Newspaper & Documents write-ups about Carleton County People

Carleton County HomePage

The Carleton Sentinel, The Dispatch and The Press Newspapers were published
in the Town of Woodstock, N.B.

Page 62

Press Newspaper Sept 9, 1901
House And Barns Burned.
Lightning Cause Severe Loss To Debec Farmer
The thunder storm of Wednesday last was the most severe in its intensity of any this season and that is saying a good deal. It came up very quick and the claps of thunder and flashes of lightning were almost simultaneous. The dangerous forked blaze scared everyone and men and women not generally nervous wished it would soon be done with.
Two other buildings in town were slightly touched but in the country two farmers at least have reason to remember the storm.
John Grant owns the so-called Leighton farm just at Debec Junction. A lightning bolt passed through the roof of one barn clear down through the oat mow and in a moment the barn was filled with smoke which presently burst into flames. To save the barn was out of the question. It was soon a mass of flames and another nearby also caught. The flames extended to the house which was also destroyed. The furniture was saved. The barns were filled with hay and grain. Two hogs fell victims to the flames. The rest of the stock was not in danger. A farm hand named William McKay was in the barn that was first struck. He was stunned for a short while and a horse which he had with him in the barn was knocked down.
Mr. Grant had a pretty good insurance, two policies for $1250 and $300 in the Keystone and one for $1250 in the Quebec.
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Press Newspaper Sept 23, 1901
Many people grieved sincerely when they learned of the sudden death last Sunday week of Mr. Thomas Vail of Jacksonville. He was found dead by Samuel Jones, in the cow stables, adjoining his residence, at five o' clock, and had probably been dead a couple of hours. His death was caused by heart, disease it is supposed. The deceased was in Woodstock the day before and made preparations to leave for a hunting trip, on the Miramichi. He was aged 56 years and 8 months and unmarried, owned a good farm at Jacksonville Corner, his sister keeping house for him. Three sisters and a brother, all residents of the county, survive. The funeral took place on Tuesday afternoon, and was largely attended. Rev. Ernest W. Simonson conducted a short service at the grave, and the interment was made in the Church of England cemetery at Jacksonville Corner. The pall-bearers were James Loomer, Leonard Harding, Wentworth Winslow and Solomon Perley.
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Press Newspaper Sept 23, 1901
No Fear of Small Pox
Mr. Editor,
I have learned that it has been reported that we had small pox in our family. Will you kindly allow me space to contradict this statement. I find that there are patrons of the Grist and Carding Mills who fear to come to mill for this reason. It is true that the Board of Health put us in quarantine, because
Mr. Ansley Alterton was working for us and boarding in our house during the month of June. His family are supposed to have had the disease while he was staying with us. But I am thankful to be able to say that no member of our family was sick with any disease during the whole time of the small pox scare, except three of the younger members who were quite sick from the effects of the vaccination. I might say, that all the inmates of our house were vaccinated, and every one had a good typical case of vaccination. I think this quite sufficient proof that not one of us had any small pox.
The steam mills are running along every day, and
Mr. Aaron Clark is the efficient miller in charge, and we assure the public that there is no danger now, and never was, so come along and we guarantee you prompt attention and good returns.
Yours respectfully,
A. F. LOCKHART
Hartford, Sept. 20th, 1901
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Press Newspaper Sept 23, 1901
Harry Dysart and Robb Hughes are employed on bridge work by the C. P. R. Last week they were working at Debec and Houlton. They will not be in camp this year. It seems a pity that the boys who, went to the front should not be in this camp, but it cannot be expected that they will throw up good jobs. Many of them did throw up good jobs to go to the war. They have done their share of soldiering.
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Press Newspaper Sept 23, 1901
Among the addresses to be presented to the Duke of Cornwall and York will be one from the Canadian Club of Boston. A delegate of the society will go to Ottawa where the address will be presented. It will be read and presented by Dr. R. H. Upham, president of the Canadian Club. It is hardly necessary to say that Dr. Upham is a native of Woodstock.
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Press Newspaper Sept 23, 1901
J. L. McAvity, who with some friends is now on a shooting trip in the vicinity of Grand Falls, sent to the city the carcass of an exceptionally fine bull moose, killed by him. The carcass, which is at S. Z. Dickson's stall in the country market, weighed, when dressed, over 600 lbs. The head and hide, which were also sent in, are being dressed by J. H. Carnail.- Sun.
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Press Newspaper Sept 23, 1901
MARRIAGES
On the 15th, ist. by Rev. J. W. Clarke,
Wesley Vantasel to Miss Maude Clarke, both of Smyrna Mills, Aroostook Co., Me.
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Press Newspaper Sept 23, 1901
On the 16th inst., by Rev. J. W. Clarke, Wm. J. McKinna to Miss Gertrude M. Marshall, both of Houlton, Me.
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Press Newspaper Sept 23, 1901
On the 19th inst., by Rev. J. W. Clarke, Ward E. Fox of Temperance Vale to Miss Sadie E. Reid of Bloomfield, Car. Co.
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Press Newspaper Sept 30, 1901
GUNNING EXPEDITIONS
Terrible Result of a "Day's Shooting" Near Canterbury
Shooting moose, deer or partridge is a popular diversion these fine days. It may well be said of the sportsmen in a literal sense that the woods are full of them. Sometimes on Sundays there are to be heard sharp quick reports like a gun being fired, but of course this must be something else__crackling of twigs or any old thing, but shooting. Partridges are said to be very plentiful. A Woodstocker driving to Millville the other, had by chance his gun with him. He bagged two partridges on the way. Accidents are bound to occur in gunning and a very sad accident occurred near Canterbury about a week ago.
Claud Law, aged 13, a son of Postmaster Jarvis L. Law and Jack London had gone out shooting and some distance away Mansfield Grant a man about 65 years of age was watching for deer. He saw a movement in the bushes where young Law was, and, thinking it a deer fired, the bullet entering the boy's stomach. he called out, "Jack I'm shot, " and died in a few minutes.
This accident has cast a gloom over the community where the parties resided, as it well might. An inquest has been held. It is said that Grant feels keenly the result of his hasty action. One cannot but pity him, but if sportsmen are to shoot whenever they see an object moving in the bushes, gunning for partridge or deer will be almost as dangerous as gunning for Boers. A more distressing accident that that above referred to it has not been the duty of this paper to record. Young Law was a popular youth and his parents are quite heartbroken.
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Press Newspaper Sept 30, 1901
Miss Laura Tracey, daughter of Mr. Merrill Tracey of Lakeville died at Fort Fairfield on Thursday last where she was visiting friends. She had been ill for some time from an incurable disease, but it was not expected that the end would come so soon. She was 21 years of age, a young lady held in high esteem by a large circle of relatives and friends. Not long ago she was on a visit in this town to Mr. and Mrs. Frank B. Carvell. The funeral was held at Lakeville, where the body was brought for burial on Saturday and was largely attended.
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Press Newspaper Sept 23, 1901
Daniel McMillan, of Benton, received the sad news recently that his eldest son, John McMillan had been severely injured while at work lumbering in Humboldt Co., California. A subsequent telegram was received saying he was dead. No furthur particulars have yet been given. His parents, with three sisters, Mrs. Robt. Moxon, Mrs. George Mills and Miss Gertie McMillan, with three brothers who reside here, have the sincere sympathy of the community. Deceased was about 27 years old, and has been away from home two years. He is the second young man belonging to this place who has met with an accidental death in California lumbering interests within three years. Bruce McElroy, an employe in Arscott & Co's tannery, Benton, was scalded quite badly recently about the face and neck by tanning liquor.
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Press Newspaper Sept 30, 1901
A wedding in which many people are interested took place at the Mouth of Keswick on Wednesday afternoon last, when Wm. A. Kennedy, in the C. P. R. yard here, and one of South Africa's volunteers and Miss Bertha A. Merrithew, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Abram Merrithew were united in wedlock. The affair took place at the residence of the bride's father, Rev. George Howard officiating. There were some fifty guests. The bride has many useful and pretty presents, in money silver and glassware. The grooms present to her was a bracelet made from coins collected while he was with "E" Battery in the South African campaign. The young couple have returned to Woodstock and taken up housekeeping.
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Press Newspaper Sept 30, 1901
UNION CORNER ( excerpt)
The marriage of
Mr. Frederick Furse to Miss Lena Pearl McAnarlin took place on the evening of Sept. 18th in the church, which was beautifully decorated for the occasion. Rev. A. H. Hayward was the officiating clergyman, who was assisted by Bro. E. Leroy Dakin. The bridal party entered the church to the strians of the wedding march from the organ presided over by Mrs. B. Carpenter, and took their places beneath an arch made of evergreens intermingled with flowers. The bride was given in marriage by her father, Mr. George McAnarlin, and attended by her sister Maude. Mr. Thaddeus Furse, brother of the groom, was groomsman, and the ushers were, B. Carpenter and J. R. Barton. At the conclusion of the impressive ceremony, the newly married couple returned to the home of the bride's parents, followed by the invited guests to the number of 70 or 80, where they sat down to a sumptuous repast prepared for the occasion. The wedding presents were too numerous to mention here, suffice it to say they were both costly and magnificent. After tea the groom took his bride to his beautiful home, where they intend spending their lives together, followed by the well wishes of all who knew them.
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Press Newspaper Oct 7, 1901
John R. McConnell has gone to the scene of his lumbering operations on the Aroostook. Mr. McConnell states that the report that he had disposed of his lumber interests to the Ashland Mill Company is incorrect, or, at any rate, premature. Some negoiations have been going on for the transfer of his Aroostock property and interests, and that is as far as matters have gone as yet. R. A. Estey has left for the Tobique to superintend and overlook his lumbering operations now being presented there. Mr. Estey already has about about fifty men on the ground, who are chopping and piling up the logs ready to be hauled to the brows in the winter. He will send in other crews. Mr. Estey has no difficulty in getting his logs out in the spring and he will lumber quite extensively next winter.
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Press Newspaper Sept 23, 1901
Wm. McDonald who attended the Pan- American in Buffalo, has just returned to his home in Woodstock. Talking with a Press representative, Mr. McDonald said that he was within forty feet of the building in which President McKinley was shot when the shooting took place. He with others was just trying to get a chance to enter the building. When the word was given out that the President was shot, there was a tremendous commotion. Rather strange to say, Mr. McDonald heard more than one person when they specualting as to whom did the deed, say " I bet it was a Canadian." He saw the conveyance carrying the President from the building to the hospital, and had an excellent view of the President as he was going to the building where the crime was committed. He also saw the police removing Czolgosz, and says it was a narrow squeeze, getting through the crowd with the prisoner. At one time he thought the police would have been overpowered. One part of the crowd, however, thought the prisoner was out before he really was. Had it not been that they went away from around the building, he thinks the mob would have taken the law into their own hands.
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Press Newspaper Oct 7, 1901
Rev. J. W. Clarke is seriously ill with typhoid fever. He was able to take his service on Sunday morning, a week ago, and during the day was taken sick. His condition has been such as to give his family and friends much anxiety. Everyone will wish for his speedy and complete recovery.
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Press Newspaper Oct 7, 1901
Mr. Richard Currie of Bath received word on Thursday of the death of his son Charles, aged 17 years, who went to the Northwest on the Harvest excursion in August last. Typhoid fever was the cause of his death.
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Press Newspaper Oct 7, 1901
Mr. George Sparks, of Bristol, died at the Provincial Lunatic Asylum on Thursday, where he had been for about three months. He leaves a wife and four children. The remains will be brought home for burial on Saturday.
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Press Newspaper Sept 2, 1901
Geo. Gunn, a well known character about Woodstock for many past years died at the lunatic asylum where he was taken between one and two years ago, last Friday. He used to work as a railway navee.
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Press Newspaper Sept 2, 1901
Harry Purington of Richmond, son of Ex-Coun. Purington has just recently undergone an operation for appendicitis and it is probable that he will entirely recover. Dr. Tracey performed the operation being assisted by Drs. Rankine and Griffin. Mr. Purington had been in Nelson, B.C. He suffered from blood poisoning and was laid up in the hospital out west for many months. The surgeons then thought it was useless to attempt an operation. After he came home it was concluded that therein lay the only chance for him and it is now hoped he will quite recover.
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Press Newspaper Sept 2, 1901
Charles Campbell son of Colin Campbell is dangerously ill, and one day last week it was feared he could not recover. Later reports are that his chances for recovery are better.
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Press Newspaper Sept 2, 1901
Mr. and Mrs. Frank B. Carvell have returned from a pleasant trip including a visit to the Pan American Exhibition at Buffalo.
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Press Newspaper Sept 2, 1901
Jos. Fever returned last Wednesday from a successful business trip to Perth and Edmundston. He and Mrs. Fewer are now spending a few days in St. Andrews.
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Press Newspaper Sept 2, 1901
BIRTHS
At Woodstock, on the 25th, inst., to the wife of Wm. Lilly, jr., a son.
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Press Newspaper Sept 2, 1901
MARRIAGES
At the residence of the bride's father, August 27th, by Rev. J. K. Beairsto,
George Allan, of Glassville, to Ellen M., daughter of Mr. James Young, of the same place.
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Press Newspaper Sept 2, 1901
DIED
Died at Knowlsville on Aug 7th, 1901, Vera, Ann third daughter of John and Helena Kierstead at the age of four years two months and thirty one days.
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Press Newspaper Sept 30, 1901
John Hughes claims to have broken the record in buckboard parties. He carried 40 persons on one trip from the bridge to the Exhibition building.
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Press Newspaper Sept 30, 1901
Visiting His Old Home
Mr. Chas E. Beckwith, now, of Missoula, Montana, and formerly of Grand Falls is on a visit to this his native province. He was in Fredericton last week and came to Woodstock on Friday taking in the exhibition that day. Mr. Beckwith has many friends in Woodstock, who were glad to see him. He was for many years connected with the 67th Batt, being in command of a company with headquarters at Grand Falls. In his early days he was intimately associated with the pioneers of railway construction around Fredericton and Woodstock. He learned landsurveying under the late H. M. G. Garden C. F. and Jas. Hartley C. E. He was the first man to drive via the Newburg road from Woodstock to St. Marys. He was on the first engine that ran over the road from Woodstock to Debec, and from Fredericton five miles up, when the "narrow guage " was under construction. He Beckwith talks French fluently and coming up on the train the other day he met a French Canadian from Madawaska, and was much pleased to find that his knowledge of French had not left him in spite of his long residence in a country where it is seldom heard. Mr. Beckwith left Woodstock for Tobique on Saturday where he will spend a couple of weeks camping and shooting before returning to Montana.
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Press Newspaper Oct 7, 1901
Mrs. John Earley, Bristol, will have her millinery opening on Thursay, Friday and Saturday of this week. All the latest styles including the Pan American and all the latest knovelties will be shown. Ladies are invited to call.
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Press Newspaper Oct 7, 1901
A pretty marriage was soleminized at the Rectory, Centreville, on Wednesday, 2nd Oct. by the rector Rev. E. W. Simonson. The contracting parties were Mr. Edward W. Wiley of Argyle, Carleton Co., and Miss Ferne M. Lovely of Stickney. Both the bride and groom are very popular in their respective homes, and the good wishes of many are extended to them for the joy of their married life.
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Press Newspaper Oct 7, 1901
Miss Addie Briggs, daughter of Mr. George Briggs was married on Wednesday to Mr. Hanford Jones of Kings Co. The ceremony took place at Mr. Brigg's residence, Gordonsville, Rev. A. G. Giberson officiating.
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Press Newspaper Sept 2, 1901
A sad event occurred last week at Florenceville. A relative visited Mrs. Vernon Nicholson having with her a box of nerve pills containing strychnine which she was taking under medical direction. Mrs. Ncholson's little child under two years old got the pills and swallowed several of them. Medical assistance was secured and everything possible done, but the little one died. The funeral was held on Wednesday afternoon and was largely attended. Rev. E. W. Simonson officiated. The interment took place in the new burial which Mr. John L. Saunders had given to the Church of England congregation.
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Press Newspaper Sept 16, 1901
Lewis Purinton, Richmond has returned from British Columbia where he was working for some time past for the C. P. R. He will make his home here in his native county. His brother who has passed through a successful surgical operation is improving rapidly.
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Press Newspaper Sept 16, 1901
The new house for the caretaken of the waterworks is rapidly approaching completion. It is in a pretty site near the railway and overlooking the river. The building is being put up by Mr. Killan and is a model of what such a house should be. The contact price is somewhere in the neighborhood of $1500.
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Press Newspaper Sept 9, 1901
Albert Shaw has been appointed a Justice of the Peace for Carleton County.
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Press Newspaper Sept 9, 1901
On Wednesday at Cloverdale the barns, with the season's crop of Alexander Wallace were struck and burned by lightning.
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Press Newspaper Sept 9, 1901
The wedding of Charles M. Rideout of Rideout Bros., Hartland, and Miss Mabel F. Barker of Four Falls is announced to take place next Wednesday.- Advertiser.
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Press Newspaper Sept 9, 1901
Dr. I. W. N. Baker has moved his office from Chapel Street to the Jewett house off Victoria Street, on the corner of which is the Reformed Baptist church. The entrance to the house is just off from the Orange Hall.
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Press Newspaper Sept 9, 1901
Mr. Frank Dunn, of Woodstock, agent for the Imperial Life Assurance Co., has taken a wife to himself in Miss Jessie Sharp, daughter of Mr. Whitfield Sharp, Midland. The wedding took place on the 28th ult.
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Press Newspaper Sept 2, 1901
At St. John last week Judge Barker delivered the following judgement:
In re Vanwart__This was a petition presented by
D. McLeod Vince to have his accounts as a trustee under an asignment made to him by ex- Judge Vanwart, allowed and passed, and for the court to order a commission to him as a renumeration for his services. Judge Barker refused the first part of the petition on the grounds that there was no statute authorizing him to make such an order, nor could he find a precedent for such a course. He allowed Mr. Vince a commission of five per cent. for his services.
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Press Newspaper Sept 2, 1901
Thursday morning the scholars in Miss Neales' department, College school, witnessed an event of considerable interest. It was the presentation of the prize donated by Mr. H Paxton Baird, chairman of the school board, for highest standing in the recent high school entrance examinations. The fortunate winner is Miss Jean Garden, who made the very excellent total of 800 1/2 out of a possible 1050 marks. The prize, which is a very handsomely bound edition of Longfellow, was presented by Mr. Baird in a neat speech, followed Mr. J. R. Murphy, who also congratulated the winner in well chosen remarks. It will no doubt be interesting to very many to learn that Mr. Baird has offered a prize for next year under similar conditions and that Mr. Murphy has offered one to the pupil making the higest marks in the grading examination from the sixth grade to the seventh in the college school.
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Press Newspaper Sept 2, 1901
Open season for shooting all kinds of wild duck begins Sept 1st; for hunting moose and caribou can be procured from G. H. Saunders game warden, after Sept. 15th. All parties caught in the woods hunting for moose or caribou without licenses will be fined according to the game law. Sunday shooting and hunting are strictly prohibited.
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Press Newspaper Aug 19, 1901
SUDDENLY CALLED AWAY
John McDonough an Old Woodstock Boy Died at Presque Isle.
The sudden death of a Woodstock boy took place early Friday morning last in Presque Isle where he had been living for some years past. John McDonough had been on an excursion to Millinockett. On getting back to Presque Isle he complained to one of his boys that his leg was numb. The numbness spread rapidly so that he became incapable of walking before he reached his horse. He soon became unconscious after being taken home and passed away at an early hour Friday. His remains were brought to Woodstock, where he was born.
Deceased was a son of John McDonough, a well-known resident in Woodstock. he married a Miss Mary Lenihan of St. Stephen. She with two sons survives. They are in Woodstock now. Mrs. James McManus of this place is a sister of Mr.Donough's. Michael McManus's first wife was also a sister of the deceased.
The funeral took place on Saturday afternoon. The remains were borne from the residence of Mr. Jas McManus to St. Gertrude's church, where the usual office for the dead was said by Rev. Father Chapman. A large number of friends and acquaintances showed their respect by attending.
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Press Newspaper Aug 26, 1901
Saturday evening as Mr. R. H. Steeves, the C. P. R. station agent, was driving along leading from the B. & A. station to Main street in company with his wife, he met a single team the driver of which, evidently in an intoxicated condition, turning out on the wrong side, causing a collision with the team occupied by Mr. and Mrs. Steeves. The latter succeeded in getting clear of the entanglement without bodily injury, but Mr. Steeves' carriage was a good deal damaged by the collision, and his horse received several cuts and bruises.
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Press Newspaper Aug 26, 1901
Deputy Sheriff Martin Lawlis had a most miraculous escape from a very serious accident, recently, while returning from the Robinson campmeeting where he was engaged in performance of official duty during the day. While he was driving down whqt is known as Monticello hill a portion of the harness gave way, allowing the wagon to come upon the horse. The frightened animal started on a run. Mr. Lawlis seeing the possible danger jumped from the carriage and endeavered to catch the horse by the bridle. He failed in this and the horse started to run down the hill. The plucky deputy sheriff hung to the reins and was dragged down the hill at a fast clip. He was badly bruised about the body. The left hip was badly injured and the skin badly lacerated on the limbs. The thumb of the left hand was dislocated. Fortunately no bones were broken.- Houlton Paper.
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Press Newspaper Aug 19, 1901
Jack Dibblee met with a serious accident that might have been much more serious than it was. He was cleaning a revolver in the store of W. F. Dibblee & Son, when it accidently discharged and the bullet passed through the palm of the left hand. He is doing well, but as yet is unable to work.
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Press Newspaper Aug 19, 1901
The following young men of Aberdeen parish, left for Manitoba recently to work in the harvest fields: William Simpson, Frank Welsh, Robert McElhinney, Geo. Ball, Thomas Somerville, Arthur Jordan, Jacob Doucett, Robert Scott, Charles Jamieson, Charles Wilson, Jacob Lunnie and John McFarlane.
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Press Newspaper Aug 19, 1901
That business is not declining in Woodstock should be evidenced by the way several of the industries are branching out. J. D. Dickinson & Son are adding 24 new vats to their tannery outfit. This will make about 100 vats in the concern. The new department means a largely increased output and the employment of many more hands.
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Press Newspaper Aug 26, 1901
About Bath
Business appears to be thriving up river judging by the appearance of the houses and outbuildings, the luxuriance of the crops and the cheerful disposition of the merchants and farmers. At Bath a large new building is being erected by
C. E. Giberson which will be utilized for store room and general business emporium. A stranger will sometimes wonder where the Bath merchants get all their trade. Among the stores are Bohan & Co., P. Corbett, C. J. Green, Mrs. Giberson, G. F. Shaw, C. E. Gallagher, W. W. Mellville and they all appear to be doing a good business. Of course Johnville, Canaan and Giberson settlement form a good section of country to draw from. There is a school at Bath taught by Mr. Reuben McClintock, with an attendance of some 60 pupils. On Sunday the Methodist have service every two weeks, Rev. T. Allen officiating. Rev. M. L. Gregg looks after the spiritual welfare of the free Baptists.
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Press Newspaper Aug 26, 1901
Mrs. Peter Shea of Johnville was taken to the Insane Asylum on Friday by deputy Sheriff Foster. On several occasions she had attempted suicide. There is hope of recovery under proper treatment.
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Press Newspaper Aug 26, 1901
Samuel Nason, a well known C. P. R. employee died on Friday after an illness from typhoid fever. He had recently been employed as a brakeman on the Gibson branch. His family live at Debec where his father for a long time held a position as foreman of section.
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Press Newspaper Aug 26, 1901
Mrs. Luther Smith, mother of Herbert Smith, died on Friday morning last after a long and weary illness from rheumatism. She was boarding of late with Mrs. I. Vanwart. Deceased was a widow, her husband having died several years ago. Besides the son referred to, one daughter unmarried survives. Mr. Charles Titus, formerly of this place , now of Bangor, is a brother to deceased. He was present at the funeral which took place on Saturday afternoon, and was largely attended. Mrs. Smith was beloved by a large circle of friends.
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Press Newspaper Aug 26, 1901
What cost one his life occurred at W. H. Haines' sand pit last Tuesday morning. Martin Rosmussen, from New Denmark, N. B., who was at work for Charles Waldron taking out a load of sand, and Herbert Nickerson and Ervin Chapman with Mr. Haines' team were at work at the pit when the cave in occurred. Rosmussen was buried under three feet of earth and the life almost instantly crushed out of him, Chapman was in the sand to his armpits and was taken out with three broken ribs, while Nickerson stood a little more than ankle deep, from which he was able to extricate himself and give the alarm. _Fort Fairfield Leader.
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Press Newspaper Aug 19, 1901
At the residence of the bride's parents by Rev. J. C. Bleakney, the 17th inst., Hugh W. Smith of Presque Isle, Me., to Miss E. Mauud Manuel, of Woodstock, N. B.
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Press Newspaper Aug 19, 1901
Centreville ( excerpt)
J
essie Dougherty and Burton Clarke left here last Saturday for the North west to take a hand in the great harvest.
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Press Newspaper Sept 2, 1901
Mrs. John Ring of this town died on Friday night after a comparatively short illness from typhoid fever. She had been laid up about two weeks. Her husband and one child a little daughter survive. Deceased was about thirty-five years of age.
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Press Newspaper Sept 18, 1905
Green Road
Sept 11th___
Mr. and Mrs. William John Kyle and two children of St. John, have been visiting for three weeks their friends in Carleton county, they have had a fine time and are well pleased with their trip, especially Mrs. Kyle who formerly belonged to Richmond. Mr. Kyle's relatives, Mr. Neal's family, own large farms in Greenville; their crops are in first class order and they have them all housed.
Travelling through the country I see a good many different flocks of sheep, but
Gordon Neal has a flock of Shropshire pure breds that beats all___short legged, heavy quartered, broad backed and trim. I like to see nice sheep for there is nothing that pays so well as sheep on a farm, especially this year; his ewes average him five dollars a head.
W J Carson is loading potatoes for G N Fernier , Toronto, Potatoes are very poor in this section; there will not be an average of 40 per acre.
Mrs. Parker Tobin gave a reception to her niece, Miss McGinn of Bath, Me., recently. Dancing and whist were enjoyed until 12 o, clock, when a good lunch was served. Dancing was continued till the wee smal' hours.__ C. G.
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Press Newspaper Sept 4, 1905
Oak Mountain
Aug. 30___The farmers are engaged doing their harvesting and although the weather has been dry crops are looking fairly well.
Our school has again reopened under the management of our former teacher
Miss Gertrude Mitchell.
Miss
Kate Purvis, who has been visiting her sister Mrs. Joseph Kerr, returned to her home in Fredericton.
John Purvis has gone to visit his son Dougal in Carmel, Maine.
Mrs. John Ivy and son Leroy, of Limestone, spent Sunday in this place.
Owing to the absence of our pastor,
Rev Mr. Fowler, there was no prayer meeting on Wednesday evening.
A fire started in on the new road the other day; the Speerville hose company soon put it out.
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Press Newspaper Sept 18, 1905
Union Corner
Sept 11. ___
Emmerson Dickinson and his sister Jessie went to Woodstock on Saturday, took in Northampton, stayed all night ; next morning crossed over to Lower Woodstock; then to Meductic and visited there; Monday morning went to Woodstock and then home. If there are any other person or persons who can take in as many places in the same length of time, we'd like to hear from them.
Edmund Dickinson and son commenced thrashing some couple of weeks ago; the grain is turning out very well ; buckwheat is a light crop ; they expect to thrash and saw wood, they are prepared to do both in good shape and give perfect satisfaction to their customers ; the reason is they understand their business which is the factor for success in all branches of industry.
Mrs. Edmund Dickinson has got a splendid flock of turkeys numbering 50. If their is any other lady in Richmond or Hodgdon who can beat that I'd like to hear from them through the Press. __C G.
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Press Newspaper Sept 11, 1905
Centreville ( Excerpts )
Sept 1 :___On Monday morning of this week the citizens of our village were alarmed by the cry of fire. Hastening to the scene we found out that the fire had broken out in the barn of
John Cormier, catching in a barn of S W Burtt, just a few feet away, burning it with contents of hay, oats and some machinery. Mr. Burtt is a heavy loser. Mr. Cormier lost his house and barn also, fourteen cords of wood ready for the stove by hard work; the destroying element was confined to these place.
We want to thank those from quite a distance that came to our assistance.
Charles A Reid, a boy of our village but now of Lynn, Mass., is visiting his parents, he is accompanied by C Barry, Wm. Finney, Vera Darcey and a lady friend all of Lynn.
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Press Newspaper Sept 18, 1905
J W Kerr of Katahdin Iron Works, after an absence of 23 years registered at the Carlisle with his son last week. He was not aware of the death of his brother John Kerr which took place some time ago, until his arrival here.
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Press Newspaper Sept 18, 1905
Mr. Herbert Harper, of Woodstock, who has been critically ill here for the past two months, has so far recovered as to able to be about again. Beacon.
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Press Newspaper Sept 18, 1905
Dr. Jameson of Philadelphia is visiting his father, Henry N Jameson at Richmond Corner; they were at the Carlisle on Friday.
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Press Newspaper Sept 18, 1905
Chicken stews are the order of the day. One each held last week at the homes of Barry Bull, Bull's creek, and Thomas Allan of Woodstock, which were attended by large numbers of our young folks.
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Press Newspaper Sept 18, 1905
Miss Agnes Mowat, after several weeks pleasantly spent at her Bayside home, St. Andrews, has returned to Woodstock.
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Press Newspaper Sept 4, 1905
Death of Mrs D F Merritt
General regret is expressed at the death at 2 o'clock Saturday morning, of
Mrs. David F Merritt, at the Turner House, where she has made her home for some time. The deceased was 61 years of age and is survived by two children, Mrs. Marshman Brayley of Montreal, which was present at the death of her mother, and Charles Merritt. Her husband had been dead six years last July. The deceased has been ill for some days with grip, but a fatal ending was hardly expected. She was Miss Maggie McCoy, only daughter of James McCoy, the first principal of Woodstock Grammar School, and one of the earliest and most respected citizens of the town; her husband was for many years customs officer. The funeral took place Sunday afternoon.
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Press Newspaper Sept 4, 1905
Hartland ( excerpt)
Saml Ellis sold to S N Estabrooks, two weeks since, 4 April lambs weighing respectively 107, 105, 96, 94, total 402 lbs and of balance of flock not any weighed less than 80lbs. Beat this who can ?
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Press Newspaper Sept 4, 1905
Centreville
Aug 30__Fire broke out early Monday morning in the barn of
J Cormier. It soon spread to his house and a barn near by owned by Shepherd Burtt. The whole village turned out to fight the flames and many from Bloomfield and the surrounding country hastened here to help. At one time it looked as if the whole town would burn.
Burtt's Hotel and the St. James' Rectory were most in danger, and these were most in danger, and these were made the objective points for work, and the fire was kept to a little group of five buildings owned by Messrs Cormier & Burtt. The former's loss is upwards of $1,000 with no insurance. Mr. Burtt lost the summer's crop of hay and the most of his oats which were in the barn.
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Press Newspaper Sept 4, 1905
Mrs John Watt and her son Winslow C Watt returned on Thursday from a visit to relatives at Eagles Lake, on the line of B & A railway. From Houlton to Eagle Lake is about 100 miles, thence to Fort Kent is 17 miles. This whole country is suffering from forest fires. Many houses and a large tract of land were destroyed on Thursday.
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Press Newspaper Sept 18, 1905 ( excerpt Hartland)
The sudden death of Mrs. George R Burtt has created quite a deep and lasting sensation; a fine Christian woman has left us, one who was prominent in every good enterprise and a faithful worker in the church of which she was a member; by the survivig members she will be missed. Her husband will feel her absence more than all others; a fine residence and none of the family left to occupy; two daughters who have their own homes Mrs Carter at Andover and Mrs Taylor, at Norfolk, Virginia, both of whom were at mother's bedside during her last hours; one son in Alaska. Mrs. Burtt had reached her 58th year.
Mr. Burtt is recuperating at Andover the guest of his daughter Mrs. Carter. Mrs. Taylor is also there but will soon return to her home in Virginia.
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Press Newspaper Sept 18, 1905 (excerpt Hartland)
It is not to be judged that Rev Mr. Mair is selfish, mean or unaccomodating because he uses a carriage with a seat that will contain one person; he favors the horse.

Press Newspaper Sept 18, 1905
Presentation to Thomas Allan
Thomas Allan, who has been a valued employee of Connell Bros. Co., Ltd, for 33 years, left for Cripple Creek , Colorado, on Saturday evening, where he goes to work as a moulder in a foundry, one of whose proprietors is his son Perey Allan, who left Woodstock for the west some years ago.
During the dinner hour on Wednesday, when the men had gathered for work,
E L Hagerman, on behalf of the company and employees, made an address to Mr. Allan and among other things told him that during his long service in the foundry he had never had an enemy and all regretted his intended departure. Mr. Hagerman then presented Mr. Allan with an expensive travelling case. The recipient made a suitable reply.
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Press Newspaper Sept 18, 1905
The Dalling Cup
The Dalling cup, for the local golf championship, is a very handsome silver cup, engraved, and mounted on an ebony base. The dates for the matches are the first and second Fridays of September in each year. To be owner of the cup it must be won three years in succession. At the present writing the contest is on for ownership. This cup was offered by H V Dalling in 1900, and was won that year by
Rev G D Ireland; in 1901 by B M Macleod; in 1902 by Hon W P Jones; in 1903 and 1904 by Clarence Sprague, who is at present leading Winnie Jones by four strokes.
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Press Newspaper Sept 4, 1905
GOLF MATCH
There will be a golf match between teams captained by Clarence Sprague and B M Macleod, and selected from the following players:-

C Sprague B M Macleod
J S Creighton Dr T F Sprague
W R Jones Rev G D Ireland
Hon W P Jones Geo Mitchell
A C Calder W Sprague
R N Loane Dr R E G Smith
H P Baird Geo Phillips
H Bruce D W Newcomb
G H Harrison Dr E S Kirkpatrick
A B Connell W Dalling
N F Thorne A F Garden
S L Carr Wm. Dickinson
C L Merrit Wm. Dibblee
J S Eagles Geo W Gibson

Press Newspaper Sept 18, 1905
A New Dentist
Dr. Kirkpatrick has recently been making extensive improvements in his office in order to accomodate his increasing practice. In addition to G Fred Clarke who has been his mechanical assistant for some years he has now employed Dr. A R Currie to assist him in his operating department. Dr. Currie graduated in June last at the Philadelphia Dental College and has the reputation of being a most thorough workman and a master of his profession.
Dr. Kirkpatrick has added to his office equipment a new operating chair of the very lastest pattern, which is a model in beauty and design, and this, with a new electric dental engine makes the operation of filling teeth almost a pleasure to the patient as well as the operator.
In his laboratory he has a new electric lathe made especially for dental plate work and is also adding an electric furnace for making of porcelain inlays.
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Press Newspaper Sept 18, 1905
Centreville ( Excerpts)
Rev Mr. Freeman, Barry Estabrooks, C Cliff and son, left on the 12th for the Miramichi hunting grounds where, by their trusty rifles, they hope tp procure the denizens of the forest. Dr. Green with some American hunters expect to follow in the near future.
Our neighbor Chas White, who removed to Shilo, and expected to remain under the care and direction of Bro Sandford, has returned to his former home, much wiser and with less wealth than when he left the country.
Mrs. Roy Lee, accompanied with a trained nurse, has gone to the Montreal hospital to consult medical authorities for the restoration of her failing health.
Dr Waldo Perkins, whose late sickness threatened to terminate in death, under the skillful treatment of Dr Ross, has now entirely recovered and is now busy attending to the ills that horse flesh is heir to. His services is much in demand.
Thomas, son of Jas White, who went to the Boston hospital and was operated on for appendicitis, has returned, enjoying his former good health.
Andrew Beckwith has completed a good stone wall under his house; William Agnew has followed his example and otherwise improved his residence; I W Cheney and Dr Green have made improvements to their already comfortable
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Press Newspaper Sept 4, 1905
J A and Mrs. Lindsay were at Hodgdon, Me., attending a reunion of the Jones family of which Mrs. Lindsay was one. The meeting was held on the farm of William L Jones, and was attended by about one hundred members of the family and relatives. A most enjoyable time was spent for three days.
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Press Newspaper Sept 4, 1905
Miss Martha Moores will leave for Houlton on Wednesday en route to Providence, R I, where she will permanently reside.
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Press Newspaper Feb 27, 1905
Killed by a Log
People of this place were shocked and surprised Tuesday evening when the remains of
James Welch were brought in on a train about 9 o'clock. He was employed as foreman on the lumber job of his brother, G H Welch, not far from Oleona and just when or how his death occurred will never be known. When the men came in to camp for supper, Welch was not among their number; and it was at once thought by the brother that misfortune of some sort had befallen him. A party at once started in search of him and what the brother had thought was only too true for he was found in a sitting position, against a huge rock, cold in death. A small log lay on beyond him that had jumped from a slide and taken his life. Whether he was instantly killed and left in the position stated or had life left to crawl there is not known. One hand was frozen which would indicate that he had been dead for several hours.
The remains were brought here and placed in charge of Undertaker Mears, who prepared them for burial, and yesterday morning the sorrowing ones accompanied them to Reynoldsville, where interment was made.
Deceased leaves a wife and two children, three brothers, G H and O L Welch of this place, and J P Welch of Minneapolis, Minn. and one sister, Mrs. Fred Dewitt, and father Benjamin Welch in Woodstock, N. B.
He was 38 years of age and born in New Brunswick. He came to this county in 1888 and has resided here since.
The sympathy of all is extended to the sorrowing ones, especiallly to the wife and little children.
__Phil. Exchange. Dispatch please copy.
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Press Newspaper Feb 27, 1905
Obituary
After an illness of several weeks
Mrs. George Porter died, on Saturday, Feb 18th, at the the residence of her son-in-law Dr. E. S Kirkpatrick. The funeral on Monday afternoon was largely attended, Rev. G A Ross officiating. Her husband, two daughters and a son survive. Since her arrival in this town with her husband from Fredericton she has made many friends, who will regret to hear of her demise.
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Press Newspaper Feb 27, 1905
On Wednesday morning at 11:30
Mrs. Creighton, Sr, formerly of Halifax; died at the boarding house of Mrs. McLardy, after a severe illness, aged 80 years. Burial service was held at the house at 6:30 o'clock on Thursday, and the remains were taken to Halifax the same morning. The deceased is survived by a son James S, of the People's Bank, Woodstock, and one daughter Mrs. McKinley of Halifax, who was unable to arrive here before her mother's death, by reason of the heavy storm. Among the handsome floral decorations was a contribution from the boarders at the house.

Press Newspaper Feb 27, 1905
The people in this town heard with regret that as a result of injuries received in the hockey match here, on Monday evening, between Maryville and the local team, Hanford McLean, the sixteen year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Lemuel McLean, died at his home in Maryville on Wednesday afternoon. The deceased was playing close up to a Woodstock player when the puck was lifted, accidentally striking McLean on the head. After a few minutes rest he resumed play and it was not thought he was seriously injured. Returning home, Dr. Fisher was called on Tuesday and found he was suffering from concussion of the brain. On Wednesday morning Drs Atherton and Fisher performed an operation, removing pieces of the skull about the size of a fifty cent piece. The patient failed to rally and passed away at 3 o'clock. He was a bright young man and his loss will be keenly felt. His father is an employe' of the Gibson cotton mill.
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Press Newspaper Feb 27, 1905
The remains of Mrs. Nellie Haugh, McAdam, who had been undergoing treatment for erysipelas at the Victoria hospital, Fredericton, and who died there on Tuesday, arrived in Woodstock Wednesday night. She was 72 years. Deceased was born in Ireland and lived in the Southern States where she became acquainted with Morris McCormick who was a soldier in the Union army. At the end of the war they were married and removed to Woodstock, where he was employed at the iron works in Upper Woodstock; he met with an accident while at the works which subsequently caused death, and he was buried here. She acted as servant for Hon Mr. Lindsay in 18?8. The second husband of deceased was John Haugh of McAdam, who died about eighteen years ago. The funeral took place on Thursday morning, to St. Gertrude's church, where funeral services were conducted by Rev. F J McMurray, and the interment was made in the Catholic cemetery, Undertaker Kelly in charge.
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Press Newspaper Feb 20, 1905
Fred Tedlie, who is visiting his relatives in this county after a couple of years absence in Montana and Colorado, will return to Montana in three weeks. He says he met several Woodstock people in his travels who are doing well in their adopted home. Business since the presidential election is improving in both the states mentioned.
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Press Newspaper Feb 20, 1905
J J Rogers, Northampton, recently cut a log and brought it to Woodstock market that totalled 500 feet. There were 13 pieces of 14 ft each. Three pieces had a diameter of 12 in. each and the other ten were 40, 22, 17, 15, 7, 15, 9, 14, 13, and 8 in. respectively. Authorities claim it was a large log to be grown in this country.
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Press Newspaper Feb 20, 1905
The drive whist social in the A O H rooms, on Monday last, was attended by a large number and everybody thoroughly enjoyed themselves. The principal prizes were won by Mrs. T. L. Fewer and Leo Brown, while the consolation prizes fell to the lot of Mrs. John Thompson and R F Waddleton. The next gathering will be held this evening.
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Press Newspaper Feb 20, 1905
Mr. and Mrs. P. Graham, Hartland, left for Halifax on Thursday night, and will sail from that port on Monday by steamer Corinthian for London, England, on a two months visit to Mr. Graham's parents in that city. Mr. Graham came from England about ten years ago, and has for some years been manager of the Peoples Bank at Hartland in this county. He has not visited the old home since.
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Press Newspaper Feb 20, 1905
Mr. and Mrs. W H Gray and daughter Winnifred left for their house in the west, Monday evening.
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Press Newspaper Feb 20, 1905
Plymouth
Mr. and Mrs. John Henderson, of Union Corner, went to Plymouth to visit his brother David Henderson and other friends. They had to stay a number of days being hemmed in by a big gale of wind and snow storms, which are quite prevalent this winter, from the start. Jack Frost has got to let go his grip and the snow will wash him out of existence in spite of his teeth, if he has got any.
Plymouth is a good place to go to, blockade or no, whether the wind blows high or low. The writer has proved it true. We are well cared for ; we are just waiting for thaw ; the propect is it will come in 24 hours. We hope it will. There is one thing certain, the snow and Jack Frost hangs on like the toothache.
CALVIN GREEN.
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Press Newspaper Feb 13, 1905
Mrs. Daniel Jackson died at her home, Upper Woodstock, last Monday, aged 94 years. Mrs. Margaret Kennedy of Presque Isle and Robert Johnson of Lincoln are sister and brother of deceased. Mrs. Jackson is also survived by one son David who is in the Klondike and two daughters Mrs. L W Atherton of Woodstock and Mrs. Johnston Emery of Upper Woodstock. The funeral took place on Wednesday afternoon. Rev. W B Wiggins officiating.
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Press Newspaper Feb 13, 1905
The Dalling cup given for the championship of the hockey league is on exhibition at the jewelry store of H V Dalling. It is a gold-lined silver cup, resting on a suitable base. One one side is engraved. "Presented to the winner of the Woodstock Hockey League, by H V Dalling, Winter of 1904 05." The other side is plain, but Mr. Dalling will engrave the winning team and names of players.
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Press Newspaper May 14, 1900

William Snow farm_Rosedale.
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Press Newspaper May 14, 1900

R. H. Hull & Son Business Ad
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Press Newspaper May 14, 1900

J. C. Cole, Woodstock, May 5th, 1900
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Press Newspaper May 14, 1900

Randolph K. Jones Estate Ad
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