KIMBALL, KEEPER OF THE BELL

Prepared by: Etta Haywood-Faulkner

May, 2003

	
KIMBLL INDEX by Generations
INDEX 1ST GENERATION: 1. HENRY KYMBOLDE/KIMBALL 2ND GENERATION INDEX: 2. HENRY KEMBOLD(KIMBALL) 3RD GENERATION INDEX" 3. RICHARD KIMBALL 4TH GENERATION INDEX: 4. RICHARD #1 KIMBALL 5th GENERATION INDEX: 5. RICHARD #8 KIMBALL 6TH GENERATION INDEX: 6. JOHN #6 (4141) KIMBALL 7TH GENERATION INDEX: 7. SARAH KIMBALL 8. RICHARD #9 KIMBALL 8TH GENERATION INDEX: 9. JACOB #1 KIMBALL 10. AARON (4179) KIMBALL 9TH GENERATION INDEX: 11. ASA #2 KIMBALL 12. PHOEBE KIMBALL 13. MERCY KIMBALL 14. REBECCA #2 KIMBALL 10TH GENERATION INDEX: 15. RICHARD #6 KIMBALL 11TH GENERATION INDEX: 16. ASA #1 KIMBALL 17. WILLIAM #3 KIMBALL 12TH GENERATION INDEX: 18. DAVID 1601 KIMBALL 19. GEORGE 1516 KIMBALL 20. RHODA KIMBALL 21. JOHN #1 KIMBALL 22. MARY KIMBALL 23. FRANCAIS KIMBALL 24. JEDEDIAH 5072 KIMBALL 13TH GENERATION INDEX: 25. CLARISA "CLARA" #2 26. GEORGE A. 1520 KIMBALL *ETTA'S ANCESTOR have picture 27. ANNA J KIMBALL 28. WILMOT KIMBALL 29. MARETTA KIMBALL 30. MINERVA KIMBALL 31. HANNAH 1616 KIMBALL 32. CAMILLA KIMBALL 33. OREN KIMBALL 34. CARRIE OSCAR McKINNEY 14TH GENERATION INDEX: 35. ELVERSON HALLETT 36. MARGARET HALLETT 37. IVA "NETTIE KIMBALL *ETTA'S GRANDMOTHER 38. WILLIAM #2 C. KIMBALL 39. GUY #1 KIMBALL 40. LOIS #2 KIMBALL 41. LYNN HUBERT KIMBALL 42. MARTHA LOIS SHARP(e) 43. LEIGHTON #1 FRED KIMBALL 44. MYLES GEORGE 1639 KIMBALL 45. AGNES ETTA KIMBALL 46. WILLIAM ORSER 47. LILLY ORSER 48. BEULAH ORSER 49. FOY GILBERT PRATT 50. FERN PRATT 51. GUY #1 A. PRATT 52. EARL PRATT 53. LEONAR ORSER 54. PEARL MYRA ORSER 55. VELMA ORSER 56. PRINCE ARTHUR ORSER 57. RAYMOND BLISS ORSER 58. GRACE GERTRUDE ORSER 59. PHILIP ALEXANDER ORSER 60. HAROLD ROBERT McKINNEY 15TH GENERATION INDEX: 61. ISABEL HALLETT 62. ETHEL LOIS LONDON 63. HAZEN GEORGE LONDON 64. LESTER JAMES LONDON 65. INEZ MAE LONDON 66. VIOLET LILLIAN LONDON 67. MABEL GENEVA LONDON 68. RAYMOND FRANKLIN LONDON 69. EARL LLOYD KIMBALL 1948 LONDON HELEN AUDREY LONDON 70. GUY "CLIFTON" LONDON 71. THELMA FERN KIMBALL 72. MERRITT 1779 KIMBALL 73. DONALD #1 KIMBALL 74. CLARENCE HUBERT 1848 KIMBALL 75. GUY #2 AMOS KIMBALL 76. EDITH DELLA SAUNDERS 77. DONALD SUTHERLAND McKELLAR Sr 78. WALTER GRAY 16TH GENERATION INDEX: 79. PHYLLIS RIDEOUT 80. HOWARD GEORGE McWAID 81. MARGARET PEARL McWAID 82. ALMA NETTIE McWAID 83. ROWENA GAILE LONDON 84. GEORGE RICHARD LONDON 85. WILLARD JAMES LONDON 86. LAURA MAE LONDON 87. LOIS JEAN LONDON 88. ALICE ROSE LONDON 89. RUTH IVA LONDON 90. HAROLD LLOYD SLOAN 91. DORIS JEAN SLOAN-RUSH 92. EDWARD CECIL SLOAN Sr 93. ETTA MARIE HAYWOOD 94. JOAN GENEVA GAUL 95. GARRY VINCENT GAUL 96. SYLVIA LONDON 97. RAYMA MARIE LONDON 98. VERNA "CAROL" LONDON 99. MARILYN RUTH LONDON 100. JANICE EILEEN LONDON 101. JOHN ARTHUR LONDON 102. DAVID DARRELL CLIFTON LONDON 103. JAMES #3 "PAUL" LONDON 104. DANIEL GEORGE LONDON 105. REBECCA LYNN LONDON 106. STANLEY VICTOR OGDEN 107. FRED MORRIS OGDEN 108. IVAN OGDEN 109. SHIRLEY OGDEN 110. LINDA OGDEN 111. ALLAN OGDEN 112. JUDY OGDEN 113. GLORIA DAWN KIMBALL 114. LLOYD GEORGE #3 KIMBALL 115. DONALD HUBERT 1856 KIMBALL 116. DARRELL DOUGLAS KIMBALL 117. WANDA RUTH KIMBALL 118. AUDREY ELAINE KIMBALL 119. GARY LYNN KIMBALL 120. ROBERT GUY #4 KIMBALL 121. ANNETTE MARIE KIMBALL 122. JANET LOUISE KIMBALL 123. WELDON EDWARD HAYWOOD 124. HAZEN RAY HAYWOOD Sr 125. ALICE JEAN HAYWOOD 126. JOAN ELIZABETH HAYWOOD 127. KIM GRAY 17TH GENERATION INDEX: 128. MARK ROBINSON 129. JANET LOIS McWAID 130. GEORGE EDWARD McWAID 131. WILLIAM CLIFFORD McWAID 132. GORDON CLIFTON McWAID 133. SHARON EVELYN McWAID 134. ELVA CEDELIA McWAID 135. CATHERINE ANN WILSON 136. CAROLYN MARIE WILSON 137. JOHN EDWARD "TED" WILSON 138. LINWOOD DAVID LAWRENCE 139. SANDRA JANE LAWRENCE 140. ROBERT LORNE LAWRENCE 141. DAVID #1 WILLIAM LONDON 142. STEVEN LEWIS LONDON 143. STEWART DOUGLAS LONDON 144. COLLEEN ANN 2020 BRYCE 145. CRAIG PHILLIP BRYCE 146. CURTIS MICHAEL BRYCE 147. DOROTHY LYNN SLOAN 148. LAWRENCE "LARRY" RUSH 149. RICHARD MARVIN RUSH 150. RANDY JOSEPH RUSH 151. DOLLY SLOAN 152. DONALD SLOAN 153. PAUL "RICHARD" FAULKNER 154. CARL DOUGLAS GRAHAM FAULKNER 155. ALEXANDER MacLEOD 156. LAURIE NICOLE UNDERHILL 157. MARTHA LEIGH LONDON 158. PETER HAYWOOD Sr 159. HAZEN "RAY" HAYWOOD Jr 160. LESLIE EDITH HAYWOOD 161. JEAN MAE PLOOM
NOTES AND REFERENCES
[2]It appears Etta has Mary married to the wrong Richard Kimball [4]or 1705 [5]died before 7 May 1782, when his will was proven [6]native of Danvers, Mass [9]was she born 2 years before parents' marriage? [10]of Danvers [12]Ralph W 4633 ROGERS Jr., The ROGERS Fam. of Northampton/Psh. [13]Nadine J Sharp-Fawcett, Alexander Sharp(e) & His Descendants, 1986 [14]Carleton County [15]drowned [16]or d 31st. [17]Judson M Corey, The Story of Knowlesville, The.Community, Keystone Printin, 971.552.COR. [18]George #6 Hatfield HAYWARD, Carleton Coounty, New Brunswick Marriage Reg/B/1862-1884, book B Transcrip, of original, records, R929.371552HAY, in custody of FISHER MEMORIAL LIBRARY, WOODSTOCK New Brunswick,York Regional [19]Dr.DaltonLONDON 140SurreyCres, F'ton E3B4L3 454-5923. [20]8980 49th St North Friends, Friendship Retirement Residence [21]Carleton Manor [22]Scott's Funeral Chapel. [23]Somerville. [24]Waterloo Row [25]Funeral United Baptist Church, Lindsey; buried adjoining cemetery [26]Primitive Baptist Cemetery [27]tappen. [28]Bath Hospital. [30]Carleton Memorial Hospital. [32]Victoria Corner [33]RR#2 New Minas B0P 1X0 [34]Kings County [35]Greenwich [36]29 Elmwood Ave [37]Lunenburg County [38]Wakefield [39]Fredericton area [40]44th St South East [41]Shady Acres Trailer Court V2J 3Z45 [42]at Saint John Regional Hospital [43]interment at Greenwood Vault with burial at a later date [44]79 Main St [45]206 E.Biddle St. 21202 [46]RR#7 Hartford [47]Reformed Baptist [48]Hartford [49]Connell Rd [50]RR#7 Hartford Bloomfield Rd [51]Woodstock Rural Cemetery [52]Reformed Baptist Church [53]Grafton [54]RR#6 Jacksonville [55]RR#1 EOH 1T0 [56]Newbridge [57]11474 Chief NoonDay Road, 49333 [58]Ingraham County [59]5251 Hackman Rd 48014 [60]6376 Cade Rd 48416 [61]Apt 2, Taylor St [62]14403 Foley, 48014 [63]2904 Devonshire Ave 94063 [64]456 Parkland 48017 [65]Rt 7, Box 435 37771 [66]Box 435 RT7 37771 [67]Appendix "C" = Etta HAYWOOD #99 [68]114 Kirkpatrick St. E7M 2A7 [69]St Luke's Anglican Church [70]Appendix "D" = Paul Douglas FAULKNER #65 [71]9 Donview Dr 902-434-3520 [72]by Rev Gary Lyons, Reformed Baptist Church [73]RR#1 Victoria EOJ 1ZO [74]Pentecostal Church, St. James St [75]244 Mount Edward Road [76]separated or divorced c1990 [77]Belleville [78]St Jude's Roman Catholic Cemetery [79]1250 Marlborough Court, Unit 51 L6H 2W7 [80]4624 49th St [81]Psh Wakefield, Carleton County [82]Wesleyan Church [83]Psh Wakefield, Carleton County [84]RR#5 Middle Simonds [85]RR#6 Middle Simonds [86]111 Neville St [87]Belleville 328-6750 [88]Sharpe's Rd [90]17 Elwin Jay Dr Albert Co E4H 2S9 [92]316 Acadia Ave Suite 2008 E1A 1G8 [94]796 Englington Ave East, Apt#3 M4G 2L1 [97]112 Kirkpatrick St E7M 2A7 [98]112 Kirkpatrick St E7M 2A7 [108]20 Grub Rd E4H 3G6
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The Kimball Generations

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Copyright Etta Faulkner   2003



Kimball Preface
	                  
	NOTE BY AUTHOR, ETTA HAYWOOD-FAULKNER 13 May 2003:

	I DO NOT HAVE THE REFERENCES THAT I SHOULD HAVE KEPT WHEN
COLLECTING DATA ON THE KIMBALL FAMILY.  BECAUSE OF THIS, I HAVE
DUPLICATED SOME OF THAT DATA. I WON'T SPEND ANY MORE TIME TRYING TO TRACK 
THIS DATA DOWN SO PLEASE DON'T TAKE EVERYTHING AS "GOSPEL", ESPECIALLY
WHEN IT COMES TO THE SEVERAL RICHARD KIMBALL'S.
	IF SOME OF MY READERS CAN SORT THIS OUT, BE MY GUEST!
	WHEN YOU COME TO GEORGE KIMBALL WHO MARRIED ANNA COGSWELL,
THEIR DESCENDANTS SHOULD BE FAIRLY ACCURATE.


   I began collecting & recording this information as early as 1967, 
partly because my sons were not aware if or how they were related to other 
persons & I doubt that they are yet aware or are interested to any 
great extent at the present time.  

Perhaps someone following my generation will again show interest in this 
subject of Family Trees & will find my research of some value or 
interest.

      I am using the Roots III program so the individual numbers are
      automatically assigned by this program.  Page 7-10, the 
      number "309 (i)" has been assigned to Sarah KIMBALL & she will 
      be seen in the next generation.
	number "(ii)" Mary will not be seen in the next generation because 
      she has no child.  Also, a person could be married but if there are 
      no offspring then that person stays in her parents' file  
 
Preface
QUOTES FROM "THE HISTORY OF CENTRAL NEW BRUNSWICK by L.M.B. Maxwell":- "The first Maugerville trusteed (from the original at NB Crown Land Office) Granted in 1761 #3 Samuel Nevers, #5 Richard Kembell; #70 Geo Hayward 28 Oct 1779. Richard Kembell from Essex County, Mass George Hayward moved across river to Lincoln The County town & chief business centre of the St. John River valley for almost 20 years was Maugerville. The first representatives elected from the legislature at Halifax from the old Sunbury County of Nova Scotia were Capt. Thomas FALCONER... (note, present Sunbury County, New Brunswick, was part of Nova Scotia) A SEWELL of Maugerville left home for a year to fight in the Revolution for the Crown. (N.B. Cn. Ld. Off.) Sunbury Township settlers: Following is a memorial by Robert Smyth (N.B. Cn. Ld. Off.) "In 1765 by letter patent under the great Seal of the Province of Nova Scotia, the Townships of Sunbury, Burton, Gage, Conways & Newton were granted to Thomas FALCONER & others." "The Settlers of Morrisania & Goldsborough, east of Sunbury Township, are omitted from the Studholme report. Among them were Samuel Nivers (Nevers Road), John HAYWARD, whose log house said to be the oldest house in Sunbury County is still standing on the St. John-Fredericton highway near its Junction with the Camp road, Wm. Bakier (Baker's Brook), & Capt. Benj. Glasier. John HAYWARD was the grandfather of Hon. George HAYWARD who died in 1862." "William A. HAYWARD was sheriff of Carleton County..warden of Carleton County 1872-1873-1874 Amos H. HAYWARD; 1876 & 1878 A. H. HAYWARD; 1879 G. Leonard CRONKHITE; 1900-01 G. L. CRONKHITE..." NEW BRUNSWICK HISTORICAL TIDBITS by Mitch Biggar, Sept, 1999 Bugle: On the St. John River 1762-1770- A number of British settlers came to the St. John River, some were traders, others were retired military officers. As early as 1762 a band of New Englanders settled Oromocto Island. In 1763 a band of settlers from Massachusetts found their way up the St. John River & established a township, which they named Maugerville. Joshua Mauger was the English agent through whom they obtained the land. This settlement included what is now Maugerville & Sheffield & by 1765 General Thomas Gage & 19 of his friends from New York were given a grant of 20,000 acres where the French Settlement of Grimross had been. Two years later the grant was transferred to Stephen KEMBLE but continued to be called Gagetown. In the vicinity of what is now Westfield, Captain Beamsley Glasier was given a grant of 5,000 acres. At the mouth of the river at Fort Frederick was a garrison under the command of Captain Gilfred Studholme. On 28 Aug. 1762 James Simonds, Richard Simmons, Hugh Quinton, Francis Peabody and James Quinton arrived from Haverhill, Massachusetts. In 1764 they were joined by William Hazen, James White, & thirty others. In 1765 the Council of Nova Scotia gave John Anderson & Capt. Isaac Caton a licence to trade with the Indians on the St. John River. Anderson established his trading-post at the mouth of the Nashwaak while Caton settled on the Island of Emenenic which has ever since been called CATON'S ISLAND. During this time the Acadians were also given permission to return to New Brunswick provided that they take the oath of allegiance to the British Crown. In 1766, 800 came from Boston, upon their arrival some settled at St. Anne's Point while others settled at Saint John. Three years later in 1770 Lieu. William Owen brought a colony of 30 settlers to Campobello. There were also scattered settlements of New England fisherman along the coast of Charlotte County & the islands of the Bay of Fundy" American Revolution - 1786 (N.B. Cn. Ld. Off.), shows the 2nd Battalion of DeLancy's on west bank of St. John, but the original grant deed of the 1st Battalion of DeLancy's dated 1787 placed the latter corps where the 2nd Battalion of DeLancy's was to have been settled. Again, on the east side of St. John the soldiers of DeLancy's & The Pennsylvania Loyalists did not settle in two distinct grants but were intermingled. The regiments were settled as follows (the modern division of parishes is given). On the east side of the St. John beginning at Pine Island opposite the present Woodstock & coming down river were: 1. 2nd Battalion of DeLancy's Brigade & 2. Pennsylvania Loyalists intermingled in parishes of Northampton & Southampton 3. Queen's Rangers, Parish of Queensborough 4. Royal Guides & Pioneers, Parish of Bright 5. New York Volunteers, in rear of Queen's Rangers 6. Part of the Prince of Wales American Regiment, at foot of Sugar Island 7. Part of the King's American Regiment, about the headwater of the Nashwaaksis 8. Maryland Loyalists on both sides of the mouth of the Nashwaak 9. Half-pay officers of various provincial corps, called the Daniel Lyman grant, on the Nashwaak above the Maryland Loyalists 10. Part of the 1st Battalion of New Jersey Volunteers & part of the King's American Regiment, on the Penniac stream east of the Daniel Lyman grant 11. Part of the 42nd Regiment, along both sides of the Nashwaak above the Daniel Lyman grant 12. 1st Battalion of DeLancy's Brigade, in the Parish of Woodstock 13. King's American Regiment, " " Canterbury 14. King's American Dragoons, " " Prince William 15. 2nd Battalion of New Jersey Volunteers " " Kingsclear 16. Part of the 3rd Batallion of the New Jersey Volunteers settled on arrival at the lower end of the present Fredericton Both the English & New Brunswick governments spent large sums of money on publicity in order to produce immigration from the British Isles to New Brunswick. In 1816 the young province voted $4,000. for immigration & ships were hired to bring the settlers out. Through following years inducements to immigrants were offered in every possible way. Pamphlets were published describing the opportunities in this province, with full directions to the settler how to travel & how to obtain land on arrival. Land was offered at a very low price, 100 acres to each applicant which the settler could pay for, if he so desired, by work on the roads in the vicinity of the land he settled on. The latter arrangement was made because the great dearth of roads was a detriment to settlement... In 1819 the first immigrants brought by government inducements landed in Saint John, 7.000 in number. (David & Mary (Rogers) FAULKNER arrived in 1819 but Etta does not know if they were included in above as no immigration record has been found to date.) A few years later the people of St. John organized the Societies of St. George, St. Andrew & St. Patrick for the purpose of assisting their respective countrymen, but the first immigration society in New Brunswick was organized in Fredericton on Dec. 2nd, 1819, called, "The Emigrant Society". It lasted until 1822. 1819 - Cardigan was first settled by 27 Welsh families from Cardigan in Wales. (Among the families were those of Griffith, Evans, Saunders, Sanson & Stickles. The neighboring Settlement of Woodland was first settled by the Welsh.) 1824 - or about, Birdton settled first by Irish immigrants from County Donegal. Currieburg, on the Royal Road near Stanley, was laid out by the N.B. & N.S. Land Co. (Asa Currie of Currieburg states that Asa & Wm. Currie, who were Portugese but took the names of their foster-father, were the first settlers. They bought the Pugh grant which was granted to John Pugh in 1834.) 1830 - brought the 1st Batt of the Rifle Brigade under Col. Eel (Eel River Carleton County was named after him). Quote from T.C.L. Ketchum's "A Short History of Carleton County New Brunswick":- Carleton County was formed in April ll 1852, & Charles LLOYD represented the Psh Brighton. c1830 Frank McCarron settled in Newburg from Ireland - under THE LABOR ACT whereby work on the public roads enabled a settler to pay for his land, & other measures of assistance. The coming of the railway 1870 put Hartland distinctly on the map...A waterworks system was inaugurated in 1895 & the town incorporated in 1918, with Marvin L. HAYWARD town clerk & solicitor. Early Writers have much to say of the village of Wakefield, & older residents who recall events of long gone days, tell us that Wakefield of old was the VICTORIA CORNER of today. At this point, James R. Tupper had a large store, which was the rendezvous for certain companies of militia during the boundary excitement. Tupper was a man of prominence in the community. When the second battalion (Carleton) was organized he held the place of paymaster. Besides his immediate business interests he had many of the mail contracts & it was under contract with him that the troops were moved from Woodstock to Edmundston during the Trent Affair. In the early days there was a hotel at Wakefield, conducted by one John Moran. As showing the comparatively low price of land, it is interesting to learn that a leading resident & businessman of the location now covered by VICTORIA CORNER, bought seventeen acres of land lying between the main highway & the St. John River for seventeen pairs of long legged boots. Of late years we have all experienced the high price of even short legged boots, (or for a pair of boots), would seem to be unequal barter. Dates: 1774-1783 American Revolution - Quotes from The Daily Gleaner, Fredericton, 19 Jan. 1983 - Revival of Loyalist Regiment Unit Proposed, by Rev. Ted Eaton: "In a very real sense it can be said that the story of New Brunswick as a province began with the surrender of the Southern Army of Edward, Lord Cornwallis, on 19 Oct. 1780. Sent to subdue "the rebellious Southern colonies," his small force of British, Hessian & Loyal American regiments had fought long & hard for King George III. At Guildford Court House, Eutaw Springs, Charleston, Savannah, the Passage of the Dan River, & the Siege of Ninety Six, the New York Volunteers, New Jersey Volunteers, Kings American Regiment, Kings Caroline Rangers & the famous Queens Rangers had shown themselves to be as good fighting troops as any in the world. Their field commanders, O'Hara of the Guards, Lord Rawdon, Colonels John Harris Cruger, Gabriel Ludlow, Isaac Allen, Major John Coffin & Colonel John Graves Simcoe were gallant & competent officers. Unfortunately the higher command of the royal forces in New York was another matter. Staffed mainly by junior officers far more interested in booze & wenches than soldiering & led by elderly generals who were brave enough personally but who, in facing their command responsibilities, behaved like a collection of old maids fearing to find burgulars under their beds, the high command spent most of its time in a sort of self-imposed paralysis. Cornwallis & his men were left without adequate supplies or reinforcements, provided with contradictory orders, & finally abandoned to their fate in the hamlet of York Town, Va. The Southern Army moved out to surrender with its bands playing a tune called "The World Turned Up-Side-Down" & from the point of view of the astounded & appalled American Loyalists, a more bitterly appropriate song would have been impossible to find. The terms of capitulation made the American Loyalists outlaws, traitors, to be killed, maltreated or exiled as the states chose. Cornwallis did his best. He packed as many Loyalists as he could into the sloop Bonetta, sent her off to New York before the surrender, & undoubtedly saved a number of lives by so doing. Nevertheless, after Yorktown even the most optimistic Loyalist lost hope of returning to the new United States & looked for another home. The WAR OF INDEPENDENCE would drag on in useless losses & suffering for almost two more years but for all practical purposes it was over the "King's Friends in America" could only look to a bleak future as political refugees scrambling for fresh lands & appointments somewhere in the remnants of Empire. The only man who saw some good coming about from this disaster was General Sir Guy Carleton who had successfully defended Quebec against Arnold's Expedition & in 1781 found himself sent to New York with instructions to wind down the whole miserable affair as quietly & cheaply as possible. Carleton had grasped the value of Canada at a time when almost all the leaders of Britain saw it as nothing more than a valueless, vast wilderness useful only as a bargaining counter for West Indian sugar islands. Sir Guy saw a chance to secure this enormous untapped land for the Crown. Something had to be done with the Loyalists. A few would find service with the British Army where they & their sons would die valiantly for the King thousands of miles from home. A DeLancey son would perish as Wellington's adjutant general at Waterloo. A few Loyalists could hold office in India & other obscure corners of a spreading Empire but the majority would have to be settled somewhere. The valley of the St. John River in what was then Sunbury County of NOVA SCOTIA offered thousands of empty acres of good farm land. Moreover, the settlement of the Royal Provincial Army in regimental blocks would effectively provide a barrier to any northward expansion of the rebel colonies. The border would be held by battle-hardened troops who could be trusted to fight hard for the King. Not only did they have good reason to detest those who had forced them from their homes & professions, exiling them to what many of them bitterly referred to as "Nova Scarcity", they had nowhere else to go. So it was decided, & throughout 1783 the weary & battered regiments, their families & civilian sympathizers poured into Saint John. Scores of settlements sprang up at Digby, Shelburne, St. Andrews, St. George, Prince William, Fredericton Town, the Nashwaak, St. Martin's & scores of other places in southern New Brunswick. The settlement maps with the names of the regimental blocks reads like a roll of drums Emmerich's Chasseurs, Kings Orange Rangers, South Carolina Royalists, the Guides & Pioneers, Kings American Dragoons, Forty-Second Highlanders, New Jersey Volunteers, Queens Rangers, Royal Fencible Americans, New York Volunteers, Kings American Regiment, Loyal American Regiment, Tarletons British-American Legion & the Armed Boatmen of Long Island." 1775 June 17 Battle of Bunker Hill 1783 British Empire Loyalists arrived to what is now Canada 1784 - military Loyalists arrived in Carleton County, New Brunswick: - 1st Delancey, Kings American 442nd Dragoons, Queens Rangers, New Jersey Volunteers, Emericks Chausser, Prince of Wales American, Guides & Pioneers, Pennsylvania Loyalist, Royal Fencible Americans 1785 - Parish of Northampton was created as part of York County; it included Southampton until 1833 1786 - Parish of Woodstock was created as part of York County - included Dumfries until 1833 & part of Richmond until 1853 1803 - Parish of Wakefield created from unassigned lands in York County; it included Simonds till 1842 & Brighton until 1830 1812 - 1814 War of 1812 1833 - Great Britain abolished slavery in all of her colonies - Southampton Parish was separated from Psh Northampton 1842 - Psh Simonds separated from Psh Wakefield & included Psh Wilmot till 1867 1850 - Fugitive Slave Act was passed, spurring thousands of Negroes to cross into the province 1851 - Victoria County separated from Carleton County 1859 - Psh Brighton included Peel until 1859 1861-1865 American Civil War - when slavery was abolished (slaves had been free on north side of Mason-Dixon line) 1900 ...of South African war. It was at first thought a few months would see the end of the affair, but frontal attacks in mass on experienced rifle shots, scattered & hidden behind rocks, was not the most scientific way of meeting the situation, & to be successful in war, personal bravery must be accomplished with military strategy. Canada provided her quota to the fighting force, & a Carleton County detachment of artillerymen left Woodstock on the 11th of January, 1900. They were given the rousing send off they deserved & on their return on the 17th January 1901, with no single loss, although they participated in several engagements, their reception was most enthusiastic. The County Council, which, when it decides to do anything, does it in no half hearted way, gave the returned veterans a banquet, & each man was presented with a gold watch. Those who were to South Africa were: Lieut. W. C. Good (in command); A. Hayden; Frank Buck; R. S. Welch; George Searle; Wm. Linn; Robert Hughes; Wheeler Leighton; Harold Gray; Harry Dysart; A. Tibbitts; Fred Everett; Frank Brewer; Norman Cameron; Robert Smith; William Kennedy; Harry Hall; Harry McLean; George Parker; George GLEW. World War One - among dead "Eric Mark HAYWOOD". Military of Carleton County Valcartier, Quebec. On 20 Aug. 1914, first detachment of soldiers left Woodstock, consisting of Col. J. R. Kirkpatrick, Major A. N. Vince, Col. W. W. Melville, Major J. J. Bull, Lieuts. E. R. Vince, E. K. Connell, Franklin Rankin & Leo Graves, thirty-one men of the Brighton Engineers, 27 of the 67th Regt. & 17 of the 28th Dragoons. Seven days afterwards, the (27th) a contingent of the Woodstock Field Battery left town for Valcartier under command of Lt. W. C. Good with Lt. R. V. Jones, Sgt. Maj. Tim Wilson, Sergts. Roy Appleby, M. Armstrong, Wm. CURRIE & thirty-eight men. On Sept. 19th, Capt. G. G. McLaughlin, Lieuts. Rideout & Williams took 47 men to Halifax..." (Eric Mark Haywood among them, never to return) Private Publications by Etta Haywood-Faulkner include: Atkinson Boulier Cogswell Crabbe Cronkhite Currie Estey Faulkner Feero 1992 Fiske Glew Hayward The Haywood Family of Victoria Corner 4 Oct. 1993 Jackson 1992 Kimball London Lund-Sewell-London-Kimball-Haywood-Faulkner 22 Feb. 1993 Nason Prosser Sewell 21 Feb 2001 1st for author 2 to __ 3rd to ___ Shaw-Haywood Jan. 1993 Somers Watson Westall 3rd Edition 14 Feb. 1993 A History of The Hillsborough Girls Choir Etta's Sentimental Journey 1871 Census of Carleton County, New Brunswick, Canada 1901 Census of Carleton County, New Brunswick, Canada I cannot claim to be a "genealogist", however, I have attempted to research families in my background, as well as those of my husband. I began collecting & recording this information as early as 1967, partly because my sons were not aware if or how they were related to other persons, & I doubt that they are yet aware or are interested to any great extent at the present time. Perhaps someone following my generation will again show interest in this subject of Family Trees & will find my research of some value or interest. I am using the Roots III program so the individual numbers are automatically assigned by this program. Page 1, the number 1 has been assigned to Dominicus SEWELL, therefore, the number 2 will be seen in the next generation. 2 iii Nicholas SEWELL does not appear elsewhere. NEW BRUNSWICK HISTORICAL TIDBITS by Mitch Biggar, Sept, 1999 Bugle: On the St. John River 1762-1770- A number of British settlers came to the St. John River, some were traders, others were retired military officers. As early as 1762 a band of New Englanders settled Oromocto Island. In 1763 a band of settlers from Massachusetts found their way up the St. John River & established a township, which they named Maugerville. Joshua Mauger was the English agent through whom they obtained the land. This settlement included what is now Maugerville & Sheffield & by 1765 General Thomas Gage & 19 of his friends from New York were given a grant of 20,000 acres where the French Settlement of Grimross had been. Two years later the grant was transferred to Stephen KEMBLE but continued to be called Gagetown. In the vicinity of what is now Westfield, Captain Beamsley Glasier was given a grant of 5,000 acres. At the mouth of the river at Fort Frederick was a garrison under the command of Captain Gilfred Studholme. On 28 Aug. 1762 James Simonds, Richard Simmons, Hugh Quinton, Francis Peabody and James Quinton arrived from Haverhill, Massachusetts. In 1764 they were joined by William Hazen, James White, & thirty others. In 1765 the Council of Nova Scotia gave John Anderson & Capt. Isaac Caton a licence to trade with the Indians on the St. John River. Anderson established his trading-post at the mouth of the Nashwaak while Caton settled on the Island of Emenenic which has ever since been called CATON'S ISLAND. During this time the Acadians were also given permission to return to New Brunswick provided that they take the oath of allegiance to the British Crown. In 1766, 800 came from Boston, upon their arrival some settled at St. Anne's Point while others settled at Saint John. Three years later in 1770 Lieu. William Owen brought a colony of 30 settlers to Campobello. There were also scattered settlements of New England fisherman along the coast of Charlotte County & the islands of the Bay of Fundy" QUOTES FROM "THE HISTORY OF CENTRAL NEW BRUNSWICK by L.M.B. Maxwell":- "The first Maugerville trusteed (from the original at NB Crown Land Office) Granted in 1761 #3 Samuel Nevers, #5 Richard Kembell; #70 Geo Hayward 28 Oct 1779. Richard Kembell from Essex County, Mass George Hayward moved across river to Lincoln The County town & chief business centre of the St. John River valley for almost 20 years was Maugerville. The first representatives elected from the legislature at Halifax from the old Sunbury County of Nova Scotia were Capt. Thomas FALCONER... (note, present Sunbury County, New Brunswick, was part of Nova Scotia) A SEWELL of Maugerville left home for a year to fight in the Revolution for the Crown. (N.B. Cn. Ld. Off.) Sunbury Township settlers: Following is a memorial by Robert Smyth (N.B. Cn. Ld. Off.) "In 1765 by letter patent under the great Seal of the Province of Nova Scotia, the Townships of Sunbury, Burton, Gage, Conways & Newton were granted to Thomas FALCONER & others." "The Settlers of Morrisania & Goldsborough, east of Sunbury Township, are omitted from the Studholme report. Among them were Samuel Nivers (Nevers Road), John HAYWARD, whose log house said to be the oldest house in Sunbury County is still standing on the St. John-Fredericton highway near its Junction with the Camp road, Wm. Bakier (Baker's Brook), & Capt. Benj. Glasier. John HAYWARD was the grandfather of Hon. George HAYWARD who died in 1862." "William A. HAYWARD was sheriff of Carleton County..warden of Carleton County 1872-1873-1874 Amos H. HAYWARD; 1876 & 1878 A. H. HAYWARD; 1879 G. Leonard CRONKHITE; 1900-1901 G. L. CRONKHITE..."
Relationship Chart
A "Relationship Chart" can be used to aid you in determining direct and collateral relationships. 4 GG FATHER __(brothers) _____________________________________4 GG UNC (4 gg son) (4 gg neph) 3 GG FATHER __(brothers) ___________________________ 3 GG UNC 1c5r (3 gg son) (3 gg neph) 2 GG FATHER (brothers) ______________________2 GG UNC 1c4r 2c4r (2gg son) GG FATHER ----(brothers) ___________________GG UNC 1c3r 2c3r 3c3r (gg son) (gg neph) G FATHER _____(brothers)____________ G UNC 1c2r 2c2r 3c2r 4c2r (g son) (g neph) FATHER _______(brothers) UNCLE 1c1r 2c1r 3c1r 4c1r 5c1r (son) (nephew) SELF _________BROTHER 1 COU 2 COU 3 COU 4 COU 5 COU 6 COU SON NEPHEW 1c1r 2c1r 3c1r 4c1r 5c1r 6c1r (father) (uncle) G SON G NEPH 1c2r 2c2r 3c2r 4c2r 5c2r 6c2r (g father) (g unc) GG SON GG NEPH 1c3r 2c3r 3c3r 4c3r 5c3r 6c3r (gg father) (gg unc) You will notice that all the relationships on the chart are recorded for males. Substitute mother, daughter, niece and aunt when figuring the relationship between women. The difference between your relationship to an ancestor and the ancestor's relationship to you is marked on the chart; 4 GG FATHER - 4 gg son. Your relationship to your cousins is the same as their relationship to you.
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