Newspaper & Documents write-ups about Carleton County People

Carleton County HomePage

The Carleton Sentinel, The Dispatch and The Press Newspapers were published
in the Town of Woodstock, N.B.

Page 53

Hartland's "Observer" Newspaper May 10, 1911
Avondale Rifle Shoot
The Little Presque Isle Rifle Club had its regular meeting on the evening of May 1st in the Avondale Hall. The meeting was very well attended and the report of last year received showing a marked increase in membership, sixty two members being present, and all shooting on one occasion last season.

Officers for 1911 elected as follows:-  
S. G. Barter Captain
Bert. Rockwell 1st Lieutenant
Newman Black 2nd Lieutenant
Arthur B. DeGraa Sec. Treas.
Robert Upton Auditor
Committee men:  
  C. W. DeLong
  Hallie Gray
  W. D. Lawrence

Shoot for Dominion Silver Salver, on May 24, June 8, June 24 and July 8.
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Hartland's "Observer" Newspaper March 7, 1912
After an illness of four weeks Mrs. Willard T. Hunter of River Bank, died at her home on Wednesday morning of last week. She is survived by her husband and three children, the youngest four weeks old. She was a daughter of the late Rev. J. W. S. Young and was 35 years old. Rev. C. S. Young of Plaster, is a brother, and Mrs. Charles Dow of Woodstock, Mrs. Rupert Long of River Bank, Mrs. Elmer Tomlinson and Mrs. Walter Kay of Connecticut, are sisters. Mrs. C. H. Taylor of Hartland is a sister-in-law, and she and her husband adopted the infant. The funeral was held on Saturday.
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Hartland's "Observer" Newspaper May 24, 1911
FLORENCEVILLE ( excerpt)
A particularily pleasant and friendly social gathering was that at the home of
D. V. Boyer, of Fielding, on the evening of the 15th inst. Mr. and Mrs. Boyer and their daughter, Matilda, purpose leaving on Wednesday, the 17th inst., for Olds, Alberta, and on short notice a number of their friends met at their home to give tokens of the warm place in their held by Mr. and Mrs. Boyer, and the high esteem for their worthy character.
Miss Olive Gould, of Forest City, now a highly esteemed teacher at teacher at Bristol, presided at the piano. A large number of hymns were heartily sung. Then Henry Curtis took the chair, stated the object of the meeting, read a kindly and appreciative address and presented Mr. Boyer with a purse.
Mr. Boyer responded in words appreciative of the kindness of his friends. Rev. D. Fiske also spoke. Marshall Perkins read The Traveler's Psalm 121, and a goodly number offered prayers.
For many years Mr. Boyer has been one of the most who;e-souled Sunday school workers of the county of Carleton.
Mr. and Mrs. Boyer now go to Alberta, wither two sons and a daughter have preceded them. One of the sons is a homesteader, the other a school teacher and religious worker.
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Hartland's "Observer" Newspaper Dec 14, 1911
Thomas J. Boyer
The death of
Thomas J. Boyer, proprietor of the Victoria Hotel, Woodstock, took place Wednesday morning at the hotel. Deceased had been in failing health for the past two years and his death while not unexpected, came as a blow to his many relatives and friends. He was 77 years of age and is survived by a widow, formerly Mrs. Catherine Stephenson, to whom he was married 32 years ago, three daughters and one son__Mrs. George Scarborough of St. John, Mrs. Chas. Burpee of Brownville Junction, Miss Carrie and Geo. W. Boyer at home. Mr. Boyer was born in Woodstock and his young manhood was spent in the lumber business. He started the Exchange Hotel in Hartland, and about thirty years ago purchased the Victoria Hotel in Woodstock, which he successfully conducted until his death. He was a member of the Royal Arcanum, in which he carried insurance. Mrs. John Shea of Little Falls, Minn., and Miss Carrie Dixon of Somerville, Mass., is a brother of the deceased.
The burial took place at Hartland on Friday. Mr. Boyer had a great many friends here, since for years he was one of the leading men of the place. In the old Steamboat days he did a big business in the hotel line, as he also did during the building of the New Brunswick railway.
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Hartland's "Observer" Newspaper Aug 15, 1911
Big Florenceville Fire
A disastrous fire occurred at Florenceville on Thursday evening, 22 buildings completely distroyed. The loss is estimated at 25,000.
The fire broke out about 7 o'clock in the general dry goods store of
J. V. Kearney. There are no fire engine and as the efforts of the bucket brigade were futile, the flames soon spread to neighboring buildings. In a short time the grocery store of H. P. Gillespie was in flames, and from there the fire spread to the Miller building which was occupied by Mrs. Gallop and Mrs. Perry. Other buildings in the same group soon caught, and the progress of the fire was only checked when it reached a vacant lot.
Among the other buildings destroyed were the residences of
Rev. Father Bradley, the residence of E. B. Gallupe and Dr. Hagerman's drug store. All the contents of Mr. Kearney's dry goods store and the drug store were destroyed.
Some of the household goods in the residences were saved, but a good lot of furniture left in the road was set on fire by the great heat. A number of stables and small buildings were also burned to the ground.
The fire lasted for about four hours, and it feared for a time that most of the village would be destroyed. All the people in the village were at the scene of the fire and worked hard to check the progress of the flames and remove the goods from the menaced buildings.
Valuable assistance was also rendered by people who came from Centreville, Bristol, Bath, Wicklow and other places. But the fire spread so rapidly and the heat was so great that they could do little.
The buildings destroyed were in the center of the village on the west side of the river. There was a good deal of excitement as the fire gained headway and leaped from building to building. Fortunately nobody was injured, though several men while attempting to salvage goods, had narrow escapes from the flames.
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Hartland's "Observer" Newspaper Oct 26, 1911
Charles McCormack of Somerville is suffering intensely from blood poisoning in his hand. Murray Ellis and a little daughter of Mrs. George McGoldric are similarly affected.
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Hartland's "Observer" Newspaper May 10, 1911
Work on the new post office is progressing fairly well. H. H. Smalley has his new residence up and enclosed and James S. Faulknor, who sold his new house at Somerville to Rex York and purchased a lot from R. J. Potts, is getting along fine with his new place of abode.
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Hartland's "Observer" Newspaper May10, 1911
Mrs. A. W. Porter of Sherbrooke Que., is here with her two children and will spend the summer with her sister, Mrs. T. B. Thistle, her father and other relatives. Her husband was formerly in business here, was counted a hustler for village improvement, became discouraged and moved away. He is now travelling for S. Hyman & Co. of Sherbrooke.
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Hartland's "Observer" Newspaper July 19, 1911
Andrew Faulkner
In the early morning of July 15
Andrew Faulkner died at the residence of his son, James S., at the advanced age of 91 years. He had been seriously ill for about a week.
The funeral was held on Sunday. Services at the house were conducted by Rev. S. W. Schurman and the remains were taken to Windsor where a funeral sermon was preached by Rev. Joseph Cahill, who spoke from Luke 23:43 and 16:22.
The deceased was born in Donegal, Ulster, Ireland and in 1836 came with his parents to New Brunswick. They settled at Richmond where Andrew married Rebecca Watson who died 43 years ago, leaving him with a family of seven children. Those who survive are: Mrs. William Kirpatrick and Mrs. Wm. V. Benn of Debec, George W. of Windsor, Andrew of Enderby and James S. of Hartland. He is also survived by his second wife who was Mary Jennings of Richmond. There were also 17 grand and 21 great-grandchildren.
Mr. Faulkner was among the pioneers at Windsor. In religion he was Presbyterian; in politics a staunch conservative. he was a great reader and took much interest in all that pertained to the good of the country where he lived.
(Press and Sentinel please copy.)
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Hartland's "Observer" Newspaper Feb 8, 1912
Mrs. William Lyon
On Monday, Jan 22,
Mrs. Jane Lyon, wife of William Lyon, died at her home in Glassville. Mrs. Lyon was born in Aberdeen, Scotland, in 1838. A short time after her marriage she and her husband came to New Brunswick and settled in Glassville where they have lived ever since. She was a member of the Presbyterian church and her departure is keenly felt by the whole community. Besides her sorrowing husband and friends she leaves five sons: Alexander and Albert of Glassville, James of Caribou, Dawson of South Africa; and five daughters: Mrs. Alexander Shannon and Mrs. Robert Hovey of Greenfield, Mrs. James Hovey of Argyle, Mrs. William Donaghy of Gardiner, Me., and Mrs. Robert Blaisdell of Lynn, Mass. There are also a number of grandchildren and great-grandchildren.
The funeral took place on Wednesday afternoon and was conducted by Rev. M. H. Manuel. The body was laid at rest in the Presbyterian cemetery.
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Hartland's "Observer" Newspaper Oct 26, 1911
Estey & Curtis Co., Ltd., now have their retail and dispensing department established in the Carr Building and they now have the most spacious and well-appointed drug store in the county. The prescription department is very conveniently located near the Depot street entrance and has the light from a large plate-glass window. The bsiness office is conveniently arranged, while the shelves for chemicals, sundries, etc., are abundant for the purpose, leaving ample room for the book and stationary department, the whole made light as day by the large windows. Mr. Carr still occupies the upper floors of the building, but when he has disposed of his stock Estey & Curtis will use the block from basement to roof with their increasing wholesale, retail and manufacturing business. The firm keeps ten to twelve people employed and is one of the most thriving industries in the village.
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Hartland's "Observer" Newspaper Aug 23, 1911
The work of village improvement is still going on. H. L. Boyer has painted and very much improved the appearance of his two story warehouse near the bridge, Hatfield & Scott have painted their office, C. E. Allen has tarred his roof. Dr. Curtis is making over his vacant house on Maple St., and W. D. Keith is finishing up a new barn very neatly. All this in addition to reports of other work of improvement being done__and there is more, also, which the OBSERVER has failed to observe.
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Press Newspaper July 30, 1885
ACCIDENT
C. S. Grosvenor, Esq., of Canterbury, had a narrow escape from death Tuesday afternoon. He attached to a wagon loaded with cabbages, a young horse that never before had a britchen on him, and started from his store to take the load to the steamboat landing. At the north end of the bridge which spans Eel River at Canterbury, a road branches from the Main road, and following the Eel River stream leads to the steamboat landing. The road runs along the bank of the stream is very steep from the side of the road to the water fully seventy feet below. There is nothing along the side of the road to protect a person or team from going over the bank in case of accident. At a short distance from the bridge there is a very dangerous place on the road leading to the landing, caused by a land slide.
Mr. Grosvenor was accompanied by his daughter and a young man named
Wm. Reid. When they reached the road leading to the landing, Mr. Grosvenor requested his daughter and Mr. Reid to get down from the wagon for fear of an accident while going past the dangerous part of the road. Mr. Grosvenor then drove along, and had passed the landslide safely, when the horse shied, and instantly the horse, driver and loaded wagon disappeared over the bank. Mr. Grosvenor's head struck the ground, and he was unconscious of anything further until he found himself in the water under the wagon. He was able to work his way out, and found the horse quietly drinking. Strange to say the horse escaped without the slightest injury. Mr. Grosvenor was severely bruised over the eye, where his head first struck the ground. His left side and back are also severely bruised, and he complains of distress in his left lung when he breathes. Dr. Connell was sent for and rendered such aid as was necessary. Mr. Grosvenor expects to be all right in a few days.
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Press Newspaper Aug 20, 1885
Some much needed improvements are being made on the Court House. The plastering has fallen off in many places, and the cornicing on one side of the Court Room is badly broken and cracked. The repairing is being done by P. McAnna, who will also kalsomime the ceiling. When the repairs are finished the interior appearance of the rooms will be much enhanced. By the appearance of things a new roof is badly needed. The present one owes nothing to the County, as it has withstood the vicissitudes of twenty winters. The plastering, kalsomining, etc., will soon be in as bad a condition as before being repaired if a new roof is not soon put on. The heating apparatus, too, is of the most antique style, and has quite outlived its usefulness. If the building is to be used for any considerable length of time it should be thoroughly renovated and refurnished.
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Press Newspaper May 28, 1885
NOTICE
I have this day transferred to my son,
Ward Fletcher, all my interests in connection with The Woodstock Press Printing Establishment, and after the 4th June prox. I will not in any manner be connected with any of its business arrangements.
All bills due the establishment must be paid immediately, as I am arranging my business in anticipation of being away from this County for a number of months.
Any bills remaining unpaid on the 1st July next, will then be placed in other hands for collection.
Sincerely thanking the public for the very generous patronage extended this office since its establishment, I solicit for my successor in continuance of like favors.
J. T. Fletcher
Woodstock, May 25, 1885.
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Press Newspaper July 2, 1885
MARRIAGES
Dow- Johnson.-
At the Manse, Woodstock, on the 24th inst., by Rev. Geo. S. Allan, B.A.,
Myron E. Dow, of Manchester, N. H., to Ella F. Johnson.
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Press Newspaper July 2, 1885
DEATHS
Nevers.- At Hartland, on the 24th inst., of Cholera Infantum,
Willie McAdan, aged two months, only child of Alex. and Alice Nevers.
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Hartland's "Observer" Newspaper may 17, 1911
Farewell Party at Windsor
On Tuesday evening, May 9 a large number of the people of Windsor and neighboring communities gathered at the home of G. O. Orser to bid good bye to
Scott Orser and family who left Wednesday for British Columbia. There were about seventy-five present. The first part of the evening was spent by the young people in games. Later refreshments were served after which Mr. Young presented them with a speech and Mr. Orser a set of solid gold cuff links, Mrs. Orser a very fine toilet set, Master James a writing set in a fancy box, Miss Edna a brooch, and baby Bessie a souvenir spoon and emblem. Speeches were also made by H. L. Dickinson, Thomas Forrest, and Mrs. H. L. Dickinson. Mr. Orser responded very fitfully, thanking them for their kindness.
At the time of parting they all joined in singing "
God be with you till we meet again. "
(Press please copy.)
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Press Newspaper May 21, 1885
CIRCUIT COURT
The circuit court closed its sittings here on Monday. The cases were disposed of as follows, ;viz.:
Geo. Atherton vs. Town ; for damages sustained. Settled. Town paying $190.
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Edward and Sarah Donnelly vs. George Maddox. Case of slander. Plaintiff's received $150.
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John Doe on the demise of
I. R. Elliott vs. Thos. Oliver. Ejectment. Verdict for plaidtiff. Points reserved for argument on behalf of defendant.
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Ann Jane Craig vs. Jonathan Currie. Action for house breaking and false imprisonment. Verdict for plaintiff, $200.
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Ann Craig vs. Jonathan Currie. Action for trespass to the person. Deferred.
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Press Newspaper May 21, 1885
The manager of R. B. Belyea & Co.'s large dry goods and general furnishing stores, having attended the parades of our Volunteers, has become thoroughly infused with military enthusiasm, and now conducts his business on military principles. A long experience in the business enables him to know just what the people require at any season of the year. He has just opened a large stock of all leading articles generally found, in a first class establishment, and in another column with colors he calls attention to the fact. Which see.
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Press Newspaper May 7, 1885
Wanted at Seaborn's Eating and Oyster House__One good capable girl, to look out of the front window and chew gum: also, a good looking clerk to take sun baths in the shop door__one matrimonially inclined, preferred. Situations good all summer. Remember the Ice Cream Banquet Saturday evening, 16th May. Oysters, packed in ice, three times a week until after Dominion Day; also in shell. Everything in " Apple Pie Order." for the Celebration on the 25th. Friends and acquaintances are cordially invited to attend. Corner Main and Court streets. Yours, to appease the pangs of hunger, BOB.
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Press Newspaper May 7, 1885
DROWNING ACCIDENT
George Doak, aged 18 years, son of the late Andrew Doak of Woodstock, was drowned at Hartland last Monday evening. Mr. Doak was engaged picking up drift lumber, and got upon a log which rolled and threw him into the river. He was drowned before assistance could reach him. His body has not been recovered.
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Press Newspaper May 7, 1885
Mr. Geo. W. Baxter and wife left Woodstock on Wednesday morning, to make his residence in Boston. His brethen of Carleton Lodge, No. 41, I. O. O. F., gave him a very pleasant send off in a supper at Lee's restaurant Thursday evening. During Mr. Baxter's residence in Woodstock, he has made a lot of friends, and has won the confidence of all with whom he has had business transactions. "We regret to loss him as a citizen of this Town."
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Press Newspaper May 7, 1885
DEATHS
Swyney:_ At Woodstock, at the residence of her son, H. V. Swyney,
Sarah Swyney, 56 years, relict of Edwars S. Swyney late of H. M.'s 33rd regt.
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Press Newspaper Sept 3, 1885
On Friday morning last Thomas B. Clinch, a young lad about 16 years of age, died at the residence of Dr. C. P. Connell, where he had been as a guest on a few weeks's visit. The deceased was a son of R. T. Clinch, Superintendent of the Western Union Telegraph Co., and was taken ill only five days prior to his death. He caught cold and inflammation of the bowels set in, and despite all that skill and loving attention could do death ensued after the most excruciating suffering. It is said that a short time before he was taken ill he thoughtlessly swallowed a little stick he was chewing, and this it is supposed lodged in one f the small passages, causing an irritation that eventually developed into ulceration, which the best medical skill could not cure. Much sympathy is expressed here by the many friends of the bereaved parents in their deep sorrow.
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Press Newspaper Se3pt 10, 1885
The introduction of the Telephone in Woodstock is certainly a significant sign of the progress of the community. The ultilization of such means of accommodation speaks volumes for the enterprise of the place. In this connection it might be noticed that Alex. Henderson has in an especial manner shown the spirit of the enterprise in this particular. The line the most of the way from the Town to Upper Woodstock was chiefly built at his expense. His instruments are the only ones served by a mile and a half of wire.
But his expanding business no doubt needed this means of communication from the warehouse to the factory. Mr. H. has made such arrangements with the company that messages from the general public may be transmitted between Town and Village. By the payment of from 10 to 20 scents messages of considerable length may be sent either way. For the business men there, and for lawyers and others at the Sessions of the Court this will be a great convience.
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Press Newspaper Aug 28, 1885
The Telephone is now an accomplished fact. By means of this mysterious instrument and wire you can whisper from Upper Woodstock to Lower Corner. The wires from the different places of business all centre at H. V. Dalling's Jewelry Store, which is the Exchange Office. When any one who have the instruments wish to converse with each other they signal the Exchange Office. The attendant there by simple means connects the speaker with the party he wishes to address, and presto ! the talk can go on plainly and easily. To say that this means of communication is one of the wonders of the age is to put it midly. That the voice, at an ordinary tone, can be distinctly heard for miles by means of a wire is something so mysterious that few can appreciate the fact without themselves having actual cognizance of it.
The wire of which there are about five miles in length, were strung and the instruments placed, under the supervision of S. Hoyt, St. John. J. H. Wagstaff is the manner of the Bell Telephone Company's business in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. The following are the names of those having instruments connected with the Exchange in Woodstock at present__

V. V. Dalling Jewelry store, Central office
H. A. Connell Foundry and residence
J. C. Gibson Hotel
D. F. Merritt Custom house and residence
Dr. N. R. Colter Office
Small & Fisher Foundry
J. T. Raymond & Co. Grocery
G. W. Vanwart Express office
Wm. McKeen Hotel
R. H. Seaborn Restaurant
H. V. Dalling Residence
S. McLeod Residence
N. B. Railway Central office
J. H. Lee Restaurant
G. W. Slipp Grocery
John C. Cole Grocery
Augustus Gilman Livery stable
J. D. Dickinson Tannery & residence
Lee & McDonagh Livery stable
W. F. Glidden Livery stable
B. B. Manzur Store and residence
J. R. Tupper, Jr. Livery stable
A. Henderson Salesroom and factory
W. F. Dibblee & Son Hardware
A. Carpenter Hotel
H. N. Payson Grocery
John Whenman Meat shop

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Press Newspaper Aug 28, 1885
For The Woodstock Press
Jacksonville Items
Fred Harper is in charge of Gibson Station during the vacation of the Agent.
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Miss Lipsett
left for home on Friday.
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Mrs. W. Tracy, of Jacksontown, whilst driving into Woodstock, was met by a man on wheels. This so frightened the horse that it upset the wagon, throwing Mrs. T. to the ground with so much force that she was obliged to remain with Mrs. William Simonson, her sister, a day or two before removing to her home. It is hoped her injuries are not serious.
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Press Newspaper Sept 3, 1885
Mr. George Piper, of Knoxford, while limbing a fallen tree last week gave his foot a very ugly cut. The axe glanced and entered his instep, and severed an artery, from which he bled so freely that his life was at one time despaired of. He is recovering.
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Press Newspaper Sept 3, 1885
Elder F. W. Blackmar was on last Sunday evening, while at his home taken very suddenly and it was feared seriuosly ill. He was unable to speak for several hours, when he commenced slowly to recover.
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Press Newspaper Sept 17, 1885
The Saunders family have recently had erected in the burying ground here a handsome monument of Dorchester olive freestone. The whole monument, sub-base, base, plinth and die stands eleven feet six inches in height; it has moulded pedement, cap and tapering shaft surmounted by a draped urn. On the plinth is the family name "Saunders", in raised letters, and on the shaft is the Masonic emblems, square and compass, and S. carved in relief. On the front die is the inscription "Edward Saunders, " died Aug 22nd., 1884, aged 53 years," and on the left the inscription of his daughter's death, "Kate M. Saunders, died, January 15th, 1870, aged 4 years and 11 months." It is tasteful in design and the work, by J. Gallagher & Son, is well done.
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Press Newspaper Sept 10, 1885
The death of Col. J. R. Tupper, the notice of which will take many of our citizens by surprise. It is only a few days since his well-known form disappeared from our streets. His illness was brief. In the death of Col. Tupper Woodstock loses one of its oldest and most respected inhabitants.
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Press Newspaper Sept 3, 1885
Connell Brothers are building a motor for the Sentinel office, designed by R. Wheeler, of Florenceville, who is personally superintending the work, and from his evident knowledge of water wheels, we expect to see this effort decidely successful, and congratulate the Sentinel on the introduction of such useful power.
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Press Newspaper Sept 3, 1885
Geo. Pond, of Eau Claire, Wisconsin, who last week opened a Sewing Machine repair shop at the corner of Main and Emerald streets, reports business so good that he has decided to remain in Woodstock for a few days longer, and will be pleased to attend to the wants of those wishing work done by him. If your sewing machines are in need of repairs, notify Mr. Pond and he will call at your residence and transfer them to his shop, where he warrants a satisfactory job, or no pay.
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Press Newspaper Sept 10, 1885
Samuel S. Miller is now canvassing Woodstock for orders for the "History of the North-West Rebellion," by Charles P. Mulvaney, A. M., M.D., assisted by an able corps of correspondents, who were in the field during the whole of the rebellion. The volume embraces 400 pages, is well printed, and contains a number of maps, and portraits of prominent persons connected with the events recorded. The book is offered at a low price, and will no doubt secure large sales.
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Press Newspaper Sept 3, 1885
James Murchie & Sons are erecting extensive mills at Edmundston, on the Madawaska river, near its confluence with the St. John. They intend putting in a rotary, a clapboard machine and several shingle machines.
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Press Newspaper Aug 28, 1885
CRICKET
On Friday last a friendly Cricket Match was played between the Hartland and Woodstock elevens. The game was played on the grounds of the Woodstock Club. The interest in the game was maintained throughout.
J. T. G. Carr and J. N. W. Winslow captained the Hartland and Woodstock Clubs respectively. At noon a collation was served on the grounds by J. H. Lee in a manner quite creditable to his popular restaurant. The Hartland Club had two innings _32 and 43_ making a total of 75. The Woodstock Eleven made 77 in one inning. The following are the names of the participants:

HARTLAND CLUB WOODSTOCK CLUB
   
Jarvis Burtt J. C. Hartley
Geo. McGibbon H. Dibblee
Dr. Stevens Julius Garden
R. C. Carr Carl Ketchum
J. T. G. Carr D. Spragne
Geo. Fleming A. B. Connell
Geo. Burtt J. N. W. Winslow
Jas. Carr T. Lynch
H. Dayton Rev. G. S. Allen
Alex Nevers Wendell Jones
Spurgeon Nevers J. McKenzie

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Press Newspaper Sept 10, 1885
A Montana paper of recent date tells of the cruel murder of Fred. B. Haining, formerly of Carleton County, by Winslow D. Morgan, a former resident of New Maryland, York Co. The sad event occurred at Madisonia, where Haining was settled. While returning from a party given by his brother with his wife and child, and near his own home, the murderer sprang from a place of concealment and when within ten feet of his victim shot him dead with a rifle, the bullet of which also fractured the leg of the child he had in his arms. The terrible tragedy is supposed to be the outcome of a family quarrel.
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Press Newspaper Sept. 17, 1885
While Mr. Bartholomew Dickenson and Henry Hall, of Windsor, were at work shingling a barn one day last week, the upper staging gave way and both fell to the ground, a distance of 25 feet. Both were badly injured. Dr. Stevens, of Hartland, was called, and rendered timely aid. Mr. Hall's collar bone was broken.
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Press Newspaper Aug 30, 1885
The Garden Party at the residence and grounds of G. W. Vanwart, on Tuesday afternoon and evening was an unqualified success. The afternoon was pleasant, and the attendance was numerous. Mr. Vanwart's handsome residence and beautiful grounds are well adapted to such a gathering, and it is difficult to conceive how a more agreeable affair could be held. Music was furnished by the Cornet Band. The receipts, which were generous, go to lessen the Church liability.
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Press Newspaper Aug 20, 1885
Jas. Montgomery and Geo. Vanwart, Jr., are each building a house on Green street, nearly opposite the College. Calvin McKeen has the contract for the carpenter work of Mr. Montgomery's and J. F. Turner for that of Mr. Vanwart'd. Mr. Turner, under contract with J. G. Emery, Esq., has a double tenement on Broadway nearly finished.
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Press Newspaper Aug 20, 1885
Rev. T. J. Deinstadt held another open-air service last Sunday afternoon at the corner of Main and Connell Sts. His remarks on the petition of Blind Bartimeus were pertinent and thrilling, and the devout attention given by a large gathering showed that his effort was well appreciated. Perfect order prevailed.
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Press Newspaper Aug 20, 1885
The firm of Small & Fisher is having a system of piping arranged around the walls of their wood-working and machine shops, to have these rooms heated by steam. About 1,600 feet of 1 1/2 inch pipe are utilized, which with the special castings and fittings used make it quite an expensive and thorough job. The exhaust steam from the engine will be about all that will be required except in the very coldest weather, when what is called "live steam," that is steam direct from the boiler, will be occasionally turned on.
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Press Newspaper Aug 13, 1885
Henry Price has started a new industry in the shape of Tanned and Prepared Shoep Skin Mats, suitable for halls and parlors; they are also used as buggy mats, for which they cannot be excelled. These mats are finished in any color, and are sold from $1.00, to $4.00, according to quality. Parties wishing to purchase these goods can inspect them at Lee & McDonagh's Livery Stables, where orders can also be left.
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Press Newspaper Aug 13, 1885
The Grand Lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of the Lower Provinces of British North America, convened at Amherst, N. S. yesterday (Wednesday). Carleton Lodge, No. 41, is represented by S. Watts, A. B. Garden and G. W. Bridges.
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Press Newspaper Sept 3, 1885
For The Woodstock Press.

How they do at Benton
Benton has a Beer Saloon, or rather Benton had a Beer Saloon, but as a young minister there who has an earnest interest in the welfare of the morals and future prosperity of the young men in the community where he labors, concluded that a Beer Saloon was not a necessary adjunct to the moral standing of the place, and fearing lest something stronger than beer was kept on sale there, he with some others of similar persuasion, concluded to make an innovation on the traffic. Why should not a minister be found in a Beer Saloon ?
So armed with their spiritual weapons of warfare, they entered the Saloon. No, they didn't call for beer, but while others called for their drinks, (only once), these model reformers enlivened the company with songs (Gospel Hymns of course), and when the interest lessened, some would engage in prayer; then more singing, followed by short addresses, until with singing, talking and praying a late hour was reached. But little drinking was indulged in, and the throng finally dispersed for the night. It was rather a mixed meeting, but the utmost good feeling appeared to prevail. These meetings were kept up for several continuous evenings.
On the second evening, while they were singing the tune " Hold the Fort, " at the words " Reinforcements now appearing.", all unexpected to all parties, a number of ladies appeared at the door, and respectfully entering, voluntarily joined in the service, great to the encouragement of the innovators and the shame of the rest. After several evenings of this social, though somewhat mixed service, terms of surrender were proposed and accepted. These were briefly that the saloon be closed as a Beer Saloon, under certain conditions, and guarantees of faithful performance, in which the leading business men of the place concur, with a determination to keep the nefarious traffic out of the place.
Benton was considered a good opening, and it has been intimated that parties meditate opening a liquor shop here, but who ever comes must take his stand with all its incumbrances, risks, consequences, and probabilities of failure. His customers are liable to get mixed, they may not all drink, he may get assistance in his entertainment; but this is surmising; perhaps no one will be foolish enough to attempt it again.
To the credit of the keeper referred to above be it known that he has taken steps to join the Division of S. of T. Is not this better than Scott Act, or Prohibitory of License Law ?
Visitor
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Press Newspaper May 21, 1885
Last Monday as John Wright, of Williamstown, was driving across the bridge at Woodstock, a plank of the bridge broke under the horse's foot and the horse was thrown down, and one thill and part of the harness was broken. Mr. Wright was thrown out of the wagon, but was not injured. We do not know who has charge of that bridge, but there must be capable negligence somewhere when planks are allowed to wear so thin that the weight of an ordinary horse will cause a breakage.
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Press Newspaper May 28, 1885
Scared to Death
Mrs. Samuel McNutt who lives on the corner of Brunswick and Regent streets, was sitting near an open window Tuesday evening, rocking her babe in her arms. A number of boys were going along from school firing off torpedoes and crackers. One of them, James Shannon, seeing the open window, thoughtlessly threw a large torpedo cracker in, which alighted and went off in the mother's lap. The child went into convulsions and died in a short time, and was buried yesterday. __Capital.

Press Newspaper May 28, 1885
On the trip up Thursday the Florenceville met with an accident near Pokiok, York Co. A log broke a hole through the side aft of the bow. After going a few miles further the steamer began to fill with water, and Captian Duncan was compelled to run his boat ashore and patch up the fractured plank. _Fredericton Capital.
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Press Newspaper May 21, 1885
The following pupils of the 8th. Grade in the advanced school taught by Chas. McLean, have successfully passed the written and oral examinations for entrance to the Grammar School:

Jennie Price
Florence Fletcher
T. Emmett Milmore
Sadie Barker
Geo. Craig
Allison Allingham
Harry Bailey
Bertha Whenman
Bertram Bourne
Jennie Merrit
Mamie Appleby

Some of the pupils named accomplished the work of the 8th Standard in 6 months.
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Press Newspaper May 21, 1885
The store in Hayden's Block, formerly occupied by H. N. Payson, has been thoroughly refitted and is now occupied by Mr. J. E. Parker, who has just opened a very fine stock of ladies' misses and children's boots, shoes and slippers in a great variety of styles. He has also on exhibition a general supply of gent's hats, caps, & c., in all the lastest designs. The store is nicely carpeted and finely arranged and presents a very attractive appearance. Mr. Parker will be pleased to show his goods to all who favor him with a call.
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Press Newspaper June 11, 1885
FIRE
Between two and three o'clock on Sunday morning a fire was discovered in the shed between the residence of
Foster Brown on Connell street, and a tenement house owned by Wm. Connell, Esq., and occupied by Wm. Crangle. The fire had made considerable headway before it was discovered, and was rapidly spreading over the buildings attached each way. The fireman were very prompt in their answer to the alarm, and the powerful streams of water they poured upon the flames quickly subdued them and prevented any further spreading.
The shed, barn and ell of Mr. Brown's house were completely destroyed, and the main "House" was badly damaged. Mr. Connell's house and its contents were completely destroyed.
Mr. Brown is not able to state the full amount of his loss. He was insured in the London and Liverpool Co. for $1400.
Mr. Connell was insured in the Imperial for $600. There are strong indications that the fire was the work of an incendiary.
F. T. Perkins kindly furnished the firemen with a lunch of baked beans and brown bread, and Mrs. James Morrissy furnished them with hot tea on Sunday morning.
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Press Newspaper June 11, 1885
DEATHS
Wright, at Woodstock, May 25, of spinal disease,
Charles Murray, aged 6 weeks, only son of Jas. T. and Ida J. Wright. "Little Murray sleeps, but not forever."
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Press Newspaper June 18, 1885
MARRIAGES
Poole - Smith.- At the residence of the brides father, on Tuesday, June 16th, by the Rev. Geo. M. Campbell,
Henry A. Poole, to Ada B., daughter of Delancy Smith, Esq., of Woodstock.
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Press Newspaper June 4, 1885
Mrs. J. G. Hilt, of Jacksontown, had a miraculous escape from being seriously injured, on Saturday last. While opposite the livery stable of A. S. Gilman, on Connell Street, the carriage in which she was seated came in contact with a ladder, which projected from an express wagon, throwing the carriage over on its side, and hurling Mrs. Hilt against the wheels of a farm wagon. With the exception of a slight bruise on the arm she escaped unhurt.
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Press Newspaper July 30, 1885
Sergt. George Anderson, of the Brighton Engineers, who went with "B" Battery from Kingston to the Northwest Rebellion, returned to Woodstock, Wednesday morning. Sergt. Anderson was with the Battery at the battle of Cut Knife Creek and in several brushes with the Indians at other places. He enjoyed excellent health while away, and is in fine condition now. He speaks very highly of the Northwest as a farming country.
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Press Newspaper July 2, 1885
FATAL ACCIDENT
A very sad accident occurred at the Railway Depot here, at seven o'clock last Saturday morning. As a gravel train was running out of the Station carrying a number of the employees to their day's work, one of the workmen, named
John Moore, attempted to get aboard while the cars were in motion. In doing so he slipped and fell between two of the cars, and a portion of the train passed over his legs, and almost severed them from his body. The unfortunate man was at once taken to Gilman's Hotel, and Drs. Smith and Sprague were summoned to render what surgical assistance was possible, but an examination of his injuries showed that he was beyond the reach of human aid. He died about nine o'clock.
An inquest was held by Coroner J. T. Allan, and a verdict was rendered in accordance with the circumstances above recorded. The deceased was about thirty years of age and resided at Millville, where he leaves a wife and four children in quite destitute circumstances. The body was forwarded to Millville by the noon train, and a sum of upwards of fifty dollars were contributed by our citizens and despatched to the afflicted family.
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Press Newspaper June 11, 1885
Fred W. Flemming of Bloomfield, left on Wednesday morning for Kansas City. We wish our young friend success in his search for a wider field for the exercise of his talents in his chosen profession.
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Press Newspaper June 11, 1885
We are under obligations to S. R. Gayton, of New York City, and Geo. Connell, Esq., for late copies of American papers. They will please accept our thanks for their courtesies.
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Hartland's "Observer" Newspaper Nov 9, 1911
Addington Pearson Dead
On Tuesday morning the death of
Addington Pearson occurred at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. James Pearson, of Upper Brighton. He had been ill of pneumonia but a few days. He was 32 years of age and unmarried. For many years he suffered a severe infirmity, yet he was full of ambition and did more than make his way in the world. Many friends will hear of his death with sincere regret. He was a regular attendant at the religious services in the community and his faith was that of his fathers__Presbyterian.
Besides the parents seven sisters and a brother are left to mourn.
The funeral was he'd on Wednesday, Rev. M. H. Manuel, Presbyterian, conducting the services and Rev. J. M. Mallory, Primitive Baptist, preaching the sermon.
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Hartland's "Observer" Newspaper Nov 9, 1911
Mrs. Isabel Brown
At Glassville on Oct. 20, after a brief illness,
Mrs. Isabel Brown widow of Alex. Brown, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Edwin Welsh. Mrs. Brown's maiden name was Scott. She was born in Roxboroughshire, Scotland, in November, 1836, and came to Glassville among the earliest settlers of that place where she resided until her death. She was a member of the Presbyterian church. Besides her stepson, Alex Brown, with whom she lived after the death of her husband, she is survived by two brothers, Archibald and John Scott; two sons, James and Charles; three daughters, Mrs. Edwin Welsh, Mrs. Elliot, Mrs. Peter Quinn, and several grandchildren, all of Glassville. The funeral services were conducted on Sunday afternoon by Rev. M. H. Manuel, of Florenceville. A brief servie was held at the house after which a large cortege followed the body to its resting place in the Glassville cemetery. After burial a sermon was preached to a large and sympathetic audience.
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Hartland's "Observer" Newspaper Jan 25, 1912
HARVEY T. REID RHODES SCHOLAR
Hartland Boy Wins Honor at Acadia
The Nova Scotia Rhodes Scholarship for 1912 has been awarded to
Harvey T. Reid, senior class of Acadia University. Mr. Reid, who is a son of John H. Reid of Hartland, entered Acadia in October, 1908. From the beginning

of his college course he has had very high standing in all subjects and has also found time to take part in athletic contests. He was the best full-back in the intercollegiate football league, and has also been a regular member of the Acadia baseball team and basketball team. He is very popular with his fellow students, who are all congratulating him on his appointment.
When the news reached here telegrams of congratulations were immediately sent from a host of friends.
Mr. Reid is no less popular at home than at college and a reputation as a baseball pitcher was largely won on the home team.
He is not yet 21 years of age. He graduated and took his matriculation examination at Woodstock when he was 16 years of age and won the Carleton county scholarship. At Acadia he won the Ralph Manning scholarship in 1911, leading his class, and making the highest average in mathematics that was ever made at Acadia. During the past year he was editor-in-chief of the Athenaeum, the college paper, and he is the youngest member in his class, which numbers 75, and he is third and youngest Rhode Scholar from Acadia.
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Hartland's "Observer" Newspaper Nov 9, 1911
Back To Her Native Land
On Oct. 26
Mrs. Mary Ann Browne arrived here from Cummington, Mass., and will in the future make her home with her niece Mrs. D. H. Nixon. Mrs. Browne is a sister of the late George Stickney and is hale and bright at the age of 89 years. She is a native of Brighton and in 1844 married Josiah Sawyer Browne, jr., son of "Old Squire" Browne once a well known man in the country. They went to Oxford county, Ontario in 1852 and there hewed out of the wilderness a home for themselves. Later Mrs. Browne went to live with her son, J. Franklin Browne, who accompanied her to Hartland.
The
son J. Franklin Browne, has spent the most of his life as a missonary teacher in the Southern States, but of late years has lived on a little farm in Cummington, Mass. The particular farm he occupies was the homestead of William Cullen Bryant, the famous author of "Tuanatopsis" and the great poet's monument is but a few rods away from Mr. Browne's door.
Mr. Browne returned home on Friday last and before going, he made the Observer a pleasant call and stated that he hopes to be able soon to come back here to spend his remaining years.
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Hartland's "Observer" Newspaper Nov 16, 1911
Mrs. Albert Orser, sr.
Mrs. Albert Orser, senior, died at the residence of her son, Moses, at Highgate on Tuesday morning. Last December she was sticken with paralysis and while she recovered from the first effect she was never well again. Eight days before her death she had a second shock and never fully rallied. She was formerly Rosa Gillin and she leaves her aged husband, "Squire Orser, four daughters , Mrs. Chester Browne of Boston, Mrs. Clifford Mason, New York, Mrs. M. E. Thorton, Calgary, Mrs. C. H. Clapp of Lowell, and two sons, Moses of Highgate, and Albert, who lives with his family on the homestead. Chas. Gillen is a brother and Mrs. Hugh Riley of Bangor, a sister. The remains were brought to the home on Tuesday and the funeral takes place this morning, Rev. C. H. Orser conducting the service.
Mrs. Browne and Mrs. Clapp arrived on Friday, and Mrs. Mason came last night to be present at the funeral. Burial took place in the upper burial ground.
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Hartland's "Observer" Newspaper March 7, 1912
GOLDEN WEDDING
On Friday, Feb. 16, at their home in Windsor,
Mr. and Mrs. Stephen B. Shaw celebrated their fiftieth wedding anniversary. A large number of their friends and relatives, including the ladies circle of Windsor, being present. A splendid dinner was served, after which some of the old hymns were sung, also a song entitled "Silver Threads Among the Gold " by Misses Hazel Britton and Katie Shaw. Reading of the scripture and prayer by the pastor, others joining. Mr. and Mrs. Shaw are among the earlist settlers of Windsor and have always been active in church work, Mr. Shaw serving as Deacon of the Baptist church for many years in this place. They have four daughters living, also fourteen grandchildren. The daughters are, Mrs. John R. Porter, of Brockton, Mass., Mrs. John B. Shaw and Mrs. Asa Dow of Auburn, Maine and Miss Katie Shaw of Windsor, the latter being the only one present; also one adopted son, Harry E. Shaw, of Victoria, B. C.. The other relatives present were Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Shaw of Bath, and Mr. and Mrs. Ami Shaw of Windsor.
There were a number of beautiful presents received, also many congratulations by letters and all the relatives and friends unite in wishing Mr. and Mrs. Shaw many years more of congenial felicity and Christian usefulness.
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Hartland's "Observer" Newspaper July 12, 1911
Middle Simonds (excerpts)
The violent wind storm on Tuesday last, caused part of a hugh tree in front of Rev. J. M. Mallory's residence to fall into the front yard. The only damage that it did was to break a twenty-five foot ladder into three pieces and crush a fence. That is little compared with what it might have done, for under the trees,
Rev. C. H. Orser was lying in a hammock partly asleep, when the crash came. The butt end of the broken limb fell exactly where the hammock was but he escaped uninjured.
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Mrs. Ward Brawn has had a severe attack of appendicitis.
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Hartland's "Observer" Newspaper March 21, 1912
CARLETON COUNTY CENSUS RETURNS
Policy Needed to Restrain Emigration
Following are the census returns for Carleton county:

Parishes 1911 1901
     
Aberdeen 1,061 1,204
Brighton 2,605 2,788
Kent 2,724 2,779
Northampton 1,126 1,125
Peel 1,519 1,301
Richmond 1,470 1,699
Simonds 692 768
Wakefield 1,530 1,543
Wicklow 1,672 1,906
Wilmot 1,543 1,817
Woodstock 1,648 1,047
Woodstock t. v 3,865 3,644
     
Total 21,446 21,621

It is really alarming to note that the parish of Brighton has lost 183 of her population in ten years; more so that Wicklow has lost 234. Aberdeen's loss is 143, Wilmot 274, Richmond 229, Simonds 76, Kent 55, Wakefield 13, and Northampton is fortunate in having gained 1.
Peel has a gain of 218 and Woodstock town and parish have both had substantial gains. The gain in Peel parish is undoubtedly due to the industry established at Stickney by the Peel Lumber Co.
In view of this alarming exodus from the county either the doctors must become more skilful in life saving, if the decrease in population is attributed to a dying off of the people, or measures must be taken by others to stop this alarming emigration. The observer would suggest that the local goverment would do well to think seriously over the matter. There is an airy proposition, a highly sentimental and idealistic proposition to import people from the old country to accept at the hands of the goverment ready-made farms. What seems an absolute necessity is that the government gets right down to business and formulates a policy that will induce the people native-born to remain on the farms which their fathers made ready __for the Flemming immigrants.
It is senseless to say that the depopulation is caused by death. It has been caused by a spirit of unrest occasioned by limited markets for farm products and the huge advertising campaign carried on by competing provinces__and the lure of the States.
It is true our markets have improved wonderfully in the last fifteen years. They have practically had their origin in that time. And there was given last autumn an opportunity for the greatest stimulus to canadian agriculture that was ever known. Yet Premier Flemming in full face of the fact that the farmers were crying for wider markets put forth the effort of his life to defeat the measure.
Since this gentleman has adopted the standard for the Valley railway, so vigorously pressed for by Pugsley and Carvell, he might have, without further humiliating himself, befriended the farmers and strengthened his own position, by defending the measure he strove so hard to defeat.
Now comes this grand policy, this heroic effort, to bring from the old country people unused to our way of living, unused to our climate, unused to our methods of farming , to grow rich upon the farms which native-born population have left in despair.
The Observer is not against immigration. It would be a grand thing for New Brunswick if the population can be increased in this way. But the supreme and uppermost thing to do now is to formulate a plan to restrain emigration and to bring back New Brunswick's sons and daughters from the States.
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