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Grand Falls Genealogy Club
a/s 
Bibliothèque Publique de Grand-Sault
200 rue Pleasant
Grand-Sault NB 

Tree Arbre
c/o
Grand Falls Public Library
200 Pleasant street
Grand Falls NB
 Club de Généalogie de Grand-Sault
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The Deane and Cavanaugh report of 1831 

John G Deane and Edward Kavanaugh were mandated by the government of the state of Maine by a decree dated 31 march 1831, to inquire as to the number of "squatters" that were illegally established on yet to be granted lands in the Madawaska and Aroostook valley region. Their report is to include evidence of the period of the earliest settlers, the condition of the land, geology etc. Their report is considered an important historical document, as it is a census of some of the earliest inhabitants of the region. It is reproduced here as it can be a very usefull resource for research on past and present Grand falls families.

Le rapport Deane & Cavanaugh de 1831 

John G Deane et Edward Kavanaugh ont été  mandatés par le Gouvernement de l'État du  Maine, dans un  décret daté le 31 mars 1831, de s'enquérir du nombre de colons établits sans titres légaux sur les terres ("squatters") dans la région du  Madawaska et de la vallée de l'Aroostook.  Leur rapport devait inclure des faits concernant les premiers occupants des terres et les dates de ces  premières occupations, la condition actuelle de ces terres , la géologie etc. De nos jours, le rapport a une importantce historique, puisqu'il constitu un recensement de plusieurs des premières familles de la région. Nous l'incluons ici comme une ressource importante pour la recherche sur les habitants passés et présents de la région de Grand-Sault

 
 
Concerning the information obtained for this report, from: AmericanCatholic Historical Society, "Madawaska on the River St. John: New England's Last Frontier" by Rev. William L. Lucey, S.J.: "They {Deane andKavanagh} gathered the needed information in a methodical manner. They contacted and spoke to as many settlers as time allowed, but relied in  good part on visits to the more prominent families located in the most convenient places. From them they got as much information as they could; but they checked and tested all given information with others. They soon ascertained that: 'much time would be unprofitably consumed by calling at the dwelling house of every Settler; we therefore at the most convenient place ascertained, to our satisfaction, all the points pertinent to our duties,and in every case we had numerous opportunities of testing the correctness of the representations which had been made to us by our own view and the statements of others.'"
Extract from a statement made by John G. Deane and Edward Kavanagh, 
1831.
. . . "On the other side of the St. Francis River, on the south shore 
of the
St. John River is a patch of land which is cleared and partly 
cultivated.
We can see the frame of a timber house. We landed and had our dinner 
there.
On this land, hay, raspberry bushes, millet grass, wild oats, wormwood,
nettles, parsnips, potatoes, are growing in the wild confusion.
David and Ruben ESSENSA cleared three acres on this lot in 1826.
Joseph WILD took possession of it in 1827. Cyrus GANNON cleared it and 
took
the first crop in 1828. James MCPHERSON gathered the crops of 1829 and 
1830
and now he claims the land as his. No work has been done on this lot 
this year.
Next lot. Thomas KETCH cleared two acres in 1828. David 
POLLARD
planted some potatoes on this lot last year. The land is now vacant.
Next lot. Franklin HALE felled a few trees four years ago; but 
he
has neither cleared nor sown the land.
A little distance below, Owen FITZGERALD felled a few trees in 
1829,
but made no clearning. Very near, or perhaps on the same lot, Jesse 
WEELOCK
and Walter POWERS began to fell trees in August 1830, they built a 
timber
house where they spent the winter and this spring they have sown. On 
this
lot there is a brook and they are preparing to build a mill, but the 
brook
is too small to be useful.
We arrived at John HARFORD's house, on the north shore of the 
St.
John River around five o'clock in the afternoon and spent the night 
there.
HARFORD is six or seven miles below the St. Francis River.
Below the falls of the Allagash River, we saw about eighty pine
trees felled very recently and taken away by three men of the Province 
of
New Brunswick, who, we heard later, made out of them one hundred and 
fifty
tons of merchant wood.
July 25. On the north shore of the St. John River, John 
Augustine
WEBSTER claims the first possession. He has been improving his land for 
the
last three years. He bought his lot from Jesse WEELOCK, who bought it 
of
John BAKER, who had purchased it from John HARFORD, Jr., the first 
occupant.
HARFORD had cleared seven to eight acres.
The next lot, on the north shore, is occupied by John HARFORD 
and
his son Phinehas Randall HARFORD. He began to clear in 1816, he says. 
He
affirms that on the advice of Simon HEBERT, he had begun to clear some 
land
at the mouth of the Madawaska River in 1815. He cleared two acres, then
built a log house and lived there for a year, [SNIP]. Later we heard 
that
HARFORD had sold his rights to that lot of his, to John BAKER.
The next lot on the north shore, is the one of Firmin CYR. He
bought 120 rods of John HARFORD five years ago for one hundred dollars.
HARFORD had cleared about one acre. CYR lives on the south shore of the 
St.
John River almost opposite Madawaska Church. (St. Basil). He bought 
this
lot for his three sons and occupies it through a farmer named OUELLETTE.
CYR began to work on this lot in 1826.
Next, on the north shore, the lot belongs to Firmin THIBODEAU, 
who
bought it from Stephan GROVES. GROVES opened this lot in the fall, in 
1826;
he cleared eight acres and built a house.
Next, the lot is occupied by Dennis SMITH who began in 1829; he 
has
cleared six acres and built a house which he occupies.
Next, on the north shore Thomas KENNY, Canadian. He began in 
1829.
He bought of Jonathan CYR, who according to the custom of the colony had
made a possessory chopping in 1823. KENNY has a house on this lot, but 
he
lives lower at James BACON's and runs John BAKER's grist mill.
Next, north shore, Philip LONG, [SNIP]. He occupied this lot in
1828 and is still there.
Next, north shore, Marmosie LONG, who began in 1828.
Next, north shore, George LONG, who began in 1828. The two last
named are the sons of Philip and they live on their lands.
Next, north shore, Menard CHOUINARD, a Canadian. He began in 
1830;
he has a house and he occupies same.
Next, north shore, Louis NADEAU, born in Madawaska. He began in
1829; he has five cleared acres, but he lives lower.
Next, north shore, Thomas PELLECH a Scotchman; he felled the 
trees
on the three or four acres in 1829. He left his lot and went to live in
Riviere-du-Loup.
Now we are going back to the enumeration on the south shore of 
the
St. John.
Next, south shore, lower than Jesse WEELOCK and Walter POWERS, 
lives
Charles MCPHERSON, who was born in Portland. The lot which he occupies 
is
opposite the properties of Augustine WEBSTER and John HARFORD of the 
north
shore. P. Randall HARFORD has cleared this lot and built a small house 
in
1827; he sold his improvements to MCPHERSON in the winter 1829 for two
months and eight days of work. MCPHERSON now occupies the lot.
Interval in forests.
Following on the south shore is a clearing and a vacant house. 
Owen
FITZGERALD took this lot three or four years ago, then he sold it and we 
are
told that he left the country.
Next, south shore, John HARFORD Jr. He says he began on the 3rd 
of
August 1827. He occupies a breadth of one hundred rods.
Next, south shore, Electus OAKES, born in Canada. He began in 
July
1827. We are told that he sold his lot. This property is opposite the
farthest end of Churchill Island.
Next, south shore, Abraham CHAMBERLAIN, born at Chaleurs Bay. 
He
began in the autumn of 1828.
Next, south shore; we find a plaque of possession which, we 
hear,
was made by Pierre MARQUIS, who lives below.
We met Firmin CYR today, who tells us that he lives on the south
shore opposite the church, that he is fifty-three years of age and was 
born
in New-
Brunswick. He bought the land, which he has been occupying for twenty 
years
from Firmin CYR, Sr. His land is sixty rods in breadth by six hundred 
in
length. He has the deed to his land which was granted to his 
predeccessor
(sic) by the English."
"Below the lot marked by Pierre MARQUIS, the shores of the river 
are
high and the land is vacant on a two mile distance.
Next, south shore, Isaac YEARNTON, Englishman, occupies a lot 
which
he began to clear in 1828.
Next, south shore, Joseph WILD, born in Fredericton; he began to
clear in August 1828.
Next, south shore, Miles EMERY. He opened the lot seven years 
ago.
Two years ago he sold to Joseph MICHAUD for twenty dollars. MICHAUD 
lives
below, but he cultivates the lot and claims a holding 40 rods of 
breadth.
Between WILD and MICHAUD is a space of unoccupied land of a two 
mile
length.
Next, south shore, on the west point formed by the Fish and St. 
John
Rivers is a clearing which belongs to Sigefroy NADEAU. He was born in
Madawaska and is twenty-five years of age. He lives with his 
father-in-law,
Joseph MICHAUD. He took this lot in 1821 and spotted a breadth of sixty 
rods.
Next, south shore, on the point formed by the St. John and Fish
Rivers, is Jean-Bte DAIGLE, who came in 1819, he cleared a small portion 
of
the land. He lives below and claims several other lots. One of them he
bought from Joseph PELLETIER, fifteen or sixteen years ago on the south
shore of the St. John River; breadth, thirty rods. Another which was 
opened
at first by a man named L'APOSTAT sixteen years ago. This man worked on 
it
for two years then gave it to Michel MORIN. The lot remained vacant for 
a
few years. Then MORIN gave it to DAIGLE, who has occupied it since.
We landed below the mouth of the Fish River and went by land as 
far
as Daniel SAVAGE's house. This man lives in a framed house. SAVAGE and 
a
man named WALKER hired by Peters & Wilmot Co. of New-Brunswick, built on
this lot in 1826 or 1827 a double saw mill. They received a part of 
their
salaries but the contractors having failed in their undertaking, they 
kept
the mill. Since then SAVAGE sold his share to Nathaniel BARTLETT. The 
mill
and the lot are still the property of SAVAGE.
Half a mile below the mill, BARTLETT occupies a lot which he 
opened
in 1827 and which he is still cultivating.
We had our dinner at SAVAGE's then we went back to our canoe.
Two miles down the Fish River, Benoi ALBERT possesses a land 
which
he has occupied since 1829.
Next, south shore, Hypolite COUFFRE (sic) born at Chaleurs Bay. 
He
began on the 1st of June 1824 and occupies a breadth of one hundred 
rods.
Next, south shore, Sylvain DAIGLE. He took the lot twelve years
ago, which has a breadth of 60 rods. He has been farming ten years and
people say that he is not twenty-three years old yet.
Next, south shore, Joseph DAIGLE. He began twelve years ago and
occupies a breadth of sixty rods. He felled trees but has not burned
anything yet. A year and a half ago, he bought twenty rods from Basile
GARNIER for twenty dollars. DAIGLE may be thirty years of age.
Next, south shore, Hilarion DAIGLE. Bought from Basile GARNIER, 
the
latter had bought from Joseph MICHAUD who was the first occupier four 
years ago.
Next, south shore, Thomas BARNABE (probably MARTIN) bought from
Christophe MARQUIS.
Next, south shore, Christophe MARQUIS.
Next, south shore, Thomas READY, born in Canada. He began in 
1829.
Next, south shore, Antoine GARNIER of New-Brunswick. He began 
in
April 1831.
July 26. We went back to our work on the north shore beginning
where we left it yesterday.
Next, below Thomas PELLOCK's lot; Joseph PELLETIER, Jr. He 
began in
1828; but he lives on the south shore below.
Next, north shore, Joseph PELLETIER; he opened a lot on this 
very
year. He is an old settler who came from Canada.
Next, north shore, a lot opened this year.
Next, north shore, Pierre LANDRY; he began this year, he came 
from
Canada.
Next, north shore, Gabriel DUBE, Canada. He began this year. 
He
has not sown yet.
Next, north shore, Jeremie SOUCY. He possesses a lot but lives 
on
the other side of the river.
Next, north shore, Joseph TERRIEAU (Canada). He began in 1829.
Next, north shore, Abraham DUBE (Canada). Began in 1829. 
Occupies
the farm.
Next, north shore, the PRUDENT brothers and Leblanc GUIMONT
(Canada). Began in 1830 and occupy the lot.
Next, north shore, Charles BEAUPRE. Began in 1830, lives on the
lot. Comes from Canada.
Next, north shore, Alexandre OUELLETTE (Canada). Began in 1829 
and
occupies the land.
Next, north shore, Amos MADDOCK; possesses a lot, but lives at 
the
SAVAGE mill on the Fish River, Stephen GROVES took the first possession 
of
this lot then sold it to Owen FITZGERALD who sold it back to MADDOCK.
MADDOCK has occupied it for two years. Breadth, ninety rods.
NOTE. These MADDOCKS are said to be the MADORES of today.
Next, north shore, Nathaniel BARTLETT, the same man who 
possesses a
lot on the Fish River and a part of SAVAGE's mill. He bought fifty rods
from John BAKER and ten rods from Amos MADDOCK. The lot was opened five
years ago. BARTLETT is married and has charge of BAKER's saw-mill.
Next, north shore, John BAKER. Began to clear in 1823.
Next, north shore. The lot of one hundred acres which BAKER 
bought
from the State of Maine and Massachusetts. Baker also claims a lot on
Meruimticook River which he occupied in 1826. He cleared seven acres on
this lot, which is now (in mowing). He Claims also an island, in the 
St.
John River, of a three acre area. He began to work there in 1828. The
island is in mowing.
John BAKER says that John HARFORD, in 1817, cleared the west 
point
of the confluence of Madawaska River and lived there one year. BAKER 
bought
the improvements of HARFORD before witnesses and entrusted the clearing 
to
Walter POWERS.
John BAKER says also that Cyrus CANNON, from New Hampshire,
possesses a clared lot on the south shore of the St. John River, 
opposite
the mouth of the St. Francis River, which MCPHERSON claims, but on 
leaving,
CANNON left it in the care of BAKER. CANNON and MCPHERSON bought this 
lot,
when only a few trees were felled on it, for ten thousands long 
shingles.
CANNON left a year ago saying that he would return when the frontiers 
would
be definitely fixed, but it is not probable that he will ever return.
Nathaniel BARTLETT has in his possession SAVAGE's deed to half 
of
the saw-mill on the Fish River; the document is dated on the 16th of 
October
1828 and contains half the rights of SAVAGE but it is not acknowledged.
BARTLETT assumes that Cotton WALKER has the deed to the other half.
The saw-mill was built in 1825 or 1826 through a contract 
between
Wm. Peters & Co., for one part, and WALKER and SAVAGE for the other. 
The
Peters Co., pledged itself to pay WALKER and SAVAGE four hundred Louis 
for
the erection of the mill; and in fact during the erection the company 
paid
150 Louis. When they were through building, the company took hold of 
the
mill and ran it for a year. But not being able to meet its obligations
because of a failure, the company left all its interests in the mill to
SAVAGE and WALKER on the condition that they return the obligations they
were holding and reimbursed the one hundred and fifty Louis already 
paid.
Since, the mill has been the possession of BARTLETT to whom SAVAGE has
transferred his part of rights as we have read already."
 
"Next, north shore, James BACON to whom Maine and Massachusetts
granted a lot in 1825. Considerable clearing has been done on the lot 
which
is now under cultivation. BACON died last year. He was the son of 
Timothy
BACON of Gorham.
Next, north shore, Barnabas HANNAWELL, born in Madison, 
Sommerset
County. He bought the house and land of Charles STETSON through a sale
contract. STETSON had begun in 1825, HANNAWELL took possession of this 
lot
in October 1827, and has occupied it since; he has thirty cleared acres 
and
occupies a sixty rod breadth. HANNAWELL claims also the Isle au Sucre 
in
the St. John River, a little below the St. Francis River. The island
contains seventy to eighty acres of land, a few of which are cleared.
Formerly potatoes were planted there; wild hay grows on this island 
which is
unoccupied.
Next, north shore, Pierre MARQUIS, of Madawaska; he began in 
1828,
cleared five or six acres and built a house which burned down last 
spring.
On this lot we see a hovel and fields which are sown. Pierre MARQUIS 
sold
to Firmin DAIGLE who occupied a part of the DAIGLE Island.
Next, north shore, Firmin DAIGLE; began in 1829, felled ten 
acres
and cleared two or three acres, which are in mowing. He occupies a 
breadth
of fifty rods.
Next, north shore, Basile GARNIER (GAGNE)of Madawaska. Began in
1827 felled twelve to fourteen acres, ten of which are culture. He has 
a
house and barn; occupies the property.
Next, north shroe, Honore CHASSE of Madawaska. Began in 1828; 
has
ten acres in culture. He has a house and barn; occupies a breadth of 
fifty
rods.
Next, north shore, Justin (Augustin) DAIGLE of Madawaska. Began 
in
1826; has thirty acres in culture, house and barn, and occupies the
property. He claims also an island on which he worked and built a barn.
This island is between the island claimed by BAKER and DAIGLE Island. 
The
location of DAIGLE is opposite the lower part of DAIGLE Island.
From here we are going back to the south shore.
Next, south shore, Baptiste BOUCHER (Canada). Began in 1826; 
has
thirty acres in culture, house and barn; lives on the farm; occupies a
breadth of fifty rods.
Next, south shore, Pierre LANDRY (Canada). Lot bought from 
Benoi
NADEAU for fifteen dollars. There we see a felling only. LANDRY claims 
a
breadth of sixty rods.
Next, south shore, Nathaniel BARTLETT. Felled trees on one acre 
in
July 1831.
Next, south shore, Barnabas HANNAWELL. Began in 1830; felled 
trees
on four acres.
Next, south shore, Dominique DAIGLE, of Madawaska. Began in 
1828;
has a barn, ten acres in culture. He lives below and occupies other 
lands.
Next, south shore. Benoi NADEAU, Canada. Came to this country
twenty-four years ago; for some time, he was the farmer of the priest. 
In
1824 he opened the lot which he occupies now, has twenty five acres 
cleared,
house and barn.
Next, south shore, Francois GENDREAU. Canada. Bought the lot 
from
Desire NADEAU, who took possession of it in 1826. He is twenty years of 
age
and lives with Dominique DAIGLE. He occupies a breadth of sixty rods.
Next, south shore, Hilarion DAIGLE, of Madawaska. Began in 
1827,
built a framed barn and opened sixty acres of land. He lives on DAIGLE
Island. Occupies a breadth of sixty rods.
John BAKER tells us that the average of crops in Madawaska is as
follows:
Wheat on new lands produces twenty bushels per acre.
On plowed land, twenty bushels per acre.
Barley on new lands produces from twenty-five to thirty bushels.
Oats, from thirty to forty bushels.
Potatoes from three hundred to four hundred bushels per acre.
Hay, two tons per acre.
Corn grows well every year. Apples are raised successfully, but
there are few apple trees in the region.
We ate cucumbers on the 25th of July; John BAKER says that he 
picked
some on the 17th of July.
The settlers call the establishment up the Daigle ISLAND the
American Settlement.
Hilarion DAIGLE lives on the DAIGLE Island, the third of which 
he
occupies on the western part. He began in 1810 and all his portion is
cultivated.
Dominique DAIGLE occupies the eastern part of the Island, the 
third
of which he owns. Began in 1810, the whole of his portion is cleared. 
He
lived on the island until very lately. Firmin DAIGLE occupies the 
middle
part of the Island. Began in 1810 and has cleared all his part.
Dominique DAIGLE began on the south shore, below Hilarion's lot 
in
1816. He has cultivated this lot for eight years. Two years ago, he 
built
a house and he lives on his lot now. He has twenty cleared acres and 
two
barns. He also claims the lot opened by Electus OAKES, neighbor of John
HARFORD, Jr. He paid one hundred and twenty dollars to OAKES for the 
lot.
Next, south shore, near Dominique DAIGLE, Chrysostome MARTIN.
Bought his lot from Simon BEAULIEU, sixteen years ago. Occupies a sixty 
rod
breadth. Cleared fifty acres, which consist of grain, hay and pasture. 
He
has a house and two barns. He also claims another lot on the north 
shore, a
fifty rod lot which he opened sixteen years ago and on which he cleared
eight acres. He says he possesses another lot farther up the river 
between
Dominique DAIGLE's and Christophe MARQUIS' lots; it is a lot of 
thirty-five
rod breadth, he bought it last spring from Christophe MARQUIS for
thirty-five dollars, and on which he has a ten acre felling.
Next, south shore, Jean-Bte DAIGLE of whom we have already 
spoken.
He has done much work on his lot.
Next, south shore, Joseph PELLETIER, he began eighteen years ago 
and
always occupied the lot. Has a forty acre breadth, house and barn, and
forty acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Michel PELLETIER, who began nineteen years 
ago;
died few years later, leaving five children. His widow married 
Christophe
MARQUIS. The lot is granted to two of PELLETIER's daughters, Des Agnes 
who
married Pierre MARQUIS and Locade who married Desire NADEAU. The
sons-in-law are to support the father and mother-in-law. The land is a
sixty rod one. It contains a house, a barn and forty acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Michel MORIN, (Canada). Began sixteen years 
ago.
Has a house a barn and a considerable clearing. Breadth: sixty rods. 
He
also claims a lot on the Fish River, bought from Nathaniel BARTLETT. 
The
land is not cultivated.
Next, south shore, Raphael MICHAUD, Canada. Bought from Joseph
MICHAUD, four years ago. Michel felled trees on one acre to take 
possession
of the lot, which measures thirty rods in breadth. The last occupant 
has a
house, a barn and forty ploughed acres. He claims he possesses the 7/8 
of
the Isle aux Pins on which he and his brother-in-law have sown fifty 
bushels
of wheat this year. He has a barn on the island; he has been farming 
for
four years on this island."
 
"Next, south shore, Joseph DAIGLE of Madawaska. Bought four 
years
and a half ago, from Charles BEAUPRE for one hundred dollars. BEAUPRE 
had
bought from someone else. When DAIGLE bought, there were four acres of
wheat and one of hay. The lot is ninety rods in breadth. DAIGLE has a
house, a barn and ten acres in culture. He claims eight acres of land 
on
the Isle aux Pins, which he bought at the same time as the preceeding 
lot,
but his part on the island is not cleared.
Next, south shore, Alexandre GIRAUD (GIROUX or GIRARD) Canada. 
he
lives one mile below on the north shore, where he owns a farm. He 
bought
this land last spring from Charles BEAUPRE, who had taken a crop of 
wheat on
it two years before. The land is thirty rods in breadth. Five or six 
acres
are ploughed.
Next, south shore, Germain SAUCIER, Canada. Bought from Vincent
ALBERT and Jean PELLETIER fifteen years ago. Paid sixty dollars to one 
and
fifteen to the other in exchange for their deeds. The complete lot has 
a
sixty rod breadth. SAUCIER has a house, a barn and forty cultivated 
acres.
Next, south shore, Vincent ALBERT, Canada. Bought from Benjamin
BOUCHER fifteen years ago. BOUCHER had begun two years before and had 
sown
one bushel of wheat. Occupies a sixty rod breadth, has a house, a barn 
and
thirty acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Germain SAUCIER, Canada. Began eighteen 
years
ago and has always occupied the lot since. Breadth sixty rods. Has a
house, a barn and thirty cleared acres.
Next, south shore, Jean-Baptiste SAUCIER, Canada. Had his lot 
from
his brother thirteen years ago. His brother had not opened the lot.
Jean-Baptiste occupies a sixty rod breadth, has a house, a barn and 
eight
acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Hubert CARON, Canada. Bought from Paul 
MARQUIS
eight years ago for twenty dollars. Occupies a fifty rod breadth, has a
house, a barn and fifty acres in culture.
On the next lot is the Chapel of St. Luce; this lot has a thirty 
rod
breadth.
Next, south shore, Benjamin BOUCHER, Canada. He lives at the 
Grand
Ruisseau (Grand Brook). This brook is sufficient to run a grist mill.
BOUCHER bought the lot of Jean-Baptiste LECLERC, eight years ago and 
paid
thirty dollars for it. The lot was a wood-land one then. It has a 
forty
rod breadth. BOUCHER has a house and a barn and thirty acres in 
culture.
He sold twenty rods of his lot to the church.
Next, south shore, Jean-Raphael ROY, Canada. Bought from Hubert
CARON two years ago for sixty dollars. CARON had sown two bushels of 
wheat.
The lot has a twenty rod breadth. Twenty acres are cleared. There are 
a
house and barn on the lot.
Next, south shore, Germain MICHAUD, Canada. Bought from Paul
MARQUIS, nine years ago, when the lot was a woodland one. It is a forty 
rod
lot; thirty acres are now in culture, there are a house and a barn.
Next, south shore, Elie LAGASSE, Canada. Bought from Benjamin
BOUCHER, eighteen years ago. Breadth, sixty rods. House and barn and 
forty
acres in culture. He also claims a lot on the Fish River which he has 
taken
with his brother, Basil LAGASSE, four years ago. Both claim a twenty 
rod
breadth; they have a few acres cleared.
Next, south shore, Clement LAUSIER (or SAUCIER), Canada. Bought
from Simon HEBERT twenty-three or twenty-four years ago for ten dollars.
HEBERT had bought from Jacques MATELOT, the land was not clearned then.
Breadth, one hundred and five rods. He has a house, two barns and sixty
acres in culture. He says he owns a lot farther up the river, between
Joseph PELLETIER's and Jean VASSEUR's. He opened the lot this year and
felled a few trees on it.
Next, south shore, Ferdinand OUELLETTE, Canada. Bought forty 
rods
from Clement SAUCIER, two years ago, and ten rods from Jean-Baptiste 
AYOTTE,
when there was only one cleared acre. Clement SAUCIER had bought the 
forty
rods from Simon HEBERT and AYOTTE had bought the ten rods from 
Jean-Baptiste
BABA by deed of sale. OUELLETTE has a house, a barn and forty acres in 
culture.
Next, south shore, Jean-Baptiste AYOTTE, Madawaska. Bought a 
forty
rod breadth by deed of sale from Jean-Baptiste BABA, five years ago, and
paid one hundred dollars. At the time of the purchase, there were a 
house,
a barn, ten acres in culture and a five acre felling.
Next, south shore, Charles AYOTTE, Madawaska. Bought a forty 
rod
breadth from his brother Jean-Baptiste AYOTTE. Has a house, a barn and 
five
cleared acres.
Next, south shore, Joseph ALBERT, Canada. Bought from Pierre
GENDREAU a year and a half ago by deed of sale and paid seventy-five
dollars. At the time of the purchase five bushels of grain were sown on 
the
lot. Breadth, thirty rods. House and barn. The deed of sale is dated 
on
Feb. 8, 1830.
Next, south shore, Joseph LAGASSE, Jr., Canada. Bought from 
Joseph
JOUBERT, seven years ago and paid twenty-five dollars. At the time of 
the
purchase there was a possessory chopping. Occupies forty rods in 
breadth
and has actually eight acres in culture. He says he possesses an island
opposite his farm. The island is cleared and in mowing.
Next, south shore, Raphael MARTIN, Madawaska. Bought from 
Simonet
HEBERT about eight years ago. HEBERT had marked the lot but had not 
cleared
acres. He claims he possesses the tenth part of the island opposite his
lot, on which he has a barn.
Next, south shore, Christophe MARTIN, Madawaska. Took the lot
twelve years ago. Occupies a seventy rod breadth, he has a house, barn 
and
twenty acres in culture. He claims also the tenth part of the adjacent 
island.
Next, south shore, Pascal MICHAUD, Madawaska. His father took 
this
lot eighteen years ago. The son occupies it now upon the condition of
supporting his father and mother. Breadth, thirty rods. He has a house 
and
barn but lives with his brother-in-law, on the next lot. He claims also 
the
twentieth part of the neighboring island. Has twenty acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Alexandre OUELLETTE, Canada. Lives with his 
brother-
in-law, P. MICHAUD and helps him to support his father and 
mother-in-law.
Occupies a thirty rod breadth, has a hosue and barn and twenty-four 
cleared
acres. He claims also the twentieth part of the island.
Next, south shore, Benjamin BOURGOGNE (probably used for 
BOURGOIN,
or perhaps for MARTIN surnamed BOURGUIGNON), Canada. Bought nineteen 
years
ago from Benoi TERRIEAU, when the lot was uncultivated. Occupies a 
sixty
rod breadth, has a house, barn and fifteen acres in crops. He also 
claims
the twentieth part of the island.
Next, south shore, Joseph MICHAUD, Canada. Bought four years 
ago
from his brother, Francis MICHAUD, by deed of sale and paid three 
hundred
dollars. The land was not cleared at the time of his purchase. 
Occupies a
twenty-five rod breadth, has a house, barn and thirty acres in crops.
Next, south shore, Francis MICHAUD, Canada. Bought the lot of 
his
brother, Germain MICHAUD for one hundred and fifty dollars. Germain had
bought from Benjamin who had bought from Pierre BEAUDRY, the first 
occupier.
When Francis MICHAUD bought, there were three or four acres cleared on 
the
lot with neither house nor barn. Now there are a house, barn and twelve
acres in culture."
"Next, south shore, Louis BELLEFLEUR, Canada. Bought ten years 
ago
of Germain MICHAUD through deed of sale for one hundred and fifty 
dollars.
Breadth twenty rods. Has a house, a barn and six acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Benoni MANUEL, Canada. Bought eight years 
ago
from Germain MICHAUD by deed of sale for thirty dollars. Breadth, 
thirty
rods. Has barn, house and six acres sown.
Next, south shore, Jean-Baptiste BOUTIN, Canada. Bought two 
years
ago from Clement SAUCIER for eight dollars. SAUCIER had bought from his
brother J.-B. SAUCIER, who had bought from Paul MARQUIS, the first 
occupier.
At the time BOUTIN bought, the lot was marked only. Breadth sixty rods.
There are ten acres cleared, with neither house nor barn. He lives 
below
the old church of St. Basil on the north shore of the St. John River. 
He
claims also a lot in a second settlement, which he opened four years ago 
and
on which there are twenty acres in crops. Breadth, sixty rods. Behind 
this
lot along the path which leads to Simonet HEBERT's lot is the lot of 
Joseph
OUELLETTE, Canada. Began in 1828, occupies a sixty rod breadth, has 
house,
barn and twenty acres in culture.
Next, on the river, south shore, Joseph CHASSE, Canada. Began 
in
1827. The river forming an angle here, the lot ends to the river in a
point. No house, eight or ten cleared acres, lives with his 
father-in-law,
Elie JEANNETTE.
Next, south shore, Germain CHASSE, Canada. He marked the lot 
ten
years ago, sowed wheat five years ago, he has a house and the frame of a
barn and fifteen to sixteen acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Edouard LECLERE, Canada. Exchanged a 
property
which he owned, farther up on the north shore with Paul MARQUIS, who had
marked the present lot four years ago. The land is not cultivated this
year. According to their conventions, Paul MARQUIS is to provide 
LECLERE
with a house and barn. LECLERE occupies sixty rods and has seven or 
eight
acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Francois BELANGER, Canada. Began very 
lately;
has marked a forty rod breadth, piled up the burned trunks and sown 
seven
bushels of grain this year. Lives on the north shore, he has taken this 
lot
with the intention of speculating.
Next, south shore, Etienne GAGNON, Canada. Bought this lot this
year from Aristobule GAUVIN for twenty-five dollars. GAUVIN says that 
he
owned it four years, and he had cleared enough to sow three bushels of 
seed.
GAUVIN lives below on the south shore. GAGNON has also bought thirty 
rods
from Joseph BEAULIEU for fifty dollars, this lot contained a clearing 
large
enough to sow four bushels of grain. GAGNON has his family with him on 
his
land and has the frame of a house. The family is sheltered under a few
planks which cross from one wall to the other.
At four o'clock in the afternoon the rain began to fall and at 
five
we decided to go to the first inn on the way, which is at a five mile
distance. We reached there at six o'clock in the evening. Simonet 
HEBERT
is the proprietor.
{SNIP}
Next, south shore, neighbor of Etienne GAGNON, Benjamin LEBEL,
Canada. He bought from Simon BARNABE (MARTIN), three years before for
twelve dollars. BARNABE had marked the lot but he had not improved it;
LEBEL occupies a 30 rod breadth, has sown four bushels of wheat but has
nothing built on the land. He lives on the north shore of the river 
where
he has other possessions.
Next, south shore, Olivier LAGASSE, Canada. He bought of 
Jacques
BOULET two years ago and bought from Abraham COUTURIER, six years ago; 
also
bought from Abraham COUTURIER, six years ago; also bought from a 
doubtful
proprietor six years ago. {sic} Occupies a 30 rod breadth, has four 
bushels
of wheat sown, has no building. Unmarried, works on salary for Joseph 
HEBERT.
Next, south shore, Jean GUERETTE, Canada. Began eight years 
ago.
Occupies a 60 rod breadth, has house, barn and twenty bushels of wheat 
sown.
Next, south shore, the widow of Simonet BARNABE, Madawaska. Her
husband began eight years ago. She occupies a 30 rod breadth, has no
buildings, has eight bushels of wheat sown and harvests two or three 
tons of
hay. She lives on the north shore of the river.
Next, south shore, Francois PICARD, Canada. Began and bought 
three
years ago, from Joseph LEBEL for $150. LEBEL had sown 15 bushels of 
grain.
PICARD occupies a 30 rod breadth, has a house; but actually the lot is 
in
pasture. LEBEL lives further down.
Next, south shore, Joseph LAGASSE, Canada. Began to clear eight
years ago. Occupies a 30 rod breadth, has a house and barn and 17 acres 
in
culture.
Next, south shore, Eugene SIROIS, Canada. He is Father SIROIS'
brother. Bought from Regis TERRIEAU, two years ago for $50. TERRIEAU 
was
the first occupier of the lot. SIROIS occupies a 30 rod breadth and has
three acres in culture, no buildings; live with the priest. (pastor).
Next, south shore, Leon ALBERT, Canada. Opened a lot eight 
years
ago, has a house and a barn and three acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Charlemangne BEURNACH (BARNECHE), Canada. 
Bought
from Leon ALBERT three years ago; ALBERT had taken the lot four years
before. Occupies a 30 rod breadth, has house, barn and enough cleared 
land
to sow four bushels of grain.
Next, south shore, Ignace CLAVETTE, Canada. Began five years 
ago.
Occupies 30 rods, has a house and enough cleared land to sow two pecks 
of grain.
Next, south shore, is a lot marked by Paul PICARD, Canada.
Next, south shore, Charles BOUCHARD, Canada. Bought from Firmin
NADEAU for $50. Occupies a 60 rod breadth, has a house and barn and 
enough
cleared land to sow 12 bushels of grain.
Next, south shore, Antoine SIROIS, Canada. Bought from Francis
BELANGER, about four years ago. Occupies a 30 rod breadth, has house 
barn
and four acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Vincent PELLETIER, Canada. Began eight years
ago; occupies 80 rods, has a barn and enough cleared land to sow ten to
twelve bushels of grain; lives with Alexandre ALBERT, his father-in-law, 
on
the north shore.
Next, south shore, Pierre OUELLETTE, Canada. Began eight years 
ago;
occupies an eighty rod breadth, has a house and enough cleared land to 
sow
18 to 20 bushels of grain.
Next, south shore, Simon HEBERT, Madawaska. Occupies a twenty 
rod
breadth, has a house and two acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Jacques BEAULIEU, Canada. Exchanged his land 
for
this lot. The one who occupied it before him had bought it from Joseph
BEAULIEU who had marked it six years before. Occupies a 30 rod breadth, 
has
an old barn {SNIP}.
Next, south shore, Justin BELANGER, Canada. Bought from 
Francois
BELANGER and occupies a 15 rod breadth.
Next, south shore, Andre LEVESQUE, Canada. Began recently and
occupies a 60 rod breadth, is building a barn and has eight to ten acres
partly cleared.
Next, south shore, Casimie ALBERT, Canada. Just beginning."
"Next, south shore, David DUFOUR, Canada. The lot was 
inaugurated
several years ago by Paul MERICAND, (Paul a Marie Jos: Paul POTIER) his
father-in-law. First they cleared a part of the lot and a grist-mill 
was
built. The mill was destroyed by fire. It was rebuilt, but now it is 
in a
bad condition and has not been used for twelve years. The brook is 
small.
DUFOUR lives further down.
Next, south shore, the occupier refused to give us any details.
Next, south shore, Anselme ALBERT, almost facing the mouth of 
the
Madawaska River. He marked this lot for his children twenty years ago;
occupies a 60 rod breadth, has 18 cleared acres. He lives further down.
Next, south shore, David NADEAU, Madawaska. Was brought up by 
Simon
HEBERT who have {sic} him his lot. NADEAU has been on it for six years.
Breadth, 60 rods. Has a house, a barn and 20 acres in culture.
Interior lots, Joseph BEAULIEU, Canada; opened a lot a mile and 
a
half from the river, has four felled acres, occupies a 40 rod breadth. 
Elie
GAGNON, Canada, has opened this year another lot next to BEAULIEU on the
west side. He is eighteen years old and lives with his father, Etienne 
GAGNON.
Next, south shore, the occupier refused to give us any details.
Next, south shore, the occupier refused to give us any details.
Next, south shore, Anselme ALBERT, Canada. He came to this 
country
with his father who bought the lot 45 years ago, from Augustin DUBE. 
DUBE
had it through the English. The dimensions of the lot are 50 x 670 
rods.
ALBERT has a house and barn and 40 acres in culture. There is a brook 
on
the lot and a mill privilege. The privilege was sold few years ago and 
a
saw mill and a grist mill were built. Formerly Simon HEBERT was the
proprietor of these mills {SNIP}.
Next, south shore, the occupier refused to give us any details.
Next, south shore, the occupier refused to give us any details.
Next, south shore, the occupier refused to give us any details.
We went to Simon HEBERT's place {SNIP}.
Next, south shore, David DUFOUR, Canada. He lives on a lot 30 
rods
in breadth on which he has a house and a barn, and 40 acres in culture. 
He
also claims a 30 rod lot next to Guillaume FOURNIER; 40 acres are in 
culture
but there is no house. He still claims another 30 rod lot between 
DUREPOS
and PICARD, on which he has 12 acres in culture.
These lots as well as the mill situated further up were given 
him by
Paul MARICHAUD (Paul a Marie Jos: POTIER).
Next, south shore, Guillaume FOURNIER, Canada. Bought from 
Francois
ALBERT. Occupies a 30 rod breadth, has a house and barn and 80 acres in
culture.
Next, south shore, next to the second lot of DUFOUR, David 
DUREPOS,
Canada. He occupies a lot which he believes has been granted by the
English. He has occupied it twelve years. Breadth 60 rods; has a good
house, a barn and 50 acres in culture. He is the son-in-law of Simon 
HEBERT.
Next, south shore, Francois Picard, Canada. Bought from
Jean-Baptiste FOURNIER by deed of sale, four years ago. FOURNIER bought 
it
eight years before from Joseph DUFOUR. He does not know who was the 
first
occupier, but he believes that the lot was originally granted by the
English. The dimensions of this lot: 35 x 560; has a house, a barn, a
forge and forty acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Chrysostome CYR, Madawaska. The lot was 
given
him by his father Firmin CYR who had it through Francis CYR. The latter 
is
still living and is eighty years old. Francis CYR is one of the first
settlers. Dimensions, 45 x 560 rods. CYR has a hosue, his barn is not
finished yet; he has 15 cleared acres.
We went down the river, M. Kavanagh called on the priest and 
spoke
with him half an hour. Then we went down to Pierre LIZOTTE's house and
spent the night there.
July 30th-We left our men and our canoe at LIZOTTE's and went 
back
on foot to our starting place. Almost opposite the old church of the 
parish
of St. Basil is a path which leads to a back settlement.
On this road which runs on the south direction, the first land 
is
occupied by Charles OUELLETTE, Canada. His lot begins at a distance not
less than 500 rods south of the St. John River. The breadth is 50 rods.
The lot is situated on the east side of the back settlement road. He 
began
last spring, has a house, one acre of grain and 15 acres of felled trees
ready to be burned. He took the lot, six years ago, on the north shore, 
he
sold it to Eugene SIROIS for $115. He says his father lives in 
Kamouraska
and served 7 years in the army of the American Revolution.
Next, east side of the road, Anthime MALTE, Canada. Bought last
spring, from Pierre GENEST who had opened the lot two years before; gave 
$15
for it. Occupies a 60 rod breadth, has a house, four acres in harvest 
and
six of felled trees.
Next, east side of the road. Joseph MERCURE. Baie des 
Chaleurs.
He bought four or five years ago from Pascal MICHAUD for $50.00. At the
time of the purchase there were 16 cleared acres on the lot. He 
occupies a
15 rod breadth and has a house, a barn and 36 acres in culture.
West side of the road.
Gareon LEVESQUE DES COIGNETTER, Canada. He began four or five 
years
ago. He occupies a 15 rod breadth, has a house and barn and six acres 
in
culture.
Next, west side, Firmin DUMONT, Canada. He began 7 or 8 years 
ago,
he occupies a 60 rod breadth, he has a house, a barn and twelve acres in
culture.
Next, west side, Quentin YAN (probably DIONNE, that the people
pronounce YONNE), Canada. He began 12 years ago, occupies a 60 rod 
breadth,
he has a house and barn and 12 acres in culture.
Next, west side, Edward MCKAY, Canada. He is twenty years old, 
he
began five or six years ago. He occupies a 60 rod breadth, and is 
building
a house. He has sown four acres and felled trees on twelve others. He
lives with his brother in law, Firmin DUMONT and supports his mother.
Next, west side, Marcel COLLIN, Canada. He began in 1826; he
occupies a 60 rod breadth and has a house and four acres on which the 
trees
are felled.
Next, east side, Francois CLOUTIER, Canada. He began four or 
five
years ago. He has a house, three or four acres in culture and four or 
five
acres on which the trees are felled.
Next, east side, Joseph MERCURE, Madawaska. He began last year, 
but
he lives on the north shore of the St. John River. Occupies a 60 rod
breadth, he has sown four to five bushels of grain, has fifty acres of
felled trees; he is building a saw-mill; he has a house or rather a camp 
on
the lot.
Now we are going back on the south shore of the St. John River 
to
continue where we left yesterday."
Next to Chrysostome CYR, Joseph CYR from Madawaska; he occupies 
a
lot which is not cultivated.
Next, south shore, Francois DAIGLE, from Madawaska. He had his 
lot
from his father who had it from the English; the lot is 30 rods in 
breadth.
He has a house, a barn and twenty acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Jean-Baptiste FOURNIER, from Madawaska. He 
lives
with his father who possesses the title deed to this lot which he had 
from
the English. The lot has a 30 rod breadth, we are told. J.-B. FOURNIER 
was
not home {SNIP}.
Next, south shore, Joseph DUFOUR, Canada. He bought fifteen 
years
ago from Benoni TERRIEAU who had bought the lot from Olivier CYR, first
occupier through a grant from the English. He occupies a 23 rod breadth 
and
has a house and 60 acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Sylvain DAIGLE, from Madawaska. He keeps his
father, Joseph DAIGLE, who is the owner of the lot. The land was 
granted by
the English. They occupy a 66 rod breadth and have a house, a barn and 
60
acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Xavier CYR from Madawaska, son of Jacques 
CYR,
first grantee of the English. Xavier claims half of the lot, a 30 rod
breadth; he has a house, a barn, and 60 acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Chrysostome CYR, Madawaska, brother of 
Xavier;
and we suppose that he occupies the other half of the primitive lot. 
{SNIP}
Next, south shore, Jean-Baptiste DAIGLE, French Village. The 
lot
was granted by the English. DAIGLE occupies a 30 rod breadth, he has a
house, a barn and 30 acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Joseph CYR, Madawaska; this lot was given him 
by
Francis CYR; he has a house, a barn and thirty acres in culture. He
possesses also a lot which is vacant; we have already mentioned this.
Next, south shore, Menin CYR, Acadia; he bought a 30 rod breadth
from Michel MICHAUD 15 years ago or more; he has a house, a barn and 
from 80
to 100 acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Jean-Baptiste CYR, Acadia. The grant of this 
lot
came from the English. He occupies a 60 rod breadth; he believes the 
lot to
be eighty rods in breadth. He has a house, a barn and 200 acres in 
culture.
One of his sons lives with him and another son on the back part of the 
lot.
Next, south shore, Louis GATTE-BELLEFLEUR, Canada. The grant of
this lot comes from the English. First the lot was sold to Pierre 
DUPERRE
who sold it to Pierre FRASER from whom BELLEFLEUR bought it. He gave 
$1000
for it then paid $2000 for improvements. He possesses three houses, a
grist-mill and a saw-
mill on a little brook. He had 70 acres in culture, and the lot is 70 
rods
in breadth.
He also claims a lot on the south shore, facing the Quisibus 
River.
He bought this lot by deed of sale from Henri TARDIF 12 years ago for 
$50.
He occupies a 20 rod breadth, he has six acres in culture, but he has no
buildings.
He claims another lot on the Riviere Verte which he acquired 
through
an exchange with Charles BARNABE. They exchanged deeds. He occupies a 
120
rod breadth, he has a barn and has cleared land to sow 12 bushels of 
grain.
Next, south shore, Simon BEAULIEU, Acadia, who is the proprietor 
of
the lot. His son Simon, Jr., says that his father bought from Paul and
Joseph MARQUIS and that he promised to give him the lot. Breadth, 60 
rods.
There is a house, a barn and 70 acres in culture. The father has the 
charge
of the flour mill which is located on the back part of Anselme ALBERT's 
lot.
Next, south shore, Augustin CYR, Madawaska. He began eight or 
ten
years ago. He occupies a 60 rod breadth; he has a house, a barn and 
from 10
to 15 acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Antoine CYR, Jr., Baie des Chaleurs. It was 
he
who built the house which Charles PATTERSON occupies now. He came from 
Baie
des Chaleurs ten years ago on the advice of Pierre DUPERRE; he took a 
vacant
lot and built a house on it in the following autumn. {SNIP}
Formerly this lot was the property of Antoine OUELLETTE who left 
it.
{SNIP} Antoine CYR bought a 10 rod breadth of land from Thomas BEAULIEU.
CYR has now a house, is building a barn and has 3 acres in 
culture.
He is a policeman as well as Dominique BOURGOIN and Michel MORIN.
Next, south shore, Thomas BEAULIEU, Baie des Chaleurs. He 
bought
from Simon HEBERT. He sold 10 rods to Antoine CYR and occupies the rest 
of
the lot, a 50 rod breadth. He has a house and 10 acres in culture. He 
has
been living on this lot 9 years.
Next, south shore, Charles PATTERSON. He lives in a house built 
by
Antoine CYR {SNIP}.
Next, south shore, Antoine CYR, Sr. The grant of this lot, 
which
has a 70 rod breadth, comes from the English. He sold 20 rods to Simon
HEBERT during a period of famine. He has a house, a barn and 30 acres 
in
culture.
Next, south shore, Pierre LIZOTTE. He lives on a lot originally
granted by the English to Pierre DUPERRE, his uterine brother from whom 
he
bought it later. He occupies a 60 acre breadth; he has a house, two 
barns
and 80 acres in culture. His son, Antoine, lives also on the same lot.
July 31st, Sunday. We went to church where we met most of the
important citizens of the place. They seemed a little reserved with us
because of the presence of an English magistrate.
Monday, August 1st. Next, south shore, Joseph CYR, son of Paul 
CYR.
This lot was granted by the English to Joseph CYR, Sr., who is dead. 
Joseph
who occupies it actually has a 60 rod breadth, a house, a barn and 50 
acres
in culture. He bought a ten rod breadth from Thomas OUELLETTE which is 
a
part of a lot orginally granted by the English to Joseph SOUCY.
Next, south shore, Firmin THIBODEAU; occupies a 30 rod breadth 
which
he bought from Jean-Baptiste SOUCY. The latter bought from Paul CYR who 
had
the lot from the English. THIBODEAU has 30 acres in culture, but he 
hasn't
any house.
Next, south shore, Joseph AYOTTE, Madawaska. He occupies 60 
rods;
bought from Francois CHARRETTE, thirty years ago. CHARETTE had the 
grant
from the English. He occupies also 56 rods of a lot which he took 
himself.
He has a house, a barn and 50 acres in culture.
Next, south shore, John MARTIN, Acadia. He bought from the 
children
of Zacharie AYOTTE, the lot which was granted to Zacharie by the 
English.
He occupies a 40 rod breadth; he has a house, a barn and 20 acres in
culture. The heirs sold a 20 rod breadth of this lot to Francois 
LIZOTTE.
Next, south shore, Francois LIZOTTE, Madawaska. He bought from
Francois LIZOTTE, Sr., a twenty rod breadth, Jean-Baptiste LIZOTTE had
bought from Francois LIZOTTE Sr., the other half which consisted of a 30 
rod
breadth.
The lot has been granted by the English. Francois, Jr., has a
house, a barn and 20 acres in culture. Jean-Baptiste LIZOTTE has also a
house, a barn and 18 acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Germain CYR, Jr. He occupies a 30 rod 
breadth
which he inherited through his father. His father bought the lot from
SOUCY, who was the first grantee of the English. CYR has a house, a 
barn
and 20 acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Jean-Baptiste LIZOTTE who bought the other 
half
of the lot of Michel CYR, father of Germain. (The lot is situated 
further
up.) He occupies a 30 rod breadth, has a house, a barn, a forge and 40
acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Charles AYOTTE; had the grant from the 
English.
He sold 30 rods to Bonaventure LIZOTTE. He occupies a 30 rod breadth
himself. He has a house, a barn and 40 acres in culture. His son, 
Ignace,
lives with him.
Next, south shore, Bonaventure LIZOTTE, son of Pierre, 
Madawaska.
Bought a 30 rod breadth from Charles AYOTTE, and 30 rods from his 
father,
Pierre; has a house, a barn and 20 acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Xavier MARTIN, Madawaska. Firmin THIBODEAU's
son-in- law. This lot was originally granted by the English to Mathurin
BEAULIEU. It became the property of THIBODEAU after many deeds. 
THIBODEAU
gave it to his daughter. They have a house, a barn, a sixty rod breadth 
and
60 acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Francois THIBODEAU, Jr., Madawaska. First 
this
lot was granted to SANSFACON; it was sold to Firmin THIBODEAU who gave 
it to
his son Francois. He occupies a 70 rod breadth, he has a house, a barn, 
a
store and 12 acres in culture.
He claims also a 5 rod breadth, between the lots of Pierre 
LIZOTTE
and Joseph MICHAUD, which he bought from Joseph MICHAUD.
Next, south shore, Germain CYR, Sr., Acadia. This lot was 
granted
by the English to his father who gave it to him in his will. He 
occupies 82
rods, he has a house, a barn and 51 acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Francois THIBODEAU, Sr., Acadia. He had the
grant through the English. He occupies 60 rods. He has a house, a barn 
and
42 acres in culture. He says that in 1825 he asked of General IRISH a 
60
rod lot on the south shore of the St. John River in front of the Seven
Islands; he took possession of the said lot and cleared 5 acres on it. 
{SNIP}
Next, south shore, Jean-Baptiste SOUCY, Madawaska. He bought 
from
his father, Joseph SOUCY, a 120 rod breadth, and 30 rods from Olivier 
SOUCY
18 or 19 years ago. His father has the title deed which comes from the
English. He has a house, two barns, a store, a grist-mill on a very 
small
brook and 120 acres in culture. This year he has sown 55 bushels of 
wheat,
oats and peas. He claims also a lot on the north shore which he bought 
from
Pierre MERCURE. Breadth 20 rods. He also claims another 60 rod lot on
Madawaska River, between the lots of Joseph and David MERCURE. He has a
house on the lot and has a certain space in culture.
Next, south shore, Louis THIBODEAU, Madawaska, son of Firmin
THIBODEAU, who bought from the heirs of Germain SOUCY. He occupies a 30 
rod
breadth. He has three acres in culture and lives on the north shore, 
first
establishment on the west side of the Green (Verte) River.
Next, south shore, Romain MICHAUD. He bought from Francois 
GOODING
(GODIN). Occupies a 30 rod breadth, he has a house, a barn and 10 acres 
in
culture.
Next, south shore, Baptiste Olivier THIBODEAU, who lives on the
north shore at the mouth of the Riviere Verte. He bought from Joseph
DUPLESSIS who opened the lot twenty years ago. He has four acres in 
culture.
Next, south shore, Georges THIBODEAU, Acadia, who lives on the 
north
shore. He bought 20 years ago from Etienne THIBODEAU. He occupies a 60 
rod
breadth. He gave this lot to his two sons, Laurent and Michel 
THIBODEAU.
Laurent has a house and he is building a barn. Michel is clearing his
portion of the lot.
Next, south shore, Xavier PERREAULT, Canada. He bought from 
Henri
VASSEUR a 20 rod breadth two years ago. VASSEUR bought 14 or 15 years 
ago
from Guillaume TERRIEAU who had marked the lot 30 years before. He has 
a
new house and four acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Henri VASSEUR, who lives on the north shore. 
He
occupies the other part of the lot, 40 rods. He has a barn and 15 acres 
in
culture.
Next, south shore, Laurent TERRIEAU, Acadia. He had his lot 
from
his father who very likely had it from the English. Lot 120 rods in
breadth. The old man gave half to his son Thaddee. Laurent lives on 
the
north shore. A barn is being built on the lot and there are 6 acres in 
culture.
Next, south shore, Francois MICHAUD, Canada. He bought two 
years
ago from Firmin THIBODEAU who had bought the lot from Germain DUBE, the
first owner spotted it twenty years ago. MICHAUD has a house, a barn 
and 4
or 5 acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Benoni TERRIEAU, Madawaska. He bought last 
year
a 30 rod breadth from Joseph SANSFACON. SANSFACON had bought from 
Augustin
GAGNE. GAGNE had the lot from Joseph LAGACE who had bought it from 
Francois
THIBODEAU, the first occupier, 25 years ago. Breadth, 30 rods. 
TERRIEAU
has a house and three acres in culture on the lot which he occupies 
through
Joseph TARDIF; TERRIEAU lives on the north shore.
Next, south shore, Joseph SANSFACON, Madawaska. Bought, as we 
just
said the lot which first belonged to Francois THIBODEAU who opened the 
lot.
He occupies a 30 rod breadth, has a house, a barn and 50 acres in 
culture.
Next, south shore, Pierre RINGUET, Canada. He bought a 30 rod
breadth of a lot which was originally taken by Charles FOURNIER. He 
lives,
below; he has 17 acres in culture. There are not buildings on his land.
Next, south shore, Firmin THIBODEAU, Jr., Masawaska. He bought 
a 30
rod breadth of the lot originally occupied by Charles FOURNIER. He has 
a
house, two barns and 10 acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Paul CYR, Madawaska, son-in-law of Firmin
THIBODEAU, who gave the lot to his daughter. Firmin bought the lot of
Toussaint THIBODEAU who marked it 30 years ago. Paul CYR, in the name 
of
his wife occupies a 60 rod breadth. He has a house, a barn, a stable 
and 15
acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Paul THIBODEAU, Acadia. He opened the lot 30
years ago. He has a house, a barn and 50 acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Gregoire THIBODEAU, Acadia. He is a grantee 
of
the English. Breadth, 60 rods. He has a house, a barn and 40 to 50 
acres
in culture.20
Next, south shore, Jean-Baptiste VASSEUR, Madawaska. He bought 
from
Louis LEBLANC who had his grant from the English. VASSEUR occupies 
sixty
rods; he has a house, a barn and 50 acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Paul THIBODEAU. Like the last one mentioned, 
he
bought from Louis LEBLANC.
Next, south shore, Augustin VIOLETTE, Acadia. He bought from
Olivier THIBODEAU who had bought from the late Francois CORMIER. They 
say
that CORMIER had his grant from the English. VIOLETTE occupies a 40 rod
breadth; he has a house and 50 acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Julien THIBODEAU, Madawaska. He had his lot 
from
his father, Olivier THIBODEAU, grantee of the English. Julien occupies 
40
rods, he has a house and 50 acres in culture.
Next, south shore, the lot is occupied by the heirs of Francois
CORMIER. The eldest son is the owner. Breadth, 30 rods. They have a
house, a barn and 30 acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Henri SOUCY, who lives on the north shore. 
He
bought from Alexandre AYOTTE who is married to one of Alexis CORMIER's
daughters. Breadth, 20 rods. He has a barn and 30 acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Benjamin THIBODEAU. Bought from Firmin 
THIBODEAU
who had bought from Alexis BONIFACE, Alexis CORMIER's son-in-law. 
Breadth,
20 rods. He has a house, a barn and 24 acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Pierre CORMIER, Acadia. He opened the lot 30
years ago and had his grant from the English. Breadth, 60 rods. He has 
a
house, a barn, and 50 acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Edouard LEBLANC, Acadia. He married Simon
TERRIEAU's widow. TERRIEAU had marked the lot 25 years before. 
Breadth, 60
rods. He has a house, a barn and 25 acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Frederick TERRIEAU, Canada. He bought from 
his
brother, Germain TERRIEAU, who marked the lot 25 years ago. Breadth, 60
rods. He has a house, a barn and 40 acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Francois CORMIER. He opened the lot 30 years
ago. He occupies a 120 rod breadth, he has a barn and 60 acres in 
culture.
CORMIER died last year.
He sold to Firmin THIBODEAU a piece of land for a mill. Firmin
built a grist-mill and a saw-mill. The advantage for a mill there is 
poor
like the other places which we have seen further down from BAKER's
establsihment, with the exception of the one on Madawaska River, at the
falls; but the river is still unused.
Next, south shore, Samuel Romain GUEDRIE, Baie des Chaleurs. He
came here three years ago and bought from Francois CORMIER who died last
spring. It is a 60 to 65 rod lot. He paid $600 on it. This lot had 
been
marked 10 to 12 years before, but had been left uncultivated. He has a
house, a barn and 40 acres in culture. In the same purchase he claims 
also
12 acres or two lots on the Grand Isle.
He says that his son, Samuel GUEDRIE, bought the lot next to his
near THIBODEAU's mill, from Francois CORMIER. The lot has a 60 rod 
breadth
and is long enough to form 200 acres. He gave CORMIER $50.00 for it. 
He
has the deed of sale. He has 8 acres in culture and he is getting ready 
to
build.
Next, south shore, Cyprien CORMIER, Madawaska. He inherited the 
lot
from his father, Francois CORMIER. Breadth, 60 rods. He has a house, a
barn and 15 acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Damien CORMIER, Madawaska. He has inherited 
the
lot from his father, Francois CORMIER. Breadth, 60 rods. He has a 
house,
is building a barn and has 8 acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Henri SOUCY, who lives on the north shore. 
He
occupies the lot through a deed of sale. Breadth, 60 rods. He has 12 
to 14
acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Widow Simon THIBODEAU with five children.
Breadth, 60 rods. There are a house and a barn on the lot and 50 acres 
in
culture.
Next, south shore, Hilarion VIOLETTE, Madawaska. He bought a 35 
rod
breadth from Simon THIBODEAU in exchange for a lot he occupied further 
up.
In the name of his wife, he claims also a 75 rod lot which belonged to 
her
late husband Pierre VASSEUR. VASSEUR left an 18 year old son, 
Jean-Baptiste
VASSEUR. They have a house, a barn and 50 acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Benoni BARNABE. He occupies a lot, but he 
lives
on the north shore.
Next, south shore, Louis BELLEFLEUR; he occupies a lot of which 
we
have spoken before.
Next, south shore, a proprietor of whom we have little 
information.
We arrived at the house of David CYR, the publican, where we 
settled
for the night.
Tuesday, August 2nd, 1831. {SNIP}
Next, south shore, Germain DAIGLE, son of Jean-Baptiste DAIGLE,
Madawaska. He occupies a 60 rod breadth. He is building a house and 
has 12
acres in culture.
Next, south shore, David CYR. We are told that he bought the 
lot of
a man named MERCURE.
Next, south shore, Jean PARENT, Canada. He bought four years 
ago
from Olivier THIBODEAU for $30.00. THIBODEAU had bought from a man 
named
LAGASSE, but PARENT does not know who was the first man who marked the 
lot.
He occupies a 70 to 80 rod breadth. He has a house, a barn and 30 rods 
in
culture.
Next, south shore, Etienne PARENT, Canada. He opened the lot 
four
years ago. He occupies a 90 to 100 rod breadth. He has a house, a barn 
and
30 acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Gabriel PARENT, Canada. He opened the lot 
four
years ago. Occupies a 90 to 100 rod breadth, has a house, a barn and 30
acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Alexandre VIOLETTE, Madawaska. He claims a 
90
rod breadth next to Gabriel PARENT's lot. He says that he took a 90 rod
breadth twelve years ago, and bought 60 more rods from Germain PELLETIER 
who
occupied the lot 12 years before. He paid $30.00. VIOLETTE says that 
he
has 10 acres in culture, but we have not seen much which is cleared.
Next, south shore, Etienne PARENT, Canada. He bought from 
Anselme
FRANCOEUR who marked the lot three years ago. He occupies a 40 rod 
breadth.
He has two acres of felled trees and nothing in culture.
Next, south shore, Francois PARENT, son of Gabriel. He opened 
the
lot three years ago; he occupies a 50 rod breadth, he has 2 acres in 
culture
and a 5 acre felling.
Next, south shore, Jean PARENT, son of Gabriel. He opened the 
lot 4
years ago. Breadth, 60 rods. He has a house, a barn and 3 or 4 acres 
in
culture.
Next, south shore, Jean-Baptiste-Olivier THIBODEAU, son of 
Olivier
THIBODEAU. The lot was marked 13 to 14 years ago, by Louis LAGASSE, who
sold it to Jean-Marie CYR, whose widow sold it back to THIBODEAU. No 
one
has ever lived on the lot. Trees were felled on one acre which is now 
grown
to bushes. He claims a 60 rod breadth and also an island facing the lot
which is in hay.
Next, south shore, Alexandre VIOLETTE. He bought from Justin
PELLETIER who marked the lot 12 or 13 years ago. He occupies a 60 rod
breadth, he has a felling of twelve acres of which some are cleared.
Alexandre lives on the next lot which he opened 21 years ago. He 
occupies a
90 rod breadth, he built 18 years ago and has 50 acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Dominique VIOLETTE, Madawaska. His father 
and
mother are dead and he inherited the lot; his father, Benoni VIOLETTE,
opened the lot 25 years ago. Breadth, 60 rods. He has a house, a barn 
and
18 acres in culture. Jean is the only living child of Dominique.
Next, south shore, Isaac VIOLETTE, Madawaska. He opened the lot
five years ago. Breadth, 60 rods. 25 acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Richard VIOLETTE, Madawaska. He opened the 
lot 4
years ago. Breadth, 60 rods. Six acres are cleared. He lives further 
up
the river. It rained the whole forenoon, and when we reached Alexandre
VIOLETTE's house we remained there the whole day. We were well treated
there {SNIP}.
Wednesday, August 3rd, 1831. The rain is still falling.
Next, south shore, Jean PARENT, a neighbor of Richard VIOLETTE. 
He
opened his lot this year. Breadth, 40 rods. He has sown about 3 
bushels of
grain.
Next, south shore, Henri CYR. He inherited two parts and bought
another one from his brother-in-law, Joseph CYR. Breadth, 50 rods. He 
has
a house, a barn and 30 acres in culture. Henri CYR bought the lot 
before
this one last fall from Celestin SOUCY and gave $50.00 on it. SOUCY had
bought from Joseph CYR who had his lot from the English. Breadth, 60 
rods,
12 acres in culture {SNIP}.
Next, south shore, Thomas CYR, Madawaska. He cultivates the lot 
of
the 9 children of the late Jean-Marie CYR. Thomas is married to CYR's
widow. The lot was granted by the English. Breadth, 60 rods, 40 acres 
in
culture. Thomas CYR lives on the north shore of the river.
Next, south shore, Jacques VIOLETTE, Madawaska. He occupies the
late Francois VIOLETTE's lot. 120 rod breadth. He has a house, a barn 
and
10 acres in culture.
Next, south shore. Augustin VIOLETTE, Madawaska. He had the 
lot
from his father, Joseph VIOLETTE. Breadth, 10 rods, no buildings.
Next, south shore, Celeste VIOLETTE, Madawaska; son of Joseph. 
He
had this lot through his father. Breadth, 10 rods. He has 10 acres in
culture, but no buildings.
Next, south shore, Augustin VIOLETTE, who lives on the north 
shore,
near the church. He occupies a 90 rod breadth which he inherited from 
his
father. He has a barn and 30 acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Firmin NADEAU, Canada. He opened this lot 15
years ago. Breadth, 60 rods. He has a house, a barn and 9 acres in 
culture.
Next, south shore: The chapel of the parish of St. Bruno built 
on a
30 rod lot bought from Elie THIBODEAU. Elie lives on the north shore. 
The
lot at first was taken by Francois VIOLETTE. {SNIP}
Next, south shore, Cyprian GRACE, Irish. He began 5 years ago. 
He
occupies a 40 to 60 rod breadth. He has 4 acres in culture, but no
buildings; he lives on the north shore.
Next, south shore, Isidore DUBE, Madawaska. He had his lot 
through
Abraham CHAPPE (CHASSE?) with whom he exchanged lots. Abraham had 
bought
from Joseph GODIN a few years before. He occupies a 30 rod breadth; he 
has
a house, a barn and 10 acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Dedie MORIN, Canada. Bought from Francois
THIBODEAU who had bought the lot with the crops from Augustin DUBE, 6 or 
7
years before. He occupies a 40 rod breadth. There are no buildings and 
the
land which was cleared formerly, now consists of brush-wood and pasture. 
He
lives on the north shore.
Next, south shore, Firmin NADEAU, Canada. He bought from Henri
TARDIF, who had bought from Augustin DUBE, the first occupier 10 years 
ago.
Breadth, 60 rods. He has no buildings, 12 acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Germain DUBE, Canada. He bought a part of 
Henri
TARDIF's lot, 10 years ago. This part was not much cleared. He 
occupies a
40 rod breadth; he has a house, a barn and 10 or 12 acres in culture.
Next, south shore, William MCREA, Irish, and John KEATON, Nova
Scotia. They obtained this lot from George MANSER who had bought from
Abraham DUBE, first occupier. They gave a lot on the Aroostook River to
MANSER in exchange; the lot was partly cleared when they came to occupy 
it
in February 1828. They occupy a 40 rod breadth. They have a house, a
distil-house and malt-house and 30 acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Francois VIOLETTE, Acadia. He marked the lot 
30
years ago and began to cultivate it 4 years ago. He built a house, a 
barn
and a grist-mill. He has lived on the lot for three years. He said 
that
his father, Francois VIOLETTE, built a mill on that lot 40 years ago and
that he has his rights from him. The old mill fell in ruins a long time
ago. He also claims a lot on the north shore of the St. John River; 
this
lot is situated at the mouth of the Grande Riviere on both sides. This 
lot
which was granted by the English on the 16th of May 1826, has a 90 rod
breadth and consists of 300 acers with a ten percent reserve for public
roads. Two sons have a house on the lot which they occupy.
Next, south shore, Michael FARRELL, Irish. He bought from 
Joseph
SANSFACON 10 years ago. He paid $8.00. The lot was scarcely opened 
then.
Breadth, 80 rods. Has a house and barn and 50 acres {SNIP}.
Next, south shore, Dennis DOUGLASS. He left the country six 
years
ago and left his lot in care of FARRELL. Breadth, 60 rods.
The next lot which is not cleared is 80 to 100 rods in breadth.
Next, south shore, James KEEGAN, Irish. He opened this lot 
three or
four years ago. Breadth, 60 rods. He has a new house and from 8 to 10
acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Louis VIOLETTE, son of Francois VIOLETTE. He
began a few years ago. He occupies a 60 rod breadth; he has a new 
house, a
barn and from 10 to 12 acres in culture. This lot is near a little 
brook
which runs from the south. Louis was not at home, but we were told that 
he
was working on the military road near the branches of the Madawumkeag 
River.
Next, south shore, Michel THIBODEAU, Madawaska. Toussaint
THIBODEAU, Michel's father, opened this lot 13 years ago and lived on it
until his death. He left three children. Michel supported his brothers 
and
sisters until they were of age. His mother and a few members of the 
family
are still with him. He occupies a 90 rod breadth; he has a house and 
barn
and 30 acres in culture.
Next south shore, Leonard COOMBS, New-Brunswick. He arrived not
quite two years ago. He holds a commission under the British; {SNIP}. 
He
claims this lot, but lives a little further up on the north shore.
COOMBS bought a part of Michel THIBODEAU's lot and another of 
Louis
OUELLETTE's lot. OUELLETTE is his first neighbor up the river. Louis
OUELLETTE marked this lot 17 years ago. He paid OUELLETTE $820, and the
other $180. THIBODEAU and OUELLETTE signed a deed of sale. He occupies 
70
rods breadth, he has no building, has 16 acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Joseph OUELLETTE, Madawaska. He began 6 or 7
years ago. Breadth, 60 rods. He has a house, a barn and 15 or 16 acres 
in
culture.
Next, south shore, Benoni NADEAU, Madawaska. He began three 
years
ago. Breadth, 60 rods. He has a house and 6 acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Edouard DUPLESSIS, Madawaska; he began six 
years
ago. Breadth, 60 rods; has a barn and 10 acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Michel DUPLESSIS, Canada. Began 7 years ago.
Breadth, 120 rods. He has a house, and barn, and 20 acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Jean-Baptiste GAUVIN, Canada. He marked the 
lot
last fall. Breadth, 60 rods. He lives on the north shore where he 
occupies
a farm. He has been in the country for twenty years.
Next, south shore, Abraham GIRAUD (GIROUX), Canada. He began 
three
years ago. Breadth, 60 rods. He has a house and barn and 10 acres in 
culture.
Next, south shore, Germain NADEAU, Canada. He bought from David
MERCURE who opened the lot 6 years ago. Breadth, 90 rods. He has a 
house
and 16 acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Gabriel MOREAU, Canada. Bought from Joseph
MERCURE who marked the lot 7 years ago. Breadth, 60 rods. He has a 
house
and barn and 15 acres in culture. 20
Next, south shore, Michel REMOND (RAYMOND), Canada. he began 4
years ago. Breadth, 60 rods, He has 12 acrs in culture.
Next, south shore, Olivier CORMIER, Acadia. He bought from
Jean-Marie OUELLETTE, who marked the lot eight years ago. Breadth, 120
rods. He has a house and barn and 30 acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Jean BOURGOGNE (BOURGOIN), Acadia. He began 
six
years ago. Breadth, 60 rods. He has a house and barn and 16 acres in 
culture.
Next, south shore, Moise BOURGOIN, Acadia. He bought from 
Jeremie
TARDIF who had bought from Elie THIBODEAU. It is a son of THIBODEAU's 
wife
who marked the lot seven years ago. TARDIF sowed 2 years ago. BOURGOIN
occupied the lot last year. Breadth, 60 rods. He has a house and 12 
acres
in culture.
Next, south shore, Alexandre AYOTTE, Madawaska. he bought from
Joseph SANSFACON who marked the lot seven years ago. AYOTTE settled on 
it
last autumn. Breadth, 100 rods. He has a house and barn and 12 acres 
in
culture.
Next, south shore, Samuel and Raphael CHRISTOPHER, Bais des
Chaleurs. (Chaleur Bay.) They began seven years ago. Breadth, 70 
rods.
They have two houses, a barn and 40 acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Augustin VIOLETTE, Madawaska. He marked the 
lot
4 or 5 years ago. Trees are felled on his lot, no clearing. Breadth, 
60 rods.
Next south shore, Isaac MICHAUD, Acadia. He bought from a man 
named
FITZGERALD who had bought from Joseph VIOLETTE, first occupier seven 
years
ago. Breadth, 60 rods. He has a house and 12 acres in culture. He has
been living on the lot for a year.
Next, south shore, Augustin DUBE, Madawaska. He bought of 
Zebedee
SQUIRES, 4 or 5 years ago. SQUIRES had felled a few trees. Breadth, 60
rods. DUBE has a house, a barn and 10 acres in culture.
Next, south shore, Samuel and Raphael CHRISTOPHER. They claim 
the
lot of their brother who opened it 4 or 5 years ago and who was drowned
since, leaving no children. Breadth, 60 rods. They have a new house 
and 12
acres in culture.
Next, south shore, John EMERSON, English. Began 3 years ago.
Breadth, 60 rods. Has a house and 30 rods in culture.
Next, south shore, Francois ROY or KING. He lives in 
New-Brunswick
but intends to settle here. He bought from Louis LAPOINTE who opened 
the
lot 5 years ago and cultivated two acres. Breadth, 60 rods. He has 4 
or 5
acres in culture but he has no buildings.
Next, south shore, John EMMERSON and his brothers. They began 
to
fell trees last year.
Next, south shore, Zebedee SQUIRES. He has opened the lot; he 
has 4
acres in culture and he is building a house.
Next, south shore, Thomas NUGENT, Irishman. He arrived 4 years 
ago;
he took a lot in his name; he bought the lot from James MALONE who had 
begun
4 years before. He bought another lot from William CARTWELL who had 
begun 3
years before. He claims 50 rods in his name, 60 in MALONE's name and 40 
in
CARTWELL's name. There is not much done on the two upper lots. He has 
a
house and barn and 20 acres in culture.
Next, we do not know the proprietor. The lot is marked and 
there
are a few felled trees on it.
Next, south shore, a man by the name of NADEAU. He has felled 
some
trees.
Next, south shore, Edward O'NEAL, Irishman. He began 4 years 
ago
and says that he mows ten tons of hay. Breadth, 60 rods. O'NEAL lives 
on
the other side of the river. A brook which is large enough to supply a 
mill
with water, crosses O'NEAL's lot.
Next, south shore, an unknown proprietor. Bushes and brambles 
grow
on this lot.
Next, south shore, Benj. WEEKS. He bought from John MCGUIRE and
paid $50.00. MCGUIRE began 5 years ago. WEEKS has been on the lot two
years. Breadth, 62 rods. He has a small house and 5 or 6 acres in 
culture.
WEEKS says that he is leaving the region to go to Tobique. He has a 
wife
and two children with him as well as all his baggage. {SNIP}
Next, south shore, John PENDERGRIS. He felled trees and heaped 
up a
few acres, {SNIP}.
Further down is the forest as far as the frontier or line which
forms the boundary such as it was decided by the Jay Treaty. This line,
from the source of the St. Croix River, follows the north direction.
Today, while we were at Michel THIBODEAU's house, a gentleman 
came
to us and asked us to show him the papers according to which we were
proceeding. In our turn, we asked him under whose authority he was 
coming
to us. He said that he was James A. MCLAUGHLAN and was the warden of 
the
disputed territory. Thereupon we answered that we knew no such man, nor
such office; that we were acting for the State of Maine and made no 
secret
of our power and had shown our papers to those who asked to see them. 
But
if we did not show them to him, it was, as we had him clearly 
understand,
because he was asking for them in the name of English authorities. Then 
he
asked us what we had done and what we intended to do yet. And we told 
him
very clearly. He protested verbally against our behavior and added that 
a
messenger had been dispatched to Fredericton, that the case had been 
studied
by the Governor and the members of his Council who were present in
Fredericton and by the Chief Justice of the Province, and that if we
persisted in our course he would be obliged to accompany us as long as 
we
would remain in the territory. He examined our commissions and the
conversation continued on the rights of Maine and United States in the
territory. As to the British claim, he placed it on the ground of
possession and would not advance from that position. Finally we told 
him:
If you have the possession of this territory, it is through usurpation, 
not
otherwise. But he did not try to defend the rights of the English on a
different ground.
The rain began to fall, we went down the river as far as Grand
Falls, two miles and a half to three miles further down from the line 
and we
put up at Pierre MICHAUD's house. From the line or rather a long 
distance
above the line--there are no settlers. Below the falls on the St. John
River there is a 7 mile distance to the first establishment, and further
down as far as the mouth of the Aroostook River there are very few 
settlers.
In Grand Falls, much business is going on and the place will become a
village if the laws of the Province (New Brunswick) do not raise any
difficulties.
Thursday, August 4th, 1831.--After breakfast we made our
preparations to go up the river. When we reached the place according to 
the
best information we could get, where the boundary line from the source 
of
the St. Croix River running due north, crosses the St. John River to 
reach
the heights spoken about in the treaty of 1783, such as DOUCETTE and 
JOHNSON
have traced it in 1817; we found a poplar spotted on the one side and 
marked
deep in the bark on the west side: I. I. G. W. C., 1825. About two 
rods
distance east of the poplar is another tree (balm of Gelead). From this
tree a well marked line runs toward the north. This line seems to have 
been
renovated recently. The tree bends towards the east and M. M., is 
marked
with an axe. Very near is another poplar marked: V. This mark is very
old. The line, on the north side of the river, passes through a second
growth. The first trees were probably cut previously. The present
vegetation consists of birch, wildcherry, poplar trees and other 
varieties
mixed with fir and spruce trees. There are no other place on the river
which resembles this place. A few rods from the line, a brooklet flows 
into
the river. With little attention one can easily find the line.
Since we are through with the enumeration of the properties on 
the
south shore, now we will begin on the north shore, with the first lot
located west of the line, in order to continue, on the north shore, 
where we
left, which is almost opposite, the lower point of the DAIGLE Island.
The four first lots are not marked. The fifth lot was formerly
occupied by a man named CLEMENT. We can see yet the ruins of a house. 
Many
acres have been cleared formerly, then have grown into bushes and serve 
as
pasture.
On this place a ledge of imperfect limestone crosses the river. 
It
is that kind of limestone which is so abundant in Grand Falls.
The next lot is not marked.
The next lot is not marked. It contains 20 to 25 acres in wild 
hay
and brushwood.
Next, M. MURPHY; occupies a 60 rod breadth. He has a house, a 
barn
and 20 acres in culture.
Next, Edward O'NEAL, Irishman; he occupies a 60 rod breadth. He 
has
a house and barn and 20 acres in culture. He has a property on the 
south
shore which has been already mentioned.
Next, John O'NEAL, Irishman; he occupies a 60 rod breadth. He 
is
building a house, he has a barn and 15 to 20 acres in culture.
Next, unknown occupier. House and barn and 20 acres in culture.
Next, M. ELLWOOD; he occupies a 60 rod breadth. He has a house 
and
the frame of a barn. He came lately. The lot was opened 4 or 5 years 
ago.
Next, Maurice WHELAN, Irishman; he ocupies a 60 rod breadth. He 
has
a house and barn and 15 to 20 acres in culture.
Next, Patrick MARTIN; occupies a sixty rod breadth. He has a 
house,
the frame of a barn and 15 to 20 acres in culture.
Next, Joseph PELLETIER; he occupies a 60 rod breadth. He has a
house, the frame of a barn, and 15 to 20 acres in culture.
Next, Louis GENET, Joseph PELLETIER's son-in-law. He occupies a
lot, he has a house, a poor barn and a few acres in culture.
Opposite this lot is an island with only one tree standing. 
People
say that this island was granted to the church by Governor CARLETON, and
that later it was transferred to Alexander ROI or KING.
Next, Samuel THEANEY, New-Brunswick; {SNIP}. He occupies a 50 
to 60
rod breadth. He has a house, a barn and 20 acres in culture.20
Next, Esekiel CLEMENTS, Yankee; he occupies a 60 rod breadth. He 
has
a house, a forge and four or five acres in culture.
Next, James POWER, Irishman; he occupies a lot on which there 
are
four or five cleared acres.
Next, William STEARNES, Irishman; he occupies a lot. He has one
acre of corn, the rest is in pasture or uncultivated.
Next, Alexandre ROI or KING, he occupies a lot, he has a house, 
a
barn and 15 acres in culture. He also claims the island on which there 
is
but one elm tree.
Next, John PEARL, Irishman; he occupies 140 rods. He has a 
house, a
barn and 50 acres in culture and a certain length of intervals (platin).
Joseph PEARL Jr. lived on the upper part of the lot.
Next, Augustin VIOLETTE, Madawaska; he occupies a 50 rod lot. 
The
trees are felled on 4 to 5 acres.
Next, M. CYR, son-in-law of Francois VIOLETTE; he occupies a 60 
rod
breadth and he has 20 acres in culture.
Next, Celeste THIBODEAU, Madawaska. He occupies a 60 rod 
breadth;
he has a house, a barn and 50 acres in culture.
Next, Boutout OUELLETTE, Canada; he occupies a 60 rod breadth. 
He
has a house, a barn and 50 acres in culture.
Next, Celeste OUELLETTE, he occupies a 60 rod breadth. He has a
house, a barn and 45 to 50 acres in culture.
Next, Jean-Baptiste ROI or KING, N.B. He occupies a 60 rod 
breadth;
he has a house, a barn and from 30 to 40 acres in culture.
Next, Modeste BIJON (BIJEAU), Canada. He occupies a 60 rod 
breadth;
he has a house, a barn and 25 or 30 acres in culture.
Next, Joseph CINQCOEURS, Canada. Breadth, 60 rods. He has a 
house
and barn and 25 or 30 acres in culture.
Next, Joseph GERMAIN, Canada. He occupies a 60 rod breadth. He 
is
building a house and has 6 acres in culture.
Next, Firmin DUPLESSIS, Canada. He has a barn and 8 or 9 acres 
in
culture.
Next, Abraham ROI or KING, New-Brunswick. He occupies a 60 rod
breadth; he has a house, a barn and 20 acres in culture.
Next, Jean-Baptiste GAUVIN, Canada. He occupies a 60 rod 
breadth,
he has a house, a barn and 15 to 20 acres in culture.
Next, unknown occupier. Possession marks on a 60 rod breadth.
Next, Charles AYOTTE, Canada. Breadth, 60 rods. He has a house 
and
5 or 6 acres in culture. He began last autumn.
Next, Leonard COOMBS, New-Brunswick. A lot which he marked 
himself.
Next, Leonard COOMBS, (homestead). The lot has been granted to
Joseph SOUCY, Jr., in the second great grant (SAUCIER's grant, by the
Government of Fredericton, 1794) and has been occupied several years.
COOMBS occupies a 160 rod breadth; he has a house and is building a 
barn.
We had dinner at Samuel and Raphael CHRISTOPHER's house. We 
arrived
at COOMBS house late in the evening and spent the night there. This 
spot is
12 miles from Grand Falls and about 9 miles from the boundary line. We 
have
not seen that the English have granted any lots further down. The
possessions of this interval are recent: from one to ten years. One or 
two
at the most might be older.
We met Mr. MCLAUGHLAN today; his manner was very polite. He 
said
that the people might be alarmed and refuse to give any information
concerning their properties. He did not attempt to stop our 
proceedings; on
the contrary, in few occasions, he helped us in our researches.
Edward O'NEAL came also to give us an account on his properties.
Friday August 5th, 1831.--The water in the river has risen since 
the
rain of last Tuesday. N. COOMBS says that it has risen to 7 feet.
Next, Firmin OUELLETTE, Canada. Old possession. He occupies a 
60
rod breadth; he has a house, a barn and 15 acres in culture.
Next, Celeste OUELLETTE, Firmin's son; he has a house, a barn 
and a
little portion of his lot in culture. Breadth, 60 rods.
Next, Jean-Baptiste DUBE. Breadth, 60 rods. He is building a 
house
and has 5 or 6 acres in culture. He lives on the other side of the 
river.
Next, Pierre OUELLETTE. Breadth, 60 rods. A few acres cleared.
Next, John KEATON who lives with W. MCKEA, on the south shore,
opposite the lot. Breadth, 60 rods. His house is used for a school. 
It is
possible that MCKEA has a shore on this lot (co-tenant).
Next, Jean TARDIF, Canada. Breadth, 60 rods. A house and 6 or 
7
acres in culture.
Next, Andre TARDIF, Canada. Breadth, 60 rods. A house and 30 
to 40
acres in culture.
Next, unknown occupier. Firmin THIBODEAU was formerly the owner 
of
this lot but he has sold it.
Next, Joseph DUBE, Canada. Breadth, 60 rods. He has a house 
and
barn and from 25 to 30 acres in culture.
Next, Elie THIBODEAU, Acadia. Breadth, 60 rods. He has a house 
and
barn and from 25 to 30 acres in culture.
Next, Francois VIOLETTE. The land on each side of the
Grande-Riviere was granted to him by the English, May 16th, 1826, deed 
of
gift. He gave $50.00 only for office fee. The lot consists of 300 
acres
with 10 percent reserve for public roads. Two of his sons occupy the 
land.
They have a house, a barn and a large space in culture.
Here we notice an island which should have been mentioned before 
in
our work. It is the Boutoutes Island which is all in hay and which 
consists
of 12 acres. It is between the lots of Abraham GENET and Germain 
NADEAU,
south shore, and those of Jean Baptiste ROI and Joseph CINQCOEURS, north 
shore.
M. MCLAUGHLAN tells us that further up from Francois VIOLETTE's 
to
the Grand Riviere, is an old general settlement granted by the English 
on
the 2nd of August 1794, to Aaron CYR and others.
Further up the mouth of the Grand Riviere are two islands which 
are
called the islands of Grande Riviere. The first is 90 to 100 rods in 
length
by 20 to 30 rods in breadth and is in hay. The second one, which is 
smaller
is in hay and half overgrown with bushes.
Next, next to Francois VIOLETTE at the Grande Riviere come 
Hilarion CYR.
Breadth, 60 rods. There are old buildings on the lot and 50 
acres
in culture. {SNIP}
The two next lots have been taken recently and are marked only.
Next, Pierre CELESTE, a little distance up the islands of the 
Grande
Riviere. Breadth, 60 rods; he has a house, a barn and a little portion 
of
his lot is cleared.
Next, Anselme FRANCOEUR. The lot was marked two or three years 
ago.
Next, Joseph SOUCY. Breadth, 60 rods. He has a house, a barn 
and
10 to 15 acres in culture.
Following the Siegas River.
Next, Thomas CYR. Breadth, 60 rods. He has a house, two barns 
and
20 to 30 acres in culture.
Next, Elie CYR. Breadth, 60 rods. Has 10 to 12 cleared acres,
which have been in pasture for ten or twelve years. On this lot there 
is a
barn which is not finished.
Next, Francois MAUZEROLLE. Breadth, 60 rods. He has a new 
house, a
barn and 8 to 10 acres in culture. He lives with Gabriel PARENT.
Next, Frederic MAUZEROLLE. The lot is marked only.
Next, Laurent MICHAUD. Breadth, 60 rods. He has a house and 
barn,
and 5 or 6 acres in culture.
Next, Jean-Baptiste RAYMOND. Breadth, 90 rods. He has a house, 
a
barn and 20 acres in culture.
Next, Maurice SIROIS. He has a house and a few acres in 
culture.
Next, Christophe CYR. Breadth, 60 rods. He has a house, a barn 
and
20 to 25 acres in culture.
Next, Francois CYR. Breadth 60 rods. He has a house, a barn 
and 10
acres in culture.
Next, Hilarion AYOTTE, breadth, 80 rods. He has a house and 
barn,
and 15 or 20 acres in culture.
Next, David CYR, tavern keeper of the other side. Breadth, 60 
rods,
5 or 6 acres in culture.
Next, Jean-Baptiste SIROIS. Breadth, 60 rods. He has a house, 
a
barn and 10 or twelve acres in culture.
Next, Pascal CYR. Breadth, 60 rods. He has a house, a barn and 
5
or 6 acres in culture.
Next, Basile MARTIN. Breadth, 60 rods. He has a house, a barn 
and
16 or 20 acres in culture. He also claims a lot west of David CYR's 
lot,
south shore, on which he has a barn and the base of which is an (du 
platin)
intervale.
Next, Marcel BEAULIEU. Breadth, 60 rods. He has a house and a
great part of the lot is in culture.
Following Quisibus River.
Down the Quisibus River, between the properties of Gabriel and 
Jean
PARENT south shore, and that of Francois MAUZEROLLE, north shore, are 
three
islands which are called the Seven Islands (Sept Isles) we do not know 
why.
It may be that small islands are hidden behind the larger ones.
We went to David CYR the Publican. {SNIP} 20
A young man who happened to be there, to learn French, told us 
that
Basil MARTIN who lives on the north shore, claims the lot next to David
CYR's up the river, that he has a barn and a little cleared land; he 
told us
also that Jean-Baptiste BARNABE, who lives on the north shore near the
Quisibus Riber, has 10 or 15 acres in culture and an old house which he 
uses
as a barn; he added that David CYR occupies a lot and has a barn and 15 
or
20 acres in culture.
We spent the night at CYR's. {SNIP}
Next, after the Quisibus River, Jean-Baptiste BARNABE. Breadth, 
60
rods. He has a house, a barn, and 20 acres in culture.
Further up on the Quisibus River, there is a new house and some
cleared land.
Next, Dominique BOURGOIN. Breadth, 60 rods. He has an old 
house, a
barn and 21 acres in culture.
Very near here is the Quisibus Island. The two ends are in hay; 
the
middle part is not cleared. The island is 90 rods in length by 20 to 30 
in
breadth.
Next, Andre MARTIN. Breadth, 90 rods. He has a house, a barn 
and
25 acres in culture. This lot is exactly opposite the upper part of the
Quisibus Island.
Next, Benoni BARNABE. Breadth, 90 rods. He has a house, a barn 
and
25 acres in culture. Lot was cleared a long time ago.
Next, Henri CYR. Breadth, 60 rods. He has a house, a barn and 
27
acres in culture.
Next, Pierre MERCURE. Breadth, 30 rods. He has a house, a barn 
and
17 acres in culture.
Next, Maurice SIROIS. Breadth, 30 rods. Has a house, a barn 
and 20
acres in culture.
Next, Charles BEAULIEU. Breadth 20 or 25 rods. He has a new 
house
and an old one, two barns and 15 acres in culture.
Next, Pierre MERCURE. Breadth, 60 rods. He has a house, a barn 
and
15 acres in culture.
Next, Jean-Baptiste SOUCY. He lives on the south shore facing 
the
Green River. Breadth, 20 rods. A small portion of the lot is in 
culture.
Next, Michel LAPOINTE. Breadth, 30 rods. He has a poor house 
and 8
to 10 acres in culture.
Next, Pascal MICHAUD. Breadth, 20 rods. He has 7 or 8 acres in
culture.
Next, Antoine BEAULIEU. Breadth, 30 rods. He has a house and 8 
or
10 acres in culture. The lot is poor. He began 10 or 11 years ago.
Next Laurent TERRIEAU, who lives near the Riviere Verte. 
Breadth,
60 rods. A little of it is cleared.
Next, Antoine DEVOST. Breadth, 40 rods. He has a house, a barn 
and
20 acres in culture.
Next, Henri SOUCY. Breadth, 120 rods. He has a house, a barn 
and
40 acres in culture.
Henri SOUCY tells us that the Grand Isle is divided thus:
Edouard LEBLANC, one lot.
Pierre CORMIER, one lot.
Paul THIBODEAU, one lot.
Francois CORMIER, one lot.
Frederic TERRIEAU, two lots.
Gregoire THIBODEAU, one lot.
Paul CYR, two lots, a barn.
Benjamin GREGOIRE, one lot.
Firmin THIBODEAU, one part of a lot.
Sam Remain GUEDORIE, 12 acres.
Antoine G. BELLEFLEUR, one lot.
Cyprien CORMIER, one lot.
Next, Germain MOREAU. Breadth, 60 rods. He has a house, a barn 
and
30 acres in culture.
Next, Gregoire THIBODEAU, who lives on the south shore. 
Breadth, 60
rods. He has 25 acres in culture.
Next, Franois GOODING (GODIN). Breadth, 60 rods. He has a 
house, a
barn and 25 acres in culture.
Next, Louis RINGUET. Breadth, 60 rods. He has a house, a barn 
and
30 acres in culture.
Next, Jerome GARNIER (GAGNE). Breadth, 60 rods. He has a 
house, a
barn and 30 acres in culture.
Next, Firmin THIBODEAU. Breadth, 270 rods of which one lot was
given him by his father; the second one he bought from Olivier 
THIBODEAU; a
half lot bought from Jean THIBODEAU; the two others were taken and 
cleared
by himself. He has 150 acres in culture, two houses, two barns, and one
store. His son Vital is married and lives with him.
He claims also an intervale (platin), and a barn on the Green 
River,
another intervale near the church as well as another lot; another lot on 
the
south shore, the second or third below Pierre LIZOTTE's lot, and several
other lots which he bought in different places and of which we have 
already
given an account.
Next, Henri VASSEUR. Breadth, 30 rods, which is the west half 
of
the lot granted to Jean THIBODEAU by the English.
Next, Joseph TERRIEAU. Breadth, 60 rods. The lot was 
transferred
to him under the name of Joseph TERRIEAU Jr. He has a house, a barn and 
50
acres in culture.
Next, Laurent TERRIEAU. Breadth, 60 rods. The lot was granted 
by
the English to Joseph TERRIEAU. He has a house, a barn and 50 acres in
culture. We are told that he possesses the island situated opposite the
establishment of Firmin THIBODEAU. {SNIP}
Next, Firmin DOUCET. He occupies a 20 rod breadth of a lot 
granted
to B. THIBODEAU and 16 rods of another lot granted to Olivier THIBODEAU. 
He
has a house, a barn and 40 acres in culture.
Next, Jean-Baptiste-Olivier THIBODEAU. Breadth, 40 rods. This 
lot
has been granted under a shorter christian name. He has a house and 50
acres in culture.
Next, Georges THIBODEAU. Breadth, 50 rods. This lot is 
situated on
both sides of the Riviere Verte and inclosed in the lot conceded to 
Olivier
THIBODEAU. The greatest part of the lot is in culture and THIBODEAU 
lives
in the second house further up the St. John River. This lot is the last 
one
(going up) of the second large settlement made by the English in 1794, 
on
the north shore of the St. John River. On the Riviere Verte, there are 
nine
families and many marked possessions.
On the northwest side: Francois GOSLIER (GOSSELIN), 
Jean-Baptiste
THIBODEAU, David THIBODEAU, Jean ROQUE, Pierre LIZOTTE, Jr., Louis
ST-PIERRE, Joseph MERCURE. Several of the next were lots marked a few 
years
ago. Some are opened, on some others there is nothing done.
Southwest side: Simon THIBODEAU, Joseph FOURNIER, Michel 
THIBODEAU.
The other lots are as advanced as those on the other shore.
Here is what Firmin THIBODEAU declares about the division of the
Grand Isle. Paul CYR possesses the west part, breadth, 50 rods. This 
part
was bought from Charles SAUCIER by Firmin THIBODEAU and given to Paul 
CYR.
Gregoire THIBODEAU, the neighbor, has an 8 rod breadth of this.
Firmin THIBODEAU bought a lot from Toussaint THIBODEAU which
consists of an 8 rod breadth. He has a barn on his portion.
Frederic TERRIEAU has 8 rods.
Julien THIBODEAU has 8 rods.
Paul THIBODEAU has 8 rods.
Henri SOUCY has 8 rods which were bought from Edouard LEBLANC.
Pierre CORMIER has 8 rods.
Georges THIBODEAU has 8 rods which were bought from Michel 
DUPLESSIS.
Henri SOUCY has 8 rods, bought from Augustin VIOLETTE. He is
building a barn.
Edouard LEBLANC has 8 rods and an old barn.
Francois CORMIER had 6 rods; he sold them to Romain GUEDERIE.
Benjamin GREGOIRE has 8 rods.
Paul CYR has 8 rods, bought of the heirs of Alexis CORMIER.
Antoine GATTE-BELLEFLEUR has 8 rods bought from Charles 
BEAULIER.
Firmin THIBODEAU has 12 rods, the end of the Island.
Today after leaving the inn of David CYR, we stopped at the 
Grande
Isle and while Mr. Deane was on the island getting information from 
Henry
SOUCY, Daniel SAVAGE and Jesse WEELOCK who are building a barn for 
SOUCY,
Mr. MACLAUGHLAN spoke of going to Firmin THIBODEAU's house to order our
dinner. Since it was late in the afternoon we went as far as 
Jean-Baptiste
SOUCY's house where we spent the night.
Saturday, August 6th, 1831, Mr. MCLAUGHLAN left us early this
morning and went up the river.
{SNIP}
We are continuing our enumeration on the lot next to George
THIBODEAU on the north shore of the St. John River at the mouth of the
Riviere Verte. This lot is occupied by Louis THIBODEAU from Madawaska 
(son
of Firmin). This lot at first was granted by the English to Etienne
THIBODEAU and then was bought by Firmin. Breadth, 60 rods. Louis has a
house, two barns and 70 acres in culture.
Next, Joseph THIBODEAU, Acadia. Breadth, 30 rods. He had the 
grant
through the English. He has a house, a barn and 60 acres in culture.
Next, Leon BELLEFLEUR. He occupies an 80 rod breadth. The lot 
was
granted by the English to Baptiste THIBODEAU who gave it to BELLEFLEUR, 
his
son-in-law. He has a house, two barns and 100 acres in culture.
Next, Nicholas PELLETIER. Breadth, 40 rods. He has a house and
barn, and 20 acres in culture.
Next, Francois THIBODEAU. Breadth, 30 rods. He has a house and 
10
acres in culture. He lives with Joseph THIBODEAU.
Next, Joseph PELLETIER. Breadth, 30 acres. He has a house, a 
barn
and 20 acres in culture. We are told that the three last lots mentioned
have been granted by the English to the late Antoine GAGNON or GARNIER.
Next, Benoni TERRIEAU. Breadth, 120 rods. This land included 
the
two lots granted by the English to Alexandre CYR and Jean VASSEUR. He 
has a
house, a barn and 10 acres in culture.
Next, Benoni PELLETIER, 60 rod breadth. This is the grant to 
Pierre
CYR by the English. Has a house, barn and 60 acres in culture.
Next, Widow PELLETIER who is now married to Remi DESCHENES.
Breadth, 60 rods. This is the lot granted by the English to Paul CYR. 
The
children of the first husband occupy the lot. They have a house, a barn 
and
60 acres in culture.
Next, Christophe CYR, who lives on the south shore. Breadth, 60
rods. He has a house, a barn and twenty acres in culture. This lot has
been granted by the English to Louis OUELLETTE. We did not get any 
proofs
of this.
Next, Michel MARTIN. Breadth, 30 rods. The lot was sold many
times. MARTIN has a house and 6 acres in culture.
Next, Baptiste BABA. Breadth, 30 rods. The lot was sold 
several
times. BABA has an old house and a new one, and 10 acres in culture.
Next, Simonet HEBERT, who lives on the south shore. He occupies 
two
lots. Breadth, 120 rods. {SNIP} There are two houses, one on each lot.
Clement CYR occupies one and another settler occupies the other one as
HEBERT's underfarmers. One the two lots there are 20 to 30 acres in 
culture.
Next, Pierre CYR. Breadth, 30 rods, half a lot. He inherited 
this
from his father who opened the lot. He has a house, a stable and 8 
acres in
culture.
Next, Jean CYR. He occupies the other half of the preceeding 
lot.
He has a house and a few acres partly cleared.
Next, M. FRANCOEUR, Canada. Breadth, 50 rods. He has a house 
and
15 acres in culture. The lot was sold many times. He has 10 cleared 
acres.
Next, Michel CYR. Breadth, 60 rods. He bought the lot. He has 
a
house, a barn and 100 acres in culture. He has a married son who lives 
with
him.
Next, Michel MARTIN. Breadth, 30 rods. He has a barn and 30 
acres
in culture. See further back.
Next, Francis MARTIN. Breadth, 30 rods. He inherited the lot 
from
his father. He has a house, a barn and 50 acres in culture.
Next, Joseph MERCURE. Breadth, 40 rods. This lot was at first
taken by the Indians who began the clearing. MERCURE has a house, a 
barn
and 50 acres in culture.
Next, Augustin VIOLETTE. Breadth, 30 rods. He had this lot 
through
the Indians. He has a house, a barn and 50 acres in culture.
Next, Michel MERCURE. Breadth, 30 rods. This lot was first 
taken
by the Indians. Has a house, a barn and 50 acres in culture.
Next, Michel MARTIN. Breadth, 60 rods. The lot was marked by 
Jean
TARDIF. MARTIN has a house, a barn and 100 acres in culture. This is 
his
third or fourth lot.
Next, Germain LAGASSE. Breadth, 10 rods. He has a house, a 
stable
and 4 acres in culture.
Next, Church and lot of the Parish of St. Basil. On the lot is 
the
church, the priest's residence, a barn and another building for the
convenience of the public during the intermission stand.
Next, Antoine GATTE-BELLEFLEUR, Jr., Canada. Breadth, 60 rods. 
He
bought from the first occupier. He has two houses, a store, two barns 
and
40 acres in culture.
Next, Simon and Joseph HEBERT, who live on the other side. They
claim half a lot or 30 rods. The whole lot was granted by the English 
to
Joseph DAIGLE. They have 10 acres in culture.
Next, Jean-Baptiste DAIGLE, who lives on the south shore. He 
claims
the other half of Joseph DAIGLE's lot. Has a few acres in culture.
Next, Celestin SOUCY. First the lot was granted by the English 
to
Joseph CYR and changed hands many times. Breadth, 30 rods. SOUCY has a
house and barn and 60 acres in culture.
Next, Joseph and Firmin CYR, who live on the south shore. 
Breadth,
30 rods. 20 acres in culture.
Next, Jean-Baptiste FOURNIER. He had this lot through the 
English.
Breadth, 30 rods. 30 acres in culture.
Next, Benoni TERRIEAU. Breadth, 15 rods, a part of the lot 
granted
by the English to Marichette CYR (Alexandre). He has a house a barn and 
20
acres in culture.
Next Regis TERRIEAU, Jr. Breadth, 15 rods which is the other 
part
of Marichette CYR's lot. He has a house, a barn and 30 acres in 
culture.
N.B. "Marichette" might be a nickname for the nicknames are numerous in
Madawaska. It is possible that in many cases we have used the nickname
instead of the real ones.
Next, Alexis CYR. Breadth, 60 rods. Lot granted by the 
English.
He has a house, a barn and 60 acres in culture.
Next, Joseph MARTIN, who lives further up. Breadth, 30 rods. 
20
acres in culture.
Next, Paul CYR. He bought from Joseph ALBERT. The lot had been
granted to Louis MERCURE. Breadth, 30 rods. He has a house, a barn and 
120
acres in culture.
Next, Simon MARTIN's Widow. Breadth, 60 rods. It is the lot 
which
was granted to her father-in-law. She has a house, a barn and 6 acres 
in
culture. A river runs through the lot. (Iroquoise).
Next, Joseph MARTIN. Breadth, 60 rods. This lot was orginally
granted by the English and then bought by his father, Francois MARTIN 
who
gave it to him. He has a house, a barn and 50 acres in culture.
Next, Antoine GATTE-BELLEFLEUR, Jr. He lives near the church. 
He
bought from Joseph TARDIF. Breadth, 30 rods. He has a house, a barn 
and 20
acres in culture. Louis STREPANI occupies it in his name.
Next, the church occupies a lot 30 rods in breadth. A few 
cleared
acres.
Next, Alexandre ALBERT. Breadth, 60 rods. He bought from Louis
MERCURE who had the lot through the English. ALBERT has a hosue, a barn 
and
60 acres in culture.
Next, the Indians. They have 3 or 4 houses which look as
comfortable and well furnished as most of the houses of the white 
settlers.
They have 20 or 30 acres in culture. They are but 5 or 6 families, the
remains of the tribe which was populous when the white settlers came to
settle in Madawaska.
Next, Simon HEBERT. He has deeds dated May 16, 1825, to 250 
acres
of land with an addition of 10% as a compensation for the land taken for 
the
public roads or unsuitable for culture.
Next, Madawaska River. This river takes its source in 
Temiscouata
Lake. It is a winding river, 24 miles in length by 20 rods in breadth. 
At
the mouth there is a fall 4 feet in height. With the exception of this
fall, the whole length is navigable. There are two islands below the 
mouth.
The islands are of little value.
We had our dinner at Joseph MARTIN's house. Mr. MCLAUGHLAN was 
with
us. He had left us in the morning and had gone to Mr. Francis RICE's 
(an
English magistrate). After dinner, we continued going up the river 
while he
left us to cross the south shore. His company was a great help to us 
and
had a favorable influence on the inhabitants.
On Madawaska River, there are 8 families.
East side -- Andre LEVESQUE, Canada. Breadth, 60 rods. He has 
a
house, a barn and 15 acres in culture.
Next, east side, Pierre PLOURDE, Canada. Breadth, 60 rods. He 
has
a house a barn and 20 or 30 acres in culture.
Next, Charles X . . . , Irishman. Breadth, 60 rods. He has a
house, a barn and 15 acres in culture.
Next, possession of minors.
West side of Madawaska River. James DOLL, Scotchman. Breadth, 
60
rods. He has a house, a barn and 10 acres in culture.
Following the Trout River.
Next, Charles TERRIEAU. Breadth, 60 rods. He has a house, a 
barn
and 30 acres in culture.
Next, Joseph MCDONALD. His lot is scarcely marked.
Next, . . .? Irishman. Came here two years ago. He has a 
house, a
barn and has accomplished much in this short time.
There are many other lots which are marked or on which some 
clearing
is done. The rest is in timber land.
Before the war of 1756, the French government granted a track of
land to a French officer named ANVILLE. This land around Temiscouata 
Lake
which was 26 miles in length extended outward 6 miles from the shore.
The lord was to do homage three times at the castle St. Louis,
according to the wording in the grant of the feud. D'ANVILLE sold to
MURRAY, first governor of Quebec. After changing hands several times, 
the
estate has become the property of Alexandre FRASER, who lives at the
entrance of the Grand Portage. He has been living there for 8 or 9 
years.
This post occupied by FRASER has been for a long time in the care of 
guards
of the English government who protected the transportation of mails.
William DOLL and two or three other families, have settled on the lake
shore. FRASER gives free hospitality to all who go through the region. 
It
is quite likely that he is paid by the English government for this 
service.
The ownership of his lands is probably guaranteed through the treaties 
of
1783 and 1794.
The Portage begins north west of the lake, 20 miles from 
Madawaska
River, its outlet.
This Portage seems to have been used many years. The French 
used it
to communicate between Canada and Acadia. The English use it to 
transport
their mails and for all their communications between Nova Scotia, New
Brunswick and Canada. It is a mountainous road which goes through the
Delact, DeRoche, Noir, Paradis, Grand Fourchu and St. Francis Mounts.
We still see, on Paradis Mount, at Petit Fourchu and Grand 
Fourchu
brooks and on St. Francis Mount old clearings and possessions.
The old clearings which we see on Paradis and St. Francis Mounts 
are
on the heights which divide the rivers that flow into the St. Lawrence 
River
from those that flow into the Atlantic Ocean, that is saying the land 
mark
of the treaty of 1783. The other marks of colonization are on the side 
of
the Province of Lower-Canada.
The Portage crosses the St. Francis River at a 17 miles distance
from the St. Lawrence River. The river is navigable from that place to 
the
St. John River. The frontier, according to the wording of the treaty of
1783 is in this region, 13 miles only from the St. Lawrence River.
The settlements which we just mentioned were deserted because of 
a
general too cold climate which was caused by the high latitude and the
height of the soil. This plateau forms the line of west demarcation 
between
the two countries; it is naturally designed to be an international 
frontier
since the soil can support but a scattered population, and the passages
there can very easiliy be defended if need be.
Now we are going back to the mouth of Madawaska River to 
continue
our enumeration work on the north shore of the St. John River. The 
first
lot which is bounded on the east by the Madawaska River and south by the 
St.
John River is the one which John HARFORD began to clear and which John 
BAKER
claims and which we have mentioned in the beginning of this statement.
People say that Simon HEBERT had the title deeds through the English and
that he claims the lot through these papers. He is clearing the lot. 
The
Indians built two houses on the lot; one is very good and is half the 
size
of the houses of the French settlers.20
{SNIP}
Next, Francis RICE, Irishman. He came to Madawaska as adjutant
soldier under the authority of the New-Brunswick Government and was
incorporated in the militia which the English maintain at that place. 
He
has been also a civil magistrate since one or two years {SNIP}. He 
occupies
a 40 rod breadth of land. He has a house, a barn and 10 or 15 acres in
culture. {SNIP}
Next, Michel TIGHE, Irishman. Breadth, 50 rods. He has a 
house, a
barn and 10 acres in culture.
Next, Abraham Daniel DUFOUR. Breadth, 60 rods. He has a house, 
a
barn and 15 or 20 acres in culture.
Next, Pierre LACOMBE. Breadth, 60 rods. He has a house, a barn 
and
8 or 10 acres in culture.
Next, Francois PICARD. Breadth, 60 rods. He has a house, a 
barn
and 4 or 5 acres in culture.
Next, Joseph DOMINIQUE. Breadth, 60 rods. He has a house, a 
barn
and 8 or 10 acres in culture.
Next, Jean-Elie SIROIS, the pastor. He occupies two lots. Each 
one
60 rod breadth. He has a little house and a barn on one of his lots, a
little house on the other, and 20 or 30 acres in culture.
Next, Pierre OUELLETTE. Breadth, 60 rods. He has a house, a 
barn
and 4 or 5 acres in culture.
Next, Vincent LEBEL. Breadth, 50 or 60 rods. He has a few 
acres in
culture.
Next, Joseph HEBERT. He has 4 or 5 cleared acres and a barn. 
The
base of the lot is intervale (platin).
Following the HARFORD brook which is said to be the division 
between
the parishes of St. Basil and St. Luce.
Next, Antoine BOULET, Canada. Breadth, 60 rods. He has a 
house, a
barn and 15 or 18 acres in culture.
Next, Francois BOULANGER (BELANGER), Canada. Breadth, 30 rods. 
He
has a house, a barn and 8 or 10 acres in culture.
Next, Pascal LANSOUT, Canada. Breadth, 40 rods. He has a house 
and
8 or 10 acres in culture.
Next, Gallant SAINT-ONGE, Canada. Breadth, 40 rods. He has a
house, a barn and 15 acres in culture.
Next, Francois, Charles, Jean, Thomas CLAVET. They have 3 or 4
marked lots.
Next, Alexandre OUELLETTE, Canada. Breadth, 120 rods. He has a
house, a barn and 60 acres in culture.
Next, Alexis NADEAU. Breadth, 60 rods. He has a house, a barn 
and
10 or 12 acres in culture.
Next, Joseph OUELLETTE, Canada. He began 5 years ago. Breadth, 
50
rods. He has a house and 10 acres in culture.
Next, Firmin ALBERT. He has a few cleared acres on the east 
side,
on the lower part of the lot. The work is recent, two or three years 
ago.
From the Madawaska River to here, on the north shore, and on the
south shore, a good distance further up, the occupation is recent, one 
to
eight years ago at the most, and this with scarcely an exception.
We reached Joseph MICHAUD's house late and spent the night 
there.
Sunday, August 7, 1831. We stopped at Joseph MICHAUD's house 
until
late in the afternoon, then we went up to John BAKER's house six miles
further up.
Monday, August 8, 1831. Next, Joseph MICHAUD, Canada. He lives 
on
the north shore, on the point formed by the bend of the river. Pierre
BEAUDRY began the clearing on the lot 24 years ago, then he sold to Jean
NADEAU who occupied it one or two years and died. MICHAUD married the
widow. The back line of the lot has a 230 rod length and runs from one
river to another. There are a house, two barns on the lot. The soil is
good and consists of intervale.
He claims a land further above the mouth of the Fish River, next 
to
the lot of Sigefroi NADEAU. He bought this lot from Miles EMERY two 
years
ago for $20.00. EMERY marked the lot seven years ago, and began the
clearing. MICHAUD sowed 7 bushels of wheat and is building a barn.
Breadth, 40 rods.
In the river, opposite the MICHAUD property betwen his lot and 
the
one of another Joseph MICHAUD who lives on the south shore, is an island
divided in ten lots. Joseph MICHAUD claims a 30 rod breadth for his 
share.
The island is in mowing, and there are two barns on it.
Further up are two smaller islands. We have already spoken of 
these
islands.
Next, Firmin ALBERT. He occupies the lot next to the MICHAUD's 
lot.
The lot is bounded on its two extremities by the river like the 
preceeding
lot. Breadth down the lot, 30 rods. Breadth up the lot, 67 rods. 
ALBERT
has a house, a barn and 40 acres in culture.
Next, Elie JANETTE who married CHASSE's widow. Breadth, 60 
rods.
He has a house, a barn and 15 acres in culture. The first husband left 
nine
children.
Next, Paul MARQUIS, Jr. His father lives on the south shore 
further
up, and they are the only ones named MARQUIS. He married ALBERT's widow 
and
it is in his wife's name that he occupies a 60 rod breadth. He has a 
house
and barn and 15 acres in culture.
Next, Louis ALBERT. He bought from his father. The lot was 
opened
24 or 25 years ago. Breadth, 60 rods. He has a house and 20 acres in 
culture.
Next, Joseph ALBERT. He began 20 years ago. He occupies 90 
rods.
He has a house, a barn and 30 acres in culture.
Next, Francois BARON. He bought from Edouard LECLERC. The lot 
was
marked 12 years ago. Breadth, 30 rods. He has 5 acres in culture; he 
lives
with Paul MARQUIS.
Next, Alexandre MICHAUD. He bought from Germain MICHAUD who 
marked
the lot 15 years ago. Breadth, 30 rods. He has a house, a barn and 7 
acres
in culture.
Next, Alexandre GORNEAU. The lot was marked 8 years ago. 
Breadth,
60 rods. He has a house, a barn and 8 acres in culture.
Next, Charles LAMORD. The lot was marked 12 years ago. 
Breadth, 30
rods.
Next, Francois MICHAUD. The lot was marked 12 years ago. 
Breadth,
30 rods. MICHAUD lives in Fredericton.
Next, Baptiste LABRIE. He bought from Francois MICHAUD. The 
lot
was marked 12 years ago. Breadth, 30 rods. He has a house and 8 acres 
in
culture.
Next, Olivier CHASSE. He began 6 years ago; he has a barn and a 
few
acres in culture.
Next, Antoine ALTON. He occupies this lot in the name of Joseph
STREPANI who is an Italian. Breadth, 60 rods. He has a house, a barn 
and 4
acres in culture.
Next, Jean VASSEUR. Breadth, 30 rods. He has a house and 8 
acres
in culture.
Next, Widow DUPONT, who is now married to Nicholas PELLETIER.
Breadth, 30 rods. There are 7 acres in culture. The house is vacant.
Next, Jean-Baptiste LAGASSE. Breadth, 50 rods. He has a house, 
a
barn and 5 acres in culture.
Next, Alexandre BELZILLE. Breadth, 30 rods. He has a house, a 
barn
and 15 acres i nculture.
Next, Simonet HEBERT who lives further down, on the south shore. 
He
bought from Philippe LONG. Breadth, 30 rods. He has a house, a barn 
and 20
acres in culture.
Next, Hilaire CYR. Breadth, 60 rods. He bought the lot. He 
has a
house, a barn and 15 acrs in culture.
Next, Urbain CYR, who lives at the Green River. He bought from
Francois MICHAUD. He has a house, a barn and 5 acres in culture.
Next, Jean NADEAU. He marked the lot 20 or 21 years ago. 
Breadth,
60 rods. He has a house, a barn and 15 acres in culture.
Next, Joseph ALBERT. He exchanged with Paul CYR who marked the 
lot
15 years ago. Breadth, 60 rods. He has a house, a barn and 8 acres in 
culture.
Next, Louis NADEAU. He bought from the Indians 12 years ago. 
He
sold to Firmin THIBODEAU, but he still occupies the lot and has a right 
to
the crops this year. Breadth, 60 rods. There is a house, a barn and 20
acres in culture.
Next, Alaric ANDRE. He bought from Benjamin MICHAUD. The lot 
was
marked 15 years ago. Breadth, 20 rods. He has a house, a barn and 8 
acres
in culture.
Next, Widow MICHAUD. Breadth, 60 rods. Has a house, a poor 
barn
and 16 acres in culture. Has six children.
Next, Joseph MARQUIS. Breadth, 40 or 50 rods. He has a house, 
a
barn and 10 or 12 acres in culture.
Next, Pierre LANDRY. Breadth, 30 rods. Bought from Joseph 
MARQUIS.
He came to occupy the lot in March 1830. He has a house, a barn, and 10 
or
12 acres in culture.
Next, Firmin OUELLETTE. Breadth, 30 rods. The lot was given 
him by
Paul MARQUIS. OUELLETTE is obliged to support MARQUIS when the latter 
gets
old. He has a house, a barn and 15 acres in culture.
Next, Paul MARQUIS, who lives on the south shore. Breadth, 20 
rods,
which is the other part of the lot of which he gave 30 rods to Firmin
OUELLETTE. He began seven years ago and has 7 acres in culture.
Next, Thomas BARNABE (MARTIN). The lot is open only. MARTIN 
lives
on the other side.
Next, Firmin DESCHENES. Breadth, 30 rods. He has a house, a 
barn
and 6 or 8 acres in culture.
Next, Elie PELLETIER. Breadth, 60 rods. He has a house and 
barn,
and 15 or 20 acres in culture.
This takes us to Justin or Allister DAIGLE (Augustin) who lives
opposite the DAIGLE Island which is the place where we stopped on the 
north
shore going down the river.
When we stopped in St. Basil while going down, M. Kavanagh 
called on
the priest and on Sunday after the office we both went to his house. 
His
behavior towards us led us to think that he would not be pleased to see 
us
again; that is why we did not call on him going up. But since in many
places the people told us that he expressed the wish of seeing us once 
more
and as we were unable to pay him a visit, we sent him the following 
note:
John BAKER's Residence, August 9, 1831.
Reverend Jean-Elie SIROIS:
We beg of you to forgive us for not having called on you while 
going
up the river. Circumstances as well as our desire to reach here as soon 
as
possible have prevented us from fulfilling a duty which would have been 
agree-
able to us. We are to leave for home after dinner, we shall go through 
Fish
River, Aroostook, Houlton and Bangor.
Please accept, etc.
John G. Dean
Edward Kavanagh
{NOTE: They added the following:
We can say that the colony of Madawaska began in 1783 when 
Pierre
DUPERRE and Pierre LIZOTTE settled there. The following years, a strong
contingent of descendants of Acadians, who came from New Brunswick and 
who
were driven away from their lands . . .came there also. . . . They know 
the
frontiers of the Province. In fact, some of the first settlers 
described
perfectly the frontiers such as indicated in the Treaty of 1783. For a
certain time, they were not disturbed, but finally they were induced to
accept their lands from the English authority. . . .
The inhabitants governed themselves according to their customs 
and
habits. They have kept until now a custom which they have without doubt
inherited from their ancestors and which has been existing since the
beginning of the colony: it is the one of respecting the rights of
possession. When they have marked the front of a lot of land by 
notching a
few trees and felling a few others between these, the possession is then
considered legal. This gives them the right of selling the lot thus 
marked
although it is left intact several years. As far as we know, 
derogations of
this custom are very rare, and in several cases, these possessions have 
been
sold at high price. Several lots are now occupied this way and the 
rights not violated. Some acquire these rights for their children, while
others acquire them for speculation. . . .
These people are inoffensive and charitable. Most of them wish 
to
live under the control of law. They say they know that they are 
dependent
on American Government but this Government does not protect them, and 
the
English impose on them their jurisdiction from which they cannot escape.
With few exceptions, they answered our questions cheerfully, not only 
the
questions concerning them, but also those which concerned their 
neighbors.
However the fear of the English have in many cases induced them to ask 
us
not to disclose their names for if we did they should be oppressed.
There is only one priest to serve them. He is sent there by the
bishop of Quebec, as Vicar General of the Bishop of Boston. The 
settlement
being within the see of Boston, which embraces New England, we 
understand,
it has always been considered in the Church to be in the see of Boston.
Most of the houses are built with logs. They are of primitive
construction. One room only, sometimes two, but rarely three. Most of 
them
are clapboarded, a few are painted, almost all of them are well made and
warm .
End of extract from a statement made by John G. Deane and Edward 
Kavanagh, 1831.

 
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