Newspaper & Documents write-ups about Carleton County People

Carleton County HomePage

The Carleton Sentinel, The Dispatch and The Press Newspapers were published
in the Town of Woodstock, N.B.

Page 49

Press Newspaper Jan 2, 1899
Plummer - Gardener
A very happy event occurred at Waterville on the evening of the 21st of December. When
Harry Woodford Plummer, was united in holy wedlock to Miss Idella Marion Gardener. The ceremony was performed by Rev. John Dystant. The Methodist church was tastefully decorated and a splendid display of plants added to the beauty of the scene.
The bride was escorted to the alter by
her father, J. M. Gardener Esq. The wedding garment was of white cashmere, with beautiful bridal veil, and the bride looked charming as she stepped to the side of the bridegroom.
The impressive ritual of the Methodist church was read, and the nuptials performed amid the soft strains of the organ presided over by Mrs. Brewer of Woodstock, and as the young couple left the alter the wedding march was rendered in fine style.
A large congregation graced the occasion, and the guests repaired to the residence of the bride's parents where a sumptuous repast awaited them, between seventy and eighty were present and a most enjoyable evening was spent. There was a fine array of wedding presents, and everybody felt to say, we wish you bon voyage across the sea. The ushers were
Alexander Shaw and Frank Hendia arranged everything magnificantly.
Mr. and Mrs. Plummer will reside at Waterville during the winter, and go to their new home in Aroostook Maine in the spring.
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Press Newspaper Jan 2, 1899
Charles McLean
After a very severe and tedious illness
Charles McLean departed this life last Monday. Mr. McLean was born in Johnston, Queen's Co. in January 1851. He was educated at the Paptist Seminary in Fredericton. He was for many years a teacher in this county, both in the town and at Upper Woodstock; he was an excellent teacher. For several years before his death he had conducted an office as collecting Justice. He was an active member of the Orange Association; and a member of the Royal Arcanum, in which he had for a good many years held the office of collector. He was the regular correspondent of the St. John Telegraph, and was a ready and correct reporter. He was a prominent member of the Presbyterian church, and for several years was superintendent of the Sunday School. He had filled many positions, and all with credit. In all the ways, of life he proved himself a reliable man, and a faithful christian.
The funeral took place Wednesday afternoon, when service was held in the Presbyterian church by the pastor, Rev. George Ireland, assisted by Rev. H. D. Marr, pastor of the Methodist church. Woodstock L. O. L. attended in regalia, and concluded the service at the grave.
He leaves a widow and one young son, and five brothers and three sisters.
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Press Newspaper Jan 16, 1899
Howard White
It is about seven months ago that the many friends of
Howard B. White, of Centreville, were pained to hear that he had been stricken with paralysis; and daily enquiry was made, inspired by the hope that symptoms of recovery would be reported. But no promises of recovery were forthcoming. He grew worse rather than better, and he was called to suffer through months of weary, painful illness. Other diseases assisted to deprive him of sight and strength; and he bore the gradual wasting away and suffering without a murmur; till on Wednesday last death terminated the struggle. His christian faith sustained him through all.
He was a member of the Free Baptist church at Tracey Mills. The funeral took place Friday afternoon, and was largely attended by friends from all parts of the county. The body was interred in the family lot in the Episcopal cemetery at Centreville.
Howard B. was the eldest son of G. W. White, of Centreville; he was in the 59th year of his age; and leaves a wife and two sons. He was a man of broad opinions, generous impulses, and tender affections. He possessed good business ability, and would have been more successful in this respect if he had been less kind hearted and generous. Many more than his immediate relatives will keenly regret his departure in the midst of life, and his many good qualities and kind deeds will continue to live fresh in the memory of his numerous friends.
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Press Newspaper April 20, 1891
FROM OUR CORRESPONDENTS
Lower Williamstown
(excerpts)
The home of Mr. and Mrs. Robt. Anderson of this place was the scene of a very pleasant event on Thursday, April 9th, the occasion being the marriage of their neice,
Mrs. Carrie Ladner to Mr. Henry Duncan of Beaconsfield, Victoria County. The marriage ceremony was performed at three o'clock , p.m., by Rev. J. G. Harvey of Centreville, after which a most elaborate supper was served by the hostess. The bride was very becomingly attired in a costume of white embroidered muslin and lace, with the customary boquet. The presents were both numerous and costly. After partaking of the bountiful repast, the happy couple departed to their future home in Beaconsfield, amid the good wishes and hearty congratulations of the crowd of relations and friends who were present.

The many friends of
Mr. Archie Anderson will be pleased to hear that he is recovering from his last bad attack of illness.
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Press Newspaper April 13, 1891
BIRTHS
Dow.- Thursday, April 9th, to the wife of Conductor Robt. Dow, a son.
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MARRIAGES
Press Newspaper April 13, 1891
Dempsey - Collins.- At Houlton, April 1st, by Rev. Father Lonergan, Mr. Daniel Dempsey of East Boston, Mass., and Miss Agnes Collins of Woodstock, N.B.
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Press Newspaper April 13, 1891
Smith - Campbell.- At the residence of the officiating minister, on the 2nd instant, by Rev. C. T. Phillips, Elmer Smith and Mina Campbell, of Brighton, Carleton County.
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Press Newspaper April 13, 1891
Pickles - Appleby.- At the residence of the officiating minister, on the 10th instant, by Rev. C.T. Phillips, Frank Pickles of Woodstock and Lottie Appleby of Millville, York County.
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Press Newspaper April 13, 1891
Green - Ruth.- At the residence of the officiating minister, by Rev. C.T. Phillips, on Easter Monday, Henry Green and Lucy Ruth, of Lincus, Maine.
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DEATHS
Press Newspaper April 13, 1891
Mills.- At Tracy Mills, carleton County, March 21st, Sarah Jane, wife of Rev. Hezekiah Mills and daughter of Deacon Cornelius Connolly, of Jacksontown, aged 61 years.
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Press Newspaper April 13, 1891
Wasson.- At Lindsay on the 8th instant, after a short illness, Lydia C., aged 19 years and 8 months, wife of George A. Wasson, and daughter of Robert and Sophia McLellan, of Lindsay, 7th Tier, Carleton Co. (Sentinel please copy.)
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Press Newspaper April 13, 1891
O'Donnell.- On Thursday, March 26th, Theresa, wife of Thomas O'Donnell, leaving a husband and seven children to mourn the loss of a kind wife and loving mother.
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Press Newspaper January 9, 1899
IN THE POLICE COURT
Fined for Cruelty to Animals.
Albert Brown and David Raymond were before the police magistrate, Friday and Saturday, charged with illtreating swine. The charge was made by Mr. Colpitts, agent for the society for prevention of cruelty to animals. The charge is incident to the manner in which slaughter houses are conducted, and in which swine are kept in connection therewith.
Mr. Colpitts testified to the location and condition of the slaughter house, and the number of hogs kept there, which was 10 or 11. He was there Monday, the coldest day of the season. The pen in which the pigs were kept was only rough boarded, and the doors were open. There was no straw nor bedding to protect them from the cold. No evidence of any feed except the bones of cattle and the skeleton of a horse. The larger pigs tried to get some of the horse and drove the little ones away. The yard was very filthy. There were three dead pigs in the yard, which had apparently died from exposure and starvation.

The defence was that the pigs were well cared for, and in the usual manner customary among butchers. They claimed that they were supplied with sufficient offal for feed, and sufficient straw for bedding.

Judge Dibblee reviewed the evidence and said he felt it his duty to the dumb animals to make it plain to the butchers that they cannot be allowed to treat dumb animals as they like. He had been informed that the slaughter houses are kept in such a bad condition that cattle can only be got into them with great difficulty, and sometimes the animals tails are twisted till the joints are cracked, and that they are dogged and beaten unmercifully. He said he would instruct all peace officers of the town if they hear of any such cases, to lay the information before him and he would see that proper authority should be exercised, and the law enforced for the protection of the animals. He believed that a light fine in this case would accomplish just as much as a heavy one, and he would therefore put the fine at $2.00 and costs.
A. B. Connell was counsel for the prosecution, and F. B. Carvell for the defence.
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Press Newspaper Jan 2, 1899
Frank Wright of Grafton is very ? ill, and doctors have pronounced the cause to be cancer in the stomach.
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Press Newspaper Jan 2, 1899
Clara, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jeremiah Bragdon, of Grafton, died Thursday morning of consumption. She was 21 years of age. The bereaved parents have general sympathy in this sore trial.
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Press Newspaper Jan 2, 1899
Mr. Weldon W. Melville of Bath, and Miss Ella Gertrude, eldest daughter of William Tompkins Esq., of East Florenceville, were married at the residence of Mr. Tompkins on December 28th, by the Rev. A. H. Hayward.
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Press Newspaper Jan 2, 1899
Harry W. McKinley and Miss Jessie Hanson, both of Woodstock, were married in Houlton, December 29th, by Rev. Mr. Owens. A number of the Sons of Canada assembled Friday night, and proceeded to the home of the newly married couple, and presented them with a set of dishes. A pleasant evening was spent.
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Press Newspaper Jan 9, 1899
Mrs. Archibald Scott died at her home in Glassville on Wednesday December 28th, after an illness of several years. She was the only daughter of the late Robert and Tillie Robinson. She was 63 years of age; and leaves a husband, one son and one daughter to mourn the loss of a faithful, loving and true wife and mother. She was born at Lancaster, St. John.
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Press Newspaper Jan 9, 1899
Mr. William Hamilton
Mr. Wm. Hamilton died at his home on Connell street, Monday, Jan. 2nd. Mr. Hamilton was born at Greenwich, August 26th, 1815, and was therefore in the 84th year of his age. He came to St. John in 1854, and to Woodstock in 1855, and had lived here ever since. For 33 years he did a successful tinsmith's business on Main street; and erected the building now occupied by his sons William and James, and J. C. Milmore. He was a man of sterling integrity, a good citizen, and a kind friend. A widow, one daughter and three sons survive him.
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Press Newspaper Jan 16, 1899
A Swell Dinner
Christmas day
Mrs. A. E. Francis of Connell street gave a swell dinner to her relatives, the "Nelson Family," which was a very brilliant affair. Dinner was served at 5 o'clock. The guests sat down to a well filled table which completely filled the spacious dining hall. After the table was cleared the party adjourned to the next room where there was a large Christmas Tree beautifully decorated with China lanterns and miniature bunting. The presents were both costly and numerous. After the distribution of gifts a male quartette rendered some of their choicest selections, eliciting rounds of applause from all parts of the house. The hostess then passed round refeshments in the form of oranges, bananas and grapes, with other fruits, cake and wines of various kinds. After the rendering of "God save the Queen" by the male quartette the guests departed, pronouncing Mrs. F. an excellent hostess.-Com.
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Press Newspaper Jan 9, 1899
Miss Maggie Boyer, who for two or three years has been confined to her bed, is greatly improving under the skilful treatment of Dr. Saunders. She is able to move around the house and take light exercise.
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Press Newspaper Jan 9, 1899
A spirited young horse driven by
John Emery, of Jacksonville, made matters lively on the town streets for a few minutes Saturday afternoon. He got away from his driver and broke from the sleigh. The most damage done was breaking the plate glass in one of the windows of the People's Bank.
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Press Newspaper Jan 9, 1899
There was an interesting and pleasant entertainment in the Presbyterian church at Greenfield last Wednesday evening. The program consisted of music, readings, recitations, and addresses. There were strong reinforcements from surrounding localities. Bristol's fine choir was very largely represented along with its leader,
Miss Ella Tompkins. Two pleasing features were a duet by Misses Semple, and a solo by Lulu Boyer.
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Press Newspaper March 23, 1891
ROTARY MILL
Connell Bros., whose manufactures have received widespread notoriety have, recently completed for
W. C. Purvis, Carleton, St. John, a rotary mill of more than ordinary merit. The chief distinguishing feature between this and the ordinary rotary is that it has a rope feed instead of a rack and pinion. The advantages of this feed being a saving in wear of machinery, and that it cuts lumber truer and smoother. It is also supplied with four patent champion set dogs, by which a crooked log or piece of timber may be held steadily and firmly in place till it is all sawed up. It will take on a log fifty feet long. The carriage is made of southern pine. The arbor is of hammered steel with solid collar. This is the second mill of the kind built by this firm this winter; the other being now in operation in Sawyer's Mill. Besides these mills, this firm have in the last three months built seven shingle machines, one of which was for a firm in Quebec. They have also built a steam engine, which is now in use in their machine shop, besides doing their usual amount of other work. They are including mowing machines in their manufactures this year, of the celebrated Congo pattern. The fact that a St. John millnian should come to Woodstock for his machinery speaks more highly than anything else could for the enterprise of the firm that he is patronizing.
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Press Newspaper March 23, 1891
OBITUARY
Mrs. Eulia Brewer, wife of Alonzo G. Brewer, died in Brookline, Wednesday, Mar. 11, aged 30 years and 10 months. She was the daughter of Zebulon and Mary Ann Birmingham, and was born in Victoria Corner New Brunswick, in May 1860. From early childhood she was religiously inclined, and at age 15 years made public profession of religion, and engaged in the active duties of the Christian life. Married, at the early age of 17, she met with womanly judgement the responsibilities of the conjugal relation. Though modest and retiring she won the favor of acquaintances and made lasting friendships. Her religious experience was clear and assuring, characterized by steady confidence rather than joyousness. She was devoted to her family, and to the church, generous to the poor, and abundant in unselfish labors for those needing her aid. Many, stimulated by example to consistent living, will long remember her unblemished life.
Her health became impaired about two years ago, and for months constantly declined, till, in the early spring of 90, she left Brookline to seek restoration in the place of her nativity. Familiar scenes and the greeting of friends ever dear, seemed for a time to give renewed strength, but the insidious foe did not relinguish his grasp. In cloud and sunshine, relentless consumption was doing its fatal work. Soon after her return to Brookline, last autumn, she showed encouraging signs of returning vitality, but these were illusive. A stern battle for life was waged from that time till her decease.
At times her suffering was severe, but her patience was equal to the intensity of the struggle. She endured without a murmur. In all the trying contest she expressed strong confidence in the Lord, and showed a Christian spirit of surrender to his will. Her light and joy increased as the final hour approached, and just before her departure she expressed unusual animation and joy as in the presence of the glorious Saviour.
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MARRIAGES
Press Newspaper March 2, 1891
Adams - Connolly.- At the home of the bride's parents, Jacksontown, N.B., on Feb 24th, by Rev. B. H. Thomas, Capt. John W. Adams (67th Battalion of Canadian Militia) to Miss A. Maude Connolly.
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Press Newspaper March 2, 1891
Dent - Miller. - At Woodstock, on the 24th inst., by the Rev. W. Dobson, T. S. Dent, Esq., to Mrs. Eliza Miller, both of Woodstock.
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Press Newspaper March 2, 1891
Caldwell - Foster.- Feb. 12, at the residence of the bride's father by Rev. J. M. Rogers and Rev. R. W. Hamilton, Charles Sproule Caldwell, solicitor, Londonderry, Ireland, only son of John Caldwell, and grand nephew of the late Casper Caldwell, of Florenceville, New Brunswick, to Jennie Hamilton, younger daughter of Samuel Foster, of Ballinacross, Londonderry. ( Sentinel & St. John papers please copy.)
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Press Newspaper April 20, 1891
Hartland
Wesley Stevens, of Somerville, left for the West Tuesday morning. He was a member of Waloostook Court, No. 103, I.O.F., located at Hartland, and the members showed the esteem in which this brother is held by the Court by entertaining him at an Oyster Supper at Thornton's Hotel after the meeting of the Court on Monday evening. Major G. E. Boyer, C R, occupied the chair. Toasts were proposed to the Queen, by the chairman; B. N. Shaw, the guest of the evening, responded to by Mr. Stevens; D. H. Pyne, the Order of Foresters, responded to by Major Boyer and S. Brown, D. C. R. The bachelors, proposed by B. N. Shaw, brought to their feet Messrs. John Plummer, C. H. Taylor and Stanley Hatfield. The ladies, proposed by George Richardson, brought up a number of young men, all ready to respond to so worthy a subject. Gideon Phillips and L. E. McFarlan responded to the toast of " new made members." In all the responses allusions were made to the departing brother, expressive of the high esteem in which he is held as a member of the Order and of the community, and regrets for his intended departure.
James Carr is being congratulated on the recent advent of an addition to his family__it is a boy.

W. & W. Raymond, of Simonds, have purchased the Hartland ferry from Mrs. Shaw.

A petition to the Legislature for a grant to the ferry here has been circulated, but too late to be of any service.
April 14, 1891
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Press Newspaper Jan 26, 1891
Eel River (excerpts)
Miss Sadie Scott has gone to Augusta, where she intends to remain for some time with her uncle, Mr. H. S. Scott. Sadie will be greatly missed, both in the Sabbath school and the Division.

Mr. Alonso Dow's little daughter Ruby, while going to school on Thursday of last week fell and broke her arm. Dr. Turner was called and set the fractured arm, which is now doing as well as can be expected.

Mrs. Joel Young, we hear, had the misfortune to break her arm in two places about the same time. Dr. Turner was also called to attend her.

The Sunday school of this place elected officers last Sunday for the ensuing year:
Mr. Girdwood, Supt;
Edy Taylor, Assist. Supt.;
Lila Edwards, Sec.;
Jerome Porter, Treas.

Mrs. Edward Taylor, of Green Bush, was much pleased to receive a visit from her brother whom she hadn't heard from for over ten years. He had been travelling in the Western States.

Mr. Edward Higgins lost a valuable horse last week, it broke loose and ate about a peck of wheat.

Mr. Higgens, while working at the forge was struck by a sliver of iron he was hammering, cutting him in the left eye; he is unable to work at his trade.
January 18, 1891
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Press Newspaper Jan 3, 1884
On Christmas Eve Mrs. McDonald, widow of the late James McDonald, met with a very serious accident. She was coming from a neighbors house when she was struck by a team, by which she was dragged along the road about two rods. The team drove right along as though nothing happened. John Hutchinson, who happened to be passing along, carried the old lady to her home. On examination of her injuries it was found, two ribs were broken from her backbone and other considerable bruises sustained. She is now in a critical state, but hopes are entertained of her recovery.
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Press Newspaper Jan 3, 1884
About 8 o'clock Saturday evening the alarm of fire was given. Flames had been discovered creeping out alongside the flue of Robt. Humes' Cottage, situated near the north end of Main St. The Engine was quickly placed at the tank near Small & Fisher's Warehouse, but it was found there was not sufficient good hose to reach the burning building. Had there been the fire could have been promptly mastered. While the blaze could not be successfully combatted by hand, many willing workers saved what they could of the furniture and household effects. The shed was torn down and the barn was thus saved. As it, was, however, considerable property beside the house and ell was destroyed. Mr. Hume had insurance in the Liverpool, London & Globe, of which J. C. Winslow is agent, as follows:- $1,200 on the house; $150 on the ell, and $400 on the furniture.
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PERSONAL (excerpts)
Press Newspaper Jan 26, 1891
Mrs. Wayman A. Smyth will leave on Friday next for Fredericton en route to Southern California to join her husband at Los Angeles. Mrs. Smyth will spend a few days in Fredericton and Boston before proceeding on her transcontinental journey.
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Mrs. E. Hutchinson, who has been travelling in the Western States for a little over a year, returned on the 16th inst., and is the guest of Enoch Campbell. She expresses herself as being well pleased with some portions of the West, but not with others, and on the whole is well satisfied with N.B. as a country to live in.
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Press Newspaper April 6, 1891
THE LATE ANTHONY KEARNEY
The death of
Anthony Kearney occurred after an illness of several weeks at the residence of Mr. David W. Smith, Jacksonville, on the 19th March, aged 71 years, leaving two sons and a large circle of other relatives to mourn their loss. He was born and always resided near the scene of his death, and was widely and prominent known both in public and private life, having served many years as member of the County Council and in other prominent offices, living the life of a true Christian throughout, and being beloved and highly esteemed. His loss will be mourned by all who knew him.
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MARRIAGES
Press Newspaper Feb 16, 1891

Bourne- Crawford.-
On the 4th inst., at St. Paul's church, Hampton, by the Rev. Geo. F. Maynard, Frank W. Bourne, formerly of Woodtsock, to M. Addie, youngest daughter of the late Wm. Crawford, of Hampton, N.B.
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Press Newspaper Feb 6, 1891
Williams - Anderson.- At the residence of the officiating minister, Woodstock, Jan.28th, by Rev. G. W. McDonald, Mr. Clinton Williams, of Poquioc, York Co., and Miss Ella Anderson, of the same place.
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DEATHS
Press Newspaper Feb 16, 1891
Hale.- At Pembroke on the 15th inst., from the effects of la grippe, William Hale, aged 61 years. His end was peace. Funeral from the F. C. Baptist church, Pembroke, Tuesday, at 1 p.m.
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Press Newspaper Jan 26, 1891
THE WARDEN DID IT.
On Wednesday as the County Council adjourned at noon Warden Smith invited the Councillors, Clerk, Reporters, and Auditor to take dinner with him at the
Trecartin House. Those who have not dined at this excellent establishment on similar occasions must not suppose it necessary to go to the city to find a first class menu. Mrs. Trecartin is always equal to the occasion, and her efficient hospitality has done much towards popularizing the Shire Town. After dinner Saml. Watts was called to the chair, and on behalf of the Council read a very flattering address to the Warden. The Warden replied in pleasing terms, and then followed a perfect round of speeches which were highly enjoyable.
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Press Newspaper Jan 26, 1891
L. Ervin has just finished wiring up the residence of Garden Bros. for electric lamps and has made a very neat job of it. He is now putting in the lamps; the current is to be supplied from Small & Fisher's dynamo.
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Press Newspaper Jan 26, 1891
The close season for deer began on the 16th inst., and as there is but little of either sport or profit in shooting this noble animal at this season the law should receive the strictest respect. The fine for infringement is $100, one half of which goes to the informer__so don't shoot.
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MARRIAGES
Press Newspaper Feb 9, 1891
Sutton - Stapleford.- At Woodstock, Feb 2nd, by Elder John Hutchinson, John Sutton and Myrtle Stapleford, both of Woodstock, N.B.
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DEATHS
Dugan.- In East Hampden, Jan 29,
Barbara wife of the late Owen Dugan, aged 69 years, 11 months and 28 days. Funeral from St. Marys church, Saturday, at 10 a.m.
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Press Newspaper Feb 9, 1891
Sherwood.- At Bristol, Jan 3rd, of bronchitis, Zella Jennie, infant daughter of W. A. and Lizzie A. Sherwood, aged 1 year and 22 days. Her remains were taken to Waterville for Interment.
T
he gardener took the bud away,
We tended with such care;
She's blooming in his home on high,
We soon shall meet her there.

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Press Newspaper Feb 9, 1891
Kearney.- At Kamloops, B.C., Dec 19th, Asa D. Kearney, aged 22 years, 1 month, youngest son of Alexander Kearney, Northampton, N.B.
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Press Newspaper Feb 9, 1891
Davis.- At Woodstock, on Friday morning, 6th instant, after a lingering illness, Hugh Davis, leaving a wife and son to mourn their great loss.
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Press Newspaper April 20, 1891
About half past two o'clock Tuesday morning the fire bell rang__the roof of Estey's Carriage Factory was aflame. Firemen were soon on the ground and the flames promptly extinguished, but not till Mr. Estey had suffered a loss of between four and five hundred dollars to his building and stock. He put a crew to work at the building next day, and by Saturday night had it repaired again.
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Press Newspaper March 30, 1891
OBITUARY
Hepsy Estella, eldest daughter of Thomas and Rhoda Estey, of Woodstock, died at Marysville, York Co., March 4th, aged 19 years. Our young Sister found the Saviour a few years ago and continued firm in allegiance to him until her death. A naturally sweet disposition improved and carried God-ward by gracious experiences made her life pleasant to herself and won the love of her companions; so that when death came many of them were ready to manifest sorrow though they had known her but a short time. Her last monents were peaceful and confident. The sorrowing parents have the consolation that the seeming family loss is her eternal gain. May the presence of the comforter be the mourners support.
G. W. McD.
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Press Newspaper March 30, 1891
Mr. Geo. H. Saunders and Mr. John Connor of this town have sold their handsome black stallion, Allright, jr., record 242, to Mr. Jarvis Kitchen, of Houlton, Me., for a handsome figure. We understand Mr. Kitchen intends keeping him in Houlton this summer for stock purposes, after which he will be fitted and handled for speed with hopes of entering the '30 list. This horse can do it if properly handled as he has lots of speed. We wish Mr. Kitchen every success with his handsome animal.
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Press Newspaper March 30, 1891
Judge Palmer has issued an injunction restraining Scott Act Inspector McClintock from further proceedings under the G. T. Act, until the points raised are decided by the Supreme Court which meets second Tuesday in April. The injunction was issued on the application of S. A. Perkins and Trueman Jack. The point raised is that the Municipal Council have no authority to appoint or pay an Inspector.
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Press Newspaper April 20, 1891
PERSONAL (excerpts)
Walter Hay
, Richmond, started for Montana last week, in response to a telegram from his brother, who is seriously ill.
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Press Newspaper April 20, 1891
Geo. N. Clark has moved his family to Newcastle.
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Press Newspaper April 20, 1891
Wilfred Sipprell and Wesley Stevens, Somerville, left here Tuesday for British Columbia.
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Press Newspaper April 20, 1891
R. J. Potts and bride, formerly Miss Barnes of Richibucto, arrived home at Hartland, Saturday, 11th instant, from Salem, Mass.
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Press Newspaper April 20, 1891
George S. Fisher and Mrs. Fisher returned home to Chatham Friday.
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Press Newspaper April 6, 1891
Mr. C. Turner, of the Turner House, Chapel street, picked up a small Brooch on the street this morning, and will restore it to the owner by calling on him.
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Press Newspaper April 6, 1891
The people in West Glassville are preparing to build a Public Hall for religious and moral purposes. They have secured a lot; Mr. Wm. Rogers has generously donated a quarter of an acre for that purpose, and they have the frame. The building will be 24 x 34 and will be a credit to that prosperous locality.
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Press Newspaper April 6, 1891
Elder D. D. Page, entered upon his duties as pastor of the Advent church here yesterday.
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Press Newspaper April 20, 1891
BIRTHS
Hay.- On Friday, April 17th, the wife of W. W. Hay, a son.
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MARRIAGES
Roark - Gray.- On the 11th March, at the residence of the bride's mother in Wilmot, by Rev. J. G. Harvey, Mr. Rainsford Roark of Andover, to Miss Bertha Gray of Wilmot.
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Press Newspaper April 20, 1891
Duncan - Ladner.- On the 9th of April, at the residence of Mr. Robert Anderson in Wilmot, by Rev. J. G. Harvey, Mr. Henry Duncan of Andover, to Mrs. Carrie Ladner of Wilmot.
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Press Newspaper April 20, 1891
DEATHS
Bell.-
At Woodstock, on the 11th instant, Jeremiah Fraser, aged 10 months, youngest child of Henry J. and Alice Bell.
"Of such is the Kingdom of Heaven." - (Fredericton papers please copy.)
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Press Newspaper April 20, 1891
For Sale.- That comfortable house situated on the Houlton Road. This house contains 6 rooms, 2 halls, clothes presses, pantry, etc., with large yard adjoining. This place must be sold immediately, as I intend leaving the Town. Also, a fine young Jersey Cow, cheap.
Mrs. Daniel Murphy
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Press Newspaper April 20, 1891
PRIVATE SALE
To be sold at Private Sale, previuos to the 1st of June, a lot of Household Furniture. May be seen at the residence of
Mrs. Jas. Munro, opp. College.
April 11, '91.
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Press Newspaper April 27, 1891
A Gentleman in this town has a brother living in Minneapolis, wishing to keep conversant with the family connections, he in writing a short time ago asked his brother the names of his children and received reply, "Lizzie, John, Robert, Benjamin, George, David, Sadie, Mabel, Charles, Edwin, Ernest, Blaine and Fannie __I can't think of any more at present.
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Press Newspaper April 27, 1891
Born in New Brunswick. _
On Sunday evening, April 11th, the Rev. W. C. Weir; of the Vancouver, B. C., Baptist church, preached on "Divine Compensations for Our Trials" having special reference to the sickness and death of
Charles C. Versey. Mr. Versey was born in Kings county, N.B., 1832, and resided for a number of years in the town of Woodstock. Having lost his first wife in 1860, he travelled considerable until 1868, when he settled permanently in Sydney, C. B., where he remained till 1887. Since that time Vancouver has been his home. (Globe

Press Newspaper April 6, 1891
VENDOME RESTAURANT
With commendable enterprise
Mr. Chas. Budden, of the Vendome Restaurant, has been making elaborate improvements in connection with this popular establishment. A large dining hall has been added to the main saloon for the accommodation of those wishing meals. The whole building inside has been kalsomined in handsome and artistic colors, and the woodwork painted and grained. Improvements have also been made in the large dining hall upstairs. This work was done by L. A. Abbott and Lee Donoho. Everything about the place has a neat and tasty appearance. The accommodations are first class, and permanent or transient boarders will be accommodated with all the comforts of a home. The sleeping rooms have been newly furnished throughout. Meals will be provided at all reasonable hours, with a first class bill of fare to select from. A large stock of cigars, tobaccos, fruits, canned goods, confectionery, etc., fresh and of the best quality, will always be kept on hand. A share of the public patronage is respectfully solicited. Queen street, two doors from the Exchange Hotel.
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Press Newspaper April 20, 1891
C. Budden of the Vendome Restaurant has an eye to business; in his window is a placard with the unique inscription "I will positively give no credit to any man, devil or tramp after April 10, 1891."
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Press Newspaper April 6, 1891
Glassville (excerpts)
The fine residence _certainly the finest in Glassville _lately put up by
Mr. David Lamont, our enterprising blacksmith, is being rapidly finished by another crack tradesman, Mr. Joseph Lee of Beaufort, a first class framer and joiner, without a wrinkle. Mr. Lamont's house will be an orament to the village. The proprietor has now been in business here for some time; and from the manner in which he has conducted his business, always meeting his obligations with promptitude, while giving the greatest satisfaction to his employers, he has won the confidence and secured the patronage of all. Go on, young man. May your bow abide in strength and your cup overflow. Above all, let us soon have that expected house warming, when we hope to welcome " an addition to the family " _not in the popular sense, be it observed _ but in the shape of a full grown, finely developed, and beautifully formed daughter of Eve. Again we say, may your bow abide in strenth, and your cup to overflow.

Several letters have of late been recieved from our worthy citizen,
Mr. Robert Miller, now on a visit to friends in U. S., from which we learn he is well and enjoying himself in studing the Manners and Customs of Barbarous Nations.

We are glad to learn that our esteemed friend,
Mr. Christopher Macbrine, who has been so long confined to a bed of sickness, is somewhat better. We shall all be glad to hear of his speedy and complete recovery.

Mr. Lindsay Robinson, the other day killed a fine moose back of friend Tweedie's lot, East Glassville. "A day of feasting," etc, etc.

Several teams passed through Glassville on Saturday in charge of
Mr. Murdock Mackenzie, loaded up with settees for the new Baptist meeting house, Highlands. The building will shortly be opened for public worship.

We have just heard that
Wellington Hanington has departed this life__as a bachelor__ and is now realizing all the bliss of the beatific vision of his "future state." He sweetly fell asleep in the arms of___Requiescat in pace. But for all that the boys are preparing for a roaring charivari.
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Press Newspaper April 6, 1891
Debec (excerpt)
Capt. R. Kirpatrick and Mr. Kearney accompanied
Mr. Joel Henderson to St. John last week for medical treatment. It is to be hoped that he will soon be restored to good health again.
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Press Newspaper April 13, 1891
The death of Joel Henderson, Debec, of conjestion of the brain, gave that community a painful shock.
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Press Newspaper April 6, 1891
Debec (excerpts)
Mr. P. Lenehan
has sent away some 15 carloads of potatoes at from $1.60 to $2.10 per barrel.

Last Saturday night a mob of ruffians attempted to mob and waylay
Mr. Benn when he was returning from a Law Court. I am informed that certain parties distinguished for their lawless proclivities and sneaking treacherous acts, vowed that if the law went against one of their clan Mr. Benn would not reach home the night of the trial without two black eyes instead of one. Are such acts to go unpunished in a land of law and equity.
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Press Newspaper April 6, 1891
East Knowlesville (excerpt)
It is always gratifying to notice the triumphs of genuis, especially in those mechanical arts, which relate to the comforts of life.
Mr. Olive Hemphill, Esq., a young gentlemen as distinguished for his great inventive power, as for his success as an agriculturist, has just succeeded in turning out a patent bootjack, with no other tools than an axe and jack-knife, adapted for every description of boot, shoe, slipper, dancing pump, larigan, shoepack and moccasin__male or female__of any size__ wet or dry. The ease, with which such can be removed in a twinkling from the pedal extremities of one's corporal frame is truly astonishing. Everyone testifies to the inestimable value of the priceless boon which our friend has conferred on suffering humanity. The jack is as remarkable for the simplicity of its construction, as for its efficiency. There are no awkward handles to hang on by __no slewing pirot to balance yourself on __no chair attachment to study yourself in, but a simple jack and nothing more. All you have to do is to place the heel of your boot, etc., in the crotch, and in a moment you are free from every encumbrance, sock, drawers, pants and all.
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Press Newspaper April 13, 1891
Fred Moore has the contract for log driving on the river for four years in the corporation limits.

Press Newspaper April 13, 1891
John H. Reid
, the veteran horseman, has been seriously ill for two weeks; says the Farmer.

Press Newspaper April 13, 1891
Rev. Thos. Connor
has moved into Town again, having purchased the Williamson Fisher house, corner Richmond and Cross streets.

Press Newspaper April 13, 1891
Moses McNally
, one of the oldest farmers on the river, died at his residence, Queensbury, on Thursday the 2nd instant, at the advanced age of 82 years.

Press Newspaper April 13, 1891
A St. John Globe despatch from Perth, April 11th says:
Jas. Grant, of Lower Perth, employed with Messrs. Kitchen on the Tobique Valley Railway construction, was crushed beneath a mass of overhanging rock, which fell upon him this afternoon at the Narrows. Both arms and legs are broken and he is internally injured. His recovery is impossible. he leaves a wife and family.
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Press Newspaper April 27, 1891
Willard Kitchen has removed his business office from Fredericton to Andover to be near the construction of the Tobique Valley Railroad, which will be vigorously pushed forward this summer.
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Press Newspaper April 13, 1891
C. Estey has enlarged his carriage factory by raising it a story higher, giving him ample room for paint and trimming shops. He will be ready to meet his customers with a good lot of carriages.

Press Newspaper April 13, 1891
Mrs. Connell's green house is just now a place of promising beauty. A rose bush of fifteen years growth spreads its branches, loaded with beautiful white roses all over the upper area. Several rare specimens, especially of ferns are to be seen here. The time of transplanting is near and then the beautiful garden and grounds become a luxurious enjoyment to the public eye.
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Press Newspaper April 27, 1891
Joseph Smith's house, Oakville, was burned Saturday the 11th inst., with most of the contents.

Press Newspaper April 27, 1891
At the Town Council meeting last Monday evening William Karnes Tender $240 per year for keeping the Poor House and managing the farm was accepted.

Press Newspaper April 27, 1891
Rupert Hutchinson lost his overcoat Saturday, he left it at Queen street siding and while absent some one came along who preferred the coat to his character and took it with him.

Press Newspaper April 27, 1891
G. C. Watson, who has been working up a furniture business at Hartland, will in a few days move his family from Jacksontown to Hartland. Mrs. Watson is opening a millinery establishment.
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Press Newspaper Feb 2, 1891
PROBATE COURT
The last will and testament of
Sedgefield D. Shaw, late of Hartland, deceased, was admitted to probate in the Probate Court on Thursday, and letters testamentary thereof granted to Charlotte A. Shaw, sole executrix. The estate was entered at $3000, J.J. Gallagher, Proctor for Execution.
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Press Newspaper Feb 2, 1891
STILL FLOATING AROUND
It seems there are still some relics of the rebellion in the states of thirty years ago, floating around in the form of confederate currency. The Mr. Ganong referred to in the notice below clipped from The Taunton (Mass) Gazette is
F. G. Ganong, a native of Woodstock.
A German woman entered Ganong's store yesterday and after selecting some purchases tendered a $10 confederate note for payment to one of the young clerks and the latter returned her change in good United States money. The character of the note was discovered by the cashier before the woman left the store and she was stopped and the money demanded. In explaining the affair she said that the bill had been given to her in Boston for ten dollars and she took it for that. She returned the change which the clerk had given her and then paid up in American coin.
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Press Newspaper March 2, 1891
On Thursday night last between the hours of nine and ten o'clock fire was discovered breaking from a building on Main Street, owned by B.B. Manzer. The fire originated in a room occupied by E. M. Campbell, Photographer. The firemen were not long in reaching the scene and soon had the flames under control. Considerable damage was done; however, before the alarm was given.
Those who suffered loss were: B. B. Manzer, building; J. C. Hartley , building; Bailey Bros., shoe store; H. V. Dalling, jewellry store; E. M. Campbell, Photographer; H. V. Mooer's, harness maker; G. McHarg, tailor. All the losses with the exception of G. McHarg are covered by insurance. After the fire had been extinguished Messrs. Bailey Bros. and H. V. Dalling treated the firemen and those who had assisted at the fire to an oyster supper.
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Press Newspaper March 2, 1891
The Wilbur House
, of Woodstock, was taxed to its utmost last week, when the Orange Grand Lodge met in that town. The popularity of this hotel is brought about by the fact that they have comfortable rooms, a good table, attentive waiters, and the smiling countenance of "Jim", the popular clerk. The travelling public fully appreciate the efforts of the proprietors of the Wilbur.- (St. Croix Courier.)
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MATRIMONIAL
Press Newspaper Feb 23, 1891
Another of Woodstock's fair ladies took upon her the bonds of wedlock at the residence of the officiating clergyman, Hope Hill Cottage, St. John St., when S. A. W. Baker, civil engineer of the government staff of the Cape Briton Railway, was joined in matrimony to Miss Eliva Churchill by the Rev. J. C. Bleakney on Tuesday last. The happy couple started on their bridal tour on the evening train of the 18th inst. amid showers of good wishes, accompanied by showers of rice fully as heavy. Mr. Baker is a nephew of Sir Charles Tupper, our High Commissioner to London. We extend to them our hearty congratulations, hoping that their joys may be many.
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AT A GOOD OLD AGE
Press Newspaper Feb 23, 1891
Thomas Stevenson died at his residence in Woodstock on Wednesday the 11th inst., at the good old age of 86 years. Mr. Stevenson was a native of Donegal, Ireland. He emigrated to New Brunswick in 1845, and has ever since lived on his farm in Woodstock a highly esteemed and respected citizen. He had been a Mason for 65 years and was buried on Friday the 13th inst., under the impressive ritual of the Masonic order.
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MARRIAGES
Press Newspaper Feb 23, 1891
Walberton- Gallupe.- On the 15th inst., at the residence of the bride's father, by the Rev. H. A. Charlton, Leonard O. Walberton to Mary L. Gallupe, second daughter of James and Esther Gallupe, all of Knoxford, Carleton County, N.B.
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Press Newspaper Feb 23, 1891
Baker - Churchill.- At the residence of the officiating clergyman, Rev. J. C. Bleakney, of Woodstock, N.B., Feb. 17th, 1891, Mr. S. A. W. Baker, civil engineer of the goverment staff of the Cape Breton railway, to Miss Eliza Churchill, of Woodstock, N.B.
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DEATHS
Press Newspaper Feb 23, 1891
Dykeman.- At Kirkland, Carleton County, Feb. 14th, of bronchitis, Lulu Eveletta, aged 3 months, 2 weeks, child of Mr. and Mrs. David Dykeman.
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Press Newspaper Feb 23, 1891
Stevenson.- At his residence in the Parish of Woodstock, N.B., on Feb. 11th, 1891, after a painful illness of several months, which he bore with christian patience, Thomas Stevenson, aged 86 years, leaving five sons and a large circle of friends to lament their loss.-(St. John Sun and Telegraph copy.)
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Press Newspaper Feb 23, 1891
Hannah.- At Jacksonville, on the 12th inst., Mrs. Margaret Hannah, wife of Wm. A. Hannah, aged 72 years.
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Press Newspaper Feb 23, 1891
Kinney.- At Bristol, on the 29th Nov., after a short illness, which he bore with christian fortitude, Asa Kinney, in the 90th year of his age, leaving five sorrowing children, by whom he was much beloved, together with a large circle of friends, to mourn their berevement.
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Press Newspaper Feb 23, 1891
Bailey.- On Sunday, 22nd inst., of consumption, Annie, wife of Charles Bailey, aged 52 years. Funeral from the residence of Mr. Chas. Bailey, Chapel St., Wednesday, at 2 o'clock.
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Press Newspaper Feb 9, 1891
Chas. Budden, of the Vendome Restaurant, had his foot severely jammed on Tuesday last, by a barrel falling on it, his injuries will confine him to the house for some time.
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Press Newspaper Feb 9, 1891
Meals served at the usual hours at the Vendome Restaurant; also oysters and lunches between meals. Cigars, Tobacco, confectionery and fruit in quantities galore.
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Press Newspaper Feb 9, 1891
Frank Culberson, Norris Whitney, Allen McLean and Frank Burpee pressed 66 1/4 tons of hay in one week for G. R. Ketchum. When this is beaten they are ready to try again.
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Press Newspaper Feb 9, 1891
Miss Jennie McMullin, Hartland, is moving her goods from the store of M. E. Thistle to the office recently occupied by Dr. Stevens, where she will in future be found with a fine stock of goods in her line.
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Press Newspaper Feb 9, 1891
A. E. Clarke's grocery store, Queen St., was broken into last Monday night and between five and six dollars removed from the till. The theft was traced to a colored lad named Henry Norton, and he was arrested while in the act of expending the stolen money. He was tried before Police Magistrate Dibblee and sentenced to thirty days in the County Jail. He confessed to having gained entrance to the shop by springing the lock on the front door.
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Press Newspaper March 2, 1891
NOMINATION.
THE COURT HOUSE CROWDED
A Good Meeting is Brought to a Premature Conclusion by Liberal Shouting.
Though a thaw for two days had rendered the roads very bad, almost impossible for teams to travel on them, yet there was a very large gathering at the Court House. Sheriff Dibblee opened Court at 12 o'clock, J. C. Hartley acting as clerk.

Newton Ramsey Colter was nominated by _  
Hamilton Emery John Scott
Allison C. Phillips Gideon E. Perkins
Frank Good John A. Carpenter
Elisha Slipp William Wilson
Charles P. Bull Judson B. Briggs
Gilbert W. Vanwart Charles L Smith
John C Cole Arsetes Carter
James Kirkpatrick Charles N. Scott
G Randolph Ketchum William Craig
Frederick H. Hale Henry A. Connell
George T. Hartley John Donnelly
John Harper John McCormac
Albert Simonson Samuel Wolhaupter
Ralph Seely John Fisher
John Colter William H. Neal
Henry M. Patterson Thomas Slater
Thomas McIntyre William Bell
Andrew McIntyre Richard Hand
Ezra J. Briggs David Irvine
Wm. A. Bell William V. Benn
George G. Bell  
   
Donald McLeod Vince was nominated by _  
F. E. McNally James Boyd
Alfred Giberson John Price
John A. Shea W. F. Dibblee
Forester McLean John McDonagh
Herbert Connell E. J. Clark
Jeremiah Bragdon John Walker
Geo. L. Holyoke John Graham
Julius T. Garden Zebulon Connors
James Hemphill William Lindsay
J. G. Wright John Connor
John W. Grass Bartholemew Lynch
John J. Rogers Benjamin H. Smith
George W. Gibson LeBaron L. Moore
William Ralston George R. Burtt
Allison B. Connell George W. Hovey
Wm. Balmain  

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Marriages
Press Newspaper March 9, 1891
Giberson - Drier - At Bristol, February 28th, by Rev. D. E. Brooks, Sanford Giberson of Bath, to Bertha Drier of Bristol.
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Press Newspaper March 9, 1891
Strong - McLellan.- At Belleville, March 4th, at the residence of the bride's mother, by the Rev. H. R. Baker, Methodist minister, Alexander L., fourth son of Thomas Strong, Esq., Lindsay, to Miss Merada, third daughter of Mrs. Jacob McLellan.
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DEATHS
Press Newspaper March 9, 1891
Slayter.- Feb. 24th ?, Lester, eldest child of Mr. and Mrs. David Slayter, aged four years and five months, South Richmond, Carleton County.
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Press Newspaper March 9, 1891
Hatch.- At Bath, Carleton County, on the 24th ? of February last, Mrs. Elizabeth A. Hatch, aged 69 years, leaving five daughters to mourn their loss. Our sister had her peace made with God, and passed away to join that blood washed throng on the other shore. This solemn occasion was improved by Elder David E. Brooks.
Dearest mother thou has left us,
And our loss we deeply feel,
But 'tis God that hath bereft us,
He can all our sorrows heal.

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Press Newspaper March 9, 1891
Good. - At Millville, Jan 17th, Carrie E. Good, aged 17 years.
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Marriages
Press Newspaper March 23, 1891
Rourk - Gray.- At the residence of the bride's mother in Good Settlement, on the 11th of March, by Rev. J. G. Harvey, Mr. Rainsford Rourk of Bath, and Miss Bertha Gray, third daughter of the late Robert Gray of Good Settlement.
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DEATHS
Press Newspaper March 23, 1891
McCluskey.- At Eel River, 14th instant, D. McCluskey, leaving a widow to mourn his loss.
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Press Newspaper March 23, 1891
Nicholson.- At Connell, Carleton County, N.B., after an illness of 21 days of lung trouble, Albert Stanley, aged 12 weeks, only son of Albert and Lizzie Nicholson.
Dearest baby thou has left us,
And thy loss we deeply feel,
But 'twas God who hath bereft us,
He can all our sorrows heal.

(Carleton Sentinel copy.)
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Press Newspaper March 23, 1891
Perley.- At Middle Simonds, C. C., Feb 19th, of pleurisy, Jane, widow of the late Israel Perley, a native of Glasgow, Scotland, in the 79th year of her age, leaving two sons and three daughters to mourn their loss.
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Press Newspaper March 23, 1891
Burtt.- At Hartland, Carleton County, N. B., on the 16th inst., of consumption, Willie F. A., aged 18 years and 8 months, youngest son of G. R. Burtt.- ( St. John and Fredericton papers copy.)
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Press Newspaper March 23, 1891
Stump.- On the 22nd ult., at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. E. Saunders, Grafton, N. B., Ann, widow of the late Henry Stump, in the 74th year of her age.
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Press Newspaper March 23, 1891
Cox.- The death of Mrs. Elizabeth, wife of Mr. Geo. Cox, Four Falls, occurred on Saturday evening, Jan 24th, aged 61 years. All were pained to learn of the fatal termination of her protracted illness. Mrs. Cox was beloved as few are by all, who knew her. A faithful wife, a devoted and indulgent mother, her loss will be keenly felt. The deceased leaves a husband and ten children, 4 sons and 6 daughters, who have the heartfelt sympathy of our entire community in this their great affliction.
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Press Newspaper March 23, 1891
Carpenter.- At Woodstock, 18th instant, Jennie Maud, aged three weeks and three days, daughter of Charles and Esther Carpenter.
"Suffer little children to come unto me and forbid them not."
(
Intelligencer and Sentinel copy.)
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Press Newspaper March 23, 1891
Acton.- At the school for the blind, Halifax, N. S., on the 16th instant, Grace, aged 12 years and 6 months, daughter of Andrew and Isabel Acton of Upper Brighton, Carleton County. Much sympathy is felt for the bereaved parents, as their little girl was an exceptionally bright and talented child, and a universal favorite. She was taken ill while attending the School for the Blind at Halifax. She made arrangements for her funeral, which was largely attended at her late home at Hartland. - (Intelligencer and Sentinel copy.)
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Press Newspaper March 23, 1891
Kupkey.- At Andover, Victoria County, March 16th, Jessie, wife of A. E. Kupkey, leaving a husband, two children, and a large circle of friends to mourn their loss.
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Press Newspaper March 23, 1891
The last will and testament of Daniel McGrath, late of Wakefield, was duly proved in the Probate Court on Monday, and letters testamentary thereof granted to Charles A. Fitzpatrick and Judith Dugan, executor and executrix; respectively thereof. The real estate was valued in petition for Probate at $1700 and the personal estate at $2000. J. J. Gallagher was Proctor for Petitioners.
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Press Newspaper March 23, 1891
Mrs. Morey's house at Upper Woodstock was burned Wednesday night. All the furniture, provisions and clothing were destroyed. One of the boys had $100 in money, which also went in the flames. There was no insurance. Mrs. Morey is a hard working, economical woman, who had made her home from her scant earnings, and much sympathy is felt for her.
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Press Newspaper March 23, 1891
Anthony Kearney died at the residence of David Smith, Jacksonville, Thursday. Mr. Kearney was one of the most intelligent and highly respected citizens of this County. He passed most of his life as a farmer, gave close attention and study to his calling of which he made a most successful demonstration.
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Press Newspaper March 23, 1891
Dr. Colter, assisted by Drs. Smith and Hand, successfully removed a tumor from Mr. Charles Trafton's breast on the 17th inst., and under the skilful treatment of the Drs., he will be well in a few weeks.
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Press Newspaper March 23, 1891
W. R. Wright, Upper Woodstock, has just received a fine lot of Japanese buckwheat for seed purposes, and is prepared to deal it out in any quantity to those who are desirous of purchasing. Call and inspect it.
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Press Newspaper March 23, 1891
A Two year old son of H. W. Rogers was badly bitten by a dog last Thursday. The animal's teeth grasped the nose and cheek, tearing the skin on the nose very badly. Dr. Smith attended the little sufferer and sewed up the wounds.
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Press Newspaper March 23, 1891
CHEESE FACTORY
An agitation has been on foot for some time to secure the erection of a cheese at Richmond Corner, and it is now certain that the efforts of the farmers in that section for the purpose have been crowned with success.
Mr. C. L. Tilley, of Waterville, opened negotiatious with the leading farmers of that prosperous locality some time ago, and having received the necessary assurance of the requisite number of cows for the specifield period of five years, will at once proceed to the erection of the factory. The site chosen for the factory is a very suitable one, near Parks and Perintons mill, this being the most central and convenient spot for all who wish to patronize the factory. The size of the factory is 30 x 60 and 10 feet posts.

Press Newspaper March 16, 1891
CARLETON COUNTY COURT
The March term of the Carleton County Court duly opened on Tuesday morning at 11 o'clock, His Honor Judge Stevens presiding.
The following comprises the Civil Docket_
Charles H. Armstrong vs. Handford Lindsay. Trespass for assault and false imprisonment. J. J. Gallagher, plaintiff's attorney; Fisher & A. B. Connell, defendant's attorney.

Leonard Hotham
vs. George Tedlie and Darius Nixon. Assumpsit on a special agreement. Fisher & A. B. Connell, plaintiff's attorney; S. B. Appleby, defendant's attorney.

John Connell
vs John Driscoll. Assumpsit. J. J. Gallagher files record.

The Criminal Docket was made up as follows_
The
Queen vs. Charles Ellis, charged with larceny of a bull.

The
Queen vs. William Bell, charged with an attempt to commit rape.

The
Queen vs. George F. Bishop, charged with a felonious assault.

The Grand Jury found a "True Bill" in all the criminal cases. On motion of the Clerk, a Bench Warrant was issued for the apprehension of
Ellis William Bell was arraigned on Wednesday morning; he pleaded guilty to the indictment, and was sentenced to six months imprisonment. Bishop, who was indicted for a common assault only on the person of Howard Porter, was tried on Wednesday and acquitted. Geo. F. Gregory, Q. C., defended the prisoner, and Wm. M. Connell was counsel for the Crown.

The trial of
Armstrong vs. Lindsay began on Thursday morning, and was concluded on Saturday morning. The evidence in this case was very conflicting, and the jury disagreed. The case will be tried again in July, when other witnesses will be subpoened.

In
Hotham vs. Tedlie et al., the jury were empannelled on Saturday, and the cause will be tried today.
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Press Newspaper Jan 26, 1891

Rose Gallagher's Business Ad, Woodstock, N.B._1891

 

Press Newspaper Jan 26, 1891

Stephen Giberson and his son Charles Giberson _1891 Ad

Press Newspaper Jan, 1891

Wm. & Geo. E. Balmain Business notice, Woodstock, N. B. _1891

Press Newspaper Feb 9, 1891

Thistle Property, Glassville, N. B. _1891

Press Newspaper Jan 26, 1891

Steam Saw Mill at Grafton, N.B._1891

Press Newspaper Jan 26, 1891

J. T. Collins Business Ad, Woodstock, N.B._1891

Press Newspaper Feb 9, 1891

J. H. Hall Business Ad, Woodstock, N.B._1891

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