The Vollmer's of Missouri

Scott County,  Missouri


Contributed by: Stephen Bodine (6/14/98)
4466 West Pine Blvd., #21-F (temporary address until Sept)
St. Louis, MO 63108

        I have recently started research on my family tree. One branch of my family is the "Vollmers" which originated in New Orleans and moved to Scott County around the 1830's. I lived my first 20 years in Cape Girardeau and most of my family is still living in the area.

        If anyone happens to know where the Vollmer cemetery is, I would very much appreciate that information. From what I understand it is on private property and possibly cannot be visited, even if it still exists. Also I would very much be interested in finding relatives of the Vollmer descendants.

        The following "story" was given to me by my Father in the early 1970's and I am not sure where he obtained it but it may have been compiled in the late 50's or early '60's.


        The Vollmer's of Missouri were early settlers in Scott County. The patriarch of this family was Henry Charles Vollmer, sometimes called Henry and referred as "Hy".

        The first information about Charles Vollmer was obtained in the Scott County Court House, Benton, MO. Charles Henry Vollmer was appointed a road overseer in Scott County in the year 1832. He would have been 14 years old at that time. One wonders if he were there by himself or had family with him. It was not unusual for 14 year olds to be on their own in those days.

        The next official records were the Scott County census reports of 1850. He is listed here, age 32. He had a wife, Elizabeth, age 27, (maiden name was Scheerer or Scherrer) and two daughters. They were Mary age 4, and Otilda, age 1. In this record, his last name is spelled "Wollmer" and Otilda's name is given as "Odela".

        The next official record is the Scott county census of 1860. Here he is listed as "Vollmers": Henry, age 42. His wife's name at this time was Catherine, (not Elizabeth) age 28. There were 9 others in the household:
Children of Elizabeth (Scheerer) and Henry Vollmer
Mary, age 14 born 1846
Otilda age 11 born 1849
Louisa age 9 born 1851
Hanah age 6 born 1854
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Children of Catherine (Scheerer) Bowman (Elizabeth's Sister) and Henry Vollmer
Charles age 2 born 1858
Elizabeth 6 month born 1859
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Children of Catherine and adopted by Henry Vollmer?
Jacob Borman (Bowman?) age 9 born 1851
Julia Borman (Bowman?) age 7 born 1853

(Some of the above information may not be 100% correct. I guess there can be a lot of confusion on children and who married who from about 140 years ago.)

Frank Unnerstall age 19 is also listed in this household. He was born 1840 (Melle, Hanover Germany) and married Mary Vollmer on January 27th 1865 at St. Vincent's Church in Cape Girardeau. (These are my Great-great grandparents).

        There is no question that "Jacob Borman" is Jacob Bowman and "Julia Borman" is Julia Bowman who later went by the name of Julia Vollmer.

        There is no information to tell us when his first wife, Elizabeth, died. There is a newspaper clipping which states that Hanah was Mary's sister and Charles was Mary's half-brother, which means that Elizabeth would have died between 1854 and 1858. At any rate, after Elizabeth died, Henry Charles went to Louisiana to marry her sister, Catherine Scheerer Bowman, presumably a widow with two children, Jacob and Julia.

        The information we have on the early Vollmer family is all family history, handed down from relatives. Charles Henry Vollmer was a very successful farmer and businessman. At one time he owned over a thousand acres in Scott County. On this land was the Vollmer Cemetery. The latter is part of the Dibold Orchard. He entertained lavishly. His daughter, Mary, was considered a popular belle of the area and was so referred to in the paper.


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