MAIN GEOGRAPHY PAGE

HOME

GEOGRAPHICAL AREAS OF ST. ANDREWS PARISH
Charlotte County, New Brunswick

Ministers Island

Ministers Island: 2 mi. N of St. Andrews: Saint Andrews Parish, Charlotte County: named for Reverend Samuel Andrews (c1736-1818), a native of Wallingford, Connecticut and first rector of local Anglican church: first called Chamcook Island and then Van Hornes Island, after 1890 called Covenhoven (cloven hoof in Dutch)a summer cottage was designed by Montréal architect Edward Maxwell , for Sir William Cornelius Van Horne (1843-1915), first president of Canadian Pacific Railways, 1888-1899. The is a nice view of Bar Road & Ministers Island from St. Andrews Rural Cemetery at the way back.
Ref: COMMUNITY PLACE NAMES IN NEW BRUNSWICK, CANADA, compiled by Robert F. Fellows
31 MAY 2005 :The Sir William Van Horne estate was commemorated as both a national and provincial historic site. In 1977, the province of New Brunswick designated the island as a provincial historic site and began the acquisition of our national treasure. Later in 1993 a group of citizens from the local service district of Chamcook and the town of St Andrews agreed the island should be open to the public and its history and culture celebrated through a restoration program. That was the beginning of the local partnership with the province and since 1993 there have been tours and special events on the island. The Historic Sites and Monuments Board recommended the Minister’s Island estate as a cultural landscape of national historic significance in 1996. 2 plaques were placed on the island on May 31st 2005.
There are several very interesting web sites about this Island, a few of them I will list below. To date I have not found a photo on any of these pages, of the small home built and occupied by The Rev. Samuel Andrews. (Perhaps I  have missed it.) This building still stands, just a short way up the road, when one crosses the bar at low tide. After you reach this house, if you continue to your right, you will come to the VanHorne homestead, and if you turn to your left, you will soon come to the dairy barn both of which are well described on the site listed. 

I (Cleadie Barnett) took the tour in the summer of the year 2000, and it was disappointing to see that they were not able to get the funds needed to bring the VanHorne house back into good repair. Only a few of its many rooms have furnishing, and though time it has had some modernization, which probably has altered its appearance. However, enough of its basic design remains to know that it has been one of the remarkable homes in the area. It is more amazing to see it sitting on this small island (about one mile by three miles is size) in rural New Brunswick. We were told that VanHorne had a railway siding come nearly to the road that crossed the bar twice daily, at low tide.

I was also intrigued by what is called the bath house. This is a hugh tower, that rises from the beach to the top of a cliff. On the top floor was a large room, now windowed in with glass, but in VanHorne's day, was open all around.

Descending the stairway, one came to an ocean swimming pool. When the tide came in, the pool was filled with ocean water, when the tide went out, there was a large, protected swimming pool. This has now nearly filled with silt, but enough remains to show how this wonderful feature worked. One could bath in the ocean, in relative safety, without fear of the ocean currents.

MAIN GEOGRAPHY PAGE

HOME

Legal Disclaimer: ©2005