Our County History

As found in the publication

"Dancing Rabbit"

by Broox Sledge
Published by Noxubee County Historical Society

The pages are copyrighted by E. Annette Rose ©1999 for the USGenWeb

The Indian Removal Bill by Senator Hugh L. White of Tennessee was signed by President Andrew Jackson on May 28, 1830. Then, on September 27, 1830, in what is today Noxubee County, Mississippi, the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek was signed. The site of the signing of the Treaty is located roughly fifteen miles south-west of the county seat, Macon. A small free-standing marker marks the spot.

The area "signed away" covered what is now Coahoma, Tallahatchie, LeFlore, Carroll, Grenada, Montgomery, Webster, Attala, Choctaw, Leake, Scott, Smith, Jasper, Clarke, Lauderdale, Kemper, Neshoba, Winston, Noxubee and Oktibbeha counties. Included in the lands were portions of Sunflower, Bolivar, Quitman, Holmes and Lowndes.

Prior to the formation of Noxubee county, on December 23, 1833, which was the first of the counties to be "given a name", the land was considered to be in Lowndes county. Lowndes county was originally drawn out of Monroe county in January of 1830. Then, at the end of 1831, December 6th, it was extended to cover the land which was to become Noxubee county. One might be aware that if they are looking for records between 1830 and 1834 for persons thought to be in Noxubee county, Lowndes county is where they should be searching.

Sixteen counties were formed on that same day, December 23, 1833. The counties listed in order: Noxubee, Kemper, Lauderdale, Clark, Oktibbeha, Winston, Choctaw, Tallahatcie, Yalobusha, Carroll, Jasper, Neshoba, Smith, Scott, Leake and Attala. Therefore, Noxubee county gets the title of "the first county established" from the Treaty.


 From an entry in the Police Board Minutes

"The site for the county seat of Noubee County is hereby selected as the Southeast Quarter of Section 33, Township 15 North of Range 17 East, in accordance with an Act of Congress allowing a county to locate its seat on any quarter section of unoccupied government land at a minium price of $1.25 per acre."
Also:
"The county seat is hereby named "Macon" in horor of Senator Nathaniel Macon of North Carolina."

 

Although at one time, there was some 47 different Post Offices in the County, today, there are only five, Macon, Booksville, Shuqualk, Prairie Point, and Bigbee Valley.

Those Post Offices were:

 Taledgea  Formed while considered to be Lowndes County. 1833-1835
Gholson 1834-1974 First called "Meander"
Macon  1835 - Present
Brooklyn  1836-1856
Grantsville  1837 - 1839
Mahulaville  1838 - 1960
Prairie Point  1838 - Present
Cooksville  1839 - 1955
Deerbrook  1842 - 1850 and 1879 - 1942
Parkeville  1844 - 1868
Brooksville  1846 - Present
X-Prairie  1849 - 1851
Jeff Davis  1854 - 1855
Shuqualak  1855 - Present
Roby's Store  1855 - 1860
Barry  1856 - 1861
Bigbee Valley  1858 - Present
Armitage  1858 - 1867
Hashuqua  1872 - 1905
Allgood's Mill  1873 - 1887
Cliftonville  1878 - 1974
Brazelea  1880 - 1906
Hamby  1882 -1887
Harlan  1883 - 1899
Foxtrap  1883 - 1926
Paulette  1886 - 1979
Lynn Creek  1888 - 1906
Fairport  1888 - 1907
Alliance  1889 - 1903
Wareville  1890 - 1892
Flatwood  1890 - 1895
Joiner  1892 - 1903
Mohegan  1896 - 1898
Macedonia  1890 - 1912
McLeod  1897 - 1955
Ravine  1897 - 1951
Hull  1897 - 1899
Wetwater  (Date unavailable)
Eli  1899 - 1901
Pretoria  1900 - 1905
Calyx  1901 - 1955
Aubrey  1901 -1906
Crescent  1902 - 1906
Sunshine  1904 - 1904
Dinsmore  1904 - 1924
Togo  1905 - 1932
Clearman  1912 - 1919

Each of these Post Offices are discussed in the printed book, giving names and dates of the Post Masters, plus giving a discriptive location. It is recommended reading for those who wish to know more of the county. By accessing this link, you can see what publications are available from the Historical Society.

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These Pages copyrighted by E. Annette Rose ©1999 for the USGenWeb