Newspaper & Documents write-ups about Carleton County People

Carleton County HomePage

The Carleton Sentinel, The Dispatch and The Press Newspapers were published
in the Town of Woodstock, N.B.

Page 59

Press Newspaper Jan 16, 1905
Woodstock Parish
Joseph McKeen is one of the best farmers in this parish or any other parish in Carleton County, and his stock is a proof of the statement. His farm consistes of 200 acres of extra good land. The stock numbers 26 head of cattle, 9 cows, 5 horses and 24 sheep__all good animals and in good condition. He raises 60 tons of hay, 1000 bushels of oats, 300 barrels of potatoes, 50 bushels of wheat and 300 barrels of turnips. That is the way to farm whether you believe it or not. Mr. McKeen has his pasture on the farm, just what every farmer should have. He has 50 acres of timber land or forest, well-wooded, with the best kind of wood. He is doing quite a business getting lumber and wood for home market. He does his own threshing and sawing and occasionally saw wood for his neighbors. I forgot to mention that he has 16 hogs and pigs, all in good condition. He has comfortable buildings. A source of satisfaction is that Mr. McKeen has his own help among the family, a great convenience indoors and outdoors.-C.G.

Press Newspaper Jan 9, 1905
Thomas Griffin of Debec, on Wednesday, lost by fire his barn and stock, including 15 head of cattle, 20 head of sheep, and all his hay and straw. The horses were saved. The fire was started by children playing with matches in the cellar under the barn. There was no insurance.
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Press Newspaper Jan 9, 1905
Recently Edward Kearney of Beechwood laid an information in the police court against Almon Camon charging him with having committed perjury at a hearing before Parish Court Commissioner Farley, last fall. The preliminary examination was begun last Wednesday afternoon and continued on Thursday morning. F B Carvell appeared on behalf of the prosecution, and T C L Ketchum for the defendant. Camon was committed for trial.
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Press Newspaper Jan 9, 1905
Thermometers in different parts of the town on Friday morning registered 40 degrees below zero. Night watch McIntosh, on a sheltered thermometer, took the following record:
At 12:30 a.m. it was 26 below; 1:30 at 26; at 3.00, 32; at 5.00, 33; at 5:30, 35; and at 6.00 it was 37.
For cold weather that record is all that should be desired and will not be beaten this winter.
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Press Newspaper Jan 14, 1901
Presentation to The Warden
A happy event in connection with the late session of the county council occurred. For many years
Mr. G. L. Cronkhite has been a member of the board. Several times he has filled the position of warden, and it is in this capicity that he acts this year. On Wednesday he gave a lunch at the Trecartin House, Upper Woodstock to the councillors and the officials. A most pleasant time was passed. At the conclusion of the affair, Mr. Cronkhite was presented with a fine silk hat as a slight testimonial of the esteem in which he is held. Later in the day, a deputation waited upon him at the Victoria Hotel, and presented him with a gold headed cane of ebony, the presentation being made by the mayor. The warden acknowledged the honor in fitting terms.

Press Newspaper April 1, 1901
A case in which the parish of Richmond is interested was tried on Tuesday last before the police magistrate, Thomas Roach against John Cassidy of the same place, charging him with obtaining money under false pretences. The charge was based on the alleged fact that defendant sold to plaintiff an acre of woodland that he had no right to dispose of the wood, that the person with the correct title made plaintiff pay the among over again, and of course, that the plaintiff knew that he had no right to make the sale, at the time he made it. J. R. Murphy appeared for the plaintiff and W. P. Jones for defendant. The magistrate concluded that the element of deceit on the part of the plaintiff was absent, and that when he sold the wood he did so in good faith. He dismissed the action.
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Press Newspaper April 1, 1901
CENTREVILLE (excerpts)
William Nicholson, a highly respected citizen passed away on the 26th ult., he being confined to his bed only four days with pneumonia. The family have the sympathy of the whole community.
Lagrippe is still doing its work.
Misses Bertie and Helen West who had been confined to their beds for some days, at time of writing are convalescent.
Perry Fitzgerald is putting his shop in condition for W F Dibblee & Son to occupy. We welcome a firm such as Messrs Dibblee to our village and hope that their business will grow to be too large for their present quarters.
C. M. Sherwood is pushing his new Hall on to completion it will be a credit to the owner and to the Public.
Charles Wilkinson has the contract to haul the daily mail from the village to the station and return. His term commences the first of April.
F. G. Burtt and H. S. Burtt are placing a large quantity of double and single driving Harness on the market. Being an old firm their large and growing business recomends them to the public.
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Dingee left for Nevada for a years cruise. They will be much missed.
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Press Newspaper Jan 16, 1905
By a change of city government, Daniel Mahoney, who visited his old home here a couple of months ago, has stepped down and out of the position of chief of police of Chicopee, Mass. The city in the recent elections went Republican.
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Press Newspaper Jan 16, 1905
The reported death of H P Wetmore at Springhill Mines, N. S., had no foundation. Mr. Wetmore's many Woodstock friends will be pleased to know that he is recovering quite rapidly from his recent illness.
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Press Newspaper Jan 16, 1905
On Thursday at a meeting of the newly organized New Brunswick Iron Co. Ltd, a corporation which is to develop mining properties at Musquash. C V Wetmore, formerly of Woodstock, was appointed president and Peter Clinch, St. John, secretary-treasurer.
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Press Newspaper Jan 16, 1905
James Hannah, aged 92 years, a resident of Jacksonville, while the members of the family were absent from the house, fell and severely hurt himself last Friday. Dr. Kierstead is in attendance.
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Press Newspaper Jan 2, 1905
Among the many presentations this year was that of the permanent boaders of the Turner House who gave the new proprietor Mr. & Mrs. Albion Way a beautiful oak hat rack. The presentation was made by Mr. J D Carey in a very neat speech after which Mrs. Way provided light refreshments and a very pleasant time was passed with music and songs.
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Press Newspaper Jan 2, 1905
Miss Nellie Elizabeth, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Fairfax Winslow, was united in marriage on Wednesday afternoon, at her home on Regent St.,, to Herbert Lee Wallace of Houlton. The happy couple will reside in Houlton.
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Press Newspaper Jan 2, 1905
BRISTOL (excerpt)
Ezekiel Secord has been awared the contract for carrying the mail between the post office and railway station.
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Press Newspaper Jan 9, 1905
Maggie Lenehan, aged 21 years and six months, daughter of John Lenehan, Debec, died on Thursday after an illness of several months.
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Press Newspaper Jan 16, 1905
New Brunswicker Telephone subscribers
will add to their lists.-

J W Astle House 65-3
H R Estabrooks House 19-2
B M Colpitts Store 6-2
W W Hay House 9-1
Geo. G. Hare House 74-3
Dr. G. B. Manzer House 35-1
J H Mitchell House 58-4
Phillips & Phillips Feed Store 52-4
I. S. J. Vanwart House 62-4
Rev. F. J. McMurray House 61-2
Judge Carleton House 88-1
Guy Saunders House 9-5

Press Newspaper , October 12, 1908
Upper Woodstock
Upper Woodstock is a very pleasant little village two miles from the town on the borders of the St. John River at the forks of the Jacksonville road. It is four minutes walk to the court house and the same distance from the C P R station where the railway crosses the St. John river. At present they are building a new bridge here. There is a large amount of business done in lumber, hay and potatoes annually. This village is surrounded by prosperous farmers. The business is gaining annually. It has one of the best apple orchards in N.B.

Mr. Wright has one of the best situations imaginable. He has a well trimmed hedge fence on the borders of the river and a charming lawn. He has a splendid grafted orchard: the surroundings are neat and kept in first class shape. Mr. and Mrs. Wright deserve credit for their fine surroundings.

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Trecartin commenced business here 25 years ago. He keeps a hotel and farms extensively and has made a success at both. He has one of the best equipped hotels with the latest improvements. It is well planned for convenience and comfort for the proprietor and guests. He has a well supplied tablem good cooks and waitresses. There is a good stable for horses and he has a good hostler in attendance.
Article thanks to the Carleton County Historical Society.

Press Newspaper Jan 16, 1905
OBITUARY
Last Monday morning,
Samuel Sipprell died at his home at Somerville, after an illness, of heart trouble, extending over a period of about three months. He was born Feb 24, 1836, and was the eldest son of the late Ezekiel Sipprell, one of the fathers of the Free Baptist church. He lived all his life on a portion of the homestead, and has been a successful farmer. By his first wife(twenty-two years deceased), he reared seven children, four of whom survive, the youngest son, Walter, being an engineer on the B & A railway.
He is survived by his second wife. E M Sipprell, of St. John, is a brother; two brothers live on adjacent farms and one lives in Mattawamkeag; while another is in the Yukon regions. There are also three sisters living, one of whom is Mrs. T L Steeves, of Victoria, formerly of St. John. Funeral services were conducted by Rev C T Phillips in the Free Baptist church at Victoria.
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Press Newspaper Jan 16, 1905
The funeral of Mrs. Edward Loomer took place at Jacksonville, at 3.00 p.m., on Saturday, 7th inst. Service at the house was conducted by Rev. H. Kearney. Rev. Mr. Cahill also spoke words of comfort, after which the remains were removed for burial in the Jacksonville cemetery.
For nearly a year the deceased had been on a bed of sickness with gangrene which resulted in the removal of part of the foot. Through the skilful treatment by the doctor this was healed but the patient caught a heavy cold causing her death on Thursday last. She bore her very painful and lingering illness with great patience, at all times receiving her many friends with a cheerful and impressive greeting. All but one of the children, who are somewhat scattered were present, Mrs. W Slipp, of Bedell Settlement, Mrs. G. Mills, of Dorchester, Mass., Mr. L. Loomer, of Washburn and Mrs. L. Mallory, of Attleboro, who was unable to attend. The community extends its sympathy to the children in their bereavement and to the husband in the loss of a dear companion.
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Press Newspaper April 15, 1901
SHERIFF BALLOCH DEAD
Although not unexpected, the news of the death of Sheriff Balloch, which took place Wednesday afternoon at his home in Centreville, was received by our citizens with genuine regret. The deceased had been ailing for about a year. Last summer he was ill with an affection resembling whooping cough and his health had been failing ever since. About three weeks ago he made his last visit to Woodstock, for about ten days previous to his demise he was confined to his home, the last four days of which he was confined to his bed.
The deceased was the son of the late John Balloch, and was born in this town 62 years ago.
His widow, formerly Miss Ella Blanchard of this town, one daughter, Mrs. G. L. White, of Centreville, three brothers, R. W. of Centreville, A. R. of Fredericton, and Alfred of Boston, and one sister, Mrs. D. Maln of Edmundston, survive him.
Mr. Balloch was appointed sheriff in the spring of 1894, succeeding David Irvine, and was a very popular officer. His was a sympathetic nature and the poor and unfortunate were always dealt lemently with by the late sheriff. He had hosts of friends all over the province who will learn of his death with regret.
The funeral took place at Centreville Friday afternoon, the services being conducted by Rev. Mr. Simonson. The interment took place in the Church of England cemetery. Two brothers of the deceased were present, viz., A. R. Balloch of Fredericton and R. W. of Centreville. Rev. J. E. Flewelling, brother-in-law, and other G. L. White, son-in-law, and other relatives were present. Messrs. F. Carvell, William Dibblee, H. E. Burtt, T. J. Boyer, W. F. Glidden and Lieut. Col. Vince went up from Woodstock and were present at the last sad rites. A large cortage followed the corpse to its last resting place.
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Press Newspaper May 6, 1901
OLD RESIDENT GONE
An old resident of Bellville passed away on Wednesday last in
Mr. George Wilson, who was called to his account at the ripe age of 74 years. He was only very ill for few days, the fatal disease being paralysis. He was a son of the late Wm. Wilson one of the pioneers of Bellville. Deceased lost his wife who was a daughter of the late George McMullen of Canterbury, about ten years ago. A large family, four sons, and five daughters survive. All are married except the youngest son now working in Montana. The funeral which took place on Friday afternoon was largely attended. The pall-bearers were Wm. Currie, David Smith, Wm. Guy, Thos. Watt, Clarke Watt and George Gartley. The remains were buried in the Woodstock Parish Church graveyard, Rev. Mr. Teed, rector of Richmond, officiating.
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Press Newspaper Jan 9, 1905
Duncan Brewer, who had his leg broken at Serpentine Lake recently, is in the hospital and the broken limb is regaining its strength after being treated by Dr. Rankin.
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Press Newspaper Jan 9, 1905
Congratulations to Mr. and Mrs. Murray Saunders are in order, for on Tuesday last, to them was born a son and heir.
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Press Newspaper Jan 16, 1905
Mrs. David Henderson died at Plymouth on Tuesday afternoon. She leaves a husband and five small children of whom the youngest is an infant in arms. Deceased was a daughter of the late Chas. Turney. The funeral services were held Thursday afternoon, conducted by Rev. F. N. Atkinson.
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Press Newspaper Jan 16, 1905
Richmond Corner
Charles Campbell has a matched pair of bay horses. They are handsome beasts that give satisfaction on the road or elsewhere. The writer enjoyed a drive behind them the other day, and was well pleased with them. It is a satisfaction and pleasure to have a good team and credits should be given to the farmer or any person or persons, preacher or doctor, let their occupation be what it may, who owns as good a pair as does Mr. Campbell. _C. G.
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Press Newspaper April 1, 1901
Edward T. Mallory, son of W. E. Mallory, St. Andrews, a native of Jacksonville, has elected to stay in South Africa, where he went with the mounted infantry. He has a position in the office of district engineers of the imperial railway at Waterville Boven.
In a letter to his father_"Waterville Boven is on what they call the high veldt (5,000feet) above sea level so it is bound to be healthy. There have been no sick people in this place for a long time, but from Waterval Onder, next station east, to Delgoa Bay the fever season is on now. The country is low and malarial down that way; in some places the fever is very bad. The railway here drops down through a tunnel at a gradient of one foot in every nineteen. Waterval Onder is eight miles from here, and is a thousand feet lower. The railway staff in these fever places is paid at double rate; three men are kept for one job. In some places one on the job, one sick and one getting better is the usual way.
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Press Newspaper Aug 13, 1900
Miss Minnie A. White, sixth daughter of G. W. White of Centreville died on the 9th instant and was buried in the Episcopal Cemetery, Revd Mr. Simonson officiating at the house and grave. On Thursday afternoon the 8th instant she attended a picnic in Balloch's grove; damp weather caused the party to repair to Mr. Balloch's house, where after tea she was taken sick. The very heavy rain preventing her going home, and where she died after eight hours suffering. Her physician was in constant attendance but all efforts of medical skill and friends to relieve her suffering did not avail. She professed religion under the Ministry of the J. E. Flewelling, and became a member of the Episcopal church. Her life and conduct being such as becometh a follower of the meek and lowly Saviour. The large gathering at her funeral was proof of the respect in which she was held in the community. Friends contributed many wreaths of flowers. The pall bearers were Dr. Greene, Barry Estabrooks, S. W. Burtt, and Perry Fitzgerald.
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Press Newspaper Nov 19, 1900
Howard Sawyer
Howard Sawyer died at the home of his brother Ely Sawyer, Upper Woodstock Monday night. He was a native of this place but had spent the latter part of his life at Bonham, Texas. He returned to visit his old home and friends a few months ago, and intended to return home to Bonham Monday. He was taken ill on Sunday and did not start for home Monday as he intended. His illness was not considered dangerous; and his death was sudden and unexpected. He was 65 years of age; and has a wife, one son, and one daughter at their home in Bonham. Ely Sawyer started with the body Wednesday afternoon to take it to the family in Texas. H. N. Payson accompanied him as far as St. Louis.
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Press Newspaper Aug 20, 1900
KIRKLAND (excerpt)
Richard Dore of Canterbury, York Co. died Aug 6th 1900, aged 58 yrs. Drs. Rankine and Turner performed an operation on the 5th. He was only sick about four days. He leaves a sorrowing wife, two daughters, one brother and one sister besides other relatives to mourn their very sad loss. His remains were interred in the cemetery at Southampton.
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Press Newspaper Aug 20, 1900
UNION CORNER (excerpts)
Gordon and Inez, children of Mr. and Mrs. Milton Green, start next Thursday for Chicago to visit their uncle James Lloyd.
Mr. and Mrs. Renfrew Sypher, after a very pleasant vacation of four weeks, have returned to Lowell Mass., and with them the Phonograph, which sang talked and laughed to the amusement of the many that heard it.
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Press Newspaper Aug 13, 1900
BRISTOL (excerpts)
John J. Hayward, proprietor of the wood working factory has gone on a trip to England and expects to be gone about two months. He will probably visit the Paris Exposition before returning. During his absence Mr. Geo. Boyer has charge of the factory.
Warren Brooker's house in Egypt, about three miles from Bristol, and occupied by Mr. John Brooker was burned on Monday last. The fire caught from sparks on the roof. There was no insurance.
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Press Newspaper Nov 19, 1900
COUNTY COURT (excerpts)
Judge Stevens opened Court at Upper Woodstock, Tuesday morning.
There was one case on the Criminal Docket, that of
The Queen vs Thomas Durant, and Walter Durant, who were indicted for assault on Bert Graham. The Grand Jury found no Bill; and, on motion of J. R. Murphy the prisoners were discharged. S. B. Appleby Q. C. was counsel for the Crown.
The case of the overseers of the Poor for
Northampton vs. George Sharp was settled without trial. Wm. M. Connell for Plaintiff; S. B. Appleby for Defendant.
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Press Newspaper Jan 7, 1901
John Hughes who took a number of orders for "Canada's Sons on Kopje and Veldt" by T. G. Marguis B. A. is delivering the book. It is capitally gotten up the best we have seen yet and a valuable acquisition to any library.
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Press Newspaper Jan 7, 1901
Alexander H. Kennedy died at Tracy's Mills on the 28th ult. of pneumonia aged 80 years. He leaves a widow and nine children to mourn their loss. The deceased was a member of the Centreville Baptist church and was held in high esteem for his upright life and Christian character.
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Press Newspaper May 27, 1901
James Harvey, town marshall, came home from Boston on Tuesday last, where he had been in search of the young man who said he was Walter Gould, and who left town suddenly taking something like $200 and some jewelry from Michael Murphy who was entertaining him and his wife. Mr. Harvey and Mrs. Gould travelled on the same train as far as Portland . He also travelled with her in the coach to a boarding place in Portland, took the number of the house, and the next morning the young woman was in the hands of the Portland police. She admitted being in the game and said that she was to meet her husband in Boston. Mr. Harvey went to Boston and interested the detectives, and while he has returned without his man the Boston detectives say he is good as caught.
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Press Newspaper May 13, 1901
Harry McLean did not come home with with Major Good and the rest of the South African quota from this county, as he was invalided at Kimberley. As it was not known when he would return, a watch was not purchased for him when the watches for the rest of the quota were bought. As soon as McLean got home, however, it was decided that he should be used the same as his comrades, and the town council procured for him a gold filled watch. In was duly presented at the meeting of the council on Monday evening last, the mayor making a few appropriate remarks. Mr. McLean, in a modest manner thanked the citizens of Woodstock for the gift, which he would always value and treasure.
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Press Newspaper May 13, 1901
James Gallagher, of Williams Settlement, York Co., was probably fatally injured while working on J. R. McConnell's drive on the Aroostook recently. A raft of logs was being warped across a small lake by means of a rope and windlass, and Gallagher was assisting. He became entangled in the rope, the bight of which encircled his body just above the hips and a strain was put upon the rope just before Mr. Gallagher could get himself clear. The rope cut almost through his body, crushing and lacerating him in a terrible manner. The injured man was taken home. He is entirely without feeling from his hips downward. He has a wife and six children.
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Press Newspaper May 13, 1901
Edward Taylor, late of Woodstock, now of Peabody, Mass., will bring for burial here today, the body of his daughter, Nellie who died on Friday.
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Press Newspaper May 13, 1901
Two barns belonging to
Robt. Flemming. Between Greenville and Debec were burned down last Thursday night. The fire, it is said was caused by children playing with matches.
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Press Newspaper May 13, 1901
The many friends of Dr. Colter will regret to hear that he was seriously injured in a railway accident between Elgin and Peticodiac the train breaking through a bridge, and the doctor being jammed between the falling stove and a car. Latest reports are that he is improving.
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Press Newspaper May 13, 1901
Word has been received by his relatives here, of the death in Butte, Montana, of Sydney Bull, brother of F. Byron Bull, Mrs. C. F. Perkins and Mrs. Thos. McIntyre of this county, and son of late Abner Bull. He was attacked with paralysis some weeks ago. He was about fifty years of age and unmarried.
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Press Newspaper May 13, 1901
Principal Mullin of the Normal school collided with a team on Queen street one day last week. His right knee was seriously injured and he was also injured internally. Ex.
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Press Newspaper Dec. 24, 1900
Annual Meeting of the Carleton County Institute (Excerpt)
During Friday's session E. F. Thorne read a paper on "Thoughts on Teaching," which was discussed by Messrs. F. A. Good, Insp. Meagher, Prin. Mullin, D. W. Hamilton, Isaac Draper, C. H. Gray and others.
"Canadian History" was well treated in a paper by
Isaac Draper, and it evoked a lively discussion on the subject, Messrs. Hamilton, Barnett, Jewett, Thorne, Good, Prin. Mullin, Insp. Meagher and others taking part.
At the afternoon session an interesting and instructive paper was read by
Clinton Gray on "Mathematics". Messrs. Meagher, Thorne Ross and others discussed the paper.
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Press Newspaper April 1, 1901
Mrs. Brock, wife of Rev. Canon Brock of Kentville and mother of Mrs. Lee Raymond of Woodstock died quite suddenly of paralysis on Thursday morning last. Mrs. Raymond had just heard of her illness and had taken the morning train to go to her bedside. Mrs. Brock was 69 years old.
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Press Newspaper April 1, 1901
Robert Smith, of Lakeville, the big "boy" of the Woodstock quota returned on Friday from an interesting trip to Chatham. There he was married, the bride being Miss Alice Irving, daughter of Andrew Irving. Rev. Mr. Henderson was the officiating minister. A reception was given to the young couple at their home on their return to Lakeville on Friday evening.
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Press Newspaper April 15, 1901
BRISTOL (excerpt)
Mrs. Andrews Elkins, is reported dangerously ill from internal abscess. The Victoria hospital is a suitable place for such cases.
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Press Newspaper Jan 7, 1901
Wm. Slipp, an old resident of Waterville, died on Dec. 27. His malady was a peculiar one but not unknown among very old people of a certain temperament. A couple of days before his death he fell asleep and slept for two days. Aroused on Thursday evening he soon fell asleep again and shortly after passed into the longer sleep that knows no awakening. Deceased was widowed a number of years ago, and since that time has lived chiefly with his daughter Mrs. James Gardner. Another daughter and a son Frank, of Milltown, are left.
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Press Newspaper April 1, 1901
The new fire bell for the town hall will be here in a few days. It has been ordered from the Cincinnati Bell Foundry Co. makers of the old bell, will weigh half a ton, and costs $98 outside of freight and duty. A petition has gone to the minister of customs asking that a rebate of the duty on the bell be made, seeing that the old bell became ruined in a fit of patriotic enthusiasism, when Cronje surrendered.
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Press Newspaper May 20, 1901
Solomon Steeves, a well-known mason of Woodstock died Monday morning in the provincial lunatic asylum, of which he had been an inmate for about a year. The deceased was 66 years of age. The remains arrived in Woodstock for interment. A widow and three sons survive.
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Press Newspaper May 20, 1901
Somewhat Technical
On Wednesday while the young sons of
Robert Mean of Windsor were playing with an axe, one of the youngsters got a finger badly injured. Dr. Estey was summoned and he found it necessary to amputate the distal end above the articular surface of the proximo phalanx of the right hand. When the doctor left the child was doing as well as could be expected _Advertizer._ The child ought to be doing well, after all that.
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Press Newspaper May 20, 1901
Mrs. John Balloch, an aged lady died at the home of her daughter Mrs. Dr. Main at Edmundston on Friday. The deceased lady was well known in Woodstock and vicinity. She was mother of Alfred Balloch in Boston and step mother of Wilmot Balloch, Rainsford of Fredericton, and of the late Sheriff Balloch.
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Press Newspaper May 20, 1901
Considerable interest was taken in the King vs Jas. Mitchell, assault, tried summarily before the Police Magistrate last week. The complainent was H. V. Dalling who alleged that Jas. Mitchell had committed an unprovoked assault on him on Queen street. The defence was that Dalling had made some sneering allusion to Mitchell at the Queen street station, on the morning in question. After hearing the evidence the magistrate fined the defendant $20 and costs.
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Press Newspaper May 20, 1901
Mr. Knox who for several years past has been foreman of the Woolen Mills here, has gone to York Mills, where he will conduct a mill on his own account. He is a capable man and will no doubt be successful in his new enterprise. His place in the Carleton Woollen Mills is taken by Nelson D. Lee who comes from Thurso, Quebec. He has been 34 years in the woollen mill business and comes with the very best recommendations from all the concerns with which he has been engaged.
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Press Newspaper May 20, 1901
The new Hartland bridge is open for traffic and there is great rejoicing on the banks of the Guimic. It is a fine structure and has received the official approval of Mr. A. R. Wetmore the government engineer. The toll keeper is
James Pearson, the toll is 12 cts double, 6 cents single team, and 3 cents passenger, and $12 was taken in the first day of traffic.
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Press Newspaper May 20, 1901
A LADY OF FOUR SCORE
First to Cross The New Bridge at Hartland.
The Advertiser says:
Eight years ago
Mrs. Susan Boyer of Somerville had much faith in the coming of the Hartland Bridge. At that time she was 76 years of age and her younger friends were discouraged of ever seeing a bridge across the river at Hartland. Mrs. Boyer was more hopeful and remarked with much confidence that she anticipated walking across the Hartland bridge even though she was near four score. Early on Tuesday she was the first woman to pay toll and walked across. Mrs. Boyer is a remarkably, active lady for the age of 84 years. No doubt it will be many years before an older woman walks across.
Warren Rideout drove the first double team across. Miss Amanda Thomas was the first woman to cross after the planks were laid; and Donald Matheson says that he was the first of all to walk the structure from shore to shore.
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Press Newspaper May 13, 1901
NORTHAMPTON (excerpts)
Charles F. Rogers
is reroofing his house, and Ellsmore Robinson is adding another story to his ell.
Owen Brannon
who has worked for Chas. W. Connell for a number of years has has moved his family out to W. C. Raymond's on the Houlton road where he will reside.
James Clowes is getting his new barn nearly boarded in. This barn is 60 ft. long and 45 feet wide, 30 ft. posts and a big roof. It's a pretty large structure.
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Press Newspaper May 20, 1901
Wedding at St. Luke's.
Last Thursday morning at the early hour of six o'clock,
Mr. Herbert Ellis Clarke, son of Mr. Elisha J. Clark, and Miss Helen Beardsley, youngest daughter of Mr. Charles Beardsley were united in marriage at St. Luke's church, by the Ven. Archdeacon Neales. Few people were aware that the ceremony was to take place or else even the early hour, would not have prevented a large attendance of the friends of both bride and groom. As it was there was quite a gathering, principally made up of relatives of the happy young people. Precisely on the stroke of the hour, the bride walked up the central aisle leaning on the arm of her father. She was daintily attired in a travelling gown of grey, hat and gloves to match and carrying a lovely bouquet of carnations. After the service was concluded, Mr. Bourne the organist played the wedding march, and the young people received the hearty congratulations of those present, who also accompanied them to the Queen st. station where they took the train for Boston, their future home. Mr. Clarke is engaged in the B. F. Sturtevant Blower Works, one of the largest concerns of the kind in the eastern states. They are situated at Jamaica Plain.
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Press Newspaper May 13, 1901
BATH
Nearly all the young men that returned from stream driving have gone up Tobique or to Maine to work for the summer.
Thatcher Barker has gone to Cabano to work in the saw mill.
Stanley Barker
who has been away from home about a year has returned to work on the farm.
Our barber
H. E. Gray has moved to his old stand at the corner.
Mr. William Smith who has been sick for nearly eleven weeks died last Friday. His remains were interred in the F. B. cemetery, Sunday. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. M. L. Gregg.
Rev. J. T. Parsons of Middle Simonds was in the village last Monday visiting friends.
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Press Newspaper May 27, 1901
DROWNED IN THE AROOSTOOK
Sad and Fatal Accident To a York County Young Man
A sad drowning accident happened on Thursday last on the Aroostook river, whereby
Edward Hill of Howland Ridge near Millville York Co., son of Wm. Hill lost his life. Just how the accident occurred no one seems to know. The young man was river driving for John R. MacConnell, a large operator on Aroostook waters.
He had been working for some time and was well liked by his comrades and was a good lad at his task. The accident happened at what is known as the Giberson cut above Little Moose Lake. He was stationed on a turn. It is supposed he tried to cross the cut on a log, but as he was alone no one saw him go under. Only some one heard him call "My God ! I am gone " three or four times. They hurried to the spot whence the cry came, and could find no trace of the young man. His pevy was found near by. At first search was unsuccessful. Next day
Wm. McGinn the boss of the crew and Danial Donahue went to the spot in a canoe and after some searching found the body in a bit of dead water about ten feet deep. The body was brought to Houlton by Samuel Hill, uncle of deceased. The remains were taken to his late home in Millville, on Saturday. Everyone speaks in high terms of the unfortunate young man. He was 23 years of age.
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Press Newspaper June 3, 1901
DEATH OF " DUKE " HARRISON
Well Known in Earlier Days Around Town And Upper Woodstock.
Men between the forties and fifties well remember "Duke" Harrison of whose tragic end an exchange tells in the following extract. His name was
Henry Harrison and the nick-name of "Duke" was given him among the boys of his age, by reason of his nose bearing a fancied or real resemblance to the proboscis of the celebrated Duke of Wellington. He was the son of Hugh Harrison, for many years fishery warden on the St. John river. His brother, Thomas, was here visiting friends, about a year ago. The following will be read with melancholy interest by many who knew the deceased days ago, and learned to like him and take an interest in his career because of his many good qualities.
From Maine Woods it is learned:-
Mr. W. H. Harrison of Redington who, with Mrs. Harrison, has charge of the Redington Lumber Company's boarding house at that place for some time past, committed suicide in his room last Sunday night or Monday morning by shooting himself with a shotgun.
Mr. Harrison had been in a bad condition physically and mentally for quite a number of days previous. The act was not an entire surprise to the people of Redington for the reason he had threatened to make away with himself upon more than one occasion.
On Sunday night when he left the supper table he told
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Hough, who were with him, that he had eaten his last meal, or something to that effect. He tried to borrow a revolver from Mr. Hough. Failing in that he shot himself in the head with a shotgun after Mr. and Mrs. Hough had gone to their home.
The body was not discovered until Mr. Hough arrived at the boarding house on Monday morning and went to call Mr. Harrison to breakfast.
Mrs. Harrison was with her sister in Shawnut at the time. Mr. Harrison was 61 years old last April. He leaves a wife and four children and has two brothers in New Brunswick and one in Massachusetts. The funeral services were held at Phillips Tuesday afternoon and the remains were interred in the new cemetery.
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Press Newspaper June 3, 1901
Death of Charles S. Jameson
The residents of Richmond were surprised upon the sad news getting round of the death of one of the most respected and well known farmers of the parish.
Mr. Charles S. Jameson died very suddenly of heart disease, at his home last Monday afternoon. He was just about starting to drive to Richmond Corner a mile from his home when the fatal summons came. Mr. Jameson was in his 82 year but seemed to be wonderfully well for his advanced years. He leaves five sons John Jameson of East Florenceville, Henry of Richmond, W. F. of Council Bluffs, Iowa, Charles O. of Minneapolis and Dr. Jameson of Philadelphia. Deceased was a pronounced Conservative in politics and a devout member of the Church of England.
The funeral service which was conducted at St. Johns church, Rev. A. W. Teed officiating was largely attended. The three sons, Henry, John and Lee, and Geo. Tracey, son-in-law of deceased were the pall bearers. The funeral arrangements were under the direction of Mrs. Andrew Ray. Mrs. Jameson survives her husband. Her maiden name was McIntyre, Andrew McIntyre, of Richmond, being her brother.
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Press Newspaper May 20, 1901
John Glancy who resided on Leonard St., committed suicide by shooting with a rifle through the heart. Mr. Glancy was about 46 years of age and for some time past has been in a very poor health and in a moment of despondency and temporary insanity he committed the deed. He had been away from the house for some time and his wife becoming alarmed at his absence, started to search for him and finally she went to the barn and as a last resort raised a trap door leading to the basement of the barn and looking down she was surprised and horrified to see her husband cold in death, a bullet wound in his breast from which the blood was slowly oozing. The body was left as it was found until the arrival of the coroner who deemed an inquest unnecessary as the man, without doubt, met death by his own hand. _ Houlton Times.
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Press Newspaper May 27, 1901
BATH (excerpts)
Last week while
James McDougal of Moose Mountain was driving his cows from the pasture he was startled to see a young Moose running towards him, not more than a week old by the look of it. It followed him home and since then it has been brought to Bath and is in possession of John Bohan, it is quite a curiosity and has lots of callers, it will drink milk and is doing well, but Game Warden P. Corbet is on its track.
The Tracey Hotel has a new proprietor it is now in the hands of
Mr. and Mrs. William Harris who will doubtless spare no pams to attend to the wants of the public. Mr. and Mrs. Tracey who have been in attendance so long will no doubt appreciate their much needed rest. Mr. Tracey has purchased a nice bay mare for a driver.
The Pedleton Panacca team ran away last Saturday, they ran about a half mile and were captured in front of
C. E. Gallagher's store, while they were running the wheel struck a stick of birch timber and shook up some of the goods and did some little damages but nothing to speak of, some repairs were made on Monday and they went on their way.
Fishing seems to be the order of the times
Mr. Christopher Cumming caught a very nice trout last Monday weighing about one and a half lbs.
Mr. Yibea Giberson who left here last April for South Africa returned agin on Wednesday 22nd, feeling a wiser and better man.
Report says that
Mr. Walter Tweedie of Wicklow and Miss Berniece Currie of Bath are to be married on Wednesday the 29th inst., in the F. B. church, by Rev. Joseph Noble, assisted by Rev. M. L. Gregg, cermony at 5 o'clock, p. m.
The four year old child of
Timothy Dugan of Moose Mountain, strayed away from home to the woods about noon Wednesday. His mother searched but couldn't find, no tidings of it at a late hour that night.
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Press Newspaper May 27, 1901
KNOXFORD (excerpts)
The home of
Wm. E. Reid has been saddened by the death of their eldest son Ralph, from scarlet fever with complications. A particularly bright and promising little fellow, a favorite among playmates and friends, he will be very much missed by those who knew him. Illness in his case, always meant a desperate battle for life, but despite the best nursing and the experience and skill of his physician, the little life of nine years is ended. Much sympathy is felt for the parents and friends. Rev. S. Greenlaw, Reformed Baptist of Royalton, preached the funeral sermon in lieu of Rev. Wm. DeWare who although in attendance was unable to do so.
Mahlon Knox visits the place weekly with his peddling cart.
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Press Newspaper May 13, 1901
Personals ( excerpt)
Mr. and Mrs. Tappan Adney are visiting Mrs. Adney's old home in Woodstock.
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Press Newspaper May 27, 1901
Marriages
At the Manse, Houlton, by the Rev. Kenneth McKay, B. A., on the 21st, inst.,
William Fraser of Jacksonville to Delia Waters of Woodstock.
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Press Newspaper May 27, 1901
Arthur Duff 's (Richmond) team got away from him in town the other day galloped over the bridge and out the Houlton road. They collided with a telegraph post, and Noble & Trafton's team. One of the horses broke his leg and had to be shot.

Press Newspaper May 27, 1901
A sad accident happened this forenoon to Hon. Ira G. Hersey and Mrs. Hersey. They had started for Woodstock and when on top of Cook's hill, just east of this village, Mr. Hersey opened an umbrella which scared the horse and they were thrown out of the carriage. Mr. Hersey had three ribs broken and Mrs. Hersey received a fracture of one arm.
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Press Newspaper May 27, 1901
Geo. W. Anderson, for twelve years purchasing agent for E. Putnam & Co., Boston, commission merchants and wholesale dealers in Aroostook potatoes, left town about ten days ago, since which time no tidings of his whereabouts have been learned. He told his wife he was going to Benton, N. B., to purchase a carload of potatoes. Mr. Stackpole, Putnam & Co. bookkeeper, who was in town last week, was of the opinion that Anderson's accounts with his house are all right. Several reasons are given for his sudden and quiet disappearance, but anyone can guess. It is thought that he is in Montreal.
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Press Newspaper May 27, 1901
Mr. and Mrs. George W. Gartley of Lindsay have the sympathy of everyone in the loss of their little girl, Kate Elizabeth aged 1 year and 8 months who died last Wednesday.
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Press Newspaper May 27, 1901
Robert Corbett, aged 19, made quite a record in bicycling. He left for Fredericton a little after six Friday morning spent six hours at the Capital, and was back in Woodstock about nine in the evening.
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Press Newspaper May 27, 1901
Dr. Fraser, principal of the Halifax school for the Blind, writing to J. A. Lindsay about his son Hollis, says, "his progress during the year has been exceedingly satisfactory. I think you will find him more cultured, more thoughtful and more manly. He is certainly a very promising student from every standpoint.
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Press Newspaper April 8, 1901
An Old Resident Gone
One of the oldest residents of the town of Woodstock passed away last Friday in the person of
Mrs. John MacQuarrie, after a long and painful illness. Mrs. MacQuarrie was born in the town of Ayr in Ayrshire, Scotland just eighty-one years and six months ago, and was the oldest daughter of Dr. James Wood who was for many years one of the best known physicians in Carleton Co. Dr. Wood, who was a graduate of the university of Edinburg, came to this country about year 1827, and after practicing in St. John and Fredericton for a number of years, finally settled in Woodstock. Mrs. MacQuarrie had only one sister, Mrs. Charles Coy of Gagetown, who survives her. The deceased was a patient sufferer from an internal disease for some years back, and leaves an aged husband and a large family to mourn their loss. The funeral which was held on Sunday was largely attended, the remains being interred in the cemetery at Woodstock, Rev. Mr. Ireland officiating. Some beautiful flowers adorned the casket, the most noticeable being a wreath of callas, and a sheaf of wheat as a fitting emblem of a long and faithful life. All the surviving members of the family were present with the exception of Joseph A. who lives in Pennsylvania.
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Press Newspaper June 3, 1901
The many friends of Mr. Edwin R. McClement, familiarly known as "Eddie" will be more than pleased to hear that he has been allowed a pension by the U. S. Goverment for services in the Civil War, 1861-5.
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Press Newspaper June 3, 1901
Mrs. Martin Day, aged 83 years, died at the residence of William Dorey, Connell street, recently. Mrs. Day was one of the oldest residents in the community. She was born in Ireland, came to Fredericton when quite young, and she and her husband removed to Upper Woodstock over 50 years ago. There she resided until a few years ago, when she took up her residence in town. The deceased leaves a daughter, Mary, and a son Thomas.
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Press Newspaper June 3, 1901

The Ladies Auxiliary, D. of E.,
in connection with the A. O. H.,
on Wednesday evening, elected the following officers:
 
   
Miss Agnes Gallagher provincial president
Miss Agnes Malaney provincial secretary
Miss Daisy Hughes provincial treasurer
Miss Agnes Gallagher county president
Miss Annie Owens president
Miss Mamie McClement vice-president
Miss Daisie Hughes recording secretary
Miss Sadie Brown financial secretary
Mrs. M. Ryan treasurer

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Press Newspaper June 3, 1901
At the Encoenia of the University on Friday Mr. Wm. Raymond, son of Rev. W. O. Raymond, who won the Douglas gold medal read a part of his essay. Mr. D. W. Hamilton, a Centreville man, won the governor-general medal for proficiency in Natural Science. Mr. Hamilton received the degree of B. A. At the annual meeting of the Associated Alumm: Ven Archdeacon Neales was elected second vice-president.
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Press Newspaper June 3, 1901
Colby Gray died at his home in Milmore's alley on Friday last after a long illness of consumption. He came to Woodstock from Newbridge. When he was able he worked as a labourer. Of late he had support from the town. He leaves a wife and family.
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Press Newspaper June 3, 1901
John Scott and Frank Welch of Glassville appeared before the Police Magistrate one day early in the week to answer the charge of damaging property at Love's hotel, Glassville. A. B. Connell represented the complainants and Dr. Welch the defendants. The magistrate decided on Saturday that the boys were not guilty.
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Press Newspaper Dec 24, 1900

Teachers in Session    
     
Blanche Plumer Daisy M. Holmes M. Ethel Bourne
Cora Estey H. K. Clark Lena McLeod
Annie McLean Mabel Barker L. Antoinette McLean
Annie M. Kenney Myrtle Harmon Annabel B. Taylor
Hattie Shea Mrs. J. R. H. Simmons Bernice M. Haley
Marie McNally Mary J. Caldwell Ella A. Smith
Anetta Bradley Maggie McLeod Bessie Carvel
Maggie M. Lacy Maggie Millen Bessie Brittain
Martha Everett Mary Milmore Ada Wiley
Delia Payson Sadie Estey Evangeline Kinney
Mary Baker Julia Neales Elizabeth Cupples
Frances M. Peters Kate Appleby Fannie Ives
Ella Wolhaupter Myrtle Fowler Katherine McIntyre
Nora McIntyre Nettie Bearisto E. L. Scholey
Minnie Carman Cora Kirkpatrick Clara Carson
Annie R. Rice Annie A. Caldwell Allie Gill
R. E. Agatha Carpenter Mabel Shaw Helena Mulherin
D. W. Hamilton G. Hugh Harrison, M. A. Frank A. Good
N. Foster Thorne C. H. Gray L. H. Huggard
A. P. Davis W. A. Rideout Isaac Draper
Joseph Howe C. B. Ross John Barnett
Rex. Cormier L. H. Jewett W. M. Crawford
Ernest M. Read N. R. Brittain C. F. Hendry

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