Newspaper & Documents write-ups about Carleton County People

Carleton County HomePage

The Carleton Sentinel, The Dispatch and The Press Newspapers were published
in the Town of Woodstock, N.B.

Page 60

Press Newspaper Aug 5, 1901
Lemuel McKenzie was sent to gaol for six months one day last week having pleaded guilty to the charge of stealing a horse and wagon the property of Robt. Hawkins, from in front, of C. H. Sherwood's, Centreville. The team was recovered in Presque Isle. The young man has hitherto borne a good character and it is probable, that the deed was committed when he was under the influence of liquor.
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Press Newspaper Aug 5, 1901
DEATH CAME SUDDENLY
To Richard McGlynn, a Well_Known Farmer of Plymouth
Many people in town were shocked at hearing on Saturday morning of the sudden death of
Richard McGlynn, a well-known and respected farmer of Richmond parish, whose home was in Plymouth. He went out of the house to the woodshed, fell down and expired almost immediately. Heart failure no doubt was the immediate cause of death. At first it was questioned whether an inquest should not be held, but it was soon decided to be quite un necessary. Deceased was probably 58 or 59 years of age, and had lived on the farm where he died for the greater part of his life. He was unmarried, a sister keeping house for him. Only a few days ago he was in town, and then seemed to be in the best of health. His farm was next that of Richard Hand, Dr. Hand's father. A brother of deceased, James McGlynn, is in charge of the poor farm at Presque Isle.
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Press Newspaper July 29, 1901
IS HE CHARLIE MILLOY ?
Inquest on a Dead Body Found on Railway Track Near Benton
The dead body of a man was found lying across the railway track between Debec and Benton last Thursday morning when the 6 a. m. train passed.
The remains were picked up and brought to Woodstock on the morning freight. Deputy Sheriff Foster happened to be on the down train, and at the request of Supt. Newcomb who was notified of the event he took charge of the remains until they arrived in Woodstock.
Coroner W. W. Hay summoned a jury. They examined the remains which were badly mangled, an inquest was held in the town building on Thursday afternoon. The jury were:-
Jas. McCanna, Warrie Lindow, H. N. Payson, Charles Peabody, C. L. Tilley, George Weeks, Robt. Lindsay.
A. B. Connell was present to watch the case for the C. P. R.
Deputy Sheriff Foster was the first witness. He said:- I was on the train this morning, and two miles and a half above Benton, the train stopped. I got out with the conductor and brakesmen and we found the body of a man. It was lying across the track, the head and shoulders on the inside and the feet on the outside. I did not recognize the man.
To Mr. Connell__The body was cold. It could not have been struck by the train on which he was. I examined the man's hands which were covered with grease, indicating that he had been hanging on to some iron. There was no search made to amount to anything.
To Juryman Linsday__The train did not stop before it came to the body__it went over the body.
Samuel Nason was brakesman on the train which brought the remains up. I helped pick up deceased and put him on the car. We crossed the other train at Canterbury. Never saw deceased before.
Jacob Vanwart, undertaker, testified to having taken charge of the remains. He found a small pen-knife, a wallet and $3.15 in it. Another knife was found but it had disappeared off the bench on which he had laid it. The body was cut clear in two. There was a mark, and I and V tattooed on the left arm. He thought he would weigh between 150 and 160 and between 25 _ 30 years old.
Mrs. Wm. Karnes said that deceased looked like Charles Milloy. She had seen him some two weeks ago. He often came to town with Jas. Martin of Red Bridge. In her opinion the remains were those of Charles Milloy. He came to the house sometimes and had dinner. He was rather odd acting man.
Cook Hall saw the remains and recognized them as the remains of Charles Milloy. He had no doubt about that. Milloy was not very bright. Could not say as if he was subject to fits, but he was a little bit out. He worked at farm houses. Have known him seven or eight years. he stayed at Herb McBride's the last time I saw him. At one time he worked at Everett Colwell's at Tapley's Mills. He has one sister in Boston.
Wm. Grantham, brakeman, testified to helping carry the remains to the car in which they were brought to Woodstock.
The hearing was adjourned till next Wednesday night at 9 o' clock.
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Press Newspaper Aug 5, 1901
The following party went to Skiff Lake on Saturday to spend a couple of weeks: Misses B. Maude Dibblee, Maude S. Wright, Elizabeth Bull, Pauline Balloch, Rose Dibblee, Messrs. R. N. Loane, Jack Balloch, Jack Dibblee, Sabine Carr, Almon Crombie, Lebaron Dibblee and Aubrey Connell.
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From Historical and Statistical Acount of New Brunswick B. N. A. with Advice to Emigrants by Rev. Christopher Atkinson. Published in 1844.
"...The next place worthy of notice is the town of Woodstock, which is composed of three villages. At the lower village, which is termed the Corner, the road turns off at a right angle, and passing through Richmond, where another crosses it, forming what is called Scotch Corner, it extends to the American Post, called Houlston. The Boundry Line, as at present existing, passes within site of this place, which is commanded by an elevated ridge, called Park’s Hill. The second village, at the Creek, is connected with the lower village by a bridge that crosses the Meduxnikik; the third is about two miles beyond it, where are the court-house and gaol, and the residence of the High-Sheriff of the county. There are a number of good buildings and stores at Woodstock, also a branch of the Commercial Bank is established. Woodstock is forty miles from Fredericton, and is the capital of the county of Carleton. It contains 482 inhabited houses; 520 families, and 9757 acres of cleared land. ..."
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1902 Carleton Sentinel
May 23 - Jottings: A company is being formed at Bath to run a telephone line from Bath to Johnville and Holmesville. A sufficient amount has been subscribed and the work of putting up the poles has been commenced. Dr. Cummins is one of the chief promoters of the company.
Aug 1 - Bristol: Chalmers Derrah of Glassville who went to South Africa in Feb 1st, last year, returned Saturday and spent Sunday in Bristol. He was in the battle at Hart’s River where he was wounded in the leg and spent some weeks in hospital, after that he rejoined his corps, and remained until the close of the war.
Sept 19 - East Florenceville Bank was robbed. They escaped to Littleton, Maine. Sheriff Foster tracking but they were not caught.

1903
Jan 9 - Squires-Gee : Miss Alfreda Gee, daughter of Mr. Israel Gee was married on New Years Day to Mr. Upton Squires of Wicklow. The ceremony was preformed by Rev. L. A. Fenwick at the residence of the bride’s father, Upper Wicklow.
April 10 - Wicklow: Mr. C. B. Milbury and family have moved to Clearview where he has opened a general store, which was formerly occupied by C. H. Phillips. We wish him success.
Sept 4 - Through Kent Parish
…Bristol: Dr E. H. Freeze has commenced practice of medicine in the village; the doctor, who is a genial young man, is a graduate of the leading medical colleges and judging from the successful treatment of cases by him since making his home here, his future success is assured.
Bath is steadily improving. The water works is almost completed, and the convenience to water users as well as protection given against fire, which necessarily means the lowering of the fire insurance, is thoroughly appreciated by the enterprising people here; the pipe will be extended this fall 40 rods further south, and 3 hydrants place, which, when completed, will take in the corporation; the officers for the fire brigade will be elected shortly.
…The Exchange Hotel is a new building the proprietor of which is Hamilton Giberson, his son Perley J. Giberson being manager, and it is safe to say there is no better village hotel in the county; the proprietor and waitresses are obliging and prompt; the bill of fare furnished is all that can be desired; many large well ventilated, fully furnished, carpeted bedrooms, are in constant use by the large number of guests who patronize the Exchange. Teams attend all trains for the convenience of the guests.
...Over the Monquart stream, at Bath, W. Brewer, of St. Mary’s, had the contract from the local government to erect a covered Howe truss bridge; 170 feet long and 35 feet high from the bed to the stream, with hard pine cords and cedar abutments filled with stone; a number of men are at work framing the bridge and building the piers and the structure will be completed in 6 weeks.
…The genial G. F. Giberson, proprietor of the Bath livery stable, drove your representative to Beechwood, where he became acquainted with Dr. A. P. Wyman and J. R. Tupper, after which the river at Beechwood was crossed by ferry, which is in charge of Stanley Dyer. We are now in Upper Wicklow; the postmaster is Rubert Hutchinson.
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3 Dec 1912 "An Enterprising Firm"
Stevens Bros., the well known Woodstock druggists, have taken into firm their youngest brother J. E. Stevens and having purchased the Richardson drug store at Centreville, the junior member of the firm took charge last Tuesday. The drug store at Centreville was started seven or eight years ago by Mr. Hawker, passing int the hands of J. C. Richardson.......
Newspaper articles thanks to the Carleton County Historical Society.

Press Newspaper Aug 5, 1901
Charles Howard, employed in the Small & Fisher foundry, met with a painful accident by a stove falling on his little finger and breaking it. This put him out of work as a mechanic, but he has secured temporary work on the Health Police Force.
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Press Newspaper July 29, 1901
At St. John's Church, Richmond, July 24th by the Rev. A. W. Teed, M. A., Rector, Kathleen Isabella, daughter of the late Thomas and Sara McIntyre, of Richmond, to Joseph Speer, of Speerville, Parish of Woodstock, N. B.
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Press Newspaper Aug 12, 1901
Union Corner ( excerpt)
Thad Farze has the frame of his new house up and boarded in.
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Press Newspaper Aug 12, 1901
St. Luke's annual Sunday School picnic will take place on Wednesday afternoon next at the grounds of Alfred Dibblee, Northampton. Teams will leave the town side of the river bridge at 2 p. m. If rainy the picnic will take place the next fine day.
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Press Newspaper Aug 12, 1901
Mrs. John P. Caldwell, of Middle Simonds died last week of paralysis. She was 70 years of age. A husband and family of four sons and two daughters survive. The funeral took place on Thursday afternoon, Rev. Mr. Hayward and Joseph Parsons officiating.
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Press Newspaper Aug 12, 1901
Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Hamm mourn the loss of their little daughter, Marie, who succumbed to typhoid fever. She was a little over seven years of age. The funeral was on Thursday afternoon and was attended by many sympathizing friends. Little friends of the dead child acted as pall bearers.
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Press Newspaper Aug 12, 1901
Cloverdale Picnic
Dear Editor:-
We had a meeting to arrange for a picnic after giving a week's notice, which was largely attended and we decided on having our annual Cloverdale picnic on the 21st of Aug, 1901 and appointed a committee of three to select suitable grounds for it, and the committee were:
James W Crabb, Charles H. Wallace and Robert Morgan. The committee selected the field of Arnold Crabb east of the Cloverdale road, but some two or three families were not satisfied and a certain Millville party, T. Howland, has had handbills printed and has scattered them broadcast advertising to have the annual Cloverdale picnic on the 22nd inst. on the " beautiful grounds of Charles and Albert Jones." The handbills were signed Geo. L. Howland per order of committee.
Now we will say that this is incorrect, for we never ordered any such thing and this individual is trying to run our picnic from us for himself. We think the public should know that we of Cloverdale will hold our annual picnic on the 21st of August in the field of Arnold Crabb, and not on the 22nd as advertised by Geo. Howland. Everybody come on the 21st of August and we will guarantee them a good time.
We do not thank Mr. Howland for his interference and we hope the public will frown down such proceeding by any individual who for his own gain will try to stop a settlement having a half day's celebration in their own free legal way.
Thanking you for your kindness in giving us space in your paper and extending you the invitation to come and enjoy yourself for a brief half day with us in picnic style we will close. This letter is written by the order of committee.
James W Crabb,
Chas. H. Wallace
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THE DAILY TELEGRAPH, ST. JOHN, N.B., TUESDAY, MAY 24, 1904, p. 2, col. 3.
YORK COUNTY MAN FINDS POT OF MONEY
Treasure Was Found Near the River Bank at Kingsclear, and There Were About 200 Spanish Silver Coins in the Lot
Fredericton, N.B., May 23   -(Special)-
Frank Francis, a colored resident of Kingsclear, found a pot or jar of Spanish silver coins while sacking logs at Queensbury on Friday last. The find was made near the river bank, on what is known as the Quinn farm, which adjoins the farm of Coun. M. B. McNally. Mr. Francis was all alone at the time, and it being late in the evening, he did not stop to hold a consultation with any of his brother workmen but seizing the jar with both hands, lost no time in repairing to his home.
He will not tell how many coins were in the jar, but his neighbors have reason to believe there were at least 200. The coins are about the size of an American silver dollar, and are in good state of preservation. On the face side is a bust of Ferdinand VI of Spain, with his name and the word "Rex." The date of issue is either 1730 or 1750; it is difficult to tell which as the figures are not plain.

Newspaper article thanks to Lloyd Webber
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Press Newspaper Aug 12, 1901
KILLED BY LIGHTNING
A Well-Known Summerfield Young Man is Suddenly Taken Off.
Shocking news came recently to a family in Carleton County, when it became known that
Frank Kilcollins, a native of Summerfield had been killed by lightning. In the spring of 1899, thinking to better himself he left his home and went to Marinette.
Frank Kilcollins was brought up and educated in the free school, Summerfield in the spring of 1899. Thinking that he should begin to make a mark for himself in the business world and having a half brother who was doing a large business in Marinette, Wis., he thought that his best chance, so in the spring above mentioned he left Summerfield with the best wishes of all who knew him. On reaching his destination he obtained work at once it is said at good wages: grew constantly in favour with his employees. Since that time he had kept up a constant correspondence with his parents and friends sending many presents, and some valuable ones to his parents all going to show that distance did not blot out the love he held for his home. His parents and the family have the sincere sympathy of the whole settlement in their sad bereavement.
A paper thus relates the sad event:
Frank Kilcollins, a teamster employed by the N. Ludington Company on the seven mile farm, was instantly killed by a bolt of lightning about six o'clock last evening. The lightning struck him on the top of the head as he was driving the horses into the stable. It knocked the horses down, but they jumped up afterward and galloped into the stable with Kilcollins's dead body in the wagon.
The electricity tore his hat to pieces, burned his body, then passed down his limbs and tore his trousers' legs in strips and then into shoes, ripping the latter all to pieces. His remains were brought to Wittig's undertaking establishment in this city.
He was a young man and was born in Summerfield, Carleton Co., New Brunswick. He came here in 1899 and has worked since that time for the N. Ludwington Co., on the seven mile farm. He is survived by his parents and six brothers. He was a half brother to
Fred Hutch, of this city. He was a young man of industrious habits and excellent character and had many friends since coming to this city.
When the accident occurred Kilcollins was just driving home after taking a load of hay to market. He was just at the gate leading from the main road into the farm when the bolt descended and struck him on the head. It prostrated his horse, and also a team behind him. The man driving the latter horses was not injured. After being struck the deceased fell back in the wagon and the horses ran into the stable. His brother saw the accident and hurried to his side, to find him dead.
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Press Newspaper July 23, 1900
Mrs. Good
Mrs. Margaret Good widow of the late George Good died at her home Upper Woodstock on Tuesday evening July 10th.
Mrs. Good had suffered at times for years from heart trouble and about seven weeks ago became seriously ill. Dr. Hand was called and gave all possible relief, but other complications appeared. Her daughter Mrs. A. G. Brewer living in Boston was summoned and she, with her two brothers at home faithfully attended her until the end.
Mrs. Good leaves four sons, two in the west and two, Randolph and Asahel at the old home also an only daughter Georgie with a large circle of relatives and friends in Carleton and Queen's counties to mourn their loss.
The funeral services were conducted at the home of the deceased by Revd's Crisp and Spargo assisted by Rev. Mr. Atkinson (Baptist).
Mrs. Good was a member of the Methodist church and lived a life of devotion to all its interests. Her christian faith grew stronger, as her physical condition became weaker and she passed quietly away surrounded by loved ones and friends.
(St. John papers please copy.)
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Press Newspaper July 23, 1900
Rideout-Pearson
A happy event took place at Upper Brighton on Wednesday, July 11th, when
Miss Mary Pearson daughter of James Pearson, was united in marriage to Mr. Carey Rideout, at the home of the bride in the presence of a large number of guests. The bride was attired in white muslin with lace trimmings and looked very lovely. The ceremony which was performed by Rev. Mr. Daggett, took place under a large tree in the garden and the wedding march was nicely rendered by Miss Cora McCollom, as the contracting parties took their places. The bride was unattended. After the ceremony the company sat down to a well prepared supper. The presents received by the bride were numerous and elegant. After the company had dispersed a brilliant serenade was given by the U. B. boys who were then treated in grand style.
Mr. and Mrs. Rideout will reside with us still in Upper Brighton.
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Press Newspaper July 30, 1900
Leonard Markee died at his home in St. Stephen Tuesday after a long illness. Mr. Markee was an architect and builder and was not unknown here. Mrs. W. B. Belyea, and Mrs. Evans was with her father during the last weeks of his illness.

Press Newspaper July 30, 1900
The champion bark peelers of New Brunswick are at work over at R. W. Richardson's camp on the little Presque Isle. One day this week they cut and "spudded" one hundred trees and piled the bark thereof, which scaled nine cords. The crew was J. F. Murdock, foreman, Bill Perkins, chopper, Gordon Sherwood limber, Gordon Burloch spudder. - Advertiser.
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Press Newspaper July 23, 1900
Master Bernie Murphy, Allie Jones, Arthur Smith, Willie Dalling, and Arthur Glidden, left on Tuesday morning train for St. John where they will join the St. John Boy's and go from there by steamer for Califf's Island to spend a two week outing at the Maritime Boy Camp.
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Press Newspaper July 23, 1900
Guy McAdam passed a successful examination at Fredericton for Grammer School license a few weeks ago; making an average of 69.3. For a young man of only 19 years this is an excellent record. He has a school at Albert A Co. and will prosecute his studies while teaching.
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Press Newspaper July 23, 1900
At a regular meeting of Woodstock Div. No 1, A. O. H. last week, the following were elected officers for the ensuing year:
Jos. Fewer, president;
Alex Beaton, vice-president;
William Cogger, secretary;
William T. MacDonald, financial secretary;
John P. Malaney, treasurer;
Daniel Rairdon, sergeant-at-arms.
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Press Newspaper July 23, 1900
Charlotte K., wife of George P. Cameron died at their home at Andover on Saturday the 14th instant. She was 21 years of age; a daughter of the late George F. Street ;and leaves one child, three weeks old.
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Press Newspaper Dec 17, 1900
GREAT FOR THE FEET
Are The Larrigans Manufactured by a Woodstock Company.
We should not fall into the pernicious habit of shouting that the town is going to the dogs. For, it isn't. We have passed through a pretty severe depression, but the clouds are already breaking, and " good times' is at our doors.
Last week a brief statement was made in this paper of the business done by the Carleton Creamery Co. whose head-quarters are in town.
Now, it is the pleasure of the Press to call attention to another industry being carried on at the old McCormac tannery stand on Connell street.
Mr. Dickinson bought out the premises in Feb. 3rd, last. About the first of March he had three men engaged in making larrigans. The business started on a small scale but increased rapidly. The proprietor bought the patent of the Henderson larrigan, a shoe manufactured by Thos Henderson of Parrisboro, N. S. and thus received the right to make their larrigans for the dominion. Such proportions has the business assumed that 18 men are now sewing as hard as they can sew and the whole force employed amounts to 24 hands. The goods are selling like hot cakes, and go all over the dominion, an order being already taken to go to the Yukon. Mr. Dickinson recently visited Quebec, Montreal, and Toronto and three of the largest houses in the dominion have undertaken to handle the goods. In connection with this industry it may be interesting to know that C. D. Dickinson & Co, for such is now the firm, have a pair of the Henderson shoepacks won in South Africa by Rev. Mr. Lane, the Methodist chaplain with the second contingent. They can be seen in the office at anytime. When he was in England, the chaplain was presented to the Prince of Wales. The Prince admired the footgear of the good chaplain, and as a result the company here have made a pair of sporting larrigans, the kind that lace up neatly around the leg, and has forwarded them to Mr. Lane who will send them as a present to H. R. H. Upwards of 7000 pairs of larrigans have been turned out at the factory. Such is the demand at present, that the company can not fill all the orders, and it is absolutely necessary that the plant be enlarged and more men employed. So long as industries such as this are started, the town of Woodstock will take no backward steps.
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Press Newspaper July 30, 1900
Miss Leora Harmon won the silver medal presented by Dr. Manzer to the pupil of Broadway graduating into the grammer school with the highest average.
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Press Newspaper July 30, 1900
Alexander Nevers, after three years of prostration died at his home a mile or two below Hartland on Saturday the 21st. He was one of the earliest settlers in that locality.
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Press Newspaper July 30, 1900
R. E. Holyoke runs a vegetable cart in connection with his grocery and delivers green peas, beans, carrots, beets and all other vegetables in season. Orders by telephone receive prompt attention.
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Press Newspaper March 4, 1901
On Wednesday last Constable Woolverton took Joseph Breen to the penitentiary. He is a native of Halifax, and has been working in this county for some time past. He worked for Albert McBride at Lockhart's Mill, and some time ago he stole $20 from Frank Freeman. He admitted the theft and was sent to the penitentiary for two years and one month.
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Press Newspaper March 4, 1901
A run-away that caused quite a commotion occured on Thursday afternoon last. A horse with a sleigh attached, onwed by Mr. Tower started on King St. and crossed over to the West side of Main. Here the sleigh struck a telephone pole.
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Press Newspaper March 4, 1901
In the four-mile race in the roller rink, Saturday evening, there were five skaters__Harry Hascall, Denny Glew, Arthur Glew, Johnnie Brown and Charlie Embleton. Arthur Glew and Embleton retired in their ninth laps, and Brown followed suit in the 13th lap of the second mile, leaving the finish between Hascal and Dennie Glew. Hascall was leading about a quarter of a lap at the end of the second mile; and at the end of the third, after an exciting chase, had gained a lap on Glew, which position he held till the finish.
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Press Newspaper March 4, 1901
Mr. I. E. Sheasgreen, of Connell's pharmacy received word early in the week that his mother who lives near Newcastle was seriously ill. He left immediately on the receipt of the news for his old home.
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Press Newspaper March 4, 1901
The last Royal Gazette contains notice of the following resignation: In the County of Carleton_of Stephen B. Appleby, as Judge of Probate, pro hac vice in reference to the Estate of Randolph K. Jones, deceased.
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Press Newspaper March 4, 1901
Col. F. H. J. Dibblee collector of customs who is just fairly recovered from a most severe attack of typhoid fever was able to be at his office for the first time on Thursday last. He was taken ill early in November. His many friends are glad to see him around again.
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Press Newspaper March 4, 1901
NORTHAMPTON
Sickness is very prevalent over here.
Mrs. A. Stone is very ill with congestion in Grafton so is Mrs. Bull. At present small hopes are being entertained of their recovery.
During the recent windy weather a barn belonging to
James Clowes collapsed killing four sheep.
N. R. Bacon and John Monteith leave in a few days for a course of instruction lasting a month, at the Provincial Dairy School at Sussex.
Mr. and Mrs
C. W. Britain of Bristol spent a few days with the latter's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Gill, recently.
The Misses Dougherty of Meductic were at Col. Bairds' for a few days last week.
C. W. Connell is doing some extensive lumbering this winter. He is working two teams. he is banking his spruce and hauling the pine to town.
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Press Newspaper March 4, 1901
LeBaron Dibblee of Millinockett, Me. arrived in town on Thursday and stayed till Saturday. He reports times booming in Millinockett where he has a responsible position in the mill of the Great Northern Paper Co. Among the people from this county living in Millinockett are Dr. and Mrs. Cody, (Mrs. Cody was a Miss White of Centreville), Walter and Garfield Smith, and A. W. Harmon of Woodstock; Ed. Brackett of Grafton. 750 men are employed in the mill and its surroundings.
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Press Newspaper March 4, 1901
Mr. John C. Gibson who has been up Tobique, book-keeping and time-keeping in Hale's camp at Nictau, has returned to Woodstock. Mr. Gibson went in the woods in October. He came to Woodstock on Election day, Nov. 6th, and returned and has been in the mighty forest ever since. He looks well, and says that he enjoyed excellent health during his stay in the bush. Mr. Gibson thinks that where he spent the winter was within view of the highest piece of land in New Brunswick. From fifty to seventy men were in the camp with him and from five to seven teams of horses were worked by the crew. It was a splendid winter for working and a lot of lumber was cut. His crew were through when he left camp, and Hale's entire outfit expected to be out of the woods this week.
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Press Newspaper July 1, 1901
Recently Mr. David Olts and Miss Lounsbury of Meductic were married. After the ceremony they were driving to their home, when their carriage collided with a wagon in front of a blacksmith shop. They were both thrown out and Mrs. Olts for the time being rendered unconscious. The waggon was quite demolished. Late reports indicate the Mrs. Olts is now much improved.
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Press Newspaper July 1, 1901
The youth, Kinney, who escaped from gaol as reported last week and hired a horse and carriage to go to his aunt's funeral, was found near Dawville, Me. But he had not been to a funeral. He was captured by the Maine police and brought to Houlton. It would seem that he was ready to come to Woodstock, but at last accounts the Houlton authorities could not bear to think of parting with him.
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Press Newspaper Jan 16, 1905
George Green died at his residence on Wednesday morning, at five o'clock from Bright's disease and a complication of other maladies. A bad attack of rheumatism rendered him unfit to pursue his work for several months past. Until his ailments forced him to resign, he was a member of No 2 hose company; he had many friends in the department and in this his native town. The burial took place on Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock.
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Press Newspaper Jan 16, 1905
At Oak Mountain Jan 2nd, after a lingering illness. Rebecca J., eldest daughter of the late Robert Kerr, passed away to be with her Saviour. She leaves a widowed mother, two sisters, one brother and a host of relatives and friends to mourn the loss of a loving sister and a kind and dutiful daughter. She will be greatly missed in the community in which she lived, for while in good health was always ready and willing to help those in need and took an active part in all church work.
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Press Newspaper July 1, 1901
The fancy sale and supper under the auspices of the women of St. Luke's church held on Wednesday afternoon last on the grounds of Mr. Duppa Smith was exceedingly well patronized and was an enjoyable affair. $95 was cleared, which will pay off the remaining debt on the organ, and on the parish hall and school house.
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Press Newspaper July 1, 1901
Dr. Robert Thompson, son of Mr. Daniel Thompson successfully passed the final dental examination necessary before opening practice in this province, at St. John last week.
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Press Newspaper July 8, 1901
Death of Mrs. Lemuel Vanwart
The death of
Mrs. Lemuel Vanwart came as a great shock to her relatives and many friends in the community, a number of the latter not being aware even that she was ill. Her health, it seems had been in bad shape for a long time, and last week her medical advisers deemed an operation necessary. She passed through but the operation was too much for her, and she sank rapidly passing away on Tuesday evening. Mrs. Vanwart was a daughter of the late Alanson Payson, and was married some thirteen years ago. Her husband survives, there are no children. Mr. H. N. Payson of Woodstock is a brother, and two others living in the states. The surviving sisters are Mrs. Dr. Camber and Mrs. J. T. Collins. When the sad news became known there was very general regret, and deep sympathy was expressed on all sides for the breaved husband and relatives. The funeral took place on Friday afternoon, from her late residence, where a service was conducted by Rev. J. W. Clark and H. D. Marr. Some lovely floral offerings were sent by friends. The remains were buried in the Methodist cemetery.
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Press Newspaper July 15, 1901
An Enjoyable Entertainment
Miss Beatrice Maud Dibblee made her debut as an elocutionist before an audience in her native town last Monday evening in the Opera House, and she scored a thorough success, affording much pleasure to an appreciative and well filled house. Miss Dibblee has made good use of her opportunities while in Boston and has before this received flattering notice from New England papers. She was assisted in the entertainment by Mrs. Tappan Adney, formerly Miss Minnie B. Sharp and Miss Walker, who afforded a real treat to lovers of good music. The following program was carried out:

The Linden Tree Schubert-Litz Miss Walker
Silence Mary Wilkins Miss Dibblee
"One Spring Morning" Nevin Mrs. Adney
"What William Henry Did" Harbour Miss Dibblee
The Erl King Schubert-Litz Miss Walker
"When the Mists" Henshaw Mrs. Adney
Exercises of the Emerson System of Physical Culture   Miss Dibblee
Aria From "Mignon" Thomas Mrs. Adney
A Judith of 1864 C. F. Cavanagh Miss Dibblee
National Anthem    

As Miss Dibblee is a Woodstock young lady the audience was naturally disposed to be generous, but simple justice prompted those present to say that it would be impossible to imagine anything more perfect than her rendering of the pieces she selected. She showed much good taste in the selections, an opportunity being afforded to judge her handling of both pathos and humor, and she did both excellently.
The audience looked for something very good from Mrs. Adney, and its expectations were more than realized. Miss Walker's pianoforte work was simply charming. It was altogether a most refined and enjoyable entertainment.
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Press Newspaper May 6, 1901
Demand For Good Bricks
Macdonald's Yard at Grafton Not Running This Summer
Wm. Macdonald made a lot of brick last year. He kept a good crew of men at work in his yard at Grafton. He went to Ontario and bought a patient kiln, something right up to date. Everyone who used his brick said they were good, but the demand did not seem as active as he would wish, and he claimed that he could not get fair terms from the railway people. Last winter, as everybody will remember, wood was scarce and high. It takes many hundreds of cords of wood to run a brickyard and Mr. Macdonald had a large quantity of unsold brick on hand. He thought he had enough to supply all the demand this coming season and he decided not to carry on further operations. Everyone knows he is a shrewd business man, but he admits he made a big mistake. Orders for his brick are coming in rapidly. He is all sold out and says he could have disposed at a good price of his output this summer had he been wise enough to have foreseen the demand.
His product gives great satisfaction. He sold 80, 000 for a convent in Van Buren, Me., 10, 000 he sent away up to Cabano, for Fraser & Son. He filled orders from Houlton, Presque Isle, and over Aroostook. Carleton County men wanted brick. And, now that the gaol must be built, and wherever it is built' of course, it will not be of wood, he would have been in for a good order. Altogether Mr. Mcdonald wishes he had come to a different decision.
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Press Newspaper Jan 2, 1905
East Florenceville(excerpt)
A very quiet wedding took place at the Methodist Parsonage, Florenceville, Monday evening, at 5 o'clock, where
Miss Renna Gallupe and Mr. Frank Thompkins, both from the village, were united in marriage by the Rev J. B. Young. Bennie McIsaac acted as groomsman and Miss Mabel Gallupe, sister of the bride was bridesmaid.
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Press Newspaper Jan 2, 1905
Mrs. S S Miller, of Hartland, who has been ill for several weeks with nervous prostration, returned home on Wednesday very much improved in health. She was accompanied by her nurse Miss Hazel Welch.
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Press Newspaper Jan 2, 1905
Mrs. and Mrs. Wendell P Jones entertained about sixty of their friends at a charming drive whist party on Friday evening. Handsome prizes were awarded to the lady and gentleman making the highest scores and consolation prizes to those whose ill-luck was most conspicuous. A sumptuous supper was served at eleven o'clock and the guests dispersed shortly after midnight, having spent a most delightful evening. The prize winners were: Mrs. Williamson Fisher, lady's first prize, Limoges china bon bon dish; G H Harrison, gentleman's first prize, ash tray; lady's consolation, Mrs. Charles Dibblee; gentleman's consolation, Coun. Arthur Bailey.
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Press Newspaper Jan 2, 1905
Stephen Wetmore, M. D., some few years ago a clerk with G F Smith, is now a successful medical doctor in Buffalo, N. Y. He is spending his Christmas and New Year's holiday with relatives here.
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Press Newspaper Jan 2, 1905
A team, weighing only 2500 lbs owned by John Smith of Summerfield, distinguished itself recently by hauling from that place to Florenceville station, over eight miles of rough road a load of hay weighing 6600.
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Press Newspaper Jan 2, 1905
Miss Theresa Niles and Robert Smith, both of Centreville, Carleton County, were quietly married by Rev R W Demmings, at the residence of J W Niles, brother of the bride, on Wednesday morning.-Victoria County News.
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Press Newspaper Jan 2, 1905
Aaron Clark went to Woodstock Friday to visit his wife, who is very sick with pleuro-pneumonia and other afflictions and may not recover. Mrs. Clark has of late undergone five operations for tumors in the neck, and may have to submit to another soon. -Fort Fairfield Review.
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Press Newspaper Jan 2, 1905
John Ricker, who is in jail at Charleston, Mass., charged with murdering his wife, is thought to be a native of York county. A man of that name and answering his description, resided at a place called Tattletown, in the parish of St. Marys up to about ten years ago when he removed to the states. The police here are confident he is the same man.
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Press Newspaper Jan 2, 1905
Miss Carrie Hayes, of Forest City, who has friends in this town, and who is said to be the heaviest woman in Canada as she tips the scales at 525 pounds, was a witness for the defence in a trial for assault before the police magistrate in Fredericton last week.
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Press Newspaper July 8, 1901
Quite a serious accident which might have been more so, happened to Adolph Grant Friday night. He was driving with his two little children. The horse became frightened at the Salvation Army and was uncontrollable. The occupants of the wagon were thrown out. One little girl was seriously hurt and Mr. Grant himself was a good deal bruised.
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Press Newspaper Jan 9, 1905
Edward McDade of Newbridge, Northampton, who had a large toe removed by the doctors at the hospital as a preventive against gangrene, is recovering rapidly at the residence of his son-in-law, Thomas L. McCaffery.
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Press Newspaper Jan 9, 1905
M McGrath of Lindsay, who had been treated for three weeks by the town doctors for an internal trouble, and who finally was compelled to have an operation performed, is still in the Hospital quite sick, but with fair chances for recovery.
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Press Newspaper July 1901
The rain, thunder and lightning of Friday evening constituted one of the severest storms for several years. It lasted through the greater part of the night. The lightning was very vivid and the rain came down in torrents. Dy Walker's house near the standpipe was struck but no injury of account was done. The lightning struck near the chimney, ran down the corner of the house and passed through a wire connecting the house with the standpipe. This wire saved further damage. Main street hill was badly damaged, the torrent carrying down a good deal of the fine gravel covering put on two years ago. The water in the river raised quite a bit as a result of the rain.
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Press Newspaper July 8, 1901
Mark Gillen is the latest addition to the ranks of the students-at-law. He has entered with D. McLeod Vince, Esq and will go for his preliminary at Michaelmas.
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Press Newspaper July 8, 1901
The Queen Hotel has been leased by John W. Blackie, who took possession on the first of July. He intends to make it a first class house, and will conduct it on strictly temperance principles.
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Press Newspaper July 8, 1901
Speaking of big eggs, Andrew Ray sold a lot to Terry Monohan the other day, and the daddy of them all was one which measured 6 3/4 inches around the bust and weighed a quarter of a pound.
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Press Newspaper Jan 9, 1905
At a recent gathering in Fewer Bros' store, Thomas A Lindsay, on behalf of the Woodstock Civilian Rifle Club, presented its captain William Balmain with an expensive binocular.
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Press Newspaper Jan 9, 1905
An important social event took place on Wednesday afternoon, at the home of the bride, when I N Draper, principal of the Broadway school, was united in marriage to Miss Cora Lee Hale, by the pastor of the Albert street Baptist church, Rev. J. A. Corbett. Among the handsome gifts received by the bride was a cabinet of silver from F H Hale and Lt. Col D McLeod Vince. The newly married couple will reside in Grafton.
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Press Newspaper June 10, 1901
Fatal Accident
A sad accident occurred at the Aroostook Lumber Company's saw mill.
Mr. Samuel Chetley was engaged sawing lath, when a piece of wood from a bolt which was being sawed off and flew back, striking Mr. Chetley with much force in the abdomen. The injured man was removed to his boarding place, at Macy's in Gouldville and a physician summoned. At first it was not apprehended that the man had suffered serious injuries, but soon he soon became worse, and died Monday morning in much agony. An autopsy revealed the fact that the blow caused a rupture of the gall bladder. The remains were removed Monday noon to the house of the deceased in Richmond. Mr. Chetley had worked for the company some time and was a man of excellent character and personal qualities. He was 54 years of age and leaves a wife and three children.- Ex.
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Press Newspaper July 15, 1901
DIED
At Washington, D. C., July 7th,
William Alexander Balloch, aged 74 years, formerly dentist of Woodstock, N.B.
Press Newspaper July 15, 1901
Death of Alex Balloch
Many people in this county will read with regret the news of the death of
Alex Balloch and an uncle of R. Wilmot Balloch. His first wife was a Miss Simpson, sister of Mrs. Neales.
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Press Newspaper Jan 2 1905
James Kelly
James Kelly, who has until recently lived on a farm in Richmond, about six miles from Woodstock, and who was well known over the county died suddenly on Tuesday morning, at the Brunswick House, Woodstock. Mr. Kelly was 71 years old.
Coroner W W Hay was called and inpaneled the following jury:
Joseph Fewer, John Atherton, H E Burtt, George Cunliffe, George F Smith, J M Jacques and H V Moores. An inquest was held in the council chamber on Tuesday evening.
Ira Foster, sworn, said that deceased has been living with Mrs. Foster, in Houlton, for five or six weeks. They were to board him and he promised to give them a deed of his farm. The deceased and witness came to Woodstock in connection with the land.
Alex Munro, sworn, said he was proprietor of the Brunswick House; deceased and Foster drove into his yard at 4 o' clock; they entered the house for a while and shortly afterwards drove away; he did not know when they returned and retired for the night; Foster and deceased roomed together; he arose at 4 o'clock Tuesday morning; Foster came to breakfast and said the old man was sick; the young fellow drove away before 8 o ' clock; the waiter on the table went to call the deceased to breakfast at 8 o'clock, and returning said to the witness that she thought the man was dead; he (Munro) went to the room and finding him dead he reported the case to the Coroner.
Owen Kelly, sworn, said he was chief of the police, he knew the deceased; he went to the Brunswick House and found that James Kelly was dead; he notified Dr. Hand who examined the body; on the clothing of deceased was found a wallet with $10 or $15, and two prescriptions. Dr. Hand had been attending the deceased for Bright's Disease and a weak heart. The doctor expressed the opinion that these diseases were the cause of death.
The jury then retired and, in a few minutes, returned with the verdict that the late James Kelly came to his death by natural causes.
The funeral took place on Thursday morning and the interment was made in St. Gertrude's cemetery in this town.
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Press Newspaper June 10, 1901
The death of A. I. Brown which occurred on Monday morning, of pneumonia, was a particularly sad event. Death came very suddenly to a young man in the full vigor of life up to his last illness. He leaves a wife and three children the youngest of whom is but a baby. The funeral on Wednesday afternoon was impressive. It was conducted by the Salvation Army of which deceased was a member. The band led the procession from the house to the cemetery playing a solemn march, and the members of the Army wore white bands on their arms, really more suitable than the conventional black. Comrades of the deceased were pall-bearers. At the grave the usual service of the Army was read by the Captain. Deceased was a hard working laborer, employed most of his time in Hayden's mill. His bereaved family are worthy of all sympathy and help.
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Press Newspaper June 10, 1901
Friends of the bride, in Woodstock have received announcements of the marriage of Lalia Gladys Walton, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Walton, to Mr. John Scovil. Mr. and Mrs. Walton moved to Butte Col. from Woodstock a couple of years ago. The wedding takes place where bride and groom reside in Butte, today.
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Press Newspaper June 10, 1901
A young man named Joseph Bull was in town last week with an order signed by Cox & Co., general agents for the Imperial army, calling for the payment of a sum of money something over L2, being the share of Bull in the effects of his brother who bore the name of Leslie and died in South Africa of fever. He was in the East Lancashire regiment. Bull is an Englishman who came to this county some time ago. His brother changed his name on entering the army.
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Press Newspaper June 10, 1901
An alarm of fire, Thursday noon, called the fire department to Doctor Saunders' house where a chimney was burning out.
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Press Newspaper June 10, 1901
Those having white hats which they wish to have bleached should call early to avoid the rush of the advanced season upon Miss I. C. Rickerson, Victoria st.
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Press Newspaper June 10, 1901
Dr. and Mrs. R. E. Guy Smith and family who have been living for several years past in Montreal, arrived in Woodstock on Wednesday. They will spend the summer months in Woodstock occupying Dr. Smith's residence here.
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Press Newspaper June 10, 1901
W. E. Mallory, St. Andrews, recently added to his stud of horses a very handsome bay horse with black points. He was sired by Claymore, a standard bred Kentucky, is seven years old, stands sixteen hands high, weighs twelve hundred pounds and was raised by George Burtt at Jacksonville, Carleton County.
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Press Newspaper June 10, 1901
Mr. Lloyd will be at the Turner House with children from Middlemore Home, England, on Wednesday next. On arrival of Gibson train persons applying for children are requested to be in attendance.
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Press Newspaper June 10, 1901
Mrs. George Tapley died at her home in Island Falls, Me., last week of consumption, and the remains were brought here for burial on Friday, the interment being made at the Parish Church burying ground, Rev. A. W. Teed officiating. Mrs. Tapley's maiden name was Mullis. She was but 27 years old and a husband and four children survive.
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Press Newspaper June 10, 1901
Major Good, on his return from Montreal last week, brought with him the ribbons to be worn under the medals by the Carleton County boys who served in South Africa. The colors are red, blue and khaki. The medals are expected here in time for the boys to wear them at brigade in Sussex in September.
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Press Newspaper June 24, 1901
Willie, the 4 year old son of Daniel Reardon died of diptheria at his home on Main Street south of the bridge Friday morning. Two other cases of diptheria are reported in the same house.
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Press Newspaper June 17, 1901
Invitations are out for the marriage of Walter F. Mott, representative of the Massey-Harris Company, and Miss Edna M. Smith, daughter of D. W. Smith of Upper Woodstock, Friday next at 5:30 p.m. The ceremony will be performed by the Rev. J. A. Cahill.
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Press Newspaper June 17, 1901
At the Pharmaceutical Final Examinations held in St. John last week, Mr. Edward Mair of the Baird Co. passed successfully.
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Press Newspaper June 17, 1901
In the death of Wm. Currie, Richmond has lost a good citizen. He died of acute inflammation of the stomach on Saturday, the 8th inst. and the funeral was on Tuesday, the remains being buried in the churchyard at Richmond Corner, after service in St. John's church. A widow survives, and two sons, one of whom, Edward, lives at home. Two brothers, Robert and Andrew are left, and a sister, Mrs. Ivory Kilburn now living in Vancouver.
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Press Newspaper June 24, 1901
Mrs. Phillip McCaffrey died at the residence of her daughter Mrs. Thibadeau of this town on Sunday the 16th inst. She was in her 82nd year, the relict of the late Phillip McCaffrey, so long and well-known as sitting Justice, before the office of Police Magistrate was formed. Two sons, James and Thomas, the latter in the Custom House here survive. The funeral took place on Tuesday, a requiem mass being celebrated in St. Gertrude's church.
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Press Newspaper June 24, 1901
The large barn, house, one horse, two sets of double harness, farming tools, hay and grain, owned by
Woodford Ketchum of Houlton were totally destroyed recently on his farm in Littleton, caused by sparks from the chimney igniting the roof of the house. Mr. Ketchum's loss is about $1,500. There was an insurance of $600 on the barn and $200 on contents. The household goods which were destroyed belonged to a man in Mr. Ketchum's employ and were not insured.
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Press Newspaper June 24, 1901
Flag raisings are the order of the day. The schools that have not a flag and pole are daily becoming a smaller minority. On Friday the 14th a flag was raised on the school house at Lindsay, where Miss Annie McIntyre is teacher. Among the speakers were Rev. A. W. Teed, Rev. Mr. Thomas and J. K. Flemming, M. P. P. Next Thursday a flag will be raised over the school house at Lakeville, where Miss Nora McIntyre teaches. The ceremony will take place at 2:30 and several speakers have been invited to address the gathering. A picnic will follow the flag raising.
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Press Newspaper June 10, 1901
At the residence of A. Thornton, Hartland, on Thursday 6, his daughter Bertha was married to Arthur L. Baird of this village. Rev. G. W. McDonald was the officiating clergyman. There were no invitations issued. The ceremony took place at 10 o'clock and the happy couple took the noon train for Fredericton and St. John. They will reside in Hartland.
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Press Newspaper June 10, 1901
On Wednesday afternoon a large number of invited quests gathered at the home of Joseph Rideout at Upper Brighton, the occasion being the marriage of their daughter Agnes Elizabeth to Harry Newell Dickinson of this village. The ceremony was performed in the open air, Rev. J. B. Daggett officiating. After the ceremony the company partook of a boutiful supper. Mr. and Mrs. Dickinson will have the good wishes of a large circle of friends. They will reside in Hartland, and will be "at home" after June 17.- Advertiser.
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Press Newspaper June 10, 1901
This Week's Weddings.
Two weddings will take place in Christ church this week. This morning at a quarter to eleven
Miss Edith Brock, sister of Mrs. Lee Raymond will be married to Mr. Tufts, barrister of Kentville, N. S.
On Wednesday morning at 5:30
Mr. W. W. Loane of Ashland, Me. and Miss Bertha Peabody will be united in wedlock. Archdeacon Neales will officiate on both occasions.
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Press Newspaper June 17, 1901
Fred W. Ayer of Bangor has purchased from F. H. Hale, M. P., the handsome moosehead which used to be admired in the Express office. It is supposed to be the best specimen in Eastern Canada and took first prize at the Sportman's Show in Chicago.
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Press Newspaper June 17, 1901
The contract for carrying the mails between Fredericton and Meductic has been awarded to John Macpherson, livery stable keeper of Fredricton. The work is at present being performed by John McCoy under a temporary arrangement with the Post Office Inspector. Mr. Macpherson's contract goes into effect on July 1st.

Press Newspaper June 17, 1901
John Oldham set up at Grand lake cemetery a day or two ago a very beautiful cottage monument Hollister marble, with freestone base, gothic finish. The monument was erected by James Flowers in loving remembrance of his late wife, Rachael L. Other much admired memorial manufactured at Oldham's marble works, and just completed, are two sarcophagus tablets, also of Hollister marble and exquisitely polished, to be erected by H. N. Robinson of Fort Fairfield, Me., to mark the last resting place of two beloved children.-Gleaner.
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Press Newspaper June 24, 1901
A SLY YOUTH
Broke Gaol And Hired A Team to go to His Mother's Funeral
A shrewd youth 16 or 20 years old is
Charlie Kinney. He got himself in trouble through making away with another person's bicycle, and as a result was spending a short time awaiting trial in the temporary cells in the court house building at Upper Woodstock. On Friday night he made his escape from the gaol. He worked away at the bars on one of the windows evidently unscrewed a bolt and let himself through. He was not very big anyway. By means of his bed clothes he let himself to the ground. And then he did the boldest trick of all. Early Saturday morning he went to the livery stable run by Duncan Johnson and represented that his mother was dead and he wanted to go to the funeral. It was true that his mother was dead, but she was dead a good long while ago. He got the horse and buggy, and although the police have been in search yet neither boy, horse or buggy has been secured. A good deal of trouble was taken in fixing up its temporary cells in the court house, while the gaol is being erected, and it was not supposed escape would be so easy.
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Carleton Sentinel Newspaper, Jan 9, 1864

S. B. Estey, Business Ad

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Carleton Sentinel Newspaper, Jan 9, 1864

Thos. W. Smith, Business Ad

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Carleton Sentinel Newspaper, Jan 9, 1864

Mrs. W. Q. Shaw, Business Ad

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Hartland's Observer Newspaper, July 12, 1911

F. D. Tweedie, Business Ad

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Hartland's Observer Newspaper, July 12, 1911

Bohan Bros. Business Ad

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Press Newspaper, June 10, 1901

Mrs. M. B. Sharp Adney, Business Ad

Press Newspaper June 10, 1901
Mrs. Tappan Adney, of New York, who is to spend the summer in Woodstock, at the request of a number of her former pupils, has consented to receive a limited number of her former pupils, has consented to receive a limited number of pupils in pianoforte and voice. Mrs. Adney's qualifications as a teacher in music are too well known to require any praise here. She can be interviewed at her residence, the W. T. Drysdale house, St. Gertrude street. See formal notice in this issue.
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