Land Records for Carleton Co., New Brunswick, Canada

Snowflakes are one of nature's of most fragile things, but just look what they can do when they stick together.   Vesta M. Kelly.

Cadastral maps or Grant Reference Plans
The reason for the maps was to show size, ownership and value of land for taxation.  Period covered appears by the Carleton County maps seems to be the mid-1800s but probably drawn much later, based on the land grants up to an unknown cutoff date.  Granted land marked with an  * asterisk on maps. Often neighbours would migrate together, settle near each other in the new communities and be related by marriage. The Knowlesville Settlement is a fine example.  Canadian Geographical Names

Cadastral maps are available from:
Department of Natural Resources and Energy, Fredericton, New Brunswick or
Service New Brunswick   P.O. Box 5001 Edmundston, N.B. Phone : (506) 735-2544. Fax : (506) 735-2036 Approximately $4.00 + tax for a map 2' x 2'8".  plus p&h.  They can process the transaction with your credit card # (Visa or Master) with expiration date.   Photocopy of deed information @ 0.50$ + tax for each copy.    Scale:1" = 1 mile. 

Cadastral maps numbers roughly

Many parishes  overlap

72  Andover &  Perth 73 74
U

S

A
Map No. 111 is shaded. I don't have maps 123 or 124.

81
Kent & Wicklow
82
Kent & Aberdeen
83
91
Wicklow, Wilmot Simonds & Peel
92
Aberdeen & Peel
93
101
Wilmot, Wakefield & Simonds
102
Brighton & Northampton
& York Co.
103
Douglas

Schematic of area covered by maps

111
Woodstock
112
Southampton Parish, York Co.
113
Queensbury

New Brunswick once was the most forested region in Canada

The majority of the land records are at the PANB. The collection contains microfilms and originals of land transactions, maps and indexes. The Archives has the original petitions for Crown lands (RS108, RS272) for the period 1783-1966. The microfilm index (F13763) is available by interlibrary loan.  If a researcher sends the PANB the name and years of residence of an ancestor, the staff can search the index and reply with the appropriate film number.  Photocopies can be obtained.  Refer to the PANB genealogical guide for Carleton County, NB.

The Lands Branch, Department of Natural Resources and Energy, Centennial Building, Fredericton, NB has the original Crown grants, surveys and cadastral maps for New Brunswick (ph 506 453-3826).  The original Crown grants include a map of the granted property, a written description, the number and the date and the grantee's name.  Crown grants contain no biographical data and these are available at a nominal fee.  Land petitions were required in order to qualify for Crown land and it is the petitions from 1783 to 1850 that usually contain biological data.  The 1785 land grants were mostly made to Loyalists. After the petition for land was made and the original crown grant issued, the provincial government was no longer involved.  The Land Registration office was created to handle all subsequent transfers of land and this was at the County Record Office at the courthouse at each county seat.

REGISTRY OFFICE RECORDS (RS85) Carleton County Registry Office Records at the PANB cover the years 1832 to 1974 and include copies of deeds, leases, mortgages, liens and other land transactions. A number of wills (those which transfer title of land) are also found in this series. There is a multi-reel grantor-grantee index at the Archives  [seller (grantor) and the purchaser (grantee)].  At present, land registry office records are not available on interlibrary loan and staff at the Provincial Archives can neither research nor do extensive photocopying of these records on behalf of patrons.

The Grantbook Database  is the searchable cadastral database for land settlement in New Brunswick for the period 1765 to 1800 from the PANB/UNB. Description. The grants are only available at the PANB on microfilm which you can burrow through your library's inter-library loan service or you can order a paper copy of a grant from the PANB for a nominal charge, credit cards accepted.  The grants do not give biographical information but the size, location and description of grant, date granted, etc.  A grant is the first deed for the property from the crown or province to the grantee (purchaser).  Early grants are in manuscript format and maybe difficult to read, many were 'group grants' and may primarily list names.  Later grants are printed forms and include a survey plan, approximately three pages in all.

NBGebWeb Maps for additional land grant maps

Hint: If you are unsure which county your ancestor lived, check the Crown Land Grant Index (RS686), published census books, 'Vital Statistics from New Brunswick Newspapers' (MC1730), probate records indices (RS61- RS75) land petitions indices (RS108, RS272) and the early Provincial directories at the Archives. Source for this information is the booklet 'Family History Resources at the PANB'.

Carleton Co. NBGenWeb Project