Tallulah Courthouse Expedition

NOVEMBER 10-13, 1863.-Expedition from Skipwith's Landing to Tallulah Court-House, Miss. 

Report of Colonel Embury D. Osband, Third U. S. Colored Cavalry. 


HEADQUARTERS POST,                
Skipwith's Landing, Miss., November 15, 1863.

     COLONEL: I have the honor to report that my command, consisting of the First Battalion, Fourth Illinois Cavalry, and three companies of the First Mississippi Cavalry (African Descent), 300 strong, in pursuance of instructions from major-general commanding, left Vicksburg at 11 a.m. the 10th instant, arriving at and crossing the Yazoo River at Anthony's Ferry in the afternoon, camping for the night at the ferry, on the north side of the river. Marched at daylight on the 11th, crossing Deer Creek at Black Fork, and moving up on the east side of it to within 7 miles of Rolling Fork, and camping for the night on Clark's plantation1, a march of 37 miles.

     Learning that Barksdale's (Mississippi) cavalry and the Seventh [?] Texas Cavalry, about 700 strong, had been at Rolling Fork four days previously, and had disabled the bridges across that stream and Deer Creek, at daylight on the 12th I recrossed Deer Creek, and arrived at the Mississippi River near Tallulah Court-House, and camped at the landing opposite Lake Providence. 

    Marched at 6 a.m., 13th instant, and arrived at this place at 12 m. I met no enemy and obtained no recruits, the route of march being through a deserted and abandoned country, and am now satisfied, from information which I regard reliable, that the two regiments of Confederate cavalry came from Yazoo City to intercept my march here. Failing to find us, they returned in the same direction, with what conscripts, horses, mules, hogs, and negroes they could obtain. About 50 men of the same class remain across Deer Creek, engaged in the same business.

     I leave to-morrow morning with 170 men of my command, accompanied by Lieutenant Lee, Thirty-second Ohio Volunteers, and shall proceed beyond the Sunflower, if practicable, to assist Lieutenant Lee and to recruit. 
I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. D. OSBAND,       
Colonel, Commanding. 

Lieutenant Colonel W. T. CLARK, Assistant Adjutant-General. 
 

Source:
THE WAR OF THE REBELLION: A COMPILATION OF THE OFFICIAL RECORDS OF THE UNION AND CONFEDERATE ARMIES PREPARED UNDER THE DIRECTION OF THE SECRETARY OF WAR, BY BVT. LIEUT. COL. ROBERT N. SCOTT, THIRD U.S. ARTILLERY AND PUBLISHED PURSUANT TO ACT OF CONGRESS APPROVED JUNE 16, 1880.
The US Government Printing Office
Volume: XXXI: Page 566

Notes:
1 The writer may be referring to the plantation belonging to J.M. Clark. J.M. Clark is listed in the 1860 Issaquena County Federal Census (page 13, family 129) as a planter, born in 1817 in Pennsylvania. Clark's plantation is shown on the east side of Deer Creek in an 1863 map. Clark's slaves are enumerated on pages 74 and 75 of the 1860 Issaquena County Federal Census Schedule 2.



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