Scott County Newspaper Articles
Scott County, Missouri
The Bridge that was Struck by the Barge

This page last modified Friday, 18-Nov-2005 19:14:24 MST




Scott County,  Missouri

The Bridge that was Struck by the Barge


    This article is contributed by the author Sue (Hopkins) Cooley and printed here with her permission.  (5/13/98)

    Excerpted from
    Gleanings from the Past and Present
    By Sue (Hopkins) Cooley
    , SCooley@foxcomm.com
    St. Clair Missourian [newspaper for St. Clair, Missouri]
    published in Wednesday April 22, 1998 edition (amended)

           Ruth Bardot of the Luebbering area called me this week and told me a story  I thought was worthwhile to share with the readers. Her cousin, Joseph  Claude "J.C." Sanders, born in 1926, had passed this bit of family legend on to her.
            Her grandfather, Heinrich Christian "Lewis" Bruns, was born April 15, 1873 at Kelso, Missouri, a town that is part of present-day Scott City. He was a  railroad engineer when the railroad bridge was built at Cape Girardeau.  This is the bridge we have been hearing about in the news that was recently  struck by barges a day or so after a barge struck the Admiral in St. Louis.
            After the railroad bridge was completed, Lewis Bruns and several other engineers drove 33 train engines out onto the bridge and parked them to be sure the bridge would hold a train safely! He was the engineer in the second engine to drive out on the bridge!
            Lewis was the father of Ruth's mother, Ruth, who married Ancel Wallace. They lived at Lonedell Lakes, which was then owned by Jack Patrick and called Back of the Moon.
            Ruth Bardot (314-629-3792) has a photograph of her grandfather beside an engine. Edison Schrum has a photograph of the 33 engines on the bridge in one of his books.



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