schools. He was married, in the parish of Carroll, Louisiana, in the year 1842, to Miss Caroline Phillips, of Kentucky, who left him a bereaved husband, but a few short months after their marriage. Previous to his marriage, Mr. Gaunt had filled the office of sheriff, of a parish in Louisiana, for a period of four years, besides serving in other official capacities, in all of which he made a good record. After the death of his wife, he returned to his native state and county, where he was again married, in 1853, to Miss Alice E. Rogers, a native of same county. They have six children: Lovell C., Emma J., Ida, Alice, Carrie and Charlie. In 1848, Mr. Gaunt moved to this state and county, where he has since resided. He is an intelligent, successful farmer, thoroughly conversant with the latest and most approved methods of farm cultivation. Page 809

 

Charles W. Surbaugh, farmer and wheel-right, P. O., Miami. Is a native of this state and county, born near Miami, 1841. He there received his education and learned the carpenter’s trade. In 1861, he enlisted in Captain Crew’s company, Colonel Gordon’s regiment, Shelby’s brigade, for six months; at the expiration of which time, he enlisted in Marmaduke’s escort, Captain Richard Stallard’s company. After the capture of Marmaduke, he re-enlisted in his old regiment, then under the command of Colonel Williams. Was engaged in the following battles: Booneville, Carthage, Wilson’s Creek, Dry Wood, Lexington, Pea Ridge, Newtonia, and several others too numerous to mention. He was captured several times, but succeeded in making his escape each time. Once he barely escaped with his life, a comrade being shot dead by his side while making the attempt. He surrendered with his command at Shreveport and returned home. He was married in 1861, to Miss Martha A. Hill, of this county, who died in 1875, leaving him, with three children to mourn the loss of wife and mother. They are named as follows: John H., Hannah J. and George A. In 1878, he was married for the second time to Miss Melissa S. Ray, of Saline county. In December, 1880, he entered into partnership with Charles Bondurant, in the operation of a saw mill, located in Jefferson township, with which they are able to cut 6,000 feet of lumber per day. Mr. Surbaugh is a thoroughly honorable and conscientious business man, industrious and energetic and a decided acquisition to the community. Page 809

 

Thomas Garnett, deceased. Was born in Culpepper county, Virginia, in 1810. His early life was spent on a farm and in acquiring an education in the public schools of his native county. While in Virginia, after becoming of age, he was engaged in farming, on a grand scale. Was married to Miss Lucy H. Gordon, of same county, by whom he had nine children, seven of whom are living: Anna M., Lucy H., wife of Jas. A. Jordan; A. C., Laura V., wife of Giles R. McDaniels; T. T., Edmonia J., Joseph H. In 1852 Mr. Garnett moved to this state and county, locating where his son, A. C., and widow, now reside, on a splendid farm, well adapted to the raising of all kinds of produce, or stock. Mr. A. C., who now manages the farm, makes a specialty of handling fine stock. The subject of this sketch died in 1880, having been an active and consistent member of the Missionary Baptist Church for forty-five years, acting in the capacity of deacon for several years previous to his death. He died at the ripe age of seventy years, living the full time allotted to man, leaving behind him a record of which his descendants may well be proud. Page 809-810

 

Stephen Wheeler, deceased. Was born in Harrison county, Kentucky, May 28, 1812. At the age of twelve years he came with his mother and brothers (his father being dead), to Saline county, where he received his education, and served an apprenticeship to the blacksmith’s trade. He practiced veterinary surgery for several years. August 1, 1837, he was married to Miss Nancy E. Monroe, of this county, by whom he had five children, two of whom are living: Charles W. and Martha J., wife to Thomas A. Hogan. Mrs. Wheeler died July 31, 1856. December 14, 1859, he was married a second time, to Mary A. Collier. By this union he had three children: Lee, Mintie and Clara. Mr. Wheeler was one of the oldest settlers of the county. He died February 13, 1871, and was buried in what is known as the “Bluff” graveyard, under the auspices of the I. O. O. F., of which order he had been an honored member for several years, having been the first Noble Grand of the Miami Lodge. His sons, Charles W. and Lee, are now occupying and managing the fine farm, upon which he passed so many years of his life. Page 810

 

Lawrence W. Haynie, P. O., Miami. Was born in Northumberland county, Virginia, August 15, 1831. When about eighteen months old, his parents moved to Missouri, and settled in Miami township, Saline county, where he grew up on the farm, and was educated at the Miami Male Institute. In 1856 he made a mercantile venture in DeWitt, in Carroll county, where he continued in business until 1860, when he returned to this county, and has made it his home ever since. In the spring of 1861 he volunteered in the M. S. G., and was elected second sergeant of his company. At the end of the six months’ term, for which his company had enlisted, it was mustered out, and the majority of them immediately re-enlisted in the Confederate army, and were captured at Blackwater, December 19, 1861, while under the command of Col. Frank Robinson. Mr. Haynie was imprisoned in St. Louis, and at Alton, Illinois, for nine months, and then exchanged at Vicksburg. He returned to the Confederate army in the trans-Mississippi department, and was mustered out in 1865, at the end of the war. He was married February 20, 1868, to Miss Emma Robertson, to which union was born four children, three living: Mary E., Richard W., and George P., and one son dead. Mrs. Haynie is a daughter of Judge R. C. Robertson, of this county. Mr. Haynie is a member of the Christian Church, and of the A. O. U. W. Since the war he has been engaged in the lumber and in the agricultural implement trade in Miami, until 1878, when he exchanged his business and stock for a farm of 130 acres, one-half mile south of Miami, where he now lives, and is one of the present justices of the peace for Miami township. Page 810-811

 

Alfred Wheeler, P. O., Miami. Is one of the old pioneers of Saline county. He was born in Garrard county, Kentucky, August 30, 1807. When he was only five years old his father, Thomas Wheeler, was killed at Dudley’s defeat in the war of 1812. In 1819 his mother moved to Saline county with her family, her eldest daughter and husband, Mr. and Mrs. Wolfskill, having settled here two years previously. They settled in Jefferson township, where his mother afterward married a second time, to William McMahan, another old pioneer. His mother died in 1838. Mr. Wheeler has lived in Saline county since 1819, as it has also been the home of his three brothers and two sisters, Samuel, Wilson, and Stephen, Mrs. Susan Wolfskill and Mrs. Anna Galbraith. Stephen and both sisters are now dead. When about twenty years of age, Mr. Wheeler bought the improvements on a tract of land, now known as the Booker farm, and remained there about three years. He was married July 9, 1830, to Miss Ruth Perry, who was born in Cooper’s fort in 1812, and was the first white child born of American parents west of St. Charles. In the fall of this same year, 1830, he entered a farm in the Miami bottom, upon which he erected a cabin, and moved into it with his young wife. Subsequently he entered and purchased the 500 acre farm one mile and a half east of Miami, upon which he now resides, and upon which he moved in 1843. In 1848 both he and Mrs. Wheeler united with the Pinnacle Baptist Church, and when it broke up carried their membership to the Miami Baptist Church. They have raised four sons and two daughters to maturity. Humphrey died at the age of twenty-three, just as he was entering upon his studies for the ministry of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Amos A. is a well-known and leading physician of Miami. Alfred L., the youngest, is living on the old homestead, and takes care of the “old folks.” William H. lives near by, and divides his time between farming and teaching. Mrs. Cyrena Casebolt, widow of Peter Casebolt, and Mrs. Betsy Dick, wife of William B. Dick, both live in the same community. Mr. Wheeler’s grandfather, Benjamin, was born in Virginia, and was a soldier in the revolutionary war; he afterward moved to Kentucky, and died there, in Garrard county. Page 811

 

Capt. Robert Ruxton, P. O., Miami. Capt. Ruxton was born in Aberdeen county, Scotland, June 20, 1820. He left his native land in 1839, and, crossing the ocean, came to Ross county, Ohio, where he lived until 1843, and then came to Saline county, Missouri, and settled in Miami township. In 1849 he took the gold fever, and went to California, remaining there until 1852, and then returned to Saline, via the Isthmus of Panama, with $6,000 in cash, as the result of his work in the mines. Since then, this county has been his home. Capt. Ruxton spent two years at Kemper’s Academy, in Booneville, after he came to this county, teaching during the vacations. He was married, May 22, 1853, to Miss Mary P. Brown; and to this union have been born, Alvan K. and William R., both living, and one son dead. He is a member of the Methodist Church South, and is also a member of the I. O. G. T. In 1861 he enlisted in the M. S. G., and was commissioned quartermaster, with the rank of captain. Returned to Saline, in the fall of 1861, with orders to recruit, and was returning south with a company of recruits, in Robinson’s regiment of recruits, when the whole were captured by Gen. Jeff. C. Davis, at Blackwater, December 19, 1861. Was in prison in St. Louis, and Alton, Illinois, for nine months, and was then exchanged at Vicksburg, in 1862, and rejoined the confederate army. Was in the quarter-master and commissary departments, most of the time, and was mustered out at the end of the war in 1865. At the August election, in 1860, Capt. Ruxton was the regular democratic candidate for sheriff of Saline, but was defeated by a small majority, by D. R. Durrett, the Bell and Everett candidate. In 1872 after the re-enfranchisement of the southern men in Missouri, Capt. Ruxton ran for the office of collector, as an independent democrat, but was defeated by H. H. Harris, the regularly nominated candidate of the democratic party. In 1876 he was a candidate against the regularly nominated democratic candidate, running against Col. W. S. Jackson, for the office of county clerk, and was again defeated. Before and since the war, Capt. Ruxton has traveled largely in Canada and in all the states of the Union. Since 1855, he has been engaged in the general shipping business, except during the war. In 1857 a fire cost him about $9,000, and then the war almost impoverished him, losing him about $15,000. But by his indomitable pluck and energy, he has once more worked out for himself, a fair competency. Capt. Ruxton, a gentleman of the old school, and a man of hard Scotch sense, and notwithstanding his repeated political defeats, is one of the most popular men in the county. Page 812

 

Columbus G. Ingram, P. O., Miami. A Saline county farmer, born in Adair county, Kentucky, January 18, 1841. When he was a child of five years old, his father moved to Boone county, Kentucky, where he was raised on a farm and lived until 1876, when he moved to Saline county, Missouri, and settled six miles east of Miami. He was educated at Morgan Academy, Burlington, Boone county, Kentucky. February 4, 1862, he was married to Miss Ella F. Bond, of Owen county, Kentucky, and to this union have been born three children, all living: William R., Flavius G., and Patrick H. Mr. Ingram owns a splendid farm of 300 acres, admirably improved, convenient to market, and well adapted to both stock and grain. Page 812-813

 

John C. Scott, P. O., Miami. Mr. Scott was born in Scott county, Kentucky, July 5, 1824. At the age of twelve he came with his father to Missouri, locating in Saline county, near Arrow Rock, where he lived on his father’s farm, until 1844, when he moved to Pettis county. In 1849 he returned to Saline and settled on a farm in Miami township. His early education was obtained at a private school in his father’s house, and at ex-Gov. Marmaduke’s, and finished at the state university at Columbia. He was married in October, 1844, to Miss Mary Page, of Howard county; one child: Armede, living. Mrs. Scott died in 1847. He was married again, December 13, 1849, to Miss Maria J. Booker, and to them have been born four children, all living: Hettie E., Mattie P., Jennie J. and Amelia May. Mr. Scott has been a member of the Baptist church since 1842. Has assisted in building ten Baptist Churches, at a cost to himself of $815, and has also been liberal toward other denominations. He gave $800 towards William Jewel College, $50 to the Lexington Female School, $100 to the Greenville (S. C.) Theological School, $200 to aid three Baptist newspapers, $50 to build a parsonage, and has given $1,885 to the ministry. He also gave $100 to the association, $120 during the last twelve years to missions, and $50 to Sunday Schools—making in all $4,500—and yet he has been called “stingy” by some people. He has always thrown his influence on the side of religion and good morals. In 1861 he enlisted and was captured at Blackwater, in Robinson’s regiment of recruits, and was imprisoned at St. Louis, and later at Alton. He donated about $2,000, in the war, about equally between the militia and the bushwhackers. Since the war he has been successful and now owns 816 acres of finely improved land in this county, 2,000 acres in Kansas, and 3,840 acres in Texas; and is a stockholder and director in the Miami Savings Bank. Page 813

 

Christopher C. Booth, P. O., Miami. Mr. Booth, one of the fine stock breeders of Saline, was born in Bourbon county, Kentucky, December 8, 1832. While he was quite young his parents moved to Adams county, Illinois, where he was raised on a farm, and finished his education at Bethany College. In the spring of 1866 he came to this county, and located on the Walnut Grove stock farm, three miles southeast of Miami, where he still lives. The farm consists of 450 acres of land admirably adapted to grain, grass, and stock-raising. Mr. Booth keeps himself well posted on all matters interesting to farmers, and takes great interest in the cultivation of himself and family, and in the development of the county generally, and his own farm and stock especially. He has on hand a number of high-grade cattle and Berkshire hogs. He is the owner of the noted trotting stallion, Boone Chief, one of the best bred harness horses in the state. In 1876 this horse took the premium in the 3-year old harness ring, at the St. Louis fair, and again in the 4-year old ring, in 1877, competing with twenty-four others. He is of the Membrino and Edwin Forrest families. Mr. H. is also proprietor of Lucille, Glencoe Belle, and Alice Hutchinson, of the Membrino family, and of quite a number of high grade horses. He has also a flock of 350 full-blood Merino sheep, many of them registered. August 18, 1856, he was united in marriage to Miss Ann M. Hancock, daughter of John and Harriet Hancock, and to this union have been born eight children: William S., Henry S., George E., Robert E., Ella F., Anna J., and John, living, and one daughter, dead. The Booth family emigrated from England to Maryland before the Revolution. The grandfather of William moved to Virginia, and then to Bedford county, Kentucky, where Stephen Booth, his father, was raised. Page 813-814

 

A. J. Casebolt, P. O., Miami. Son of William and Ellen Casebolt, was born in Pocahontas county, Virginia, in February, 1839. In 1844 he came with his father to Saline county, Missouri. He was raised on the farm, and received a country school education. In 1864 he enlisted in the Confederate army during Price’s last raid; was in the battles of the retreat; surrendered in 1865, and returned to Saline. He has since been engaged in farming, having a fine farm of 272 acres, all in cultivation, and well improved. Raises the finest quality of wheat, of which he raised 1,800 bushels in 1880. December 2, 1875 he was married to Miss Margaret S. Peterman, daughter of Marion Peterman. (See his biography.) They have two children, both living, Edna and Missouri M. Is a member of the M. E. Church south, and a Royal Arch Mason. Page 814

 

George Casebolt, P. O., Miami. Is a son of William and Ellen Casebolt, and was born January 20, 1827, (his age was never set down in any record, and there is some dispute about it,) in Pocahontas county, Virginia, where he was raised on a farm. In 1844 he came to Saline county, Missouri, with his father, and has since been closely identified with this county. In 1849, he was married to Miss Jane Moberly. She died in 1850, leaving on child, Sarah, now living. In 1851 he married again, to Miss Martha Ferrill, who died in 1877, leaving nine children, all living: Lewis F. L., John M., Edmond W., Willie, Sterling P., Liddie B., Joseph, Rolla, and Georgie. He was married again, March 1880, to Miss Ellen Bowen. Is a member of the Christian Church and a master mason. He was in the Confederate army, (see soldier’s record). His farm contains 160 acres of land, in home place, and 506 acres elsewhere. He lost about $2,000 worth of property in the war. He is indebted to his own exertions solely for his prosperity. Page 814-815

 

Capt. Grandison S. Burnsides, P. O., Miami. Was born in Rockingham county, Virginia, March 25, 1832, his father moving to Missouri and locating in Saline county, on a farm, when his son was about four years old. At the age of nineteen he went to California, and engaged in mining for about three years. He then returned and settled on a farm in this county. He took sides with the government in the war. Volunteered in 1862, and was out until 1863, first as lieutenant, and afterwards as captain. The dents in his door, made by revolver bullets, are still there to prove that it was unsafe for him to remain in Saline county. In 1863 he went to Carrollton and engaged in merchandising, until the fall of 1866, when he returned to his farm, and has been there ever since. His farm contains 160 acres of land, and forty acres in the botton. He raises from 1,500 to 2,000 bushels of wheat, and about fifty acres of corn. In latter years he has been largely engaged in raising broomcorn. In November, 1857, he was married to Miss Louis G. Miles. They have two children living: Anna B., and Benson. His wife died in 1871. He married again in 1873 to Miss Eliza A. Williams. One infant child living. He is a member of the Christian Church. Page 815

 

Thomas A. Easton, P. O., Miami. Mr. Easton was born in Marion county, Missouri, August 7, 1830. His father was a physician in Palmyra. In 1844 the family moved to Knox county, Missouri, on a farm, where he remained until 1849, and then returned to Palmyra. In 1850 Thomas Easton went to California, and remained there engaged in mining for some time, and then returned to his father’s farm in Marion county, where he lived until 1860. He was married in 1859 to Miss Nancy E. Parrish, sister of the Parrish brothers, of Miami. In 1860 he moved on a farm of his own. In 1864 he moved to Knox county and lived there until 1874, when he came to Saline county and located on the farm where he now lives, containing 434 acres, and one of the finest stock farms in the county. Generally he feeds about fifty head of cattle, and one hundred head of hogs. Is a member of the Old School Baptist Church. Children: Wm. Griffin, Achilles H., Robert A., and Mary E., all living. Page 815

 

Martin Baker, P. O., Miami. Mr. Baker was born in Bourbon county, Kentucky, February 12, 1810, where he was raised on a farm and received a country school education. His father, Martin Baker, was a farmer and merchant, having been engaged in merchandising in Millersburg, Kentucky. When about twenty-four years old he came to Lewis county, Missouri, opposite Quincy, Illinois, engaged in farming, and remained there until 1837, when he traded his farm for a store in Marion county, Missouri, and continued in business there until 1840, when he moved to a farm in Knox, near Edina. While there he made the plans and specifications for the present court house and jail at Edina, in Knox county, located the swamp lands of the county, was the county’s agent to secure its portion to the school fund, and was otherwise prominently identified with the interests of the county. In 1865 he moved to Saline county and located on the farm where he now lives, containing 240 acres near Miami, which is in a high state of cultivation, with fine orchard and small fruits, and excellent house and barn. Has now in all, about 500 acres of land. He is one of the stock holders and one of the directors of the Miami Savings bank, and has been instrumental in shaping the policy of the bank. He was married April 18, 1834, to Miss Annie M. Lawrence, a New York lady. She died November 18, 1871. He has three children living: Mrs. Sarah L. Hudson, Mrs. Anna E. Greene, and James E. His son Caleb was killed at the battle of Lexington. Mr. Baker took no part in the war. He was once taken as a hostage at one time. Never owned slaves. His life is a proof that industry and indomitable pluck will succeed. Page 816

 

G. N. Jackson, P. O. Miami. Was born in Henry county, Kentucky, November 13, 1856, where he was raised on a farm and received a common school education. When he was fifteen years of age he moved with his parents to Louisville, Kentucky, where he lived until 1881, and then came to Miami, Missouri, and became one of Miami’s business men. For seven years he was engaged as salesman at Louisville. He was married October 12, 1880, to Miss H. V. Parkhurst, of Henry county, Kentucky. Page 816

 

Charles Pittmann, P. O., Miami. Was born in Prussia, September 24, 1827, where he received a German education, and a town raising. When he crossed the Atlantic, he came directly to Missouri, and settled in Saline county, on the place where he now lives. Mr. Pittman was married to Miss Elizabeth Meschide, May 24, 1853. They have had eight children, seven of whom are living, and one dead: Frederick, Christina, Joseph, Mary, Clemens, Anna and Charles. He is a member of the Catholic Church, as also his family. He was in the militia late in the war for about six weeks, and was then discharged. He gave his sons 150 acres of land, and has a farm of 220 acres left, situated in the bottom, about three miles below Laynesville, well improved, and incredibly fertile. He came to the United States without means, but by sturdy perseverance, industry and good management, has made an independent competence for his family. He lost in the war about one thousand dollars. Page 816

 

Marion Peterman, P. O., Miami. Was born in Berkeley county, Virginia, January 26, 1829. Was raised partly in the country, and partly in Martinsburg, where he received his education. In 1852 he came to this state and to Saline county, and has lived here ever since, except an interval for four years in Carroll county. He was married November 3, 1852, to Miss Sophia A. Williamson, and to them have been born four children: Margaret S., Jasper O., Emily M. and Sterling P., all living. He has been a member of the Methodist Church, South, since 1856, and has been church trustee and steward for a number of years. In 1864, he enlisted in the Confederate army, and served until the close of the war, 1865. After coming to Saline county, Mr. Peterman was employed as overseer for several years, until 1855, when he began farming for himself. Has a well improved farm of 340 acres, good buildings, and feeds cattle and sheep. Page 816-817

 

Joseph Audsley, P. O., Miami. Was born May 22, 1812, in Yorkshire, England. Was raised in the country and educated in the country schools. His father owned and operated a factory for the manufacture of woolen goods, which his son entered as soon as he quit school, and learned the trade of a worsted spinner. In 1847, he crossed the Atlantic, landing at New Orleans, and in the next year came on to Missouri, and settled at the mills, eight miles east of Miami, in Saline county, where he has lived ever since. In 1834 he was married to Miss Mary Hodgson, of England. To them were born Francis F. and Edward, both living. His wife died in 1838, and he married again, December, 1842, to Miss Margaret Whitehead, of England. They have five children: Ellen, William A., Thomas, Mary and Missouri Ann, living, and two dead. His second wife died in 1856, and in 1858, he married Miss Mary Brown, and to this union have been born Alice and Isabella, living and two dead. Mr. Audsley was a thorough-going Union man during the war, and, in politics, is now a republican. There being no one else qualified for the office, who would take the oath of loyalty, he became postmaster at Miami, from 1862 to 1870. He was constable of Miami, Jefferson and Marshall townships, until he refused to run. Has a well improved farm of 236 acres. Though a pronounced Union man in the war, and republican since, he has never been troubled because of his opinions, which is his own statement. Page 817

 

Robert C. Hanna, P. O., Miami. Son of Matthew and Fannie Z. Hanna. Was born in Mason county, West Virginia, May 10, 1840, where he was raised (mostly in town) and received his education. At sixteen years of age he commenced the cooper’s trade and followed it until 1872, employing from fifteen to twenty-five hands, the home demand for salt barrels consuming all he could manufacture. On the 23d of September, 1862, he was married to Miss Lucinda Long, and to them have been born ten children, five sons and five daughters: Job A., William V., Thomas J., Blanche E., Lou A., Callie May, Fannie K., Robert C., John Morgan and Mattie S., all living. He came to this county in 1872. Was justice of the peace in Virginia; served one year and resigned. Since coming to Saline he has been farming, three miles from Miami, and is a worthy citizen and business man. Page 817-818

 

William J. Foese, P. O., Miami. Was born in Powhattan county, Virginia, September 29, 1843, where he was raised on a farm, and received a good English education. In the spring of 1861 he enlisted in the Confederate army; was in the first battle of the war, excepting the bombardment of Fort Sumter, and was with Gen. Lee throughout the war, until his final surrender. Was wounded at Spottsylvania C. H., in the left shoulder. In one of the battles of the early part of the war, nearly all his company were killed, wounded, or captured. He was in company E., Fourth Virginia cavalry regiment, Stewart’s cavalry, Fitz Hugh Lee’s division. After the war he returned to his home, and remained on the farm until 1871, and then moved to Hickman county, Kentucky, where he farmed four years, and then came to Saline county, Missouri, in 1875, and has lived here since. He was married, June 6, 1866, to Miss A. C. Vaughan. They have two children living, Leonidas F. and James A., and one daughter dead. Both Mr. and Mrs. Foese are members of the M. E. Church South. He still owns his farm in Virginia. Page 818

 

Thomas J. Pate, farmer and teacher, P. O., Miami. Was born in Limestone county, Alabama, August 7, 1842. When he was yet an infant his father moved to Carroll county, Missouri, where the subject of this sketch was raised on a farm, and received a good English education, attending the Miami Institute about eight months. At the call of the governor in 1863 he entered the enrolled militia as fourth sergeant, his company being stationed at Carrollton. In 1864 he joined the Confederate army under Gen. Price, then in the state, and was in the battles of Independence, Westport, and Big Blue, where he was detailed to carry a dispatch to the front, was cut off from his command, and went to Saginaw, Michigan, and spent some months in the pineries there. He then returned as far as Quincy, Ills., where he remained over three months, and then came home. Soon after he reached home two discharged Federal soldiers entered his house, and one of them shot at him, the ball entering his left shoulder. He returned the fire, wounding the ex-soldier so that he died the following day. Mr. Pate then went to Mississippi, and engaged in teaching there for two years. He returned to Saline, and located near Miami, and in 1868 was married to Miss Fannie M. Thomas, and to them have been born four children, all living: Annie L., Ernest C., Edgar T., and Arthur J., and William H., dead. He then moved to Brownsville, and engaged in the transfer business until l876, then moved to Pettis county. In 1877 he moved to his present home near Miami, in this county, and expects to remain here the rest of his life. Is a member of the M. E. Church South, and a Knight of Pythias. Page 818

 

George B. Hudson, P. O., Miami. Was born in Edgar, Illinois, June 25, 1836, and when only about three years old his father moved to Lewis county, this state. In 1840, his father moved to Knox county, this state, where George B., being the oldest of a large family, remained, (his father having died) and carried on the farm until the war broke out in 1861. In August, 1861, he enlisted in company A, Colonel Green’s regiment, C. S. A., and was in the battles of Lexington, Pea Ridge, second Corinth, Iuka, Holly Springs, Prairie Grove and Helena, where he was captured, and taken to Alton, Illinois, for eight months, and then taken to Fort Delaware, where he was kept twelve months. The allowance was two ounces of meat, four ounces of bread per day; clothing scanty, and suffering great. In February, 1865, he was sent on parole to Richmond, Virginia, and on to Shreveport, Louisiana, where he got a furlough, and went to Ellis county, Texas, and remained there until October, 1865. He then returned home to Knox county. In March, 1866, he came to Saline county, where he has since been farming. He was married September 19, 1866 to Miss S. L. Baker, and to this union have been born six children, four living and two dead: Carrie M., Letitia, Annie B. and Samuel M. Has a fine farm of 120 acres, three and a half miles from Miami, good buildings and well cultivated. When he came back from the army he had just $5 left, and he has it yet. He is a member of the Baptist church. Has been in every southern state, except Florida. Page 819

 

Robert A. Henton, P. O., Miami. Was born on the 24th of December, 1834, in Augusta county, Virginia, where he was raised in the country, and received a good country school education. At the age of nineteen, he went to California, and engaged in mining for about two years, and then returned home to Virginia. About 1856, he moved to Lafayette county, Missouri, and settled for several years. In 1862, he moved to this county where he has since made his home, occupied in farming. In 1861, enlisted in the Confederate service, but was captured December 19, 1861, with Robinson’s recruits, at Blackwater, and was imprisoned in St. Louis, and Alton, Illinois, until April 1, 1862, when he took the oath of loyalty, and returned home, and adhered faithfully to the oath. Financially, he lost all he had by the war, about $5,000; but by his energy, attention to business, and careful management, has again secured a competence. Has a fine farm of 180 acres, forty of which is in timber. He was married in July, 1860 to Miss Martha McCulloch, a niece of Colonel Robert McCulloch, of Booneville. They have had eight children, two dead, and six living: Alexander, George McC., Nancy M., William, Susan H. aad Robbie. Mr. Henton is a Master-Mason. Page 819

 

Winson Rice, P. O., Miami. Mr. W. Rice is of English descent, a farmer, and was born in Northumberland county, Virginia, May 13, 1801, where he was raised on a farm. When quite young he commenced a sailor’s life, and ran on the Atlantic coast for several years, and while in New York, made a visit to Washington City, to see the president. In 1838 he came to Saline county, Missouri, has lived here ever since, and has seen many changes in the county. His is a member of the Baptist church, an organizing member at Miami. January, 15, 1828, he was married to Nancy P. M. McKay. They have nine children, six of whom are now living: Lucy V., Indiana, John A., Winnie A., William J., and Joseph M. Mrs. Rice died in 1877. He is still living, and in good health, lives with his son on the home place. During the war of 1812, he and his brothers and sisters had to lie in the woods; they used to dress him and send him to the neighbors for food. Joseph M. Rice who lives with his father at the home place, was born in Saline county, January 17, 1847; was raised and educated on the farm he now lives on, the best of his education having been received in war times. In October, 1877, he was married to Miss Fannie Nunn, no children. Mr. Rice has a small but well improved place. He is quite a young man, and has a promising future before him. Page 819-820

 

Edward S. Casebolt, P. O., Miami. Was born on a farm in Pocahontas county, Virginia, May 16, 1834. In 1844 he came with his parents to Saline county, Missouri, which has been his home ever since. His education was limited, as his father, at that time, was a poor man. He has always been a farmer, and now owns a handsome farm of 117 acres, well adapted to grain and stock-feeding, near Miami, upon which he now lives. He also owns a half interest in a farm of 680 acres in Carroll county, 300 acres of which is in cultivation. It is on his home farm that the relics of the mound builders have been found. In May, 1862, he was married to Miss Bettie Haynie, who died in 1865. To this union were born two children, both now dead. In August, 1868, he was married to Miss Hannah Bowen, and to them have been born eight children, one dead, and seven living: Branford B., William Lester, Georgie, R. E. Lee, Zachary Taylor, Minnie E. and Mary. In December, 1861, he joined Robinson’s regiment of Confederate recruits, and was captured with them at Blackwater, December 19, 1861, and was a prisoner at St. Louis and Alton, Illinois, until March, 1862, when he was released on oath, and returned home. In 1864 he enlisted in Shelby’s division in Gen. Price’s raid, and served to the end, 1865. (See soldier’s record.) He is a Master-Mason, and is also a member of the A. O. U. W. Page 820

 

R. W. Haynie, P. O., Miami. Was born in Northumberland county, Virginia, January 22, 1836, and in the July following his parents moved to Missouri, and settled in this county, three and one-half miles southwest of Miami, where the subject of this sketch was raised and educated at the Miami Institute. At the breaking out of the war he enlisted in the army. In December, 1861, was captured with Robinson’s regiment of recruits, and remained in prison in St. Louis and Alton, Illinois, about eight months, when he was exchanged at Vicksburg, and re-joined the Confederate army and served to the end of the war, 1865, being orderly sergeant at the close. (See soldiers’ record.) He was married to Miss Fannie A. Williams, January 22, 1868. They have no children of their own, but are raising four half-brothers and sisters. In 1866 he commenced to work at the carpenter’s trade, and followed it for four years, then engaged in the grocery business for about a year, and then changed his business to that of photographing, which he followed three years. He then settled on the farm where he now resides and has since been occupied in farming. The winter of 1858-9 he spent in Virginia, and the year 1860 in Colorado. He is a member of the M. E. Church, South, and is a Master Mason. Page 820-821

 

Philip S. Reynolds, P. O., Miami. An old and well known citizen of Saline, was born June 1, 1806, in Orange county, Virginia. At the death of his father, who was a wealthy citizen of Orange county, Virginia, Philip was made executor of the estate and guardian of the minor heirs. The settling up of the estate and the interests of the family, occupied him until 1836. He was married in 1832, to his second cousin, Miss. Elizabeth H. Reynolds, and in the fall of 1836, he started west and halted in Jefferson county, Kentucky, where he remained until 1842. Here his wife died, and here also, he was again married, to Miss Julia Chrisler. Dissatisfied with the country, he moved to Missouri in 1842, and remained about a year in Glasgow, Howard county. In 1843 he crossed the river at Glasgow, and settled in the Big Bottom, in Saline county. The flood of 1844 drove him out of the bottom, and he purchased a farm near the Pinnacles. He suffered so much from sickness during the following year, that he abandoned the vicinity of the Pinnacles and bought the farm upon which he lives at present. In this year, 1845, he began to purchase his supplies from John P. Scot, and to employ Dr. Dunlap as his family physician, which he has continued ever since. In 1872 his second wife died, and in 1875 he married his present wife, Miss Winnie A. Rice. Mr. Reynolds has raised seven children, four sons and three daughters, one of whom was born to his first wife, and six to his second. His present wife has no children. In his twenty-sixth year, while yet in Virginia, he joined the Baptist church, and is now the oldest member of the Miami congregation. His has been the life of a God-fearing Christian, for these many years, and always, a hard-working farmer, he has never, knowingly, wronged any man. In the war he did not enter the army on either side, though his sympathies were with the south. His property suffered greatly, having little, except his land, left at the end, but by industry and good management, he has replaced his losses. His ancestry came to America, Virginia, from Scotland, his grandfather, Joseph, being an old revolutionary soldier. His father, Washington Reynolds, one of two sons, married Miss Catherine Swan, of the well known, Maryland family, and raised a family of eight sons and one daughter, all of the highest respectability. Of these, Joseph and William yet reside in Virginia: Washington, In Louisville, Kentucky; Thomas M. S., in Nebraska; Charles D., and Benjamin F., in California; and Lucy, wife of Samuel Douglass, in Henderson, Texas. Mr. Reynolds has been a great hunter, and a splendid shot in his day. Page 821-822

 

Benjamin F. Lemmon, P. O., Miami. Is a son of Benj. F. and Emily Lemmon (Chandler), of Kentucky, and was born in Harrison county, Kentucky, September 25, 1831, where he was raised and educated in the country. At eighteen years of age he moved to Grant county, Kentucky, and from there to Missouri in February, 1876, and located one mile and a half south of Miami. He was married February 23, 1854, to Miss Elizabeth McDowell, and to this union were born four children: Millard F., Lola G., William F., and Robert H., all living, and Bettie E., dead. Mrs. Lemmon died June 16, 1871, and Mr. Lemmon was again married, March 13, 1873, to Mrs. Sarah E. Davis, whose maiden name was Berry, No Children. He has an excellent farm of 145 acres, all in cultivation, with good buildings, and he devotes himself to farming and stock-feeding. Directly and indirectly, the war cost him about $1,000. Page 822

 

Giles R. McDaniel, P. O., Miami. Was born in Booneville, Missouri, December 20, 1842. When but two years old, his father moved to Saline county, where he was raised on a farm, and received a good English education. He entered William Jewell College; but had only been there one year when the war broke out, and he volunteered, August, 1861, in the southern army, and continued in the service until the close, in 1865. First volunteered in the Missouri state guards. When discharged at the end of his six months, he enlisted in the Confederate army, Capt. Ruxton’s company, and was captured with Robinson’s regiment of recruits at Blackwater, December 19, 1861, and imprisoned in the old McDowell College, St. Louis. In the next month, January, 1862, he escaped from the prison, passing the sentry in the disguise of a negro, and spent the night in one of the hotels. Early the next morning he started out on foot, but soon encountered the picket. As soon as he came to the sentry, he stopped, and remarked to his servant (who was with him) “George, we can’t get any ice out of the river here, and we might as well go back!” They therefore turned back toward the city, but in a short time met a lost of cows going out to the common to graze, so they fell in with them and thus passed the picket. They walked all day up the river, but were recaptured that same evening. From some cause, the officer who had captured them, called Giles a “liar.” He replied, “you are neither a gentleman for a brave man, you have two revolvers, and I propose that we make this personal, and settle it with them.” The officer took the proposition in good part, and bringing out a supply of old Bourbon, proposed that, instead of fighting, they should drink and be friends. McDaniel agreed. With the idea of escape in his mind, he then encouraged the drinking, but only pretending to drink himself. By daylight, the whole of his guard, officer and men, were too drunk to take any notice of him. So he bade them adieu; and that is the last he ever saw of them. After going a short distance, he met an Irishman that had seen him the night before. The Irishman accused him of being the man, he denied it, until the lie passed, and the Irishman started for McDaniel. Mac. had no arms, but put his hand in his pocket, as if he had, and ordered him to halt, or he would shoot him. The Irishman was bluffed, and a recapture avoided. He now moved on, but found it impossible to get rid of the Irishman, who now pretended to be his friend. The Irishman finally agreed to ferry him across the river. After they got in the skiff and out a little way from the shore, McDaniel again put his hand in his pocket, and notified the Irishman that unless he landed him safely and quietly on the Illinois shore, he would be shot through the head. The Celt rowed for dear life, made a safe landing in Illinois and received his pay and returned. The rest was easy, and except that the weather and roads were bad, he had little trouble in reaching home. But the Federal soldiers soon heard of his return, and endeavored to capture him. He dodged them, and went to Louisville, Kentucky, then around to Richmond, Virginia, crossing the Chesapeake bay in a canoe, where it was twenty miles wide. From Richmond he was passed on to Little Rock, Arkansas, and reported to Gen. Price. Mr. McDaniel was married February 12, 1867, to Miss Laura V. Garnett, and to them have been born five children, all living: Mattie D., Minnie L, Ethel F., Chapman A., and Bessie R. He is a member of the Baptist Church and A. O. U. W. Page 822-823

 

William Surbaugh, deceased. One of the early settlers of Saline county; was born in Greenbriar county, Virginia, November 12, 1804, and was raised and educated, and married there to Miss Hannah Hisey. They had twelve children, six of them now dead, and six living, viz: Ann E., Charles W., Henry C., Joseph T., John L, and Mitchell B. In 1839 he moved to Missouri, and settled on a farm near Miami, in Saline county. From this place there is a fine view of the surrounding country, and of the stirring little city of Miami, and here Mr. Surbaugh lived until his death, which occurred September 27, 1878. He was mourned by a large circle of relatives and friends. His estimable lady still survives him, and, in fair health, is living at the old homestead with her son, John L. Surbaugh, the next to the youngest son, who is still unmarried, and carries on the home farm. Both the old folks have been connected with the Baptist Church for over thirty years. Notwithstanding that the war lost Mr. Surbaugh fully $15,000, he left a fine estate. Page 823-824

 

Daniel T. Guthrey, deceased. One of the early settlers of Saline county, was born in Buckingham county, Virginia, July 17, 1817, where he was raised in the country, on a farm, and received a good English education. In 1837 he came to Saline county, Missouri, and was employed by Col. John Brown, as overseer, which position he occupied for a number of years, and then commenced farming for himself. He was married August 5, 1840, to Miss Harriet M. Brown, daughter of Col. John Brown. They have nine children living, (and two, Addie, and James E., dead), viz John W., Mrs. Annie M. Jeter, Charles P., Arthur M., Ida R., Nova H., Emma B., Lucy L., and Travis S. Mrs. Guthrey died November 12, 1876, and February 23, 1880, he was laid by her side, awaiting the resurrection of the just. Arthur M. Guthrey, son of Daniel T. Guthrey, was born in Texas, while his parents were there on a trip for their health, March 10, 1853. He was raised on his father’s farm in this county, where he was principally educated, spending one year at Kirksville, Missouri. He has charge of his father’s affairs, settling up the estate, and, with his two brothers and three sisters, is managing the farm of 480 acres, keeping the family together. He is feeding sixty-seven head of fat cattle, and about eighty-seven head of stock cattle. He is a member of the Methodist Church, South, and is yet unmarried. He is a managing and enterprising young man, and is sure to succeed. Page 824

 

William H. Pate, Sr. P. O. Miami. Was born in Williamson county, Tennessee, September 26, 1816, his father being a cotton planter there; and when William was but nine or ten years old his father moved to Lauderdale county, Alabama, where he entered more largely into the growing of cotton. He (William) received a good English education. In 1836 he volunteered as a private in the Florida war, and was detailed to the very hazardous employment of carrying the mail. In 1837 he began the trade of blacksmith and gunsmith, which he followed until 1842. He then moved to Carroll county, Missouri, and located on a farm four miles west of De Witt, and remained there until 1865, when he moved to a farm in this county, and has since been engaged in farming and stock-feeding. On the 21st of October, 1841, he was married to Miss Belinda Watson, of Alabama; and to them have been born seven children, three—Thomas J., William Henry, and Andrew J.,--now living, and four, two daughters and two sons, dead. Mrs. Pate died in 1857; and March 20, 1861, he was married the second time, to Mrs. Mary D. Stephenson, widow of Edward Stephenson, by whom she had one son, William D. Stephenson. Her maiden name was Moberly, Mr. Pate was a constitutional man in the great excitement of 1860. He believed slavery to wrong per se, but yet did not believe it right to take the slaves from their masters without paying for them, after the law had made them property. He was too old for the army when the war broke out, and he endeavored to hold a neutral position; this, however, only made him the common target for both factions, and he was persecuted accordingly. His losses were large. He had a fine farm of 320 acres, well improved, but it was stripped down to the bare land; and he had to dispose of his land to get bread. Through energy, perseverance and management, he has, in a great measure, recuperated; has given his sons 268 acres of land, and has now a well-improved place of 120 acres. Mr. Pate keeps well up with the times, and has been a reader of the St. Louis Republican for thirty-eight years. Page 824-825

 

Captain William S. Bates, farmer and joiner, P. O., Miami. Son of William S. and Huldah B. Bates, (nee Parrish), was born in Goochland county, Virginia, September 16, 1817, and at the age of seven years came with his father and family to Marion county, Missouri. Soon after their arrival in Marion county, the new county of Lewis was organized, and without any further move they found themselves located in Lewis county, where Capt. William was raised on a farm. The Indians (Sacs) were still numerous there at that day, and the Indian children were his daily companions. His education was obtained in the pioneer style, and he learned to speak the Indian language. At the age of eighteen he learned the trade of house joiner, and worked at it until 1848, combined with cabinet making, and had a farm southwest of LaGrange. In 1856 he moved to this county, and located on the farm where he has lived to the present time, engaged in farming. In April, 1845, he was married to Miss Mary E. Gash, daughter of Martin and Mary Gash, of Marion county, Missouri. She died July 26, 1872, leaving five children: Mrs. Mary R. Ish, William M., Henry M., Edward J., and Elizabeth H., all living, and two dead. In July, 1846, he fell from a scaffold and broke his left ankle, and as a consequence has never since been able to do much walking—cannot walk five consecutive miles. His father was well-to-do until he was broken up by having to pay a number of security debts. From his grandfather he received $862, and at his marriage his wife received $1,500, and by economy and industry he had accumulated a competency when the war broke out, which caused him heavy losses. His energy and push have again sustained him, however, and he has now a splendid farm of 235 acres (and fifty acres of timber), admirably improved. At the beginning of the war he was worth about $25,000. His great-grandfather, James Bates, came from New England to Virginia, and there married Mrs. Duncombe, and to them were born five sons. His grandfather, also James Bates, married Mahethalum Sergeant, to whom were born four sons and three daughters. His grand-mother’s name (mother’s side) was Massey, and he is descendant from two of the best families of Virginia. During the war he opposed secession, but was in sympathy with the south. Page 825-826

 

John G. Guthrey, capitalist, P. O., Miami. Was born in Cumberland county, Virginia, May 2, 1810, and is of German descent. He was mostly reared on a farm in Cumberland county, being educated in the country schools of the period, one of his teachers having formerly been private secretary of Gen. Andrew Jackson. At the age of nineteen he entered a country store as clerk, in Stony Point mills, serving an apprenticeship of five years. He then came to Missouri, and was in the west about five years, and visited Saline county in 1835 and ’36 during a western trip. He then settled down to merchandising in Petersburg, Virginia, where he dealt largely in tobacco and making money largely. During the visit to New York in 1861, after the battle of Bull Run, he was seized as a southern sympathizer and thrown into Fort Lafayette, and all his personal property, to the amount of $140,000 in bonds and currency taken from him. After six months in prison he was released for want of evidence, and immediately brought suit for his property, which he recovered. He then established a tobacco factory in Brooklyn, New York, which he carried on to the end of the war, and out of which he cleared about $100,000. He then entered a banker’s and brokers’ establishment on Wall street, New York, under the firm name of Harvey & Guthrey, which he aided in conducting until 1867, when he sold out to his partner. Having already invested about $100,000 in real estate in Saline county, in 1868, he removed with his family to Miami, where he has since resided, and which he has greatly aided in building up and improving. While doing business in Brooklyn he married Miss E. S. Hawkins, daughter of Joseph Hawkins, of Yonkers, New York, by whom he has a family of seven children. He is and has long been a member of the Episcopal Church, as are nearly all his family. Mr. Guthrey is of Scotch-Irish descent, and his ancestors came to America from the north of Ireland. He is president of the Miami Saving’s Bank, and is also a farmer. Two of his brothers, James and Daniel, are also residents of Saline county, and have been for many years. Page 826

 

Curtis W. Pendleton, P. O., Miami. Mr. C. W. Pendleton was born in Todd county, Kentucky, February 15, 1826, and is a relative of Rev. J. M. Pendleton, the noted Baptist minister. He lived with his father on a farm in Kentucky until he was ten years old, when his father moved to Boone county, Missouri, where he died eighteen months afterward. At the age of sixteen Curtis began to learn the trade of harness and saddle making, in Fayette, Howard county, Missouri, and remained there five years. At the end of this time he volunteered as a teamster in the Mexican war, being out one year. In September, 1849, he moved to Miami, Missouri, and commenced in business. In 1861 he volunteered in Robinson’s command, and was captured, with the command, the second day out, on the Blackwater. Was kept prisoner three months, when he was released, on taking the oath. He then went to St. Louis and entered a wholesale saddle house as a salesman, where he remained two years. In July, 1865, he returned to his business in Miami, where he has remained ever since. Besides three years trade, he lost by the war $4,000, and returned to Miami, in 1865 broke. He went to work like the man he is, and at the present time carries a fine stock of goods in his line, besides a remunerative trade. Owns his business house and residence. In May, 1850, he married Miss Mary A. Hicklin. Their children are Mrs. Emma Armstrong, of St. Louis, and Annie L., both living, and three dead. They have also an adopted daughter, Lillie. He has been a member of the Baptist Church since 1844, and was one of the organizing members of that church at Miami. Is a deacon of the church. He is a Sunday school man; is a member of the Good Templar order, and also a member of the city government. Page 826-827

 

John M. Casebolt, P. O., Miami. Was born in Miami township on the 5th of March, 1856, and was raised on the farm. After the usual schooling of country boys, he finished his education at the Kirksville state normal school. After some experience in teaching, he commenced in business in Miami just two years ago, and is one of the enterprising business men of that place. On the 25th of December, 1878, he was married to Miss Laura Parcell, of Kirksville, Mo., having one child: Effie. He is a member of the Christian Church, and is secretary and treasurer of the Sunday school. Page 827

 

Henry Mertens, P. O., Miami. Was born in Prussia, near Cologne, August 19, 1823, where he was raised and educated in the country. In 1848, at the age of twenty-five, he crossed the Atlantic, landing at New Orleans. The voyage was long and tedious, he being on the ocean sixty days. From New Orleans he went direct to St. Louis, where he remained one year, thence to Glasgow, Missouri, where he also remained about one year. He then came on to Miami, Missouri, laboring at various kinds of work, burning lime kilns, running a saw mill, etc. On the day President Lincoln was assassinated, April, 1865, he commenced the drug trade, and now carries a fine stock of drugs, etc. Of course the war brought him both trouble and loss, as it did nearly all. At its close he just had $428, with which to do business, and to support a family. Now he has a handsome residence, a large brick business house, besides his stock, and a farm in Carroll county, Missouri, and a stockholder in the Miami Savings Bank. In 1855 he was married to Miss Margaret Smith of Booneville, and to them have been born eleven children, nine of which are now living, and eight of these are daughters. He is a member of the German Lutheran Church, is a chapter member of A. F. & A. M., and encampment member of I. O. O. F., and has been a member of the city council. From exposure and overheating in trying to save the property of others at a warehouse fire, he almost lost his voice, and for years could not speak above a whisper, but is now pretty well restored. He learned to read English while working for John P. Scott, in 1852. He is an able financier. Page 827-828

 

John F. Carr, merchant, P. O., Miami. Was born in Adams county, Illinois, July 3, 1853. He was raised on a farm, receiving his education mostly from public schools, and completing it in Lafayette College, Howard county, Missouri. He came to Saline county, in 1868, where he has since made his home. In March, 1874, he married Miss Rebecca Williams. Four children: Annie P., Nellie F., William F. and James F., have been born to them all, except James, are living, who is dead. Mr. Carr is a member of the Christian Church, as is his wife also. He is an earnest Sunday school man. He is the proprietor of the only agricultural implement house in Miami, and carried a large and complete stock of agricultural implements. Page 828

 

Dr. Daniel F. Bell, physician and surgeon, P. O., Miami. Dr. Bell was born in what is now Jefferson county, West Virginia, December 1, 1839. His father was engaged in farming and milling, and hence he was raised in the country. He was educated at a private school. In 1861 he enlisted in the 12th Virginia cavalry, as a private, and served in Virginia during the war. He went through the war from Harper’s Ferry, at the beginning, to the surrender at Appomattox court house, and participated in all the great battles of the Virginia campaigns. In June, 1863, he was wounded in the left arm in a charge at Brandy Station, which resulted in an excision of the elbow joint. He was assistant provost marshal at various points. After the war he entered the medical department of the University of Virginia and took one term, then entered the same department of the University of Maryland, and graduated from that institution in 1867. He came immediately to Miami, Saline county, Missouri, and in 1869 commenced the practice of his profession, in which he has built up a large and paying practice. He has been very successful with various stubborn diseases and forms of disease. In May, 1875, Dr. Bell was married to Miss Emma, daughter of John C. Scott, to whom has been born one child, Mattie. He is a member of the Baptist Church, is a Royal Arch Mason, and is high priest at present of the Miami chapter, is also a member of the A. O. U. W. As the war had destroyed all his property, Dr. Bell came to Miami with nothing but his brain and his profession, and has won a competency for himself and family. Page 828

 

John P. Scott, merchant, P. O., Miami. Mr. John P. Scott, son of Olley and Mary Scott, was born in Salem, Indiana, July 24, 1819. His parents died in 1827, and from that time he was reared to manhood by Dr. Burr Bradley, of Indiana. He was educated at the seminary of his native town. He did not remain as long at school as was his wish, in consequence of the necessity of making his own living. He served as apprentice for five years in a trading and manufacturing company, and then turned his eyes to the West as opening a more inviting field to a young man. In August, 1841, he landed at Booneville, Missouri, entered the store of S. P. Beck as a clerk, and remained with them two years. A business connection was about this time formed between himself and Judge R. E. McDaniel, and continued one year longer in Booneville. In April, 1844, in connection with Judge McDaniel, he came to Saline county, and established a store in Miami, under the firm name of McDaniel & Scott. In March, 1844, he was married to Miss Elvira A. Weir, daughter of James and Jane Weir, who had formerly lived in Washington county, Indiana, but who had since removed to Iowa. The couple arrived in Miami in April, 1844, and have lived there ever since. In 1847 Mr. Scott dissolved his connection with McDaniel and established the “cash and barter store,” which he has conducted to the present time. During the throes of the civil war, his business suffered a severe check in common with so many others, and from 1863 to 1865 he was compelled to suspend business, in consequence of the impossibility of meeting his liabilities in the east. But when the cruel war was over he again established himself in business at the old stand, and won back his credit in the east. A New York merchant, speaking of Mr. Scott, is reported to have said that he was the only Missouri country merchant that he knew of who had paid dollar for dollar the debts contracted by him during the war. Mr. Scott is the oldest merchant in Miami, and for many years has been a prominent business factor in the commercial history of Saline county. Two daughters, Mrs. Eva W. Miller and Miss Hebe, still living, have blessed his wedded life. Page 829

 

Jonas A. Saufley, merchant, P. O., Miami. The subject of this sketch was born in Virginia, in 1820. In 1840, at the age of twenty, in company with another young man, Mr. James Lynn, he came to Missouri, and landed in Miami in the fall of that year, and determined at once to make Saline county his future home. For some years he lived with Col. John Brown, on his farm six miles south of Miami, dividing his time between assisting on the farm and in hunting. The entire county, at that time, abounded in game, and many a splendid buck has fallen before the unerring aim of Mr. Saufley in his sporting days. In the year 1847, and the twenty-seventh year of his age, Mr. Saufley married Miss Martha J. Brown, daughter of William Brown, one of the old settlers of the county. Soon after his marriage, Mr. Saufley entered the mercantile business, but after three years, he sold off his stock, and settled on a farm, six miles southwest of Miami, raw prairie. He increased this farm in a few years, from 160 acres of raw prairie land, to 600 acres of finely cultivated land, which he still owns. In 1862 he returned to Miami, and in 1865, begun the business of commission merchant, to which he soon added a stock of general merchandise, in which he is now engaged. During the war he was robbed several times, and lost heavily in slave property, yet by dint of persevering industry and economy, he has accumulated a handsome fortune. Mr. Saufley has raised a fine family of two sons and five daughters, of whom the eldest married A. R. Edmonds, druggist of Miami. The second daughter is the wife of Geo. Hahn, dry goods merchant of Miami. Page 829-830

 

Dr. Marshall A. Brown, P. O., Miami. The subject of this sketch was born in Albemarle county, Virginia, July 24, 1833, and is the son of Edmond and Theodosia Brown. When about three years old his father moved from the old dominion to Saline county, Missouri, and settled on a farm near the present town of Arrow Rock. In 1848, he moved to near Miami. The doctor was raised on a farm. When about seventeen years old he entered a store in Miami, as clerk. In a year or so he became partner in a drug store and continued in the trade until 1859, reading medicine during his leisure hours. In the spring of 1860, he attended the medical department of the University of Virginia, and in the spring of 1861, graduated from the Jefferson Medical College, of Philadelphia. He returned to Miami, intending there to enter on the practice of his profession, but found the county plunged in the horrors of civil war. Dr. Brown enlisted on the Confederate side, at first, in the Missouri state guard, which later became a part of the Confederate army. He was made regimental surgeon, with the rank of major of cavalry, and remained with the army until the close of the war, in the spring of 1865. Returning to Miami in the summer of 1865, he began the practice of medicine, in connection with the drug trade, and continued until 1872, when he quit practice, in consequence of declining health, and devoted his whole attention to the store, which business he still continues. In April, 1871, Dr. Brown was married to Miss Mattie Waters, of Boone county, Missouri, and to them were born Edmond and Gertrude, both living. Mrs. Brown died in January, 1876. Dr. Brown is a Royal Arch member of the A. F. & A. M., and has represented his chapter in the Grand Chapter. He is a great lover of hunting, and is one of the keenest sportsmen in the country, and devotes a large portion of his time to this healthy and manly exercise. He is also passionately devoted to music, and delights beyond measure in the “harmony of sweet sounds.” Page 830

 

Rev. Wm. M. Bell. The Rev. Wm. M. Bell was born in Richmond County, Virginia, July 23, 1823, and is a son of Thomas V. and Elizabeth Bell. His parents died when he was but two years old, leaving him to the care of friends, who reared him in the country until 1837, when, at the age of fourteen, he came to Missouri. In 1838 he entered one of the schools at Booneville, Missouri. In 1839 he was clerk in a dry goods store in Clinton, Missouri, and worked for several firms in this capacity. In the year 1844 he was married to Mary N., daughter of Judge R. E. McDaniel, of Saline county, Missouri, and settled five miles east of Miami, on a farm; and in the autumn of 1846, he united with the Baptist Church, at Bethel, in Saline county. He soon began to speak in public after entering the church, and in 1848 was licensed by the Bethel Church to preach, and in 1850 he was ordained. Very soon after his ordination he was called to the pastoral charge of the First Baptist Church in Miami, and in a short time, also to the pastoral charge of the Bethel Church, remaining pastor of these two churches until 1858. In 1858 he resigned his pastoral care, and became agent for the board of ministerial education of the William Jewel College, and in five month raised $10,000 in cash and bonds. Constituted a church in Arrow Rock, in 1851. Was for some years pastor of Good Hope Church. In 1860, assisted by A. P. Williams, he constituted the Union Church, and became its pastor, and, with brief intervals, has continued its pastor to the present day. Was three years pastor of the church in Marshall, and for a short period pastor of the Fish Creek Church. Page 820-831

 

Dr. J. N. Dunlap, physician and surgeon, P. O., Miami. Dr. Dunlap was born on the 29th of July, 1822, in Staunton, Augusta county, Virginia, and is the son of John and Isabella A. Dunlap. He was mostly reared in the town, and his education received in the Staunton academy. At the age of sixteen he began to read medicine in a private office, where he continued until twenty years of age, when he entered the medical department of the university of Virginia, from which he graduated at the completion of his course. In 1843 he commenced the practice of medicine in Greenbriar county, Virginia; but in October, 1844, he removed to Miami, Saline county, Missouri, where he began the practice of his profession. At the breaking out of the war with Mexico in 1846, he volunteered in company K., Second regiment, Missouri volunteers, and was present at the siege of Taos, and in several skirmishes in New Mexico. In March, 1847, he was appointed assistant surgeon of the regiment, which position he filled until honorably discharged at Fort Leavenworth, October, 1847. He then returned to Miami, and resumed his practice, and remained there until 1857, when he moved to Rockport, Atchison county, Missouri, and tried merchandising, remaining there about fifteen months, when he returned to Miami, a poorer but a wiser man. He resumed his practice again, and continued there until 1860, when he removed to Arrow Rock, in this county, to practice medicine, and continued there until 1864, when he became tired of being between two fires, and struck out for Canada. Returned in March, 1865 to Saline county, and resumed his profession, first in Arrow Rock, and later in Miami where he has remained ever since. The results of the war left him once more bankrupt, but by hard work and good management, he has again accumulated a fair competency. During all his life he has enjoyed the confidence of the people around him, and has always been very successful in the practice of his profession. In May, 1850, he was married to Miss Sarah M. Brown, and to this union were born: Sarah J., Edmund J. and John A. His wife died June, 1857. His second wife, Miss Maria A. Mitchell, is still living. Mary M., William E., Arthur H. and Robert R., are fruit of his last marriage. The doctor is a great reader, and of late years has turned his attention to geology, botany, and archaeology, and has a fine cabinet of geological specimens. Page 821-832

 

Henry Ferril, pioneer. This early pioneer was one of the first settlers in the county of Saline. He was born in Kentucky, January 27, 1794, and lived there until he had reached the age of fourteen, when in 1808, he moved to Missouri, and to Saline county in 1818. He settled in the Miami bottom, two miles from Miami. January 28, 1819, he married Martha Jones. He established the Miami ferry, and located the present town of Miami, and was its first president. Died in 1854. Quite a number of his descendants are now living in Saline county. Page 832

 

Judge Jesse J. Ferril, cabinet maker. Is the oldest son of Henry and Martha Ferril, and was born near Miami, January 1, 1822. He was raised on the farm until the age of fourteen, when he took charge of his father’s ferry, remaining in charge until he was twenty-one years of age. Was educated in the subscription schools of his neighborhood. While working at the ferry during, the winter months, he learned the trade of wheelwright, and in 1845 opened a shop and worked at his trade, and cabinet making. Also burnt brick kilns during the summer seasons. In early days he made spinning-wheels, wooded sausage-grinders, and broom-corn headers, and to-day owns the only cabinet shop in Miami. He was married, October 15, 1857, to Miss Mary C. E. Goode, of Franklin county, Missouri. During the war he was a member of the state militia, and at the end of three months, was elected county judge, and thereafter excused from military duty. He held the office from 1862 to 1866. He has been notary public for fourteen years, and mayor of the town of Miami ever since 1866. He has been a member of the Board of Education of his town for three years past, and has always been earnest and liberal in educational matters. Lost heavily by security debts which he was compelled to pay, on account of the disasters of the war. Owns several lots in town, besides his residence and business house. Page 832

 

August Royer, Jr., P. O., Miami. Is the son of August and Elizabeth Royer, and was born in St. Louis, June 4, 1849. When August was about two years of age, his father moved to Miami, in Saline county, Missouri, there located in business, and there the subject of this sketch was reared, and educated in the Miami academy. In June, 1874, August was married to Miss Josephine Dill, and to this union were born, Gussie and Elizabeth, both living. Mrs. Royer died February 3d, 1880. August Royer is a member of the Episcopal Church, is a Master Mason, and a member of the I. O. O. F., and is also a member of the Good Templars. Mr. Royer was raised to his business, and is one of the live men of Miami, enjoys the confidence of the citizens, and has a large trade. He believes in using printer’s ink, as do all successful business men, and has been largely successful in his business. He advertises extensively, but with great judgment, changing his advertisements every week, and advertising has paid him well, as it always does when judiciously applied. Mr. Royer is a member of the city council of Miami, and is also a director of the Saline county A. and M. association. Page 832-833

 

Luther J. Hamner, banker, P. O., Miami. Is the cashier of the Miami Savings Bank, in Miami, Saline county, Missouri. He was born in Buckingham county, Virginia, April 3, 1844, where he was reared on a plantation. At the age of sixteen, he entered the University of Virginia, but in 1862, when but seventeen years of age, he volunteered in the southern army, and was made second lieutenant in company I, 49th regiment Virginia infantry, of which regiment ex-Governor Billy Smith was colonel. In 1863 he was promoted to first lieutenant, and was acting adjutant of the regiment the last two years of the war. He was wounded in the neck at Fair Oaks, April, 1862, and at Hatch’s Run in February, 1865, in both thighs. He was in the seven days fight around Richmond, at Williamsburg, and at all the subsequent battles of Lee, Jackson, and Early, except Antietam, and was at the final surrender at Appomattox court house. After the war closed, he moved, first to Union county, Kentucky, where he taught school for eighteen months, and then moved to Saline county, Missouri, and located in Miami. Soon after, he entered the private bank of James H. Eakin, as clerk. In eighteen months he became a partner with Mr. Eakin, and remained so until the bank changed hands, and was reorganized in 1873, becoming the Miami Savings Bank, when he was elected cashier, and has retained that position ever since. In December, 1873, he married Miss Bettie O’Bannon, and to them has been born, Sallie C., and twins, Lizzie S., and Riva Sue. Is a chapter member of A. F. & A. M., and has been twice master of the lodge. Page 833

 

William H. Wheeler, P. O., Miami. The subject of this sketch is a son of one of the early settlers of this county, and was born in Miami township, December 23, 1839, and was educated at the Miami academy, but did not graduate, as the war came on and discontinued the school. In June, 1861, he enlisted in the Missouri state guards, company A, 2nd regiment, Parson’s division, as second sergeant, and was discharged at the end of six months. He was at the battle of Lexington, Missouri. In October, 1864, he enlisted in company H, Slayback’s regiment, as orderly, and remained to the end of the war. Was in all the battles of the last invasion of Missouri by Price’s army, besides many hard marches and running fights. The provision supply of the army was very meager, and for weeks he only ate bread once, living on beef, horse flesh, mule steak, roasting ears, elm bark, etc. Returned to Saline at the end of the war, and engaged in farming first then teaching. Was principal of the Miami public schools two years. In 1880 he was elected to a position in the Miami Savings Bank, of which he is now a director, and secretary of the bank, and is devoting his whole time to the banking business. Mr. Wheeler was married January 23, 1867, to Miss Jennie E. Fishback; no children. He has been a member of the Baptist Church ever since 1855, and is church clerk and one of the deacons. He has held the office of justice of the peace two years, and has never had one of his decisions reversed by a higher court. Page 833-834

 

Henry Boyer, P. O., Miami. Was born in Lexington, Kentucky, on the 6th of February, 1838. When quite small, his parents moved to Frankfort, Kentucky, where he was raised and educated. He took a theological course under Rev. John N. Norton, D. D., with a view of entering the Episcopal ministry. His father was a prominent merchant in Frankfort, Kentucky, for a number of years, and died in 1846. In the spring of 1857 Henry entered the dry goods house of W. C. Charles, of Frankfort, Kentucky, as a salesman. In the autumn of 1860 he moved to Marshall, Saline county, Missouri, and in connections with W. R. Samuel, established a dry goods house under the firm name of Boyer & Samuel. He continued there until driven away in 1864. Losing pretty much all his property by the war, he returned to Kentucky, and located in the town of Milton. In the fall of 1865 he returned to Saline county, and settled in Miami, and there began again the dry goods business. In 1866 he formed a co-partnership with Judge R. E. McDaniel. At the death of Judge McDaniel, Mr. Boyer bought out the interest of the heirs, and continued business alone, until February of the present year, 1881, when he sold out and retired, on account of failing health, having built up a heavy trade, some years reaching as high as $60,000. He stood at the head of the dry goods business in Miami, if not in the county, and has accumulated a handsome fortune. On the 30th of November, 1860, he married Miss Hettie Fall, daughter of Dr. James S. Fall, of New Orleans. Mr. Boyer has four living children: Harry, Nettie, George and Emma. He is a prominent member of the Baptist Church, and is also superintendent of the Sunday school. He is a member of A. O. U. W., and has also been connected with the city government and school board. Page 834-835

 

Jacob Burns, Mr. Burns, of the firm of Burns & Son, Miami, Missouri, was born in Switzerland, May 15, 1832. When Jacob was only nine months old, his parents came to America, and settled in Lancaster, Ohio. In 1844, they moved to Brunswick, Missouri, and in 1854, located at Miami in Saline county. He never had but six weeks schooling, but has employed his leisure hours in study. On the 30th of March, 1856, he was married to Miss Ruth A. Clemmens, by whom he has five children living, and one dead: M. L., Jesse A., Edith B., Wilber E. and Iowa. Mrs. Burns died in December, 1873; he was married again May, 1874, to Miss Mary S. Hall. Mr. Burns is a member of the M. E. Church, South, and of I. O. O. F. In 1864, he volunteered in Jo. Shelby’s command, and was afterwards transferred to another command, and was out nine months. At twenty years of age he begun the trade of blacksmith and followed it three years. He then tried the tinner’s trade, which he has followed ever since. The war left him nearly ruined, but he has now got his affairs in good shape. Page 835

 

Hon. B. F. McDaniel, attorney at law, P. O., Miami. Was born July 12, 1849, in Miami township, Saline county, Missouri, and was reared on his fathers farm. The early part of his education was received in subscription schools. He was a matriculant in Huntsville College in 1864, when he enlisted, at the age of fifteen, in Price’s Confederate army, then passing through the state. He served until April, 1865, when he was transferred to the navy, but was captured near New Orleans while running the blockade, and was a prisoner until June, 1865, when he was released on parole, and returned to Saline county. He returned to Huntsville College for one term, and afterwards attended the Baptist College, Georgetown, Kentucky. In the winter of 1868, he taught school, and in 1870, attended the University of Virginia, and graduated in the law department of that renowned institution. Returning to Saline county he commenced the practice of law in the town of Miami. In 1876, he was elected by his (the second) district a representative in the state legislature, to which office he was re-elected in 1878. In the Democratic congressional convention of the eleventh district, 1880, he received the solid vote of Saline county for nomination, but was beaten by General Clark. Mr. McDaniel was married August 30, 1871, to Martha W. Brown, of Miami. In 1879, was chairman of the house committee on revision, and one of the two members of the house that revised the statutes of the state. Page 835

 

Capt. George Burruss, of Burruss Bros. P. O., Miami. Capt. Burruss is a sailor, and was born in San Antonia, Texas, April 19, 1850, where he was raised on a ranch. At the age of seventeen, he came north with stock, first ponies, which they retailed in Missouri, Iowa and Illinois, and then cattle, which they fed and shipped. He continued in this business for three years. They then bought the ferry at Miami, Missouri, 1868, and he went on the ferryboat as engineer. In 1870, he was made master, or captain, which position he occupied until 1877, when he was chosen captain of the A. C. Bird, and commanded her until she sunk in 1880. Capt. Burruss is a chapter member of A. F. & A. M., and also a member of A. O. U. W. He is a single man, and may need a “mate” on his next trip. He is a modest and deserving gentleman. Page 835-836

 

Dr. Geo. G. Duggins, physician and surgeon, P. O., Miami. Dr. G. G. Duggins was born in Saline county, near Arrow Rock, December 7, 1840. His father was a merchant, near Cambridge, where George was raised, and where he received his early education. At the age of sixteen, he entered the office of Dr. Alexander and began the study of medicine. He read medicine about seven years. In 1861 he entered the medical department of the Missouri state guard, and in 1862, entered the Confederate service. He was on duty at the Ft. Smith hospital, Arkansas. In 1863 he was examined, and appointed first surgeon, Scantlon’s squadron, and later was made brigade surgeon. At the close of the war he attended the St. Louis medical college, and graduated from there in the spring of 1866. He first located at Ft. Leavenworth, but his abilities were not appreciated there, and he returned to Saline county, and began to practice near Petra. In 1874 he moved to Miami, where he has since remained. In December, 1871, he was married to Miss Dora Kirby, of Carrollton, Missouri, and has three children: Daisy, George, and Theodosia, all living. He is a Master Mason; and has been very successful in his practice, both professionally and financially. Page 836

 

Charles G. Bruce, P. O., Miami. The subject of this sketch was born in Caroline county, Virginia, September 9, 1828. He was raised principally in Fredericksburg, Virginia. When about nine years of age his father died, without property, and upon Charles, the eldest, of course devolved the support of the family, as soon as he was old enough to work. At the age of fourteen he was bound out as apprentice to the trade of carriage making until he was twenty-one years of age. He gained his education by attending school at nights. He had been supporting his mother and sisters for four years when he moved west to Platte City, Missouri, and located, and shortly after, to Independence, Missouri, where he remained eighteen months. He then moved to Miami, Missouri, and began business for himself. Except during the war, he has remained at Miami ever since. April 17, 1859, he married Miss Lucy A. Hogan, by whom he has eight children, six daughters and two sons, of whom all are living, except one son. He is a member of the M. E. Church South, and is a Past Grand of I. O. O. F. Early in 1861 he enlisted as first lieutenant, commanding in Missouri state guards, and drilled the first officers of the county, as he had been a member of the Fredericksburg guards for four years, and knew something of military drill. At the battle of Lexington he commanded his company, and then returned home sick, where he remained about eight months. He then enlisted in Jo. Shelby’s command, in which he was orderly for a long time. He was out until the close of the war. Was in twenty-seven battles where artillery was used, and never received a scratch. At the close of the war he owned $1.50 and owed $800, with his constitution badly damaged. But by his indomitable energy and pluck and industry, has restored his business, and is now proprietor of the Miami Bruce Carriage Works. Page 836-837

 

William O. Burgess, P. O., Miami. Was born in Frederick county, Virginia, January 28, 1832. His father was a miller, and his son began at an early age to learn his father’s trade. His education was from the common country schools in Virginia. In 1857 he moved to Miami, Saline county, Missouri, where he has ever since been engaged in his trade. In May, 1866, he married Miss Eliza J. Bell, by whom he has three children: Martha B., Ann M. and Francis W., all living. In April, 1861, he enlisted in Price’s command, and was captured in the Blackwater surrender, December, 1861. He remained nine months a prisoner in Alton, Illinois, when he was exchanged, and sent to Vicksburg, and serve during the remainder of the war in Louisiana and Arkansas. The war broke him up pecuniarily, but he soon got upon his feet again, and is now a member of the firm of Guthrey & Co., proprietors of the Miami mills. Page 837

 

George J. Hahn, P. O., Miami. Was born in Rockingham county, Virginia, on the 10th of February, 1847, and is of German descent. He was raised on a farm, received first a country school education and then an academic course. In 1869 he left Virginia, and came to Miami, Saline county, and remained there until 1872, when he returned to Virginia, and remained one year. He then returned to Miami, and remained until 1879. Spent the year 1880 in traveling, and has now just purchased, with Mr. Taylor, the leading dry goods establishment in Miami. In 1880 he was married to Miss Eva Saufley, of Miami. He is a member of the M. E. Church South, and is connected with the church Sunday school. In 1864 he enlisted in the Confederate army, and was out about one year, when the war closed. He was wounded in the neck at Piedmont. He is now the junior member of the dry goods firm of Taylor & Hahn. Page 837

 

August Royar, Sr., grocery merchant, P. O., Miami. Was born in Bavaria, Germany, August 28, 1828. He was raised in the city of Zivri Brucken, Bavaria, and received a good German and a fair English education. He learned the shoemaker’s trade, and worked at it in the old country. When twenty years of age he crossed the ocean, amid very heavy storms, being ninety-one days on the water, landing at New York. From New York he came to St. Louis, where he remained one year, working at his trade. In October, 1849, he came to Miami, and worked at his trade until he was taken sick, and continued unable to work for two years. He then abandoned his trade and established a grocery store, in which business he has continued for twenty-five years. In 1848, just before leaving Europe, he married Miss Elizabeth Kaer, by whom he had two sons and one daughter. His wife dying in 1856, he was married again in 1857, to Miss Cresenze Hert, by whom he has had twelve children, nine of them still living. He is a member of I. O. O. F. Mr. Royar has served in two armies—first, in the German army three years during one of the French revolutions; and as a memento of this service he carries two sabre scars on his left hand. Second, one day during the war his trade was so good that he had literally nothing left; so he left, and volunteered under the Federal flag, in 1864. He was in the battles of Glasgow, Lone Jack, and Lexington. He has been a very successful business man, and has made a great deal of money since the war. Page 837-838

 

Millard F. Lemmon, miller, P. O., Miami. The subject of this sketch, a member of the firm of Smith & Lemmon, millers, Miami, was born in Grant county, Kentucky, September 19, 1857, where he was raised, and received a public school education. In 1875 he came to Miami township and engaged in farming and stock-feeding and shipping. He is a son of B. F. Lemmon, also of this county. In 1881 he purchased an interest in the People’s mill in Miami, and is one of its present proprietors. Though a young man, Mr. Lemmon is both energetic and enterprising, and is a valuable addition to the business men of Miami. Page 838

 

John D. Snelling, farmer and constable, Miami. Was born in Miami township, December 22, 1844; was raised on a farm, and educated in the country schools of the day. In the summer of 1863 he was impressed into the state service, and served about three months, when he was discharged. In the autumn of 1864 he joined Jo. Shelby’s command, and after active service to the end was discharged at Shreveport, Louisiana, in 1865. He returned to the farm, and continued farming until 1867, when he went to California, where he remained until 1870, and then returned to Saline county. In a year he went back to California, and remained until 1878, farming. He then once more returned to Saline, and has remained here since. In 1880 he was elected constable of Miami township. Mr. Snelling is a Master Mason, and is still a single man without a single “bone of his bone and flesh of his flesh.” Page 838

 

Isaac Myers, P. O., Miami. Was born in Rockingham county, Virginia, January 29, 1828. His father was a farmer, and he was raised on a farm. In 1840 his father moved to Augusta county, Virginia, where he remained until 1868, and received a common school education. In 1848 he began his apprenticeship at the carpenter trade, and worked on the University of Virginia. May 13, 1861, he enlisted as a private in the Confederate cavalry brigade, and served one year as a soldier, and during the balance of the war was on detail duty in the government shops. He lost in the war all the property he had accumulated, and at its close began anew to build up his broken fortunes. He worked at his trade in Miami, and built many of the best buildings of the town. He was contractor of the public school building, the mill, and several brick blocks. In 1874 he became a member of the firm of Guthrey & Co., proprietors of the Miami mills. In September, 1852, he was married to Miss Margaret A. Whitmer, and has nine children, two of whom are deceased. Mr. Myers is a member of O. S. Presbyterian Church. Has been a member of the school board and of the city government, and since coming west has been a successful business man. Page 838-839

 

R. S. Robertson, P. O., Miami. Mr. R. S. Robertson, of the firm of Robertson Bros. & Company, Miami, Missouri, was born one mile and a half south of Miami, March 7, 1857. He was raised on a farm and was educated at the Kirksville Normal School, and at the Glasgow Normal School, in Barren county, Kentucky. He farmed in Saline county until 1880, when he moved into Miami and purchased an interest in a livery and shipping business. In June, 1879, he was married to Miss Lollie Purcell, and is a member of the Christian Church, is also a Mason and a member of the A. O. U. W. He has charge of the shipping department of the firm, is a shrewd business man and an excellent judge of horseflesh. Page 839

 

Nicholas O. Smith, miller, P. O., Miami. Nicholas O. Smith, of the firm of Smith & Lemmon, Miami, Missouri was born in Saline county, January 25, 1843. He was raised in the county and educated in the Miami Male Institute; graduating in 1860. In 1861 he enlisted in the southern army, and was out until 1863. He then went to Kentucky, where he remained until 1870, clerking in a dry goods house. In 1870 he returned to Saline, where he has since made his home. He has been engaged in the dry goods business, general commission business, farming, etc. In 1881 he purchased an interest in the People’s Mill, Miami. He is an excellent engineer, having had experience in both steamboating and railroading. On the 28th of June, 1866, he was married to Miss Sophronia C. O’Bannon, of Kentucky, by whom he had five children: Robert, Warren, Allie and Bettie, living and one son dead. Is a member of I. O. O. F. The war destroyed his father’s estate and what he has, he has made by his own industry. Page 839

 

William Bishop, tailor, P. O., Miami. The subject of this sketch was born in Mercer county, Kentucky, May 16, 1830, and raised and educated at the county seat. He learned the tailor’s trade there, commencing in 1848. In 1853 he left there and traveled considerably over the west and southwest. In 1858 he came to Saline county, and settled in Miami, which has since been his home. In December, 1859, he was married to Miss Bettie Kaer, and to them were born six children: Rosa, Willie, Marsh B., Daisy and Joseph W., all living, and one daughter dead. In the spring of 1861 he entered the first company of state guards, raised in Saline, and was out one year. He was wounded in the thigh at Wilson’s Creek. Re-enlisted in 1862, but was discharged October, 1862, on account of failing health. He is doing well but talks of changing his business for that of livery. Page 839-840

 

Henry C. Smith, P. O., Miami. Of the firm of Smith & Jackson, Miami, was born in Henry county, Kentucky, October 30, 1850, was raised on a farm, being educated in the country schools. In 1869 he went to California, where he remained until 1872, returned to Kentucky for one year, and returned to California, where he stayed until 1878, and then once more returned to Kentucky, where he remained until 1880, engaged in the dairy business. In 1880 he came to Miami, and in 1881 entered into the grocery and queensware business, in the firm name of Smith & Jackson. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, and is also a bachelor. Page 840

 

Milton L. Burns, tinner, P. O., Miami. Of the firm of Burns & Son, Miami, was born in Miami, June 30, 1857, where he was reared and educated, and learned his trade of tinner. Mr. Burns has made Miami his home always, and is now engaged with his father in the hardware and tinning business. He is an excellent workman, and is fast building up a number one business reputation. He is a member of the Order of Good Templars. Page 840

 

Albert P. Bishop, jeweler, P. O., Miami. The subject of this sketch was born in Franklin, Johnson county, Indiana, March 6, 1857, where he was raised and graduated at the high school. His father was a jeweler before him, and the son adopted his father’s trade, and began to learn it at the age of twelve years, and except when at school and three years traveling for a Cincinnati wholesale house, has been engaged in it ever since. In October, 1878, he came to Saline county, dead broke, and located in Miami, and by close application to business, has built up a good trade, and is carrying about $3,000 stock. He is a good workman, and having the advantage of a wholesale and retail experience is sure to succeed. Page 840

 

Joseph B. Stockton. Was born in Metcalf county, Kentucky, February 20, 1835, where he was raised. In 1852 he moved to Miami, Missouri, coming by steamboat from Louisville. He was mostly educated at the Miami Male Institute. This has been his home since and except during the war, he has been steadily engaged in farming until 1872. Mr. Stockton ran the station hack and mail line for some years, in which he gave great satisfaction. Since October, 1880, he has been deputy-postmaster, and does the entire business of the office. He didn’t marry anybody, but is an “old bach.” In 1861 he enlisted in company G, 9th Missouri. Surrendered at Blackwater, the second day out. He graduated from the McDowell Medical College prison, and the Alton penitentiary, in nine months, by exchange. Was sent to Vicksburg. He was in one heavy battle, and in many skirmishes. Nearly all his regiment showed bullet marks after the battle. While attending school he was accidentally shot in the left leg, which has caused lameness ever since. He was on the steamer A. C. Bird, as steward, for several years, and was on her when she sank. He has large land interest in Tennessee. Page 840-841

 

Augustus Ralph Edmonds, druggist, P. O., Miami. The subject of this sketch is of Welsh descent, and was born in Lancaster county, Virginia, September 10, 1844, and is the son of Elias B. and Malana J. Edmonds. His father was a practicing physician of recognized ability, and also occupied a prominent position in the politics of his time, several times representing the counties of Lancaster and Northumberland in the general assembly of the state. Under these influences surrounding him, the subject of this sketch was raised in the village of Kilmarnock, on the Chesapeake bay. At the age of sixteen he entered college, having no higher ambition than to fill the position occupied by his father. He prosecuted the study of medicine until the beginning of the war. When the Old Dominion sounded her tocsin notes of war her sons from far and near responded to the call, and among them was young Edmonds, who, though exempt from military duty by his youth, volunteered in company D., 9th Virginia cavalry, and served under Gens. J. E. B. Stuart and Hampton until the war closed. Returning to what was once a peaceful and happy home, he found that the ruthless hand of war had been laid upon the place of his nativity, his home in ashes, old associations broken up and destroyed, and it devolved upon him to care for those who were left unprotected. After a few years’ effort in this direction, like many others, he sought another home in the west. In March, 1867, he landed in Miami! After serving in the capacity of drug clerk for three years, he formed a copartnership in the drug business with Dr. J. N. Dunlap. After several years of pleasant business and social relations, the doctor’s interest was purchased, and since that time the business has been conducted under the firm name of A. R. Edmonds. On the 2d day of February, 1871, Mr. Edmonds was united in marriage to Miss Annie J. Saufley, daughter of J. A. and M. J. Saufley, of Miami. To them have been born five children: Janie, Gussie, Ralph, Raymond, and Chubbie. Page 841

 

Judge James S. Guthrey, P. O., Miami. Son of John and Elizabeth Guthrey, and a brother of John G. Guthrey, of Miami; was born September 22, 1812, in Cumberland county, Virginia, where he was raised and educated—there and in Buckingham county, Virginia. At the age of seventeen he quit school, and entered a grocery store as salesman, in Manchester, Virginia. From there he went to “Half-Way House,” as bar-keeper and postmaster. He soon abandoned this, and, returning home, worked for a while at the wheel-wright trade. Quitting this he entered a dry goods store as salesman, in Amelia county, Virginia. One year after, returned home, and took charge of his father’s farm where he remained two years. In the autumn of 1835 he came to Saline county, Missouri, alone and on horseback. At first he taught school in Jonesboro. He was then employed by Claiborne F. Jackson to travel as agent for the Sappington Pill Company, traveling mostly in the south. In August, 1837, he was married to Miss Helen, daughter of William Brown. Mrs. Guthrey died in March, 1874, and to this union was born ten children, eight of whom—Ann E., Virginia M., Patrick H., John W., Rebecca S., Martha H., Caroline H., and James—are now living. Soon after his marriage Mr. Guthrey purchased the mercantile stock of Jackson & Miller, and pursued the business in Arrow Rock. Two years later he sold out, and went to farming, in which he has been engaged ever since. Since 1836 Mr. Guthrey has been a consistent member of the Methodist Church South, and during the long time that has intervened, has seen many changes pass over Saline county. During the decade of forty he was elected and served as judge of the county court. Was justice of the peace at the beginning of the war, but gave it up when the Gamble government came in. He was a southern man, and lost all he had. During the latter part of the war he went to Nebraska, and remained there two years. Page 842

 

John F. Webster, merchant, P. O. Miami. Was born in Charleston, Jefferson county, West Virginia, September 16, 1842, where he was raised and received his education. When fourteen years old he entered a dry goods store as salesman and so continued until the war broke out. In March, 1862, he enlisted in company A., 2d Virginia, Stonewall brigade, and served until the end at Appomattox. Was in all Jackson’s famous battles in the valley. Strange to say, he was never wounded or taken prisoner, and was always read for duty. At the close of the war he returned as salesman to the same dry goods store which he left, and remained there until 1867, when he came west, to Miami, in this county, and clerked for eighteen months, and then went into business with William S. Brown. In 1872 the firm changed to its present style, Webster & Irvine. They are doing their full share of business. On the 25th of November, 1868, Mr. Webster was married to Miss Ellis M. Brown, by whom he has three children, all living. Mrs. Webster died May 27, 1876. In 1877 he was married the second time, to Miss Nora E. Brown. Mr. Webster is a member of the Old School Presbyterian Church, and one of its deacons, and is a Master Mason. He came west with nothing, and now has a good business and is doing well. Page 842-843

 

Charles E. Marshall, merchant, P. O., Miami. The subject of this sketch was born in Boone county, Kentucky, July 21, 1849. When about ten years old his father moved to Carroll county, Missouri, and remained until 1866, when he removed to Miami. In 1867 Charlie entered the dry goods house of John P. Scott, as salesman, where he remained until 1876. He then started in business for himself at Malta Bend, and continued it for about one year, when he abandoned the enterprise and took a position as salesman in the dry goods house of Henry Boyer, Miami, where he has since remained. In December, 1872, he married to Miss Leola L. Brown, daughter of W. S. Brown, and to them were born Essie B. and Edwin H., both living, and Mattie H., dead. Mrs. Marshall died May 8, 1880. Mr. Marshall is a member of the Baptist Church, is a Master Mason, and is also a member of the A. O. U. W. Page 843

 

Stephen Bishop, farmer, P. O., Miami. Was born in Saxony, Germany, near Coberg, March 14, 1844. His father died when Stephen was but six years old, and in 1853 his mother crossed the ocean to America with her family, and came first to Booneville, Missouri. Being the eldest son, Stephen had to work at anything he could get to do. In spite of these drawbacks, he obtained a fair education. In 1857 he came to Saline county, and has lived here ever since. In June, 1861, he enlisted, and served six months in the Missouri state guards, and then enlisted in the Confederate army, company I, 3d regiment, Missouri infantry, in which he continued until the war closed, participating in some of the heaviest battles west of the river. Was wounded at Champion Hill and Pea Ridge; was at Shiloh and Corinth; captured at Vicksburg, and exchanged; surrendered at Shreveport in 1865. There were seven Saline men in his company, all but two of whom (himself and another) were killed in action, and they were both wounded. After the war he engaged in business in Miami, and then moved to his farm, where he now lives. December 1, 1870 he married Miss Mattie Eyers. They have had five children, four of whom are living: Henry, George, William E., and Josie. Page 843

 

Hon. Isaac Sewell Parsons, P. O., Miami. The Hon. I. S. Parsons was born on the 12th of October, 1825, in Oxford county, Maine. He is the son of Henry R., who was the son of William, who was the son of William, who was the son of John, who was the son of John, who was the son of Jeffrie, who came to America from England in 1620, and settled in Plymouth colony. From Jeffrie down the line, is the great chief-justice of Massachusetts and author of “Parsons on Contracts.” Mr. Parsons was raised in Paris, Maine, his father being a manufacturer of woolen goods and a farmer, and when not at school the son was assisting in the business. He received his academic course at Hebron academy, at which were educated Hannibal Hamlin, President Pierce and Prof. Swallow. Mr. Parsons taught several terms at the same school which President Pierce had also taught, and also taught near Boston, Massachusetts. In 1848, Mr. Parsons came to Saline county, Missouri, and located on his present farm near Miami, where he has ever since made his home. On May 29, 1851, he was married at Paris, Maine, to his early love and schoolmate, Miss Kate Hill; to them has been born: Flora J., F. Ella, Bettie K., Emma L. and Anna M.; all living, except Miss Ella, who died at school in Warrensburg, Missouri, March, 1881. Mr. Parsons is an earnest granger, and for some years has been master of the Saline county grange. In 1859, he was a candidate for representative of Saline county, and was only defeated by one vote. In 1876, he was elected to the state senate from this, the nineteenth senatorial district, serving four years, and during both sessions was chairman of the committee on enrollments; he was also a member of the committee on emigration. He was a very hard working member of the general assembly, and stood high in the senate. At the close of each session, the senate passed him a vote of thanks for his careful and laborious work in the committee. See senate journal, 30th general assembly, page 988. In December, 1862, he enlisted in the Confederate army, in the command which was captured at the Blackwater, on the second day out. But his Yankee shrewdness saved him from capture. He ran a little ways out, and laid down in the high grass, and thus escaped. He enlisted again in 1864, and was made first lieutenant, and was with General Price in his retreat to Louisiana, and was ranking officer, surrendering his regiment at Shreveport. Page 843-844

 

Robert Parrish, grain dealer, P. O., Miami. Robert Parrish, of the firm of Parrish Bros., Miami, Missouri, was born in Marion county, Missouri, September 23, 1837, where he was raised on a farm, and was educated at Philadelphia Academy in the same county. He was engaged in farming at the breaking out of the war, and in June, 1861, entered the Confederate army. In 1863 he was captured at Helena, Arkansas, and taken to the Alton, Illinois, prison, where he was kept eight months, and was then taken to Ft. Delaware, where he remained twelve months, and was then exchanged and sent to Richmond, Virginia. He enlisted as a private, and was discharged as first lieutenant. At the end of the war he returned to Marion county, and shortly after to Knox, where he remained until 1868, engaged in stock and grain trade. He then came to Saline county, Missouri, and engaged in farming until 1870, when he went into the stock trade and continued it four years. He then came to Miami, and engaged in the grain business, in which he is still engaged. His house, of Parrish Bros., ships the largest half of the grain shipped from Miami. In November, 1875, Mr. Parrish was married to Miss Mary E. Taylor, daughter of John J. Taylor, of Shelby county, Missouri, by whom he has three children, all living. He is a careful, but very active, business man, and is one of the stand-bys of Miami. The war left him penniless, but by active industry and business habits, he has made a competency. Page 844-845

 

John H. McDaniel. Is a son of Judge R. E. and Delia McDaniel, and was born in Caroline county, Virginia, July 31, 1838. In 1842 his father moved the family to Cooper county, Missouri, and in 1844 to Saline county, where John was raised on a farm. He finished his education in Columbia College, Washington City. Returning home in 1859, he commenced the grocery business in Miami. He soon disposed of his grocery, and early in 1861 volunteered in the M. S. G., and was in all Price’s battles of 1861. In December, 1861, he was third lieutenant in Capt. Ruxton’s company, in Robinson’s recruits, and with all the rest was captured at Blackwater, and imprisoned first in St. Louis, then in the Alton penitentiary. From the penitentiary he escaped in the following manner: Some of his fellow prisoners and messmates had taken the oath of loyalty, and were to be passed out by the guard. Stationing himself near the guard, Mr. McDaniel secretly and deftly abstracted the certificate of one of his friends from his pocket, after the guard had passed him, and after it had been inspected and carelessly stuck in his pocket by the soldier; the then returned to his quarters for a short time, and came down prepared to go. On presenting the stolen certificate, the officer on guard, as soon as he read the name, exclaimed, “you have been here before.” “Yes; but I left some baggage, and returned for it, and thought perhaps you would not recognize me,” said McDaniel. “Pass out this man,” was the order, and John was free. Returning home to Saline he was confined there with sickness for over six weeks. He then struck for Dixie via St. Louis, Cincinnati and Canada, crossing the lines on Chesapeake bay. On the 12th of October, 1863, he was again captured, and taken to St. Louis, where he was recognized by the prison officials. He tried again to escape, but, though he was not caught in the act, had to wear a ball and chain for several months, which came near crippling him for life. From St. Louis he was again transferred to Alton. Soon afterward, the officers of the prison called for volunteers from the prison, to help whitewash some buildings, and putting on a citizen’s coat, and passing the guard in broad daylight, John made his second escape. The war, however was soon over now, and at its close he was made deputy-sheriff of Caddo parish, Louisiana. He returned home, and entered the dry good business, under the firm of McDaniel & Boyer, in which he remained until 1870, when he sold out, and removed to the splendid farm on which he now lives. January 11, 1870, Mr. McDaniel was married to Miss Claire Rucker, of Howard county, Missouri. Children: Rucker S., Noel P., Forest R., and Robert R., living, and one dead. Page 845-846

 

Charles P. Bondurant, farmer and merchant, P. O., Miami. Was born August 15, 1803, in Cumberland county, Virginia. His father died soon after his birth, and he was raised by an uncle, and chiefly in the country. He received a good business education. From his 26th year until 1837, he engaged in mercantile pursuits in Virginia. In 1837 he came west and located in Saline county, near his present home, and has been engaged in farming ever since. When he came to Saline there were few inhabitants, and fewer still on the prairies, and he has seen many changes pass over the fair face of Saline. The tall green grass, and the countless wild-flowers of the prairie, have all turned into waving corn and wheat, under his eye, and the little country postoffice has grown into the city, before him, with its church spires, its business houses, its public buildings and its handsome residences. In the awful storm that swept the continent from 1860 to 1865, he was a Union man, but a southern sympathizer. April 11, 1833, he was married to Miss Caroline E. Smith, and they have a fair prospect of celebrating their golden wedding. To them have been born Mary W., (Hays) Betty (Hughs), and Charles P., Jr., all living. Energy and pluck were all the capital Mr. Bondurant had when he started in life, and he has made all he has. In connection with Mr. Surbaugh, his son has recently erected a saw-mill with a capacity of 8,000 feet per day, four miles northwest of Slater. Page 846

 

Judge R. E. McDaniel, merchant and farmer. Judge McDaniel, who during the latter years of his life, was one of Saline’s most prominent citizens, was born near Dumfries, Prince William county, Virginia, March 9, 1799. He lived in Virginia until 1841, when he moved west and settled in Booneville, where he carried on the mercantile business for several years. In 1844 he moved to Saline county and established two stores, one in Miami and one in Marshall, then but recently located. He superintended both establishments for several years. He had entered a large body of land, southeast of Miami, and on retiring from the mercantile business, he turned his attention to farming, and improved a large farm. At his death he possessed several thousand acres of first-class Saline county land. After becoming a citizen of Saline, he united himself with the Bethel Church, having joined the Baptist Church long before leaving Virginia. His business habits were excellent, his personal integrity beyond question, and his disposition kind and generous in the extreme—and his benevolence extended to every class of his fellow citizens. In no sense was Judge McDaniel an office-seeker, but he held the office of county judge for a number of years. In 1858 the democracy of Saline nominated him as their candidate for representative, the whigs or know-nothings opposing him with William H. Letcher, then, as now, a resident of Marshall. The contest was an exciting one, and party lines were sharply drawn. Mr. Letcher was elected and Judge McDaniel defeated, but by a very small majority. The personal popularity of both gentlemen made the race still more exciting. The war found Judge McDaniel, as he had always been, a straight, uncompromising states-rights southern democrat. For five years he was moderator in the Baptist General Association of Missouri, and always acquitted himself to the satisfaction of his brethren. He was always a consistent Christian. He died on the night of April 6, 1870, and his remains rest in the church-yard he loved so long and so well, and there, with others of his family, await the judgment day. He caught his death stroke riding home in a rain from Howard county, where he had been on a charitable errand of assisting the indigent widow of his whilom warm friend and pastor, A. P. Williams, D. D. Judge McDaniel was married three times. First to Miss Delilah Priddy—his two last being sisters, Misses Delia and Jane Richardson. He raised a family of eleven children, eight of whom are still living, and seven of them residents of Saline county: Reuben E., John H., Giles R., and Alex S. are well known farmers of Saline, while Mary N. is the wife of Rev. William M. Bell, of Miami; Flora E, is the widow of Quincy A. Thompson, and now lives in Liberty, Missouri; and Lucy is the wife of C. C. Ross, a prominent farmer of Miami township. Page 846-847

 

Reuben E. McDaniel, farmer, P.O., Miami. Son of Judge R. E. McDaniel, was born June 15, 1836, in Caroline county, Virginia. After his father had moved to Saline county, he went to school in the country, and then finished his education in 1856-7 in Columbia College, Washington City. In 1857 he went as pilot on the Missouri river, and remained there until 1869. In that year he quit the river and came to the farm upon which he now lives, and has been occupied in farming and stock-feeding since. He has a handsome residence on a fine farm, overlooking all the surrounding country. In March, 1868, he was married to Miss Kate White, of St. Louis, having five children, four of whom, Edmund N., Maud R., Reid K. and Aubrey T., are still living. Page 847

 

Henry Clay Surbaugh, farmer, P. O., Miami. Son of Wm. Surbaugh, born April 13, 1844, in Saline county, and was raised on a farm, receiving his education at the Miami Institute. In December, 1861, he was taken prisoner with the Robinson recruits, on Blackwater. He was released on oath in April, 1862, and returned home. In 1864 he went to California, where he staid until 1866, and returned to Saline and commenced farming. November 24, 1870, he was married to Miss Susan F. Doak, by whom he has four children: Allie C., Bertie B., Fannie M., William T., all living. From 1873 to 1876 he farmed in Chariton county, returning in the latter year to Saline county, to the farm on which he now lives. Page 847-848

 

Thomas H. Booker, farmer, P. O., Miami. Son of P. D. and Martha A. Booker. Was born April 11, 1835, in Amelia county, Virginia. His parents moved to Saline county when he was but two and one-half years old, and settled on a farm southeast of Miami. Mr. Booker received a good independent education, has been a great reader, and is an intelligent and cultivated gentlemen and a good farmer. February 14, 1856, he was married to Miss Agnes Lacy (daughter of Dr. William A. and Agnes Lacy, of Saline county), to whom has been born six sons and three daughters, all living: William P., Eugene A., Thomas, Stonewall, Agnes O., Mary, Edward L., Albert Sidney, Addie L. and John C. Mr. Booker was a southern man, of course, but did not enter the confederate army until 1864, when he joined Price’s invading army when it reached Saline. Like most southern men in Missouri, he lost everything by the war except his land, which the soldiers could not carry away. He has a fine and well improved farm, and from the front porch of his residence can be seen over one hundred as fine farms as the sun ever smiles upon. The view is indeed a grand one. Page 848

 

George T. Taylor, merchant, P. O., Miami. Mr. George T. Taylor was born September, 13, 1848, in La Grange, Oldham county, Kentucky, and is a son of Wm. G. and A. P. Taylor. His father was a druggist, and was the clerk of the court for several years. George lived in Kentucky until he was fifteen years of age, mostly attending school. He then went to Louisville, and was there employed in superintending the tobacco trade of Frazer Bros. for several years. In 1869 he went to Pine Bluff, Arkansas, and engaged as salesman. In 1873 he went to Warren county, Kentucky, and commenced in the general mercantile business for himself. In February, 1881, he united with Mr. Hahn in purchasing the dry goods stock and business of Mr. Henry Boyer, a well-known merchant of Miami, and in April of this same year moved to Miami, leaving his store in Warren county in charge of one of his clerks. Mr. Taylor was married December 5, 1876, to Miss Ermin Sweeney, of Gallatin, Tennessee. They have two children living: Julia E. and Elizabeth A. Mr. Taylor is a member of the Methodist Church South, and a Master Mason. Page 848

 

William T. White, farmer. Was born in Clarke county, Virginia, September 23, 1832. His father died when William was only eight years old. About four years after his father’s death, his mother removed with the family to Ohio, where they remained about eighteen months, and then moved to Illinois, where they lived until 1856. In 1856 William, who was grown, moved the family to Saline county, Missouri. February 23, 1871, he was married to Mrs. Alice Coleman, whose maiden name was Wright. Mrs. Coleman had one daughter, Mary E., when she married Mr. White. Five children have blessed this union: Robert L., Ella, Ernest H., William and Frank, all living. Mr. White is a member of the Baptist Church, and has an excellent farm in good cultivation. Page 849

 

Joseph A. Fisher, farmer. Was born in Aberdeen, Ohio, January 8, 1834. When Joseph was only one year old, his father moved to Maysville, Kentucky. When he was about fourteen years old, they moved to Louisville, where they lived about four years, and then moved to Bourbon county, Kentucky. Mr. Fisher, having received a good education, then worked on a farm until 1854, when he moved to Knox county, Missouri, and there engaged in farming until 1868, when he moved to Saline county and located here, and has since been engaged in farming and handling stock. January 22, 1862, Mr. Fisher was married to Miss Theresa E. Baker, of Marion county, Missouri. They have had five children, all now living: Thomas J., Pauline, Eliza, Sarah E., and Nancy. In 1861 he enlisted in the M. S. G., and was out eight months. He is a shrewd but liberal business man. He is a Master Mason. Page 849

 

James M. Johnston, farmer, P. O., Fairville. Was born in New Brunswick, on the 18th day of April, 1837, and is of Scottish parentage. When he was about four years old, his parents moved to Meigs county, Ohio, where he lived until fifteen years of age. At that age he went to Mason county, Virginia, where he made his home until 1871, in which last named year, he came to Saline county, and here located permanently. When only thirteen years old he went to work in a foundry and learned the moulders’ trade. At the age of seventeen, he went on the Ohio river and learned the trade of pilot. Since he came to Saline, in 1871, he has been engaged in farming. In July, 1869, he was married to Miss Kate Long, of Mason county, Virginia. They have two children: Oscar P. and John A., both living. He is a member of A. F. & A. M. and of I. O. O. F., and also of the Ancient Order of Redmen. Mrs. Johnston died in the autumn of 1880. Page 849

 

Nicholas J. Smith, farmer, P. O. Miami. Mr. N. J. Smith, one of the large farmers and stock feeders of Saline county, was born in Henry county, Kentucky, February 13, 1834, where he was raised and educated. In his thirteenth year he made a profession of religion, and united himself with the Baptist Church, to which his family for several generations have belonged. Mr. Smith first came to Saline on a visit just previous to the war, and while here, married Miss Mattie J. Smith, daughter of Stephen Smith, one of the old settlers of the county, from Henry county, Kentucky, now dead. Delighted with Saline, Mr. Smith determined to make it his home. Settling up his affairs in Kentucky, he returned, and purchased the J. M. White farm of 1,000 acres. This he soon after reduced by sale to a section, and he has now one of the finest and most desirable farms in Saline county. Since the war, like all Saline farmers, he has abandoned the raising of hemp, and has turned his attention to the raising of cereals, and to the raising and feeding of stock. In July, 1879, Mrs. Smith died, leaving five children living: Thomas S., Susan E., Mattie E., Robert O., and Clark P. Mr. Smith has always been a consistent Christian, kind and charitable, and a hospitable, old-fashioned Kentucky gentleman. He is also a most excellent and successful farmer. Page 849-850

 


Amos A. Wheeler, M. D., P. O., Miami. The subject of this sketch is a son of Alfred and Ruth Wheeler, and was born near Miami, August 4, 1842, where he grew to manhood. While attending school at the Miami Institute, the war broke out, and in the autumn of 1861, he was captured at Blackwater, taken to St. Louis, and held, as a prisoner, for three months, when he was released, after taking “the oath.” He remained at home one year, then spent eighteen months in Colorado, variously employed. At the close of the war, he returned to Miami, and after reading medicine three years in a private office, he entered the medical department of Ann Arbor university, where he attended lectures one year, then to Bellevue Hospital Medical College, from which he graduated in the spring of 1868, when he returned to Miami, commenced his profession, and has built up a large and paying practice. He was united in marriage, September 30, 1859, to Miss Alice S. Vaughan, and to the union has been born three sons and three daughters, all living. He is an official member of the Christian Church, and superintendent of the Sabbath school. Is a Royal Arch Mason, and a member of the I. O. O. F., at one time one of the Grand Lodge officers, also of the I. O. G. T. and A. O U. W. He is a strong advocate of temperance; believing, from his own early experience, the only safe plan to be total abstinence. Page 850